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L H Moon 
& Son 
Bookbinders 

Ji. 



THE ATJSTEALIAN EACE: 



ITS ORIGIN, LANGUAGES, 

CUSTOMS, 
PLACE OF LANDING IN AUSTRALIA, 

AKD 

THE ROUTES BY WHICH IT SPREAD ITSELF OVER 

THAT CONTINENT. 



BY 

EDWARD M. OXJRR, 

AfOhor of ^'Pwre Saddle Hofwu^ and ** BecoUeavm of SquaUing t» Vietoria."* 



IN FOUR VOLUMES. 



VOLUME III. 



MELBOVRNB : JOHN FEBBSS, GOVZRNMSNT PBIinnSB. 
LOKDOK : TBUBNXB AND 00., LUDGATE HILL. 

1887. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME IH. V 



.3 



BOOK THE TENTH. 



5a 






WMjom 


IVnfa.'fcA'nr T2pTna.r1rfl * . • . 






3 


136. From Port Denlaon to Gape Glou- 






oester - - - - - 


8ergeafU B, Shea 


- 


4 


137. Tower Hill and Cornish Creeka 


F. L. DdOiunty 


m 


8 


138. Upper Thomson .... 


R. Christian 


. 


10 


139. Head of Diamimtina 


M. Ctar 


« 


12 


140. Diamantina River, Middleton Creek 


E. Curr 


m 


14 


141. Western Biver .... 


J, Hainea 


. 


16 


142. Main Range between Belyando and 








Cape Bivera - - - - 


J, MacOkuhan 




18 


143. Belyando - - ... 


J, Mvirhead 
Charha Lowe 


1 


26 


144. Logan Creek, Lower Snttor, and 








Low&- Mistake Creek 


Ananymoua - 


. 


36 


145. Fort Cooper . . , . . 


W. 0, Hodgkinson 


40 


146. Scrabby Creek .... 


E. Curr 


- 


42 


147. Port Mackay 


{Q, F. Bridgeman 
Iff. Bucas 


1 • 


44 


148. Broad Sound, Yaamba, Mary- 








borongh, St. Lawrence 


F, Midler - 


- 


52 


149. Bockhamptonand Gracemere- 


T, Archer - 


- 


54 


150. Eastern Slopes of FiVpeditionBange, 


( P. Mcintosh 


) 




Lower Dawson, Upper Fitzroy, 


J W, 2>. Gooke 


\ 


58 


Mackenzie, and Isaacs 


\a 0. Barthelemy 


•) 




151. Peak and Logan Downs • 


jS.WiUon 
1 T. Murray 


\ ■ 


64 


152. Alice Biver 


J. Ahem 


- 


70 


153. Barcoo, 40 miles west of Blackall - 


J, Ahem 


• a 


72 


154. Blackall, Barcoo . . - • 


J. L, Dudley 
T. S, Williams 


} 


76 






• 


( T. ff. Hyde 


1 




155. Barcoo, Tambo, Monnt Fiimiskillen, 


\ ff. L. BeU 


i 


78 


and Bavensboome Creek • 


F. L. DalhutUy 


( 




.J. Crambie 


3 





IV CONTENTS. 

BOOK THE TENTH— cow^wMerf. 



Na 



166. Nogoa i^' ^^ddleton ) ^ 

lE. Irving Noble ) 

157. Head of the Ck>met - - . ^f . JoKphwn. - - - 96 

168. Brown Kiver F, J. Murray 100 

169. DawBon and Bnmett Kivers - - K* ^'^ow«>^ I 102 
160. Keppel Bay, GaUiope, CortiB Island Anonymous • - • 114 

BOOK THE ELEVENTH. 
Prefatory Remarks II9 

■"•»»'-"•« • • ■ ■I'istz:! ■ ■=' 

162. Bustard Bay, Rodd's Bay, Many j dmrnimomer qf j 

Peak Range - . - .( PoHee^Briebanei ^^ 

163. Baffle Greek Anonymous - - • 128 

164. North side of Moreton Bay, Mary- V ^^ WrUer 

borough between Brisbane and K j^^p^^^ \^ ^^ 

Gyrnpie, Great Sandy or Fnuier's jj jp^^y 

^ JT. LandsboTtmgh 

166. Upper Bnmett, Mount Debateable, j J?. (7. i?ifey 1 

Gayndah lif. Oiirr 3 

166. Ma 

Gountry 

167. Upper Brisbane River - - - i ^- -^«<^^o«>tt^A I . jio 

1 M, Curr ) 

168. Brisbane River - - - • W. Ridley - - - 212 



Mary River and Bunya Bonya ( , ,, , 1 

Gountry ... \\J'^^^^ \ ' 152 



BOOK THE TWELFTH. 
Prefatory Remarks ---.--... 219 

169. Gondamine and Gharley's Greek - i C^ommiMion^fr <j/" ) .220 

( Police^ Brisbane f 

170. Stradbroke and Moreton Islands 4 ^' 5^* ..1-222 

{ T, deM.M, Prior \ 
W. G. White ( „«, 

W Landsborou hi ' 
J. O'Connor ) 

172. Nerang Greek F. Fowler - - 240 

173. Tweed River and Point Dangar • «/. Bray • - 242 



OONTENTS. 



So. 



BOOK THE THIRTEEENTH. 

Pte£atory Bemarks ... ... 

174. Part of Maranoa - 



fa. Sheridan and 
F. B. Bay 



175. Baloime, Baleandoon, Nenraa, Weir, j H, Hammond 

Byrne 



and Moonie Kiyen • 
176. Dnmaresqne or Upper Madntyre 



{H,H 



1 

I 



177. ParoOy Warrego, and Mnngalella 
Greek - . - . 



178. Bichmond Biver 



D, Thtrbayne 
J. Lawlor 
G.Myks 

W. H, Looker 

W. B. Conn 
L, M. Playfair 
J, HoUingewcrth 

C. Edwards 

E, Boss 

D. Hogan 

(Anonymoust also 
\ C. B, Lowe 



179. Tenterfield, Glen Innea - 

180. QneenbaUa, Aahford, and Quining- i District Bench qf 

gnillan • - ) Magistrates 



PAoa 
261 

251 
258 

264 



270 



286 

2M 

298 



BOOK THE FOURTEENTH. 



Pre&tory Remarks - 

iW, Ridley 
J Mosel&u 
F. BuckneU, and 
Benches qf Magistrates, 



303 



304 



BOOK THE FIFTEENTH. 



Prefatory Remarks 

182. Calgoa - - . - ■ 

183. Brewarrina and Barwan - 

184. Clarenoe - - - . • 

185. Lower Macleay 

186. Port Macqnarie 

187. Manning Biver 

Hunter River - - - - 
'. Hawkesbory and Broken Bay 



J. W.Foott ' 
Bench of Magistrates 

A, Bruce 
C. Spencer 
J, Branch 

{Bench ofMagis- \ 
trates, WingJiam^ 

B, Miller - 
/. Tucherman 



327 
328 
330 
332 
334 
338 

350 

352 
358 



VI 



CONTENTS. 



Ko. 



BOOK THE SIXTEENTH. 



Prefatory Bemarkfl 

190. Caatlereagh Biver - -J, Ounther 

Warren ---... (7. Bome 

Dubbo Bench of MagistrcUes 

Wellington H, Keightly 

Hill End Bench oj 'MagistrcUes 



V- 



Bathurst ..... 

Bogan 

Sources of Bogan, Carcoar 

Forbes and Levels .... 

Gandoblin 

Waljeers . - . - . 

WaggaWagga - . . - 

Yanko, Urana, Billebong, Jerril- 

derie- - - - . - 

Deniliquin 

Howlong 

Albory ------ 



F. Foley 
J.Batft 

Bench qf MagistraUs 
J. Cameron 
W. H. SuUor 
J. E, Pearce 
H, Bayles 

L. MacLean 

G, A, Gordon 
G, Byrne 

G. B. H, Siuckey 



\ S68 



BOOK THE SEVENTEENTH. 

Prefatory Remarks . . - .... 

1J. Hunter { 

- CoUins ) 

192. Botany Bay W. BidUy 

193. Wollongong, Illawarra, and Shoal- 

haven ----- fT. Bidley 

194. Jervis Bay/ Mount Dromedary • B. Dawsey • 

195. Qneanbeyan Police Magistrate - 

196. Yaas Bench qf Magistrates 

tC.du V6 \ 

197. Monenx) \j. Bulmer f 

198. Twofold Bay W, Bidley • 



405 
406 
413 

417 
420 
424 
426 

429 
434 



BOOK THE EIGHTEENTH. 



Prefatory Remarks 437 

199. Swan Hill and Tyntynder - - /. Beveridge - - 439 

200. Fifty miles south of Swan Hill - Tlie Writer - 445 

201. Piangil T. Macredie; the Writer 443 



CONTENTS. 



Vll 



BOOK THE EIGHTEENTH— con^twjrf. 

No. 

202. Bmnbang F, Comey 

203. Knlkyne Tke Writer - 

201. Tatiarra W, Hayna; the Writer 

20S. Mount Grambier .... D.Stewart - 



452 
454 
456 
460 



BOOK THE NINETEENTH. 



• ^ 



Prefatory BemarkB 
206. Moreton Plains .... 
207a. Lake Hindmanh« Lower Wim- 

mera 

207b. Lake Wallace ... 
207a Upper Glenelg and Wannon - 
207d. Glenelg, above Woodford 
207*. Woodford .... 
207v. Dartmoor .... 
207o. Hamilton .... 
207h. Mount Bonae ... 
2Q7l Portland, Condah, Enmeralla 
207j. Hopkins Blver - 
207k. Hopkins Kiver - 



The Writer - 

The Writer - 

The Writer - 

The Writer - 

The Writer - 

The Writer - 

The Writer - 

The Writer - 

The Writer - 

The Writer ■ 

The Writer - 

W. ChodaU - 



BOOK THE TWENTIETH. 



Prefatory Remarks ... .... 

208a. Moulmein Bench qf McigiatrcUes 



208b. LakeBoga - 
208a Lower Loddon 
206d. Gonn Station 
208b. Gnnbower - 
208p. Mount Hope 
206o. Kerang 
208il Natti-yallook 
208i. Monnt Emn - 



L, Fawcett - 
The WriUr - 
J, McCarthy - 
Mickie and Sandy 
The Writer - 
The Writer • 
The Writer - 
S, Wilson - 



208j. Moorabool The Writer - 



469 
472 

474 
476 
478 
480 
482 
484 
486 
488 
400 
492 
494 



499 
600 
502 
604 
606 
608 
510 
512 
514 
516 
518 



BOOK THE TWENTY-FIRST, 



Prefatory Remarks 
^A. Goolbom, near Seymour 
200b, Upper Yarra 
200a Lower Yarra 
200d. Morediyallook 



- The Writer - 

- The Writer - 

- D. Bunce 

- The Writer - 



523 
528 
530 
532 
534 



Viii CONTENTS. 

BOOK THE TWENTY-SECOND. 

No. '*•■ 

Prefatory BemarkB S39 

1J. Bvlmer, the Writer,) 
F, A, Hagenauer, A, W. \ 543 
HmoiU - - -I 

211. Omeo •/". Btdmer - 558 

212. Snowy River /. Btdmer - - - 560 

213.' Upper Murray . - - - — MUchdl - 562 

BOOK THE TWENTY-THIRD. 

Prefatory Eemarks - - - ..... 567 
214a. Janction of Murray and Goal- 
bum Kivera ' ' - ' Tht Writer - - - 582 

214b. Tocumwall The Writer - - - 684 

214a Ulupna (or Yoolupna) - ■ - The Writer - - - 586 

214D. Yiilima - -The Writer - - - 588 



APPENDICES. 

Appendix A. 

The Tasmanians - - - - The Writer • - • 693 

Peron*B Vocabulary 604 

Scott's Vocabulary 606 

Roberts* Vocabulary 606 

Comparison of Vocabularies of 

Roberts and MiUigan 608 

Dr. Lhotsky's Vocabulary 609 

Norman's Vocabulary .-....-- 611 

Words which agree in the Vocabu- 
laries of Norman and Milligan ..... 616 

Names of Natives given in Nor- 
man's Vocabulary - ...--. 617 

Jorgenson's Vocabulary 618 

Words of Jorgenson's and Milli- 

gan's which agree 633 

Milligan's Vocabulary - - 634 

Short Sentences in the Language 

of Tasmania - - 669 

Aboriginal Names of Places in 

Tasmania - - 672 



BOOK THE TENTH. 



YOU in. 



^Iie JUiatraliatt |^. 



"I- 



BOOK THE TENTH. 

PREFATORY REMARKS. 

« 

It is amongst the tribes treated of in this book that we first 
meet with some which have the curious custom of calling 
themselves, their languages, or both, by words sprung from 
their negative adverbs. Whether this custom exists further 
to the north, I am unable to say; but from the Dawson 
Kver and Expedition Bange to nearly as far as Wentworth, 
at the junction of the Darling and Murray, a distance of 
seven hundred and fifty miles as the crow flies, we find it 
pretty generally prevalent. In many of the tribes described 
in this book, in which this custom does not obtain, we find 
the tribal name ending in burra. It is also observable that 
in the portion of the continent under notice, the opossum-rug 
is in use in some of the tribes, and also the word Murri^ the 
equivalent of BUickfelloWj which the Kevd. Mr. Ridley seems 
to have thought pretty general throughout Australia. In 
this locality also the small-pox, originally introduced at 
Sydney, terminated its ravages. Finally, in this book will 
be found the account of a tribe, taken from replies to my 
QuestionSy sent to me by an aboriginal Blacky who had 
learnt to read and write. 

At 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 136.— FROM PORT DENISON TO CAPE 

GLOUCESTER 

Bt Seboeaitt K Shsa. 

The country of the Bumbarra tribe extends from about 
Port Denison to Cape Gloucester, and inland as far as the 
head of the Proserpine River, or nearly so. In this tribe 
opossum cloaks are in use; but whether throughout the 
twenty-four hours, or only at night, my informant, Sergeant 
Shea, does not state. Objects made of the skin of the 
kangaroo, pieces of shell attached to the hair by means of 
beeswax, and necklaces made of stems of grass cut into 
short lengths and threaded, are worn as ornaments. The 
weapons of the tribe are a good deal carved, and amongst 
them are wooden swords five feet in length, spears and clubs 
of course, boomerangs of both sorts, but not the wommera, 
which, however, is used by neighbouring tribes, and the 
Bumbarra have a name for. In fact, whatever the reason 
may be for the neglect of this instrument by some tribes, 
I do not think that in any case it can be attributed to their 
not being acquainted with it. 

The Bumbarra do not object to tell their names, and my 
contributor gives Karilla and Whychaka as those of men, and 
Denterbargo and Helmerago as those of women. Girls 
become wives at about twelve years of age; marriages be- 
tween relatives are prohibited, and women rear (or used to 
rear) three children each on an average. The canoes of the 
Bumbarra are made of pieces of bark stripped from the 
ironbark-tree and sewn together, and rendered watertight 



FROM PORT DENISON TO CAPE GLOUCESTER. 

by smearing with the gmn of the pine-tree. The male 
yonths are admitted to the rights of men by means of secret 
ceremonies. Message-sticks are in nse. 

Taming to the vocabulary, ^r^ and wood are expressed by 
almost the same word. Good and sn>eetj as frequently 
happens, are also expressed by one word. Food and ecU are 
expressed by one term, and thirst and ivater by another, 
probably the result of a misunderstanding in these two 
cases. 



6 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE 



No. 136.— PORT DENISON TO CAPE GLOUCESTER. 



By SxBOEAirr B. Shsa. 



Kangaroo - 


- rooa. 


OpoBsum -• 


• koolachn. 


Tame dog - 


• kria. 


Wild dog - 


• ulaire. 


Emu • 


- goondooloo. 


Black dvLC^ 


- kooroola. 


Wood duck 


■ 


Pelican 


- yangatia. 


Laughing jackaas kourkura. 


Native companion 


White cockatoo 


- dingari. 


Crow - 


- worigan. 


Swan - 


m 


Egg - 


- gomorro. 


Track of a foot 


- dina. 


FiBh - - 


- wina. 


• 

Lobster 


■ 


Crayfish 


- 


Mosquito - 


- pigina. 


Fly - 


- kroopulla. 


Snake - 


- waroora. 


The Blacks 


- kabulla. 


A Blackf ellow 


- marL 


A Black woman 


- womiwoma. 


Nose - 


- woroo. 



Hand - 




2 Blacks • 




3 Blacks 




One - 


- warpa. 


Two - 


- kotoo. 


Three- 


• mundula. 


Four - 


- kutpoora. 


Father 


- yaboo. 


Mother 


- yanga. 


Sister-Elder 


. kotha. 


„ Younger 


• nappona kotba. 


Brother-Elder 




„ Younger 


A young man 


- koloona. 


An old man 


• kutha. 


An old woman 


• Irninmi. 


A baby - 


m 


A White man 


tta 


Children - 


- patchilla. 


Head 


- korea. 


Eye - 


- dilli. 


Ear - 


- wolloo. 



FROM POET DENKON TO CAPE GLOUCESTER. 



No. 138. — Port Demison to Caps QiovfJEsrsBr— continued. 

wangallft. . 



Moath 
Teeth • 

of the head 



same as 



Beard- 
Thunder 



Tongue 
Stomach 



Thigh- 
Foot - 
Bone - 
Blood- 
Skin . 
Fat 

Bowels 
EbcoBment - 
War-spear • 
Beed-«pear - 
Wonunera ot 

throwing-stick 
Shield . 
Tomahawk - 
Canoe - 

Snn • 

Moon - 

Star - 

light - 

Dark - 

Cold - 

Heat - 

Day - 

Night • 

Fire - 

Water 

Smoke 

Ground 
Wmd- 
Bain - 
God - 
Ghosts 



elgmha. 
era. 
korea (i 

head), 
nnnga. 
thegaroo. 
gootha. 
talong. 
hnloo. 
ngonunona. 
tnmbarra. 
dinna. 
bippo. 
gulga. 
ingarra. 
thome. 
yapoo. 
doongalla. 
githa. 
wollibnrra. 
wangalU (not in 

nse). 
goolmarri. 
balgoo. 
vinda. 
kari. 
ki^rlrft, 

nooroo. 
baringa. 

- kedoa. 
mongoola. 

■ koondawinda. 
woroo. 
bnree. 
kamo. 
pothana. 

• knana. 

- uganna. 

- matcha. 



Boomerang 
Hill • 
Wood- 
Stone • 
Camp - 
Yes - 
No - 
I 

Yon - 
Bark • 

Good - 
Bad - 
Sweet - 

Food - 
Hungry 

Thirsty 

Eat 

Sleep 

Drink 

Walk 

See 

Sit 

Yesterday 

To-day 

To-morrow 

Where are the 

Blacks? 
I don't know 
Plenty 
Big - 
Little - 
Dead - 
By-and-by 
Come on 
Milk . 
Eaglehawk 
Wild turkey 
Wife - 



bia. 

baree. 

paree. 

yamba. 

yay. 

oolago. 



bigo. 

bimgunna. 
gooioo. 
bungunna. 

Ti ||rlraiia.^ 

kangoola. 

kamo. 

nikkana. 

ooka. 

barana. 

yanina. 

nugaiia. 

etomme. 

nuinda. 

nilla. 

burganda. 



koota. 

munda. 

oomba. 

mudaya. 
dago, 
kowa. 
nanunoona. 



bergo. 



8 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No, 137.— TOWER HILL AND CORNISH CREEKS— TATEBURRA 

TREBK 

Bt F. L. Dalhitntt, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 


- tehera. 


Hand - 


- murra. 


Opoflsum 


- kodera. 


2 Blacks - 


- nemabooleroo 


Tame dog - 


- oora. 


3 Blacks ~ 


- nema wolbin- 


WUddog - 


- 




thum. 


Ema - 


- koolbnry. 


One - 


- wongeroo. 


Black duck 


- bungari. 


Two - 


- booleroo. 


Wood duck 


- kootaburra. 










Three- 


- wolbinthnm. 


Pelican 


• deroora. 






Laughing jackass kargooborra. 


Four - 

• 


- wolbunya. 


Native companion beelbangera. 


Father 


- murina. 


White cockatoo 


- tikeri. 


Mother 


. younginna. 


Crow - 


- worder. 


Sistei^Elder 


- nungmeralla. 


Swan - 


- 


„ Younger 


- 


Egg - - 


- gobin. 


Brother-Elder 


- moorkina. 


Track of a foot 


- murrengonna. 


„ Younger 


Fiah - 
Lobster 


- munga. 


A young man 


- kowoola. 


Crayfish 


- boogal. 


An old man 


. yalgenoomoo. 


Mosquito - 


- boonye. 


An old woman 


- mungeroo. 


Fly - - 


' nlmunoo. 


A baby 


- 


Snake - 


- koobooloo. 


A White man 


- yarabi. 


TheBlacks• 


- nemawulberdun- 


Children - 


- wobinyella. 




moo. 






A Blackfellow 


- nema. 


Head - 


- yalli. 


A Black woman 


- wormegoona. 


Eye - 


• dilli. 


Nose - - 


. oongye. 


Ear - 


.- munga. 



TOWER HILL AND CORNISH CREEKS. 



9 



No. 137.~TowEB Hux and Cornish Crbs]l&— Tatebubra Tbibk— 

continued. 



Month 


- tower. 


Boomerang - 


- 




Teeth . - 


- nnlgnlla. 


Hill - 


- 




Hair of the head - wooroo. 


Wood 


- toola. 




Beard 


- nnnga. 


Stone - 


- padnlla. 




Thnnder - 


- kooroo. 


Camp- 


- yumber. 




OraaB - 


- yaroo. 


Yes - - 


- ya-oo. 




ToDgne 


. tarding. 


No - . 


- nowa. 




Stomach 
BceastB 


- yabboo. 

- koolnmbi. 


I - . 


- yoondo.. 




Thigh- 


- dakyr. 


Yon - 


- yondo. 




Foot - - . 


. dinna. 


Bark - 


- yonoona. 




Bone - 


- narkoo. 


Qood - 


- thnrebnira. 




Blood- 


- koonger. 


Bad - - 


- wygoo. 




Skm - 


- markoora. 


Sweet - 


- karba. 




Pat - 


- thami. 


Food - - 


- enga. 




Bowela 


- 


Hnngry 


- karwooroongna. 


% 


Bxcrenient - 


- koonner. 


Thirsty 


- nower. 




War^spear - 


- moocha. 


Eat - 


- enga. 




Beed-spear - 


- woUerbnrra. 


Sleep - ^ 


- woga. 




Wommera or 


goonbeina. 


Drink - 


- kamo nga = 


1 


throwing-stick 






water eat. 


j 


Shield 


- tnmbooroo. 


Walk- 


- aber. 


i 


Tomahawk - 


- goocha. 


See - 


- dileenma (see 


i 


Canoe- 


- (none). 




Eye). 




Snn - 


• karee. 


Sit - 


- yinda. 




Moon - 


- kokkera. 


Yesterday - 


- woogobedo. 




Star - 


- boodtha. 


To-day 


- karinga(seeSnn). 




light - 


- bnronga. 


To-morrow - 


- wongeroo. 

• 




Dark - 


- goonda. 


Where are the nemawye? 
Blacks? 


1 


Cold - 


- mednna. 


I don't know 


- yonnower. 


! 


Heat - 
Day . 
Night 
Fire - 


- tingnn. 

- bnronga. 
' goonda. 

- boodee. 


Plenty 

Big - . 

little - 


- wolbnnya. 
. wolbnnya. 

- worbinya. 


• 




^^^^\M^Jm^^%^9 


Dead - 


- woolooma. 




Water . - 

Smoke 

Groond 


' kamo. 

- togar. 

- nnndee. 


By-and-by - 
Come on 


- mooingoo-apper. 

- kower, kowu. 


i 


Wind- 


- barega. 


Milk - 


- 


Bain - 


- kamo. 


Eaglehawk 


- 




God . - 


- 


Wild tnrkey 


m 


1 


GhOBtB 


. 


Wife - 


m 


1 



10 



TH£ AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 138.— UPPER THOMSON {Lai, 22*, Long, 144% <yr thertabouUY 

Bt Robert Chbistison, Esq. 

Unfortunately, Mr. Ghriflti8on*8 manuscript is indistinct, so that some of 

the words cannot be relied on« 



Kangaroo - 


- teggera. 


Hand - 


- murra. 


Opossum - 


- kuttera. 


2 Blacks - 


. 


Tame dog - 


- kobburra. 

• 


SBlacks - 


. 


WUddog - 


- 






Kmu * 


- goolberri. 


One - 


wongura. 


Black duck - 


- kuttebuira. 


Two - 


- boolere. 


Wood duck- 


- now-now. 


Three- 


- koorberrL 


Pelican 


- taura. 


Four - 


- ngagiberri. 


Laughing jackass kakaburri. 


Father 


• murre. 


Native compamon billbungera. 
White cockatoo • tecrflreri. 


Mother 


- yangena. 


Crow - 


- wotha. 


Sister-Elder 


- numulla. 


Swan • 


. 


„ Younger 


- 


Egg - - 


- tando. 


Brothei^Elder 


• moochL 


Track of a foot 


- timaro. 


„ Yoimger 


Fish . 


- nemerreburri. 


A yoimg man 


- tamboona (?). 


Lobster 


- karkoora. 


An old man 


- mugena. 


Crayfish - 


- mimya. 


An old woman 


- koombena. 


Mosquito • 
Fly - 
Snake - 


- gongonoo. 

- nilgana. 

- monda. 


A baby 

A White man 


- pamboona(?). 

- koeburro. 


The Blacks - 


- wolbandamo. 


Children - 


- wooma. 


A Blackf ellow 


- 


Head - 


- yalle. 


A Black woman 


- warringo. 


Eye - 


- teemurra. 


Nose - 


- goonyna. 


Ear - . - 


- munga. 



tTPPSR THOMSON. 



11 





Ko. 138.~Ufpxb Troubov— continued. 


Mcmth 


• towa. 


Boomerang • 




Teeth - 


- nalkuUa. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head 


- wooroo. 


Wood- 


- doola. 


Beard. 


- nnnka. 


Stone - 


- padnlla. 


Thunder • 


- boraL 


Camp - 


• wongo. 


GrasB . 


• yakko. 


Yes - 


- yea-yea. 


ToDgne 


- kookonya. 


No - - 


• nowa. 


Stomach 
BreastB 


- pangooloo. 

- namoona. 


I 


• neijoo. 


Thigh - 


- tara. 


Yon - 


- yoondoo. 


Foot - 


- dinna. 


Bark - 


- wonna. 


Bone - 


- goongoon. 


Good 


- tarriUi. 


• Blood- 


- yerkoora. 


Bad - 


- wyeo. 


flkm ' 


- meoora. 


Sweet - 




Pat - 


- doota. 


Food - 


- mena. 


Bowels 


- 


Hungry 


• knmwooli. 


Excrement - 


- koonna. 


Thirsty 


- poomnlgooa. 


War-spear - 


- moorcha. 


Eat - 


- pangelna. 


Beed-spear - 
Wommera or 


- bnlta. 
mirroo. 


Sleep • 


- wilgetha. 


throwxQg-stick 




Drink 


- oka. 


Shield . 


- koormorre. 


Walk • 


- noorai. 


Tomaliawk - 


- mingana. 


See - 


- tellimulla. 


Oanoe - 


- (none). 


Sit - 


- yindaka. 


Snn • 


• karri. 


Yesterday 


- naknrno. 


Moon • 


• kakkoora. 


To-day 


- naka. 


Star . 


- teegalgoona. 


To-morrow 


- waanga. 


light - 


- waandummo. 


Where are 


the wanni bobamnna 


Dark - 


- now-now. 


Blacks? 


walbandamo T 


Cold - 




I don't knoi 


¥ - nowa tilffinannia. 


Heat • 


- towwurrL 




%j 


Day - 


• 


Plenty 


- wolbnnga. 


Night 


- qnrknmago. 


Big - 


- poorka. 


Fire - 


- poori. 


Little • 


- wabootcha. 


Water 


- kmmno. 


Dead - 


- woolama. 


Smoke 


- tonoonga. 


By-and-by 


- koolpeto. 


Gnmnd 


- knndi. 


Come on 


- woori. 


Wind - 


- parritcha. 


Milk - 


- — 


Bain - 


- paggnrrL 


Eaglehawk 


- 


God . 




Wild turke] 


7 


Ghosts 


- kobbiberri,yerbi. 


Wife . 


- 



1 



12 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE 



No. 139.— HEAD OF DIAMANTINA. 

Bt Montagu Cubb, Esq. 

This vocabulary has much in common with those of the Upper Flinders 

and Porter's Range. 



Kangaroo - 


- wungunnia. 


Hand - 


- murra. 


Opossam 


• dthangaroo. 


2 Blacks - 


- 


Tame dog • 


- kooba. 


3 Blacks - 


. 


Wild dog - 


- 


One - 


• wonga. 


Kmn - 


• 






Black duck - 
Wood duck 


• mungara. 

• 


Two - 


- poolaroo, 
phiddee. 


Pelican 


- ooandgo. 


Three- 


- koorburra. 


Laughing jackass 


Four - 


- 


Native companion bilbungata. 


Father 


" 


Wbite cockatoo 


• 


Mother 


- yanga. 


Crow • 


- wa-cun-na. 


Sister-Elder 


- kurromee. 


Swan • 


- 


„ Younger 


- 


Egg - 


" • 


Brother>Elder 


- yabba. 


Track of a foot 


- 


„ Youngc 


ir 


Fish - 


- 


A young man 


- kubbena. 


Lobster 


- 


An old man 


- moobnrree 


Crayfish 


«» 


An old woman 




Mosquito 
Fly - 


. ngimunna. 


A baby 


- 


Snake - 


m 


A White man 


- wit-thoo. 


The Blacks - 


- 


Children 

• 


- 


A Blackf ellow 


' kandoo. 


Head - 


- wooma. 


A Black woman 


. bunya. 


Eye . 


- dthillee. 


Nose - - 


- ngingo. 


Ear 


- munga. 



HEAD OF DIAHAimMA. 



13 



Month 
Teetii- 

Hair of the head - 
Beard- 
nmnder 

Grass - - - 
T<Migiie 
Stomach 
Breasts 
Thigh 

Foot . - - 
Bone - - - 
Blood- 
Skin - - - 
Fat - 
Bowels 
Excrement - 
War-spear - 
Beed-spear 
Wommera or 
thiowing-stick 
Shield 

Tomahawk - 
Canoe- 
Snn - 
Moon - 
Star - 
light - 
Dark - 
Cold - 
Heat - 
Day - 
Night- - 
Fire - . 
Water 
Smoke 
Gronnd 
Wmd- 
Bain - 
God - 
Ghosts 



No. 139.— Head or 'DiamastisA'— continued. 

Boomerang - 
Hill - 



dthawa. 

eeira. 

endthaa. 

- nnga. 

- yamberri. 

- yagoo. 

• dthalango. 

• pnrra. 

- dthamboo. 

- walalla. 

- d'theena. 

- mogo. 

- koo-ur-roo. 
. binna. 

- tammee. 

- koonna. 

- moorja. 

- knndwnrra. 
woorra. 

- koonbnrra. 

- pammbnrra. 

- dthooroo. 

- yoongee, enngee. 

- yoogn. 

- konba. 

- windtha. 
. willinga. 



oola. 

kamoo. 

ynmaroo. 

kinborra. 

mnlloonoo. 

kamoo. 



Wood- 
Stone - 
Camp - 
Yes - - 

No - 
I 

You - - 
Bark - 
Good ' 
Bad - 
Sweet - 
Food - 
Hungry 
Thinrty 
Eat - - 
Sleep - 
Drink- 
Walk - 

See - - • 
Sit - - 
Yesterday - 
To-day 
To morrow - 

Where are the 
Blacks? 

I don't know 

Plenty 

Big . - 

Little - 

Dead - 

By-and-by - 

Gome on 

Milk - 

Eaglehawk 

Wild turkey 

I Wife - 



- oola. 

- koongoo. 
• yamba. 

- ngia, 

- kurra. 



- koolgooburra. 



- wingurnu 



- pnngoo. 



yunna. 



14 



THE AUSTKALKAK RACE: 



No. 140.— DIAMANTINA BIVER, MIDDLETON CREEK.— 

THE GOA TRIBE. 

Bt Eowabd Cubb, Esq, 



Kangaroo - 


- maiknmba. 


Hand- 


- murra. 


OpoBBnm - 


- tannaroo. 


2BlaokB - 


„ 


Tame dog - 
WUddog - 
Emn - 


- mikamo. 

- kolperi 


SBlacks - 
One - 


- koorbno. 


Black dnck - 


. yallamurra. 


Two - 


- orra. 


Wood duck. 


. yammoroo. 


Three- 


- koorborra. 


PeUcan 


- wolkiperrL 


Four - 


• nadera. 


Laughing jackasB (none). 


Father 


- kobba. 


Native companion kooltoroo. 
White cockatoo - poonmenberri. 
Crow - - - wawkana. 
Swan - - - 


Mother 
Siater-Elder 
,, Younger 


- yanga 
• kammL 


Egg - 


- kotto. 


Brother-Elder 


- yabba. 


Track of a foot 


- 


„ Younger 


FiBh - - 


- palpi. 


A young man 


. mabungoroo 


Lobster 


. pirrinoo. 


An old man 


- kaera. 


Crayfiflh - 


* 


An old woman 


- pandoro. 


Mosquito - 


. poonginyoo. 


A baby 


- kampala. 


Fly - 
Snake 

TheBlacks- 
A Blackf eUow 


- mungoo. 

- kanto. 


A White man 
Children - 
Head . - 


- witto. 

- katta. 


A Black woman 


- nogonmiora 


Bye - 


- teUi. 


Nose - ' 


. nmgoo. 


Ear - 


- munga. 



DIAMANTINA RIVER, MIDDLETON CREEK. 



15 



No. 140.— DlAMAHTINA RiVEB, MiDDLETON CBBBK.— ThB QoA TREBIt— 



Month - towa. 

Teetih- - ixra. 

Hair of the head- katta. 
Beard. 
Thunder - 
Gran - 



Tongae 
Stomach 
Breasts 
Thigh - 
Foot - 
Bone - 
Blood - 
Skin - 
Fat . 
Bowels 
Excrement * 
War>spear - 
Reed-spear • 
^Hirowing-stick 
Shield. 
Tomahawk • 
Canoe- 
Sun . 
Moon - 
Star - 
Light ' 
Dark - 
Cold . 
Heat - 
Day - 
Night - 
Fir© 
Water 
Smoke 
Ground 
Wind. 



nanga. 

womdL 

yakko. 



- machL 

'- manginna. 

• tarra. 
•.tinna. 

- toa. 

- morki. 

. pinganya. 

- toota, tammi 

' munda-munda. 
. konna, 

- morcha. 

• kandoora. 

. yamboro. 
' willara. 

. toroo. • 

- rangi. 

- yookoo. 
. karra. 

' winta. 
' milinyoo. 
. renkana. 

- toorongaro. 
' winta. ' 

- olla. 

- kammo. 
' maiyoo. 
. yamba. 

. malboomo. 
. kanuno. 



God . 
Ghosts 



Boomerang . 
Hill - 
Wood. 
Stone • 
Camp . 

Yes . 

No . 
I 

Yon . 
Bark - 
Good . 
Bad - 
Sweet - 
Food . 
Hungry 
Thirsty 
Eat 

Sleep - 
Drink- 
Walk- 
See 

Sit . 
Yesterday - 
To-day 
To-morrow . 
Where are the 
Blacks? 
I don't know 
Plenty 
Big . 
Little- 
Dead - 
By-and-by 
Come on 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk 
Wild turkey 
Wife . . 



oroo. 
parrL 

yamba ^ (see 
Ground), 
nia. 
kurra. 



koolkobar. 

manyo. 

wittimo. 



kannoola. 

minna. 

wonoga. 

orrtanga. 

yananga. 

nakala. 

wonta. 

paringoo. 
karra. 



toona. 
piala. 
nowola. 
poyoonaring. 

kowL 



16 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 141.— WESTERN REVER. 
By Mb. John Hainbs (at the requeet of Sir Samuel Wilaon). 



Kangaroo - 


• mutumba. 


Hand - 


- murra. 


Opossum 


. mungera. 


2 Blacks 


oro gundo. 


Tame dog - 


. mikum. 


3 Blacks - 


- goolpurra gunda 


Wild dog - 
Emu - 


- goolburra. 


One - 


goorinyer. 


Black duck - 


• tibia. 


Two - 


• oro. 


Wood duck - 


. goonumbL 


Three- 


- goolpurra. 


Pelican 


• wulkurberri. 


Four - 


toongar. 


Laughing jackass (none). 


Father 


goopa. 


Native companion gootumha. 


Mother 


yunga. 


White cockatoo 


- kurrumboola. 






• 
Oow - 


- wokkema. 


Sister-Elder 


• karmi. 


Swan - 




„ Younger • 




Egg - 


- gootoo. 


Brother- Elder ■ 


■ yuppa. 


Track of a foot 


- teena. 


„ Youngei 




Fish - 


• dugera. 


A younff man 


- bookeruma. 


Lobster 


. mundi. 






Crayfish 




An old man 


- kyerra. 


Mosquito 


- boogena. 


An old woman • 


■ pundoora. 


Fly - 


- nimunna. 


A baby 


• miUa-milla. 


Snake - 


- goonderra. 


A White man 




The Blacks - 


• gundo-toonga 


Children 


. bungonia. 




(see Plenty). 


Head • • 


- kutta. 


A Blackf ellow 


- gundo. 






A Black woman 


- bunya. 


Eye - 


tilli 


Nose - 


• ningO. 


Ear • 


• munger. 



WESTERN BIVEB. 



17 



No. 141.— Westkbn BiYXBr-coRttnuecf. 



Month 


- hewL 


Boomerang 




Teeth 


- irra. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head toonya. 


Wood- 


- toola (see Bone). 


Beard 


- nartinya. 


Stone - 


- gnngoa. 


Thimder - 


- wondi. 


Camp- 


- yamba (see 


Graaa 


- yakko. 




Ground). 


ToDgae 


- talinya. 


Yes - 


- kay. 


Stomach 


- mitcha. 


No - 


- kurra. 


BreartB 


• tnmbo. 


I 


- wito. 


Thigh 


- torra. 


You - 


• yena. 


Foot - 


•. tinna. 


Bark - 


- goolkurberra. 


Bone - 


- toola. 


Good- 


- manu. 


Blood- 


- wurki 


Bad - 


• workutindyer. 


Skin - - 


- killena. 


Sweet 




Fat - . 


- tommL 


Food - 




BowelB 


- mnttara. 


Hnngry 


• kamoUngya. 


EiXcrement- 


- koonna. 


Thirsty - 


- goongindunga. 


War-«pear- 


- morretcha. 

• 


Eat - 


• ooltunga. 


Eeed-apear 


- 


Sleep - 


- oonunga. 


Wommera or 


gnndaworra. 


Drink- 


- tarkeinga. 


thn>wing-8tick 


VValk- 


• yaninga. 


Shield 


- goonburra. 


See - 


- bimbururra. 


Tomahawk- 


- wheelera. 


Sit 


- wongunga. 


Ganoe 


. 


Yesterday - 


- winappolo. 


Snn - 


- tooroo. 


To-day 


- kyeemba. 


Hood • 


- mngi. 


To-morrow- - karrunga. 
Where are the 


Star - 


- yooko. 


Blacks? 




Light- 
Dark- 


- mutchaberri. 


I don't know 


gala. 


Cold - 


- mooerra. 


Plenty 


- toonga. 


Heat- 

TV 


. nnlkooriima. 


Big • - 


- goolkundurra. 


Day - 


» 


Little 


- nowOlyer. 


Night 


- dilU-nirringa. 


Dead- 


- tillingerringa. 


Fire - 


- oola. 


By-and-by - 


- kyemba, kan- 


Water 


- kamoo. 




daga. 


Smoke 


• ynnkerga. 


Gome on - 


- ookullya yanan- 


Ground 


- ynmba. 




yer. 


Wind 


- mulboona. 


Milk -• 


- 


Rain- - 


• kamoo. 


Eaglehawk 


- 


God - - 


m 


wad turkey 


- 


GhortB 


- 


Wife - 




TOL. m. 


] 


3 





18 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 142.— MAIN RANGE BETWEEN THE BELYANDO 

AND CAPE RIVERS WATERS. 

Bt Jambs MaoGlashan, Esq. 

For the following vocabulary and account of the Koom- 
bokkaburra tribe I am indebted to the kindness of Mr. 
James MacGlashan^ who has been, off and on, for ten years a 
resident in their country. The vocabulary, it will be seen, 
differs but little from that of the Belyando as given by Mr. 
Muirhead. 

The country of the tribe is the Main Dividing Range 
between the Cape and Belyando Rivers. It was first occu- 
pied by the Whites in 1862, the tribe at that time being 
estimated at about four hundred souls. It has since been 
reduced to one-half of that number, and Mr. MacGlashan 
attributes the falling off to abandonment of the old style of 
living, and to the use of salt beef and tobacco. Alcoholic 
drinks of every sort are held in- abhorrence by the tribe, who 
dislike the smell and decline to taste them. 

Infanticide, my informant says, is not practised, as &.r as 
he knows, but that since the coming of the Whites a great 
many young children die of cold and low fever. 



BETWEEN BELTANDO AND CAPE RIVERS. 19 

Mr. MacGlashan thinks tliat the women of the tribe live 
occasionally to a greater age than the men. Several^ he 
says, have hair perfectly white, and even fifteen years ago 
were of the most venerable appearance, and that altogether 
the duration of life amongst the tribe is not different -from 
amongst ourselves. Daring the day the men go naked, but 
most of them have a few skins of the opossom, sewn together 
with string made of the smaller intestines of the animal, in 
which they sleep at night, huddled up between several small 
fires. One of their greatest miseries is what they suffer firom 
mosquitos. This they endeavour to mitigate by the smokes 
of several small fires. Occasionally too they squirt water 
upwards from the mouth, so that it descends in a light 
vapour and frees them from these tormentors for a time. 
The young women wear in front an apron of spun opossum 
frir about eight inches long and five deep. It is generally 
given up after the birth of the first or second child. Such 
as can obtain clothes from the Whites wear them. By way 
of ornament, the skin is often rubbed with a mixture of 
grease and red ochre; bracelets and necklaces are also made of 
strong grass-stems, cut into lengths and strung on threads. 
Another ornament is a mussel-sheU, polished to resemble 
mother-of-pearl, which is suspended by a lock of the hair, 
and hangs down on the forehead as low as the eyebrows. 
They also adorn themselves with the feathers of the emu, 
cockatoo, and other birds. Of nets, and baskets, and girdles 
they have several sorts, some made from a tough grass, and 
others from the fibre of the kurrajong-tree. With their nets 
they catch fish, and also marsupials of several sorts. Those 
used for the last purpose are sometimes several hundred 
yards long. Their knives and tomahawks are of bluestone, 
ground down by rubbing on rough sandstone. Their weapons 
are the boomerang which returns when thrown, and is 
neatly carved, the shield, the usual varieties of clubs, and 
spears which are thrown by hand. Mr. MacGlashan remarks 
that he has seen the wommera or throwing-stick amongst 

Bi 



20 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

them, but it is not in nse, and is foreign to the tribe. Their 
weapons are usually smeared with red ochre, set off with a 
smudge of pipe-clay here and there. The implements used in 
the manufacture of such articles are the bone knife and the 
tooth of the kangaroo. For food, besides the usual animals 
and birds, which they sometimes cook in ovens of a temporary 
character, the Koombokkaburra have a sort of yam, which, 
grows in loose soil and scrubs, is white in color, and in taste 
not unlike a turnip. They also prepare some portion of the 
zamia (palm), shelling the edible portion (which my in- 
formant does not particularize) into a basket, and steeping it 
in water for three or four days. It is then ground between 
two stones, wrapped in a covering of ti-tree bark, and so 
baked. They have also the sweet potato, which, being un- 
cultivated, is smaU. The young men and women are for- 
bidden to eat Certain sorts of food, such as the emu, swan, 
scrub and plain turkeys, and the eggs of these birds. The 
eel, the black-headed snake, and other animals are also on 
the schedule of forbidden foods. The reason assigned by the 
old folks for these restrictions is, that the richness of these 
foods would kill the young, and so persuaded are the young 
of the truth of this assertion, that Mr. MacGlashan is con- 
vinced they would rather die of hunger than infringe their 
law. They call this law knagancij which m.eeki[x% forbidden. 

Concerning cannibalism Mr. MacGlashan gives the 
following particulars:—" I never had ocular proof of it, but 
the Blacks have told us it does occur. They made the state- 
ment themselves unasked, and could have no object in 
deceiving us. I will mention the two cases on which I 
ground my belief. Some years ago when the Blacks were 
first let on to the station, one of them, a fine vigorous young 
fellow, used to help at lambing and other light work about 
the place. He left to go to a meeting of one of the neigh- 
bouring tribes, which unfortunately was on a cattle-run, 
which, coming to the ears of the owner, a dispersal was 
ordered, and the unfortunate young fellow got a bullet 



BETWEEN BELYANDO AND CAPE RIVEM. 21 

through him, of which he died next day, the body being 
eaten and the bones conveyed to his friends for interment. 
The other case, which happened two months ago (September, 
1880), was that of a girl of fifteen years of age, who with 
several others were dispersed for unwittingly allowing the 
grass to take fire on the bank of a river, on which they were 
fishing. This was on the territory of the tribe. She was 
brought here, and died the day after she received the shot, 
and the body was eaten, and the bones carried by her relations 
to the place of her nativity. It is only on such rare occasions 
as these, when individuals in health come to a sudden end, 
that cannibalism occurs in this tribe." To an observer of 
languages, it is interesting to note the new signification of 
the verb to disperse: that when a Black girl of fiflieen is shot 
down she is said to be dispersed. 

The Koombokkaburra do not object to tell their names. 
Usually they marry in the tribe, but sometimes get wives 
from adjoining tribes. Girls are promised in infancy, and 
become wives at about fourteen. Males are made young 
men aftier the beard is somewhat grown, after which they are 
at liberty to get a wife if they can. A few of the old men 
have two or three wives. A widow is the property of a 
brother of the deceased husband, and if young is taken by 
the heir, no matter how many wives he may already have. 
Sometimes, however, she is given away. If she be old, she 
is allowed to do pretty much as she likes. The mortality 
amongst children is great, and is ascribed to cold (probably 
at night) and low fever combined. The women rear about 
two each, which my informant says belong to the tribe (no 
doubt the class) of the mother. Men and women scar the 
skin and pierce the septum of the nose. Circumcision is not 
practised. In mourning they cut the thighs and the head 
until blood flows ; the men also blacken their bodies with a 
compound of burnt bark and grease. The women plaster the 
head with clay and ashes till not a particle of hair is visible, 
which gives them the appearance of having on an earthen 
skull-cap. These Blacks, says my informant, have a 



22 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

religioos belief of some sort, and a strong dislike to hear the 
dead mentioned. They have no canoes. Kangaroo are 
captured principally with nets. Emu are speared in dry 
weather when water remains in bat few holes. Having found 
by the tracks those commonly frequented, the Black, provided 
with a spear, ascends some tree near at hand, from which he 
suspends a bunch of emu feathers with a string. When the 
birds come to water, he imitates their cry, and they, with the 
curiosity so characteristic of them, proceed to examine the 
bunch of feathers, when the Black hid amongst the boughs 
overhead spears one of them. Fish is taken with nets. 
Speaking of the women, Mr. MacGlashan says their hair is 
thick, soft, and wavy, and if dressed and allowed to grow 
long would be considered beautiful. Its color is dark- 
brown in the young, with a strong tinge of auburn. I have 
noticed the same amongst the Goulbum tribes. Originally 
there were a good many deformed persons in the tribe. 
Their deformities, sometimes in the £Bbce or hands, were 
generally in the lower portion of the person. Of their dead 
they dispose in several ways. Old women are burnt out of 
hand and their ashes buried ; indeed they are sometitaes 
buried right off, without ceremony. When an old man dies, 
a stage of bark is erected, four or five feet high from the 
ground, on as many poles, on which the body remains whilst 
the crying continues, which is usually two or three days. 
The corpse is then wrapped in ti-tree bark and buried in a 
sitting posture, the grave being covered with logs, until 
decay has been pretty well completed. The bones are then 
exhumed, collected into a bundle, and carried about by the 
relatives of the deceased for a certain time, when they are 
dropped into a tree which is hollow iu the centre but sound 
without. My informant has known trees to contain several 
such lots of bones. 

Fights occur in the tribe, which usually originate in 
jealousies about wives. The adjoining tribes are the Wokkel- 
burra, Oncooburra, Pegulloburra, and Muttaburra. Cuts are 
treated with plasters of clay, and sores are wrapped in the 



BETWEEN BELYANDO AND CAPE BIVERS. 



23 



heated leaves of the wild pomegranate. In this vocabulary 
we have the word iTula = yoUy which prevails with little 
<;hange almost to the southern extremity of the continent. 



Additional Wobds. 

Fishing net - - mookooroo. 

Baaket ^ wingen. 

Hunting net myrren. 

Stone knife makkana. 

Bark stage for the dead - - . ' Ixurdey. 



24 



THE AUSTRALIAK RACE : 



No. 142.— MAIN RANGE BETWEEN THE BELYANDO AND CAPE 

RIVERS WATERS. 

Bt James MacGlasilan, Esq. 



Kangaroo • 


- woorra. 


Hand- 


- inft^llft- 


Opossum - 


- tangoor. 


2 Blacks - 


. meean bullaroo. 


Tame dog - 


. wandL 


3 Blacks - 


- meean bullaroo 


WUfldog - 


- knurra. 




wychen. 


"Emu - 


- kundooloo. 


One - 


- whychen or 


Black duck 


- kooberdi. 




witchen. 


Wood duck 


- knaw-knaw. 


Two - 


- bullaroo. 


Pelican 


- balloon. 


Three - 


- bullaroo-wychen. 


Laughing jackass akkaburra. 


Four - 


- bullaroo-bnllaroo. 


Native companion koorur. 

• 


Father 


- waddey, yabboo. 


White cockatoo 


- dyrun. 


Mother 


- yanga. 


Crow - 


- wattan. 


Sister-Elder 


- ootheu. 


Swan - 


- boombilburra. 


„ Younger 


- waboun. 


Egg - - 


- anoo. 


Brother-Elder 


- attanna. 


Track of a foot 


- jinnaburrun. 


f, Younger wabboo. 


Fish - 


- ayau, kooioo. 


A young man 


- kowla. 


Lobster 


- 


An old man 


• bulknaw. 


Crayfish - 


- andar. 


An old woman 


- bulknaw, bulk- 


Mosquito - 


- boothen. 




• 

nangin. 


Fly - - 


- ninkna. 


A baby 


- wongoor. 


Snake - 


- mundaa. 


A White man 


- meearew. 


The Blacks - - 


- meean. 


( Children - 


- nangarawalla. 


A Blackfellow 


- meean. 


Head - 


- katta. 


A Black woman 


I - bnllmanyoo. 


Eye . 


- dilley. 


Nose - 


- noondoor. 


Ear • 


- wolloo. 



BETWEEN BELTANDO AKD CAPE BIVEBS. 



25 



No. 142. — Belyando and Cape Rivebs — continued. 



Month- 


- beea. 


Boomerang - 


- wongal. 


Teeth . 


- knalla. 


Hill - 


- byree. 


Hair of the head 


- booelin. 


Wood - 


- dulla. 


Beard - 


. knanga. 


Stone - 


- byree. 


Thnnder - 


. moonkne. 


Gamp - 


- Jamba. 


Grass - 


• bookan. 






Tongue 


dallyn. 


Yes - 


" yablenyin. 


Stomach 


■ banni. 


No - 


- karra. 


Breasts 


- ngammoon. 


I 


- knichoo. 


Thigh - 


knakkoo. 


You - 


• inda. 


Foot - 


- jenna. 


Bark - 


- okaa. 


Bone - 


• balban. 


Good - 


- marball. 


Blood - 
Skin 


■ kooma. 
- beatL 


Bad - 

Sweet - 


- wypa. 

- anga. 


Pat - 


- noonda. 


Food - 


^ 


Bowels 


- aJkyne. 


Hungry 


- anguL 


Excrement • 


- koonna. 


^^ IF 

Thirsty 


W7 

- yookinja. 


War-spear - 


■ kanda-woon- 


Eat - 


• banjal. 


Reed-spear - 


garoo. 
- kanda wolla- 


Sleep - 


- wookman, hun- 




. bnrra. 


• 


gar. 


Wommera or 


yoolman. 


Drink 


- yooka. 


throwing-stick 




Walk - 


- dooa. 


Shield - 


■ yoolmerri. 


See - 


- nakalla. 


Tomahawk - 


balko. 


Sit - 


- barribinda. 


Canoe • 




Yesterday - 


- ejabia. 


Sun - - . 


• kiey. 


To-day 


- irebutue. 


Moon - 

Star - - ■ 


akkera. 
- boothue. 


To-morrow - 


- wirran, widdoor. 


light - - 




Where are the meeanknandoor? 


■ goona, yoona. 


"V^V « ^^ 




Dark - 


■ knooroo. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


■ mnrra. 


I don't know 


• arra nakkalla. 


Heat - 


- kninjanka. 


Plenty 


- talgai. 


Day - 


- weeroo. 


Big - - 


- talgibella. 


Night - 


- knooningoo. 


Little - 


- batchingeri. 


Fire - 


■ bnrri, banying. 


Dead - 


- woolinya„ 


Water- 


■ ammoo. . 


By-and-by - 


- takoo wongieh. 


Smoke 


- toocha. 


Come on 


- danya wonga. 


Ground 


■ nanni. 


Milk - 


• knammoon, am- 


Wind - 


- yarka. 




moo. 


Bain - 


• nngalla. 


Eaglehawk - 


• ooreytella. 


God - - . 




Wild turkey 


• barkum. 


Ghosts 


• meekellew. 


Wife - 


- peykoo. 



26 THE AUSTRAUAK RACE: 



No. 143.— BELYANDO RIVER. 

Br James Muibheap, Esq., and Charles Lowe, Esq. 

Of the annexed vocabularies of the Belyando tribes, the first 
(largely supplemented with notes) was kindly sent to me by 
Mr. James Muirhead, the second was obtained by Mr. Charles 
Lowe from Mr. Edward Mayne. 

Mr. Muirhead informs me that the language of which his 
vocabulary is a specimen is spoken (no doubt with certain 
differences) by the following hurra^ or tribes : — 

The Owanburra, or Ko'Wanburra, whose country is the 

Upper Belyando. 
The Wokkelburra, who inhabit the Lower Belyando tx) 
its junction with the Suttor. 

The Babbinburra, .who dwell between Mistake Creek 

and Clermont. 
The Terraburra, who live near the Alice River. 
The MunguUaburra, whose country is near Fort Cooper. 
The Koombokkabnrra, who inhabit Bower Downs Run. 
The Muthoburra, whose country is Elgin Downs. 
The Durroburra, who own some of the Burdekin and 

Suttor country. 
Some of these tribes, continues Mr. Muirhead, are divided 
into four classes, which bear the following appellations: — 



Men. 


Women. 


Banbey, 


Banbeyan, 


Wongoo, 


Woongooao, 


Oboo, 


Obooken, 


KargiUa. 


KargUlahan. 



BfiLYANDO RIVER. 27 

The mdividoals of these classes many as follows:— 

Male. Female. 

Banbey with Wongooan; offBprmg being - Oboo, or Obooken. 
Oboo with Kurgillahan; oflfopring being - Banbey, or Banbeyan. 
Wongoo with Banbeyan; ofibpring being - Kargilla; or Kargillahan. 
Kargilla with Obooken; oflBspring being - Wongoo, or Wongooan. 

The system of class-marriage, Mr. Moirhead informs me, 
obtains amongst two or three of the neighbouring tribes, and, 
in one of them, the nomenclatnre of the classes is the same 
as that given above, but in the others different. I also 
learn the game is divided into two' sorts, called Mallera and 
Woothera respectively, as is also food generally, and that 
certain classes are only allowed to eat certain sorts of food. 
Thus, the Banbey are restricted to opossnm, kangaroo, dog, 
honey of small bee, &c. 

To the Wongoo is allotted emn, bandicoot, black dnck, 
black snake, brown snake, &c. 

The Oboo rejoice in carpet snakes, honey of the stinging 
bee, &c., &c. 

The Eargilla live on porcupine, plain turkey, &c., &c., 
and to them it appears belong water, rain, fire, and thunder, 
luad that they enjoy the reputation of being able to make 
rain at pleasure. 

Of course there are innumerable articles of food, fish, 
flesh, and fowl, into the distribution of which Mr. Muirhead 
does not enter. Tribes, remarks my informant, receive their 
names generally from some peculiarity in their district or its 
products. The food eaten by the Banbey and Kargilla is 
termed Mallera, and that of the Wongoo, Oboo or Woothera. 
Should a Wongoo Black, camped out by himself, dream 
that he has killed a porcupine, he would believe that he 
would see a Kargilla Black next day. 

As is the case in Australia generally, these Blacks believe 
that no strong man ever dies except as the consequence of 
witchcraft; that the old alone die from natural causes; 
that should A and B, two strong Blacks of the same tribe, 
who were quite friendly, go out hunting together, and A, on 



28 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

returning to the camp, be taken suddenly ill and die, the 
tribe would believe that B had killed him by means of witch- 
craft, and demand his life accordingly ; and that B, in dread 
of the consequence, on the first sign of serious indisposition, 
would take to flight and seek the protection of some other 
tribe. The result of this unusual custom is that one or two 
strange Blacks are found domiciled with nearly every tribe 
in this neighbourhood. On the evening of A's death, his 
friends, painted for war, their weapons in hand, would assemble 
and proclaim that he owed his death to B ; B's Mends, on 
the other hand, loudly maintaining that such was not the fact. 
If, after arguing the matter, A's friends adhered to their first 
opinion, they would wrap up the body of the deceased in 
bark, and having made a stage with a fire by it, would beat 
the ground about it into dust, making it smooth and level, 
and leave the corpse for that day. On the return next day of 
some of the warriors, the ground which had been smoothed 
would be carefully examined, and if any animal, bird, or 
reptile had passed over it, its track would be easily seen, 
and the murder be assigned to some member of the tribe 
in whose dietary scale the animal, bird, or reptile is included. 
If a brown or black snake had been there, some Wongpo would 
be declared to be the culprit ; if a carpet snake, an Obad ; if 
a dog, a Banbey, and so on. Then would come the considera- 
tion, to what particular Wongoo or Obad suspicion should 
attach. If no animal had left his tracks on the prepared 
ground, the friends of the deceased would try to frighten the 
ghost out of the bark shroud. Failing in this, they would 
again smooth down the dust, returning to the spot morning 
and evening until they succeeded in catching the ghost, from 
which incorporal essence they would learn to whom its release 
from the body was due. This accomplished, the corpse 
would be temporarily deposited in a grave, covered only with 
bark^and be there allowed to remain for two months. A 
half-circle would then be dug round one side of the grave, 
the body be chopped up, put into fresh bark in as small a 
space as could be conveniently managed, and be given to the 



BELYANDO RIVER. 29 

mother or sister of the deceased to carry to all meetings of 
the tribe, or until the death were avenged. Remains are 
sometimes carried in this way for two years. When tired of 
carrying them about, they are dropped down the pipe of a 
hoUow tree and left there, and a ring of bark is stripped off 
that and the neighbouring trees to mark the spot. Should 
they feil to obtain tidings of a murder in any way, a suspicion 
is apt to grow up that possibly the death came of natural 
causes. When a man dies, the women cry and cut themselves 
with sharp stones. When a woman dies, or is killed, her 
remains are burnt immediately. When bad humour pervades 
the camp, they often kill a woman and think nothing of it. 

The Blacks, continues Mr. Muirhead, have a great dread 
of falling stars; sometimes they pretend to have seen one 
enter the ground and to have dug it up. Falling stars thus 
obtained are kept in their bags with mysterious secrecy and 
used for incantation. My informant got them to show him 
one of the stars alleged to have been dug up, and found it to 
be a piece of thick glass which its owner had picked up 
somewhere. My informant also writes that the Babing- 
burra tribe is called after the bottle-tree; the Owenburra 
tribe after the emu; the Muthoburra after a variety of the 
brigalow-tree. Children are never called after their parents 
(as such names could not be used after the death of either of 
the parties), but aft;er animals, reptiles, personal peculiarities, 
deformities, &c. Besides names of this sort, the first born 
maJe child is styled Tayling^ or thumb; the second Bangan- 
burraj B&er the first finger; the third Youlgo, after the 
middle finger; the fourth Boorby, after the third finger; and 
the fifth Nallumbrew^ after the little finger. Like other 
tribes, they never name the dead. They recover from wounds 
wbich would be certain death to White men. 

Concerning the superstitions of the tribe, Mr. Muirhead 
says that there is in that part of the continent a non- 
venemous snake with a black head, called Uthagoaj or 
Kuthagoa^ the body of which is marked like a carpet. Con- 
cerning this reptile, the Blacks say that ages ago he was 



30 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



most yenemons, and used to kill many Blacks; that the 
moon became angry and barnt his head as he slept at night 
in the grass, which made hi» head black and his bite harm- 
less. They also relate of a snake called Ollery^ or Gollery, 
which has long &ngs, and is very venemous, that in past 
ages he had only small and harmless teeth; but meeting a 
venemons snake in the grass he said to him, ^^What fine 
long teeth you have; let me have yours and you mine?" and 
so the exchange was made, and Ollery became most venemoos 
and his friend innocuous. 

The above reminds me that years ago the Bangerang 
used to relate many wonderfdl tales in which the moon was 
constantly a principal performer. 

The following Additional Words were forwarded by Mr. 
Muirhead: — 





Additional Words. 




Native tobacoo • 


raickerry. 


Young woman 


- mongine. 


Gum - 


- mokine. 


Girl . 


- umbal. 


Bat - - 


tibbingburra. 


Boy .. - 


- walbra. 


Thumb 


telling or tay- 


Eagle - 


- korrithuUir. 




. line. 


Scrub turkey 


- ' wandora, 


Index finger 


bangangburra. 




cooobean. 


Middle finger 


youlgo. 


Plain turkey 


- burkum. 


Third finger 


boorly. 


A plain 


- bnrguUft. 


Little finger 


nuUumbrew. 


Squatter pigeon 


- mothoo-mothoa 


Clouda 


youngalla. 


Bronzewing 


bapa. 


Lightning • 


mathaknurra. 


pigeon 


- 


Short - 


thaan. 


Heart - 


• bundine. 


Water rat - 


ohnool. 


Elbow- 


- mungo. 


ABhea - 


boonga. 


LoinR - 


- barrew. 


Lidignation meet- 


boa. 


WaUaby - 


• doomba. 


ing 




WaUeroo - 


- achooL 


Funeral oration - 


warrgul. 


Wild cat . 


• nalgonna. 


Cry - - - 


unclewla. 


White 


- onyoo. 


Ruddle 


boing. 


Red - 


- dega. 


Band round head milman. 


Black- 


- arroburra. 


Meat - - 


euri. 


Heavy nulla-nuUa baloor. 


Corroboree - 


mombo. 


Crooked ditto 


bow-bow. 


Woman with child 


nngine. 


Boomerang • 


• waogal. 



BELTAKDO BIVEB. 



31 



Stone chiael 
Chisel for making 

weapons 
Knife - 
Gum-tree abont . 

rivers 
Mnssel 

Seal - - 

Yonng of any 

Letter 
Hail-stone - 
Sngar - 
Maggots 
Squirrel 
Sand-fly 



Additional 

tungroo. 
tabbingburra. 

angil. 
thand walla. 

arring. 

talomby. 

wongoa. 

wappegilla. 

muckerry. 

bathero. 

ooroo. 

mnngeroo. 

mongy. 



WoBDB—cotUinued. 

Wombat - 

Spittle 

Rainbow 

Beeda- 

Devil - 

Bee 

Black bee - 

Stinging bee 

Small bee - 

Eel • 

Male of any 

Female of any 

Stop - 



- warroo. 

- numba. 

- bangor. 

- bandera. 

• megoola. 

- wooooon. 

- abba, 
obnlla. 

• • 

• wathaL 

- wakel, oggella. 
bamby. 

younga. 

- naoo. 



Names of Black Men, with their Sionifigations. 



Bongerma - 
Mathadilla- 

Wongobmigey 

Armngnll • 
OrragillgiU - 
Bitknrra 



venemous. 
nearly caught an 

eel. 
after the action 

of a swallow, 
black cockatoo, 
mutton bird, 
narrow-leafed 

box-tree. 



Doolooa 
Yandowongala 
Alundorra - 
Yangera-yanger 
Almoola 
Moomoora - 



stick. 

come back, 
sand plover, 
passion fruit, 
native cotton, 
a prickly borr 

found in giddya 

scrubs. 



32 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 143.— BELYANDO RIVER. 



Bt Jambs Muibhsad, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 


• wo-e-a. 


Hand • 


- maUa. 


Opoflsnm 


dnngoo. 


2 Blacks - 


- murray bulleroo. 


Tame dog - 
Wild dog - 
Emn - 
Black duck - 
Wood duck 


• wantie. 

■ goondooloo. 

• ooberri. 
knak-knak. 


3 Blacks • 

One - 
Two - 


- murray bulleroo 

wogin. 

- wogin. 

- booleroo. 


Pelican 


- boloon. 


Three - 


- booleroo wogin. 


Laughing jackaas 


kakaburra. 


Four 


- booleroo boo- 


Native oompanioi 


1 orrowra. 


• 


leroo. 


White oockatoo • 


- dickerL 


Father 


• auntie, woddie. 


Crow - 


- waathan. 


Mother 


- yunga. 


Swan - 




Sister-Elder 


• 


Egg - 

Track of afoot • 

FiBh - - • 


■ anjoo or anoo. 

■ deena. 
• ohyoo. 


„ Younger 
Brother-Elder 


- wahboo. 


Lobster 




„ Younger 


Crayfish 


■ ander. 


A young man 


oowla or owla. 


Mosquito - 


■ mnndooor 


An old man 


minda. 




botheen. 


An old woman 


bulgnan. 


Fly - - 
Snake - 
The Blacks - 
ABlackfellow 
A Black woman • 


■ ninknnm. 
- moonda. 

• murray. 
> bnngangy, 


A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 


- anther. 




yonngeroo. 


Eye - 


- dilli. 


Nose - 


■ nunder. 


Ear 


- wollo. 



BELYANSO RIVEB. 



33 





No. 143.— Beltaitdo Rivmb-'contmued. 


Mooth 


- tunga. 


Boomerang - 


- wongal. 


Teeth- 


- eakorea. 


Hill - 


- 


Hair of the heac 


l- 


Wood- 


- 


Beard- - 


- anga or nnnga. 


Stone - 


- byo. 


Tfannder - 


- moongoo. 


Camp - 


- yamba. 


Graas - 


- walkoo, boken. 


.Yes - - 


- yo. 


Tongue 


- talline. 


No - - 


- kurra, cuira- 




- knambooma. 




• 


BreactB 


- nammoon. 


I 


berry. 




^mmtmmmmmmm^^^^mmm 


- ia. 


Thigh 


m 






TV 


m 


You - 


- indu. 


Foot - 


" deenna. 






Bone - 


- balboon. 


Bark - 


- occa, occow. 


Blood- - 


- koonuna, koom- 


Good - 


- marbeL 




maw. 


Bad - - 


- 


Skin - 


- 


Sweet - 


- 


Fat - 


- tommi, nnnda. 


Food- - 


- munda. 


BowelB 


- alkine. 


Hungry 


• 




- oonna. 


Thirsty 


• 


War-spear - 


- anda. 


Eat - 




Beed'Bpear- 


- wallobnrra. 


<^v 




Wommera or 


toomnlla. 


Sleep - 


- wongoruronana 


throwing-stick 




Drink 


- 


Shield 


- goolmem. 


Walk - 


- 


Tomahawk - 


- balgo. 


See - - 


- naggalla. 


Gall06- 


- warella. 


Sit . - 


- 


Son - - 


- kie, wUUby. 


Yesterday - 


- 


Moon - 


- kackera. 


To-day 


- 


Star - 


- woorra, butho. 


To-morrow - 


- 


li^t- - 


- 


Where are 1 


bhe 


Dark - - 


- 


Blacks? 




Gold - 


- moora. 


I don't know 


. 


Heat - 
Day - 


* 


Plenty 


-talgi. 


* 


Big - - 


- bnrca. talgL 


Night- 


- knakoon. 


LitUe- 


- bagerejnurre. 


Fire - 


- burry. 


Dead - 




Water 


- ammoo, kammoo 






Smoke 


- tocker. 


By-and-by - 


- 


Ground 


- nannie. 


Come on 


- weingally. 


Wind- 


- yerka. 


Milk - 


- 


Bain - 


- kanmioo. 


Eaglehawk - 


- korrithuUa. 


God - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


GhoetB 


- 


Wife - - 


- 


VOL. ni- 










34 



THE AUSTRALIAK RACE: 



No. 143.— BELT AKDO BIVER. 



Bt Cha&lbb Lowb» Esq. 



Kangaroo - 
Opoflsom 
Tame dog - 
wad dog • 
Enrn - 
Black duck • 
Wooddaok 
Pelican 
Laaghing jackaas 
Native companion 
White cockatoo 
Crow - 
Swan - 
Egg - 

Track of a foot 
FiBh - 
Lobster 
CrayfiBh 
Mosquito 
Fly 

Snake • 
The Blacks 
A Blackf ellow 
A Black woman 
Nose - 



mnrghoo. 
thangooL 
moorra. 

oondooloo. 

oolberrL 

boonga-boonga. 

bargala. 

arkooborra. 

ooroon. 

tequrri. 

wathoo. 

ammgharran, 

anoo. 

deena. 

weena. 

ngobbera. 
boodthim. 
ninya. 

boonalgarra. 
mnrree. 

nondooroo. 



Hand • 

2 Blacks - 

3 Blacks - 
One . - - 
Two - . - 
Three - 

Four - - - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

„ Younger - 
Brother-Elder - 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman - 
A baby 

A White man - 
Children - 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear • - - 



wirbnrra. 
buUarbn. 
argooroo. 

yaboo. 
yungha. 



munga. 

boonqua. 

boongumia. 

mabala. 

murgooloo. 

tundoo. 

adtha. 

diUe. 

waUoo or woUoo. 



wsLYAxnyo biviib. 



35 





Kg. 143.— Bxlyakdo RiyxB— cofKifiiitfd. 


Moath 


- moonoo. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


- gaanga. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head 




Wood- 


. bail 


Beard- 


- yarram. 


Stone - 




Thnnder - 


- moongnoo. 


^m 




Gnas - 


• wahoo. 


Gamp - 


- woongarra. 


Tongne 
Stomach 




Yes . - 


yo. 


- wirra. 


No - • . 


ardda. 


SteaatB 




I - - 


• ngaia. 


Thigh - 


- thorra. 


You - 


ynnda. 


Foot ■ 


. deena. 


Bark • 


ooga. 


Bone • 


- baban. 


Good - 


• bnnbea. 


Blood- 


- oona. 


Bad - - . 




Skrn • . 


. nonrmaL 


Sweet - 


- wargoo. 


Fat 


- tommi 


Food - 




Bowels 


- bamboo. 






BzcFement - 


- goonna. 


Hmigry 


• obberm. 


War-spear • 


- anda. 


Thirsty 


• obybia. 


Beed-epear - 


• waUaborra. 


Eat - - 


- bnnga. 


Wommera or 




Sleep - 


- woongar. 


throwing-atick 




Drink - 


■ engowa. 


RhiftM. 


- boorgoo. 


Walk - 


• yoanlL 


Tomahawk • 


- 


See • 


■ ngangoo. 


Oanoe- 


- balgoo. 


Sit - - 


• yambabimdi. 


Smi 


• ale. 


Yesterday - 




Moon . 


. oggera. 


To-day 




Star • 


- lx)odthoo. 


To-morrow - 




light - 


- elaroo. 


Where are the 




Dark • 


. ngoorgon. 


Blaokfl? 




Gold - 


- moora. 






Heat - 


. thalgoi 


I don't know 




Day - - 


• ehiroo. 


Plenty 


• thalgoL 


Ni^t- 


• ngoorgun. 


Big - - 


• thalgnberri, 


FSre 


- boorroo. 


little - 


- bargalberrL 


Water- 


- armoo. 


Dead • 


• marbar. 


Smoke 


> thngami. 


By-and-by - 


• boongnoo. 


Ground 


- nundee. 


Come on 


■ thyngiiip^ 


Wind - 


- yarga. 


Milk - 




Bain - 


- 


Eaglehawk - 




God . 


m 


Wild torkey 




Gboati 


• 


Wife - - 





02 



36 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 144.— LOGAN CREEK, PART OF LOWER SUTTOR, 
AND OF LOWER MISTAKE CREEK. 

NARBOO MURRE TRIBE. 
Anoktmous. 

A RESIDENT on Avon Downs Station, with whose name I am 
not acquainted, has kindly forwarded me the attached 
vocabulary. From his statements I gather .that there are 
several associated tribes speaking dialects of a common 
language, who inhabit Logan Creek, part of the Lower 
Suttor, and of Lower Mistake Creek. One of these tribes, 
from an individual of which the vocabulary was obtained, is 
called Narboo Murre, whose country, or a portion of it, 
which was occupied by the Whites in 1863, is now known as 
Avon Downs Station. The original number of the Narboo 
Murre my informant set down at five hundred, and their 
present number at one hundred souls. 

The ornaments of this tribe are mussel-shells, which 
hang on the forehead suspended from the hair, and necklaces 
made of coarse grass, cut into short lengths and threaded. 
Cannibalism occurs occasionally amongst them, it is said, 
even at the present day (1880). Polygamy prevails to some 
extent, and five or six of the old men have two wives each. 

The back, shoulders, chest, legs, and arms of this people 
are ornamented with scars, and an upper tooth used to be 
knocked out, but this custom and many others are falling 
into disuse under the pressure of our colonization. The 



LOGAN CBEEK, ETC. 37 

hair of the Narboo Murre is straight and coarse, with a little 
curl when long. A message is sent to a neighbouring tribe 
by a man who carries a stick carved for the occasion; but my 
informant believes that without the messenger to interpret, 
the signs on the carved stick could not be understood. 

Two Additional Words are given, viz. : — mountain = 
barree; hive of mid bees = kabba. 



38 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 144.— LOGAN CREEK AND PART OF SUTTOR AND 

MISTAKE CREEK. 





AirONTMOUS. 




Kangaroo • 


woora. 


Hand - 




Opossum - 


tnngoo. 


2 Blacks 




Tame dog - 




8 Blacks 




wad dog - 


ngoora. 


One • 


warbur. 


Emu • 


koondoloo. 


Two - 


- boolooroo. 


Black dack - 


gooboori. 


Three - 


boolooroo- war- 


Wood duck 






bur. 


Pelican 


booloo. 


Four • 


boolooroo-boo- 


Laughing jackass 


-karoobnrra. 




looroo. 


Native companion 




Father 


■ yaboo. 


White cockatoo - 


deckari, deroon. 


Mother 


yunga. 


Crow • 


> wadan. 


Sister-Elder 


- boolgayoo. 


Swan - 


moongabuUa. 


„ Younger ■ 


• wahboo. 


Egg - : - 
Track of a foot • 
Fish - - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito - 
Ply • • 
Snake • 
The Blacks - 


kungoo. 
deena. 
■ weena. 


Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 


• kodunna. 
wahboo. 

• cowla. 

- pringaroo. 


' moonda. 

• ninga. 

• oabooL 
> murri. 


An old woman • 
A baby 
A White man 
Children • 


- boongan. 

- camboo. 

- cambool-wahba 


A Blackfellow - 


murri. 


Head • 

• 


. kada. 


A Black woman 


- kieyoo. 


Eye - 


- diUie. 


Nose - 


- nunda. 


Ear '- 


- wolloo. 



LOOAN CREEK, ETC 



39 



No. 144.— Loo 


AN Greek and Pabt 

• 


OF SUTTOB AND 


Mistake Creek 




contintied. 




Month 


- tonga. 


Boomerang - 


« 


Teeth 


- eangallaboroo. 


Hill . - 


- mungoo. 


Hair of the head - boona. 


Wood- 


- toolab. 


Beard- - 


- onga. 


Stone- 


- pa-ee. 


Thunder - 
Gran- 


- moongoo. 

- wagoo. 


Camp - 


• 

• 


Tongue 


- tailing. 


Yes - 


- yea. 


Stomach 


- narmboo. 


No - 


- kurra. 


Bieaata ' 


- 


I - - 


- nginye. 


Thigh- 


- toomoo. 


Yon - 


- inda. 


Foot - 


- dinna. 


Bark - - 


. 


Bone - 


- balbin. 


Good - - 


- bembie. 


Blbod- - 


- goonuL 


Bad - - 


- ooitba. 


Rkin - . 


- beedie. 


Sweet - 


- cunga. 


Fat - 


- taznmie. 


Ta J 




Bowela 


m 


Food - 


- yooga. 




. 


Hungry 


- cabinoo. 


War-epear • 


- kunda. 


Thirsty 


- 


Breed-spear - 


- 


Eat - 


- 


Wommera or 




Sleep - 


m 


throwing-stick 




Drink- 


- 


Shield 


- koobnnrri. 


Walk- - 


- 




- balgoo. 


See - - 


- 


Canoe- 


- (none exist). 


Sit - 


- 


Snn - 


- ki-ee. 


Yesterday - 


- birgow. 


Moon - 


- karkurra. 


To-day 


- eja. 


Star - 


- bootoo. 


To-morrow • 


- kiebadoo. 


light - 


- 


Where are the 




Dark - 


- 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


■ 


I don't know 


„ 


Heat - 


- 


Plenty ' - 


. 


Day - - 


- ki-ee. 


Big - . 


- dulgai. 


Night- 
Fire - 


- wogoon. 

- boorie. 


Little 
Dead 


- bridgelberrie. 

- woolellie. 


Water 
Smoke 
Ground 


- kamoo. 

- dooga. 
. nanie. 


By-and-by - 
Come on 


- dagoo. 

- woujow. 


Wind - 


- yerga. 


Milk . 


- nammoon. 


Bain - 


- kamo. 


Eaglehawk - 


- oorridella. 


God - - 


• 


Wild turkey 


- wurga. 


GhoatB 


- meederra. 


Wife - - 


- burgoo. 



40 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 146.—FORT COOPER.— AMINUNGO TBIBK 



By W. O. HoDGEiNsoir, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 


- woora. 


Opossum 


• kooliga. 


Tame dog • 


• wondi. 


wad dog - 


- moura. 




koondooloo. 


Black duok - 


• barran. 


Wood dnck- 


• 


Pelioan 


kroora. 


Laughing jackaai 


1 kowkurra. 


Native companion pargammo. 


VV hite cockatoo 


- dingerri. 


Crow - 


• wartagan. 


Swan - 


goordedilla. 


Egg - - 


- kooki. 


Track of a foot - 


- tinnar 


Fish • 


- winna. 


Lobster 


• quarra. 


Crayfish - 


• 


Mosquito - 


- ooongerra. 


Fly - ■ ' 


• nnngun. 


Snake - 


■ moonda. 


The Blacks • 


■ murri. 


A Blackfellow 


• murri. 


A Black woman 


■ wamgo. 


NOTO - 


nindi. 



Hand • 


■ muUa. 


2Blacks .- 




3 Blacks - 




One - 


■ wnrba. 


Two - 


plnrro. 


Three - 


koodbnrra. 


Four - 


■ Congo. 


Father 


yabbo. 


Mother 


■ yuni^an 


Sister-Elder 


- bonngoon 


„ Younger • 


• manrogunna. 




megana. 


Brother-Elder • 


- balloona. 


„ Youngei 


' karmina, 




kurdona* 


A young man 


- maura. 


An old mim 


• broonega. 


An old woman • 


- broongewana. 


A baby 


- yallo. 


A White man 


- megolo. 


Children 


• kondo. 


Head • 


• koori. 


Eye - 


tille. 


Ear - • ■ 


• wollo. 





PORT COOPER. 


4. 


No. 145.— FoBT CooPEB.— AmNXTKGO TRJSEr—continued, 


Month 


- tnnga(UpB). 


Boomerang - 


- wonguL 


Teeth - 


- era. 


Hill • 


- boorganna. 


Hair of the head 


- kata. 


Wood- 


- darla. 


Beard- 


- unga. 


Stone - 


- barri 


Thnnder 


- tigaroo. 


Camp - 


- yamba. 






Yes - 


- karra. 


Graas - 


• kindyerra. 






Tongae 


- tnllia. 


No . - 


- kadgimbinga, 
knfta. 


Stomach 


. mmna. 


^m 


^ 


BreastB 


- ammooa. 


I 


- madyeu. 


Thigh- 


• tnrra. 


Yon - 


- yinda. 


Foot - 


- tinna. 


Bark - 


• petnlla. 


Bone - 


- bulban. 


Good - 


- poongonna. 






Bad - 


^ 


Blood . 


- koonga. 


A^V^^A 




Skin - 


^3 

- tnngera. 


Sweet - 


- kantagoonda. 


Fat • 


- tommy. 


Food - 


- nilbo. 


Bowela 


- koonna. 


Hnngry 


• kabinno. 


Excrement - 


- tnllf. 


Thirsty 


- kanga bongana. 


War-spear - 


- coombo. 


Eat - 


- yngonga. 


Beed-flpear - 


• knndnra. 


Sleep ■ 


- woongarra. 


Wommera or 


coombi yabnnga. 


Drink- 


- kamo yngonga. 


throwing-Btick 




Walk . 


- yanninga. 


Shield 


- koolmarri. 


See - 


- nnckunga. 


Tomahawk - 


- piramo. 


Sit 


- tnnnnnga. 


Oanoe 


- winda. 




^^ 


Snn - 


- karri. 


Yesterday - 


- koorgoo. 


Moon- 


- kuggera. 


To-day 


- yegilga. 


Star - 


- wiregL 


To-morrow - 


- pootka. 


TJght - 


- karri. 


Where are the 


kow-warri. 


Dark . 


• koonda. 


Blacks 7 




Cold - 


- pntarri. 


I don't know 


- knrrananga. 


Heat - 


- karrimella. 


Plenty 


- paamburra. 


Day - 


- moogonoo. 


Big . . 


- kongoobarri. 


Night - 


• koonda. 


Little - 


- pijarri. 


Rre - 


- boori. 


Dead - 


- boonda. 


Water 


- kamo. 






Smoke 


- tooka. 


By-and-by - 


- tako. 


Gronnd 


- nmmi. 


Come on 


- cooranga. 


Wmd- 


- kidjara. 


Milk - . 


- nammona. 


Bain . 


- kamobnngera. 


Eaglehawk 


- pnrpunda. 


God - • 


- 


WUdtnrkey 


- koogia. 


GhostB 


- 


Wife - - 


• wamgo. 



42 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE 



No. 146.-~SCRnBBY GREEK. 



Bt Edwabd Cubb, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 


woorra. 


Hand- 


anna. 


OpoBsum 


kulaju. 


2 Blacks 




Tame dog • 
Wild dog - 

Black duck - 
Wood duck - 
Pelican 


mudda. 

kundooloo. 
barana. 

- elganna. 

- kuddaboo. 


3 Blacks 
One - 
Two - 
Three- 
Four 


• warba. 

kurgoo. 

kurborra. 
■ kangoo. 


Laughing jackaae 


1 nurbungaL 


Father 


yabboon. 


Native companion 


L kooroora. 


Mother 




White cockatoo • 


• tingarL 


Sister-Elder 


. kudna. 


Crow - 
Swan - 

Egg . . . 
Track of a foot 


. wadagan. 
- kummara. 


„ Younger ■ 

Brother-Elder ■ 

„ Younger 


■ VftHanfri 


Piflh - 


- wmna. 


A young man 


• kaoola. 


Lobster 




An old man 


• broonga. 


CrayfiBh 




An old woman 


- undagana. 


Mosquito 


• kannieroo. 


A baby 


• wabooroo. 


Fly - - ■ 
Snake - 
The Blacks - 
A Blaokfallow 


- tugin, wamira. 
• kummbay. 


A White man 
Children 
Head - 


- migolo. 

- manoo. 


A Black woman 


- wamoo. 


Eye - 


- dim. 


Nose . - 


• ooroo. 


Ear 


- woUoo. 



SCRUBBY CBEEK. 



43 







No. 146. — Scrubby Cbexk— con^ued. 


Month 


- 


- tha. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth- 


- 


- irra. 


Hin - - 


• 


Hair of the head • knrri. 


Wood- 


- tolla. 


Beard- 


• 


. nanga. 


Stone - 


- parri. 


Thunder 


- 


• moorinoo. 


Camp- 


- yamba. 


Graaa - 


- 


- widira. 


Yes - 


. 


ToDgae 


- 


- 


No - - 






- 


. bollo. 




BreastB 


- 


- ammoona. 


I - - 


- 


Thigh- 


- 


- tarra. 


Yon - 


- 


Foot - 


m 


. thinna. 


Bark - 


- kooga. 


Bone - 


- 


- balban. 


Good - - 


- bnngoona. 


Blood - 


- 


- koonga. 


Bad - - 


- urga. 


Skin - 


■- 


- koondo. 


Sweet - 


- 


IftX . 


- 


- tammL 


Food ■ 


- tAtcari^Uft. 


BowelB 


- 


- ktirmi. 


Hnngry 


- kabbirL 




- 


- koonana. 


Thirsty 


• 


War-«pear 

Beed-«pear 

WonuDOca 


or 


- bnrranara. 

- kirmba. 


Eat - 
Sleep - 


- ngangoopooroo. 

- ooga. 


ihrowmg-i 


stick 




Drink- 


- bitangoo. 


Shield- 


- 


* 


Walk- - 


- 




- 


- balgoo. 


See - - 


- 


Canoe - 


- 


- winda. 


Sit - - 


- tanangoo. 


Bun - 


• 


- karri. 


Yesterday - 


- 


Moon - 


- 


- kagara. 


To-day 


-nilla. 


Star - 


- 


- kangalbL 


To-morrow - 


- kalgingen. 


light - 


- 


. ta.lTigaTm- 


Where are 


the 


Da^ - 


- 


. mnnnoo. 


BLicks? 




Cold - 


- 


- butaringa. 


I don't know 


^ 


Heat - 


- 


• bnmga. 


Plenty 


m 


Bay - 


. 


- karri. 


T>fl 










Big - - 


- marga. 


Kight- 


• 


- mnnnoo. 






Fixe - 


^ 


- tnnburri. 


Little - 


- wabugooroo. 


Water 


. 


- kanmioo. 


Bead - - 


- bnnda. 


i Smoke 


- 


- tuga. 


By-and-by - 


- 


Gronnd 


. 


• nanni. 


Come on 


- tawan,poorianni. 


Wind- 


- 


-kaiba. 


Milk - 


- 


Bain - 


- 


- yoc^gana. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


- 


- 


Wild tnrkey 


- 


Ghoato 


m 


- 


Wife - 


. 



44 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 147.— PORT MACKAY AND ITS 
NEIGHBOURHOOD. 

Bt Geo&qe F. Bridokmak, Esq., and thk Reyd. H. Bucas. 

For the following information relative to the Port Mackay 
tribes I am indebted to the gentiemen named above, and 
also to a resident in the locality, who has forwarded his con- 
tribation anonymously. The vocabularies furnished by 
these three gentlemen agree so well, that I have thought it 
unnecessary to give more than one of them. Other than as 
regards language, the information I have received respecting 
these tribes is to the following effect: — 

Within a radius of fifty miles or so of Port Mackay dwell 
four tribes which differ but little in speech. Their names 
are the Yuiperay in whose territory is the town; the Kungalr- 
burra^ whose country is between Port Mackay and Broad 
Sound; Toolginburra^ resident just to the west of the territory 
of the last-named tribe; and the Googaburra^ or Island Blacks. 
The occupation by the Whites of the country of these tribes 
began, I learn, in 1860, or thereabouts. During the eight or 
ten years which followed, about one-half of the aboriginal 
population was either shot down by the Native Mounted 
Police and their officers, or perished from introduced loath- 
some diseases before unknown. The Black troopers, however, 
are said to have been the chief destroyers. What the actual 
numbers of the tribes were when the Whites came amongst 
them is not known, but my anonymous correspondent gives 



PORT MACKAY AND ITS NEIGHBOURHOOD. 45 

the nmnber of the Toolginbnrra tribe at the present time 
(1880) as one hundred, made up of 40 men, 40 women, and 
20 children, and mentions that large numbers were carried 
off by measles in 1876. 

As regards clothing, these tribes used opossum-rugs at 
night, but went naked during the day, with the exception of 
the women, who wore a belt round the waist, which supported 
a fringe, which hung down in firont nearly as low as the 
thigh. Fringes of this sort are common throughout 
Australia, and are made of vegetable fibre, or of the fur of 
the opoflsmn twisted into strings, or of the skins of animals 
greased and cut into strips. Not a few of these people 
reached, it is thought, the age of seventy years, and there are 
stQl some alive whose hair is quite white. Both sexes wear 
ornaments made firom the shell of the Karreekt^ or nautilus. 
In times of rejoicing they paint themselves red, and when in 
mourning, white. 

Except that boomerangs of both sorts are in use, and 
that the wommera is not, there is nothing to record in 
connection with the weapons and implements of these tribes, 
as they differ in nothing firom what has been already so 
often described. Cannibalism used to be practised, but on 
rare occasions only; polygamy was in vogue, and infanticide 
existed. 

Mr. Bridgeman informs me that all things, animate and 
inanimate, are divided by these tribes into two classes, named 
Yungaroo and Wootaroo. In conformity with this idea, each 
of the tribes under consideration is divided into Yungaroo 
and Wootaroo, These are again each divided into two sub- 
classes, with a view to the regulation of marriage and pre- 
vention of the union of persons nearly related by blood. The 
first into Gurgela and Gurgelan, masculine and feminine, 
and Bunbai and Bunbaian, The second into Kooharoo and 
Koobarooan^ masculine and feminine, and Woongo and 
Woongoan. Every member of the tribe belongs to one of 
these classes, and the arrangement works in the manner 
shown by the following table : — 



THB AUSTRALUN RACE: 



I I AS ii 



.3 



dl d 



a s 



I I 



1 i 



PORT MACKAY AND ITS NEIGHBOURHOOD. 



47 



The reader will thns nnderstand that a Onrgela can only 
many with a Koobarooan, and that she must not be nearly 
related to him ; and so of the others. For him to cohabit 
with a Eoobarooan, not his wife, is looked on as an offence 
against her hnsband only; but to cohabit with a woman of 
any other class is esteemed shameful and unnatural. Every 
Gurgela calls every other Gnrgela brother, and every Koo- 
harooan wife, and every Woongo son, unless they be of the 
preceding generation, when he calls them £a,ther, &c. 
Woongo calls every Koobaroo kulnagu^ which probably means 
uncle^ and so on. 



Phbasbs bt Mb. Bbidoxman. 



Where are the Blacks ? 
1 don't know - 
Where are aU the women ? 
Flflhing ^ - • 

One woman is in the camp 

Where is Tommy ? 

I have not seen him to-day 

I am himgry 
A hungry Black 

Give me some animal food 
Here it is 
Come and fish • 

No, let US hunt opoflsnm 

By-and-by I wiU eat opossmn- 

OposBom (is) no good 

Emu is best 

Come and swim 

Beoff - 

IwillgO' 

Are yon tired ? - 



- anjamnrry? 

- curra ngia knnckeUy, or Not I seen. 

- anja kaiyen tappo ? 

- winna manera, or Fish taking. 

• kaihen wnrbor yambimga woonera, 

or Woman one camp remains. 

• anja Tommy ? 

- cnrrenga knrra knuckeUy ngea, ct 

Smi this not seen I. 

• gobbeno ngia, or Himgry I. 

- mnrry gobdenberry, or Black hun- 

ger with. 

• nowra yapamo, Meat give. 

- ngi woonera, cr There remains. 

- winna manera ngally, or Fish take 

we. 

• knrra, colijo yanera. No, opossmn 

let us go. 

• tacko colijo nkera ngia. 

- quea colijo, Bad opossum. 

- goondoloo binbee, or Emu good. 
. goodgimd (imperative). 

- yarromd. 

- ngally yanera. 

• dinnabingera indu ? or Tired yon ? . 



48 



THE AUSTRALIAJ? RACE: 



Ph&asbs bt Mb. Bbidokman — continued. 



I am very tired 



Well ! go to sleep 
By-and-by I will sleep - 
Where is my husband ? 
You will see him by-and-by 
I see two women 
Where is my spear ? 

1 have not seen yonr spear 

Give me one spear 
Gome and see my canoe 

Don't talk 



• dinnabingera ngia woorwaya, Tired 

I much. 

- woonomO, or Sleep. 

- tacko woonera ngia. 

. anja bulgin ? Where husband ? 

- tacko knuckanow indu. 

• kaiyeu boolera knuckana ngia. 

• anja coombo ngio, Where spear 

mine? 

- coombo curra knuckelby, or Spear 

not seen. 

- coombo wurbur ngombomo. 

• yandoolia (or winda) ngio knnckomo, 

or Canoe mine see. 

- kurrayamala. 



Phbasxs, etc., bt the Revd. H. Buoas. 

Prepositions, says Mr. Bucas, are an important feature in this language, 
and are alwajrs affixed to substantives or pronouns, of which instanoee will 
be see in what follows: — 



The Blacks are coming 

What are they bringing ? 

A kangaroo 

Where from ? - 

From a long way 

Why have you taken my meat? 



- mum woorpera. 

- .angabirri ? or What with ? 

- woorabirri, or Kangaroo with. 

- anjatum? 

- oow-warri-tum. 

- angirri nowra ngigo mxirrulba? or 

What for meat mine taken ? 



I have not taken it 

I have thrown it away stinking 



■ kurra ngia murrulba. 
- wandala ngia kaiga; wandom5, 
throw away (imperative); wan- 
dulba, thrown away. 
Why do you speak nonsense ; you angirri cuttee yamala woono bunda 
were always greedy ? indoo murri; literally. Why non- 

sense speak, always greedy you 
man? 
When I finish (digging) this ground, nanni curmbulba .anny-go wininow 
what will the White man give me ? megolo ? Earth finished, what wOl 

give White man? 
Who = andalo; what = anni; where = anga or andcUgo; words of this 
sort always begin with the syllable an. 



PORT MACEAY AND ITS NEIGHBOUBfiOOD. 



49 



Verbs. 
Tenses do not alter in penon. Many yerbs seem to be iiregalar. 



PraeDti 


Put 


Fatore. 


Impefatlve. 


RcmMki. 


Iieeorknow 


seen 


iBhallaee 


see 


* 

I have not seen the 
BUcks 




knackUba 


knuckanow 

• 


knuokomO 


knrrangia mnrri 
knnckalba 


I do or make 


done 


I shall make 


doit 


this verb resembles 


Boronibiila 


borambnlba 


banimbano 


bammbomS 


the Latin verb 
Facto 




I brought 


I shall bring 


bring 




Gorinna 


wopnlba 


gorinow 


goromO 




I tie or fasten 


fasteDed 


I shall fasten 


fasten 


rope strongly fasten 




yackaba 


ynckanow 


ynckomd 


gnbbera winberri 


lent 


cnt 


I shall cnt 


cnt 


ynckomO. 


Goolma 


goomnlba 


~— 


goolmonO 





TOL. m. 



50 



THE AUSTRALIAK RACE 



No. 147.— PORT MACKAY AKD ITS NEIGHBOURHOOD. 



Bt Gbobob F. Bbidoem ak, Esq. 



In this vocabulary will be noticed hetid and hair expreBsed by one word, 
and hill and stone by another, White man and ghosts by another. To drink 
is rendered eat water. 



Kangaroo - 
Opomun 
Tame dog - 
Wild dog - 
Ehnn - - - 
Black dock - 
Wood dnok 
Pelican 
Langhing jackaas 

Native companion 
White cockatoo 
Crow • 
Swan - 

Egg - • 
Track of a foot 

Fish - 

* 

Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito - 
Fly - 
Snake 

The Blacks - 
A Blackf eUow 
A Black woman 
Nose - 



woora. 
kolijo. 

wandy, mirree. 
moura. 
goondooloo. 
barran. 
goobirry. 
gootaburra. 
kowur, oowur- 
burra 
kooroora. 
tingert 
wotigana. 
booroobirry. 
kato. 
yalka. 
winna. 

nguchul. 

goongera,bakina. 

nungina. 

(no general term). 

murry. 

bomma. 

kaiyew or kaioo. 

bootan. 



Hand • 
*2 Blacks 
SBlacks 

One • 

Two - 
Three- 
Four - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 



Younger 
Brother-Elder 



>i 



>> 



Youpger 



A young man 
An old man 

An old woman 

A baby 

A White man 

Children 

Head 

Eye - 

Ear 



murry boolera. 
murry boolera 
warpur. 

warpur or wat- 
chin. 
boolera. 

boolera warpur. 

yaboo. 
younga. 
meekana, wango- 

baya. 
the same, 
kuttia, cutta- 

nurra. 
wobbun or wob- 

bunurra. 
mindera. 
bingabirry (witii 

grey hairs), 
bullngana. 
yalo. 
meegolo. 
yalobaga. 
kutta. 

tiUy or dilly. 
waUoo. 



PORT MACKAY AND ITS NEIGHBOURHOOD. 



51 



No. 147. — ^PoBT Mackat akd its Nexohboubhood— -eon^fiiuecf. 



Month 
Teeth - 

Hair of the head- 
Beard 

Thnnder - 
Graas- 
Tong^e 
Stomach 
Breasts 
Thigh 
Foot - 
Bone - 
Blood - 
Skin - 
Fat - 
Bowels 
Excrement - 
War-spear - 
Beed-spear- 
Wommera or 
throwing-stick 
Shidd- 
Tomahawk - 
Canoe- 
Son - - 
Jioon - 
Star - 
light - 

Dark - 
Cold - 
Heat - 

Day - 

Night- 
Fire - . 
Water 
Smoke 
Groond 
Wind- 
Bain - 
God . - 
Ghosts 



erar. 

kntta, kowno. 

ngnnga. 

tickeroo. 

kaigera,wookera. 

taUia. 

bonna. 

ngomone. 

toomo. 

bulbnn. 

gooma. 

bitty. 

tammee, nnrpy. 

ngalko. 

goonna. 

koombo. 

meero. 

goolmarry. 

beeramo. 

winda. 

knrree. 

kocknrra. 

wirrigee. 

cnrree-birry 

(with sun), 
meta. 
bootarry. 
^^mgabirry 

(with sweat), 
knrreebirry. 
goonda. 
boree. 
kommo. 
tooka. 
nanny, 
kaipa. 
kommo. 



- meegolo. 



Boomerang 
HiU - 
Wood- 
Stone - 
Camp - 
Yes - 
No - 
I 

You - 
Bark - 
Good - 
Bad - 
Sweet - 
Food - 

Hungry 
Thirsty 

Eat - 
Sleep - 
Drink- 
Walk - 
See - 

Sit - 

Yesterday 

To-day 



To-morrow - 
Where are the 
Blacks? 
I don't know 

Plenty 

Big - - . 

Little - 
Dead - 
By-and-by - 
Come on 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk - 
Wild turkey 
Wife - 



wongala. 

toolkoon, paree. 

bunga, dullo. 

paree. 

yamba. 

yo, yoi. 

kurra. 

ngia. 

indu. 

bitty, gooka. 

boongana, binbe. 

guea. 

(no term). 

munda (vege- 
table), ury (ani- 
mal). 

gobbin. 

comma miena 
(9idb [for]water). 

enchera. 

woomba. 

kommo enchera. 

toera. 

knukela or tilly- 

knuckela. 
womera. 
goorcanga. 
ageba (now), cur- 

ree ageba (this 

sun), 
beerkou. 
anga murry ? 

kurra ngia nogela 
(not I see). 

lumburra. 

woorwaya, tul- 
kurry. 

batchary. 

miebo. 

taiko. 

ngomone. 

coreeduUa. 

berkum. 

kaiyew ngijo 
(woman mine). 



D 2 



52 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 148.— BROAD SOUND, YAAMBA, MARY- 
BOROUGH, AND ST. LAWRENCE. 

Bt Friderio Mullkb, Esq. 

In this vocabnlary of Broad Sonnd, Yaamba (camp), Mary- 
borongh, and St. Lawrence, which was forwarded to me by 
Mr. Frederic Mailer, many words will be noticed very 
similar to those which occnr at Port Mackay, whilst others 
agree with those of Rockhampton, the Upper Barcoo, and 
the Diamantina. The word Bina := ear is occasionally met 
with as far south as Qneanbeyan. 



No. 148.— BROAD SOUND, YAAMBA, MARYBOROUGH, AND ST. 

LAWRENCE. 

Bt Fredxkeo Mnmot, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 


- woora. 


OpoflBum - 


- naring. 


Tame dog - 


- merrL 


VVUddog - 


- 


Emu - 


- koondaloo. 


Black duck 


- bauon. 


Wood duck 


m 


Pelican 


- kooyabula. 


Laughing jackaas kocabnrra. 


Native companion goowar. 


White cockatoo 


- wiUoo. 


Crow 


-.wathan. 


^wan - 


- gnron. 


E«g - - 


• koolpoor. 


Track of a foot 




Fish - - 


- gooyar. 


Lobster 


- goowarra. 


Crayfiah - 


- elin. 


Mosquito - 


- moowyn. 


Fly - - 


- kooroo. 


Snake - 


- 


The Blacks - 


- kattar. 


A Blackf eUow 


- kattar. 


A Black woman 


- kingil. 


Nose - - 


- wooroo. 



Hand - 


■ neUL 


2 Blacks - 


- kattar blaue. 


3 Blacks • 


- kattar kango. 


One - 


- onegan. 


Two - 

• 


- blaue. 


Three- 


. kango. 


Four - 


- blaue waijiar. 


Father 


- pena. 


Mother 


- nararoo. 


Sister-Elder 


- maroo. 


„ Younger 


- 


Brother-Elder 


- mairang. 


„ Younger 


A young man 


- kaola. 


An old man 


- barparoo. 


An old woman 


- bapawan. 


A baby - 


- wooer. 


A White man 


- taboon. 


Children - 


- wooroo. 


Head 


- naue. 


Eye - 


- meeL 


Ear - 


-bina. 



BBOAD SOUND, YAAMBA, ETC. 



53 



Moatii 


• danga. 


Teeth - 


■ neera. 


Hair of the head- 




Beard • 


' anga. 


Thunder • 


• tekoroo. 


Graai - 


kalla. 


ToDgae 


■ tallang. 




■ booloo. 


Breasti 


■ ampa. 


Thigh- 


- darra. 


Poot - 


- dinna. 


Bone • 


- billoo. 


Blood- 


• gawoon. 


8hm - 


- winnooer. 


Fat - - 


■ balge. 


Bowels 


- koonan. 


Excrement • 


• koonan. 


War-spear - 




Beed-spear - 




Wommera or 


woomeea. 


thzowing-fltick 




Shield 


• koolmare. 




- wagar. 


Canoe - 


• wynda. 


Son • 


- kaue or karre 


Af oon - 


- nillan. 


Star - 


- kandalle. 


laght ' 




Dark . 




Cold • 


- puttan. 


Heat - 


- karremal. 


Bay - 


- katte. 


Night . 


- bandaman. 


Fire - 


• ooi or wee 


Water 


- kaUe. 


Smoke 


- tooka. 


Criound 


• kappa. 


Wind- 


- kaipa. 


Bain - 


- yammaL 


God - 




OhostB 





&BTBOB 

ied. 


onoH, AND St. Lawbino»— 


Boomerang - 




Hill - 




Wood 




bulla. 


Stone 




bane cr bolle. 


Camp • 




yaampa. 


Yes 




eh-eh. 


No 






I 




matta. 


Von 




inda. 


Bark 




koka. 


Good 




- garabalki 


Bad - 




walko. 


Sweet 


• 4* « 


kattam. 


Food - 


• narraL 


Hungry 


- bapool. 


Thirsty 


- tooknl. 


Eat - - 




Sleep - 


> konin. 


Drink- 


- dalla. 


Walk - - 


- yanna. 


See' 


- waara. . 


Sit - - 


• teeka. 


yesterday - 


■ monda. 


To-day 


talla. 


To-morrow - 




Where are the 


kattar wyndar? 


BUcks? 




I don't know 


- kamanangi. 


Plenty 


. nooraing. 


Big - - 




Little - 


- kooraing. 


Dead - 


■ -wattoo. 


By-and-by - 




Come on 




Milk - 




Eaglehawk • 


• 


Wild torkey 




Wife 


w m 


. 



54 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE- 



No. 149.— ROCKHAMPTON AND GRACEMERE. 



Bt Thomas Asohxr, Esq., C.M.G. 



The following vocabulary and very interesting letter were 
kindly forwarded to me by Mr. Thomas Archer: — 

" Dear Sir, — I have filled in the vocabulary sent herewith 
as nearly as any combination of English letters can be made 
to convey the sounds and accents of a native language. 
The letter r should as a rule be sounded liquid, except when 
it is the final letter of a word, and even then it is often 
slurred so as to be nearly inaudible. In words of more than 
one syllable the accent should almost always be on the 
first. On looking over the list I find that the following 
words are identical with or closely resemble those of the 
Wirraddury language, which is (or rather was) spoken 
throughout a very large extent of country, commencing a short 
distance west of Mudgee and continuing on down the Castle- 
reagh River towards the Barwon, and from the Lower 
Macquarie to the Wallambungle mountains. With this 
language I was pretty familiar five-and-twenty years ago, 
but many of the words have now escaped my memory. The 
words I allude to are: — 



Engliah. 




Bockhampton. 


WfrrMidury. 


Dog - 


- 


mirri - 


mini (?) 


Laughing jackass 


kookooburra 


the same. 


Crow - 


- 


wagan 


the same. 


Two - 


- 


buUari 


buUa. 


Foot - 


- 


dinna - 


dinnang. 


Excrement - 


- 


koonnang - 


the same. 


Fire - - 


- 


wee - 


wien. 


Water 


- 


kaUi - 


kaUin. 


YOTl - 


- 


inda - 


indo. 


I 


- 


atta - 


addo. 


To see 


- 


nain - 


nagi. 



ROCKHAMFTON AND GRACEMEKE. 55 

" The language of the natiyes in the Brisbane, Wide Bay, 
Port CnrtiSy-and Bockhampton districts is so broken into 
dialects spoken every twenty or thirty miles that I have 
known a dozen boys playing together who wonld have given 
a different name for the same object, even such familiar ones 
as wood, water, fire, Ac. It is therefore difficult for a White 
to pick np the languages used by the Blacks inhabiting 
these districts, unless he makes them his b\isiness and 
studies them. In the western districts of New South Wales 
(and I doubt not the same holds good in Victoria) one lan- 
guage would be spoken throughout a large extent of country 
(as, for instance, the Wirraddury), and the names of these 
languages were generally made up, more or less, of the 
n^ative of the language ; as, for instance, Wirraddury, nega- 
tive Wirrai ; Kamilaroi, negative B^amil ; Wailwxm, negative 

Wail, and so on. 

^^ I am, &c., 

"Thomas Archer." 



66 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 149.— BOCEHAMPTON AKD GRACEMEEE. 



Bt Thoxas Aboheb, Esq. 



Kangaroo • 




boorro. 


OpoMum • 




naring. 


Tame dog • 




mirri. 


WUddog 










koondooloo. 


Black duck- 




barran. 


Wood duck 




■ mah. 


Pelican 




boolan. 


Laughing jackau 


1 kookooburra. 


Native oompanioi 


ikoorur. 


White cockatoo • 


• kaiagoor. 


Crow - 


■ wagan. 


Swan • 


- kootool. 


Egg - - . 


- koolpoor. 


Track of a foot 


- barin. 


Figh - 


- kooya. 


Lobster 


• wambein. 


CrayfiBh - 


- ella. 


Mosquito - 


- mingur. 


Fly - 


■ kooroo. 


Snake - 


• tookkirrL 


The Blacks - 


- kattarmattan 


A Blackf eUow 


- kattar. 


A Black woman 


• kinkil. 


Nose • 


■ « 


• wooroo. 



Hand • 

2 Blacks - 

3 Blacks - 

One • 
Two - 
Three - 
Jour - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Ekler 

„ Younger 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear 



illy. 

buUari kattar. 
bulliariwerpa 
kattar. 
werpa. 
bnllari. 
buUiariwerpa. 
kangoondie. 
bina. 
ngeia. 
maram. 

- manun. 



wooroo. 

yantarrie. 

yantarrian. 

koolmoo. 

taboom. 

mattan. 

ngarrie. 

milL 

pinna. 



BOCKHAMFTON AND ORACEMERE. 



57 



No. 149.— BooKHAMFTON AND Gracemebb — tffiUm%td, 


Moath 


- mmmo. 


Boomerang* 


r 


Teeth - 


- kirra 


mil - 


. 


Hair of the head- maxman. 


Wood- 


- dntnUa. 


Beard- 

• 


- anka. 


Stone - 


- barri. 


Inlander 
GrasB - 


• booroongai. 
- karra. 


Camp - 


- yampa. 


T<aigae 




Yea - 


- yowie. 


Stomach 


- bolloo. 


No - 




ft^Mta 


- ammou. 


I 


- atta. 


Thigh- 


- ka-aL 


Yon - 


- inda. 


Foot - 


- dinna. 


Bark - 


- kokka. 


Bone - 


- tflloo. 


Good - 


- balki. 


Blood - 


- kawoon. 


Bad - 


- wailim.. 


Skin - 


- nooman. 


Sweet-. 


- balki. 


Y^ . 


- talkL 


Food - 


- mattantalti 


Bowels 


. toidiL 






Excrement - 


- koonnang. 


Hungry 


- knunman. 


Waf-spear - 


- wooyoola. 


Thirsty 


- woolain. 


Reed-spear - 


- 


Eat - 


- talta. 


Wommera or 




Sleep - 


• konimbo. 


throwing-fltick 




Drink - 


. 


Shield' 


m 


Walk- 


- belin. 


Tomahawk - 


- bandara. 


gm 


% 






See - 


- nam. 


Canoe - 


- andooL 






Sxm - 


- Ita-iTi, 


Sit - 


- teein. 


Moon - 


- ngillan. 


Yesterday - 


- oomda. 


Star - 


- kainpiL 


To-day 


' yarrura. 


T-ight - 


- kain. 


To-morrow - 


- mallago. 


Dark - 


- kooroo. 


Where are the woondaida 


Cold - 


- kirroo. 


Blacks? 


katta? 


Heat - 


- palpalla. 


I don*t know 


- tainmanangi. 


Day - . 


- woondayan. 


Plenty 


- woorrain. 


Night - 


- koorrio. 




• 


^7 

Fire - 


- wee. 


Big - 


- woorram. 


Water 


- kaUi. 


Little - 


- kangoolkor. 






Dead - 


- wattoo. 


Smoke 


- taitookka. 


By-and-by - 


- keago. 


Oromid 


- kappa. 


Come on 


- malkalli. 


Wind - 


- kanam. 


Milk - 


. 




-ka-al. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


- 


WUd torkey 


- 


Gho0tB 


. 


Wife - 


• 



58 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 160.— EASTERN SLOPES OF EXPEDITION 
RANGE, LOWER DAWSON, UPPER FITZROY, 
MACKENZIE, AND ISAACS RIVERS, AND 
MANY OF THEIR TRIBUTARIES. 

Bt Pjbtxb MoIntosh, Esq., W. D. Cooks, Esq., C. G. Basthelbmy, Esq. 

The following yocabolary of one of the dialects spoken on 
the waters named above was, with the exception of a few 
words, forwarded to me by Mr. Peter Mcintosh. His 
spelling I have altered for convenience' sake to that adopted 
in the vocabularies taken down by myself, as set out in 
Chapter I. I think it probable that the first a in Wadthan 
= croWj Wanffoora = baby^ and in several other words, is 
meant to convey the sound of o, , Besides a vocabulary, 
Mr. Mcintosh also forwarded me a very interesting letter, 
from which the following are extracts: — 

^^ I have filled up the accompanying vocabulary as far as 
my memory serves me in the Kaanffooloo TAaay in which 
I could converse indi£ferently some thirteen years since. I 
regret to find how much I have forgotten. I have thought 
it best, however, to fill up as fiur as I can, as you may be able 
to supply the deficiency from other sources. The Eaangoo- 
loo are a tribe, or rather a confederation of several tribes — 
the Karranbal, the Maudalgo^ the Mulkalij and others 
inhabiting the country on the eastern slopes of Expedition 
Range, the Lower I>Biwson, the Upper Fit2roy, and the 
Mackenzie Rivers, and their tributaries — all speaking the 
same Thaa or Umgtie, In common with many other tribes. 



EASTERN SLOPES OF EXPEDITION RANGE, ETC. 50 

their negative Kaangoo also expresses the generic name of 
their tribe, Kaangooloo. 

"The name of every individual in this tribe ends with the 
syllable (m, as Manoonmaow^ Yakkoolabow, Mnlkaidow, 
Doorenmadow, Koongooranbow, Maiaroonmow, Bearioonow, 
Bai-in-moor-ow, Manboonbadthnow, Tarrathagow, Moor- 
koonbathow, Inganbow^ &c. All the sons of a family bear 
the same name, and are given, or take for distinction, the 
name of some animal; as Mulkaidow Koaraodilea = the 
eayle; Mulkaidow Kokobin = the scrub turkey; Mulkaidow 
Koondooloo = the ernu. Nicknames are also made use of^ as 
Mallawaramba = Uflnvrrmd; Dhilli maieba = blind-eyed. 
Some of the names have fitncifol derivations, as Yakkoola- 
bow J from Yakkooly the water-lily; Koonffoorabow, from 
Koonrgoo-oOj hoar-frost. The names of places seem to have 
been given in view of local peculiarities, as Nanni nai, or 
broum earth; Vakoolabarriy a place of water-lilies; Tooffoon- 
barriy tomaJiawk place^ or place whence the stone of which 
tomahawks are made is obtained; Kakoolabarri^ wallaby 
place, &c. The terminations angi, dangi, and bindangi mean 
nearly the same thing as barri, viz., home or dwelliny-placey 
as Kdkoolbindanyi, or home of the Tvallaby; Dthirabindangi, 
or home of the lizzards. Either of these terminals tacked 
on to the name of an animal, tree, or flower changes it into 
the name of a place, and a place. where the animal, tree, or 
plant indicated may be understood to dxist in greater 
abundance than elsewhere. Many words are dijSerently 
pronounced by different branches of the same tribe. Lagoon 
is variously called TaJtying, Kaakan, Ngiakan, and Ngarkan. 

^ . . Nganni or Ngandtha is a general 

miArTo^ii\Qj9A Ngandthangar ? = Where? Ngandtharroo? 
= Why?'' 

Then follows these phrases: — 

Nganm-mooroo mawa Baznxna mda wanthaba ? 
How many strange Blacks you see? 

Ungoor nngoor. 
Many many. 



60 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

Ngandthangoo nthoola yamba ? 
Where they camp ? 

Piari pippoora. 
Near river. 

Ngaoni jraroongali pippoora? 

Interrogative, other aide river ? 

KaangoOi oloomalL 
No, this side. 

Nganthanoo inda wanthaba ? 
When yoa saw? 

Piari karri oodara. 
Near snn slept. 

Ngaoni inda nmbarra nthoola kambirranoo ? 

Interrogative, yon think they will fight? 

Yoe, yarroo ngia nmbarra. 
Yes, that way I think. 

Ngantheroo inda yaroo nmbarra ? 
Why yon that way think ? 

Kaangoo kaiye ngalli, kaangoo walborra, kangoo, wangoora, ungoor 
No women there, no boys, no children, all 

wallali, mindi bindarra mnlka, kandai, wangal, miro. 
strong (men), with many , shields, spears, boomerang*, wommeras. 

^^ Another form of qaestioning/' continnes Mr. Mcintosh, 
'^ is alia. Alia ooloo Bama is eqmyalent to AndtJumgoo Bama ? 
i.e.y Where are the Blacks ? Yakari / is an expression of 
joyM surprise ; if I were to try to render it literally, ^'cj^u/ 
heart is as near as I conld come. Veera hatha! is an 
expression of condolence about equivalent to dear me! I met 
an old man of the Kaangooloo tribe lately, who, on address- 
ing me in his own tongue, and finding I did not understand 
it so well as formerly, exclaimed — * Yeera hatha! andtharoo 
inda waloo pierd ngattie thaa?^ — t.e., teeth (pi my) heart /— 
* Why your ear lost my tongite!^ (or why have you forgotten 
my language?). Mangarea iheans £a,ilure in anything. 
Mangarea yapaba nyia, I threw and failed to hit the mark. 
Mangarea yangaba, I failed to find. 



EASTERN SLOPES OF EXPEDITION RANGE, ETC. 61 



Additional Wobdb. 



Comrade 


- waminda. 


To break 




- padthenoo. 


White- 


- mooli 


Broken 


• 


• padtheba. 


Rftd - 


- wopooL 


Rotten 




• moothang. 


Black- 


- koora. 


A path 




- bial. 


Btown 


. naie-naie. 


A ridge 




- thoom. 


Far - -. 


• kowarL 


A plain 




- birkaUa. 


Near - 


- pearL 


Aacmb 




• moongaa. 


Straight 


- thoon. 


Bream 




- kamooroo. 


Right • 


- boolimba. 


Garfish 




- beanooroo. 


Left . 


- warramba. 


Five - 




- karkoone. 


There - 


- inal. 


Six . 




• karkoone waiba. 


Langh- 


• yatyerra. 


A bright planet • 


• ooyalgan. 


Weep- 


- pnngera. 


Orion - 


- 


- maakaraan. 


Whirtle 


- koopieL 


Sonthem Gross 


- koodyoorinadyaL 


Cnoee- 


- kangal. 


One night 


- 


- waiba oongar,f.e.. 


Speak- 


• dthoonL 






one sleep. 


Spoke - 


- dthooniba. 


Running water 


• dilkoon. 


Cut - 


- goonmanoa 


River - 




- pipoora. 


Stab . 


.- panpanoo. 


Creek - 




- tarra, f.e., 1^. 


SMke- 


- kondanoo. 


Mine - 




- ngatue. 


Stmck 


• koondaha. 


Yours - 




- unoo. 


Km - 


- noonpanoo. 


I walk- 




- wakarra or yan- 


Kining 


nooparra. 






negarra. 


Killed- 


• noopaba. 


I walked 




- wakareba w 


Swim - 


• oongainoo. 






yanneba. 


Walk - 


- wakera. 


Sleeping 




- oongarra. 


Ran 


- yaperakera. 


Slept - 




- oongaba. 


Be quick 


- yapera ma. 


Isee • 




- wantharra. 


To fly - 


- mallawakera 
(walk with 


I saw - 




- wanthaba. 




wings). 


I sit - 




- ulongarra. 


Jump - 


- bnlkanoo. 


I sat - 




- ulongaba. 


Strong- 


. waDalU. 


Posteriors 




- moola. 


Tall or long 


- goorgan. 


Go on or walk gondayanne. 


Short - 


- koolkooroo. 


away 






Tired - 


- nthuUa. 


Sick with 


hunger koopira mai-era. 


Sick - 


- mal-era. 


Tree - 


- 


- banga. 


Sore 


. nimoo. 


Honey 


- 


• kappa. 



Besides the infonnation given by Mr. Mcintosh^ I have 
also received a few words of the Common Vocabulary from 



62 



THE AUSTBALIAN RACE: 



W. D. Cooke, Esq., taken on the Isaacs River, which agree 
in the main with those of Mr. Mcintosh, and from which I 
have filled np a few vacancies left by the latter gentleman. 
I have also nsed in the same way a few words kindly for- 
warded to me by C. G. Barthelemy, Esq. 



No. 160.— EASTERN SLOPES OF EXPEDITION BANGE, LOWER 
DAWSON, UPPER FITZROY, MACKENZIE, AND ISAACS 
RIVERS, AND MANY OF THEIR TRIBUTARIES. 

Bt Petkb MoImtosh, Esq. 

The reader may compare White man and ghosU^ alao sUme and hilL 



Kangaroo 
Opoesam 
Tame dog 
Wild dog 
Ema - 
Black dnok 
Wood dnck 
Pelican 
Langhing jackass 
Native companion 
White cockatoo 
Crow - 
Swan - 
Egg - 
Track of a foot 

Fiah • 

Lobster 

Crayfish 

Mosquito 

Fly 

Snake 

The Blacks - 

A Blackf ellow 

A Black woman 

Nose - 



oora. 

ngooda. 

koondooloo. 
barran. 



gajr-gair. 
wadthaan. 



dthinna. 
wlnna. 



bootyill. 

kooli, kabool. 

bama. 

bama. 

kaiye. 

wootra (also to 
smell). 



Hand - 

2 Blacks 

3 Blacks 

One - 
Two - 
Three- 
Four - 

Father 

Mother 

Sister-Elder 

„ Younger - 
Brother-Elder - 

„ Younger 
A young man 
Ant>ld man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head • 
Eye - 
Ear 



maa, ni %|l ^, 

boolaroo bama. 
boolanx) waiba 

bama. 
waiba. 
boolaroo. 
boolaroo waiba. 
boolaroo-boola- 

roo. 

yapoonye. 
yanginde. 



wapoormyi 

kathanye. 

kaoola. 

wadtharaan. 

wadthoogaan. 

wangoora. 

mikkooloo. 

wangoora. 

kattha. 

dthnii. 

waloo. 



EASTERN SLOPES OF EXPEDITION RANGE, ETC. 63 



No. 150.— Eastern Slopes gw Expedition Range, etc. — earUinued, 



Ifouth 


- 


Boomerang - 


- wangal. 


Teeth 


- yiirra. 


Hill - 


- parri. 


Hair of the head- kaUa. 


Wood- 


- ponk (also tree). 


Beard- 


- 


Stone - 


- parrL 


Thtmder - 


- mokkiirra.' 


Camp- 


- yamba. 


GraBB - 


- woodthoon. 


Yes - 


- yoe. 


Tongne 


- thaa. 


No . ■ - 


- kaangoo. 


Stomach 


- nalkoon. 


I 


- ngia. 


Breasts 


- nganunoon. 


Yon - 


- inda or iinda. 


Thigh - 


- tarra. 


Bark • 


- pelthal, nnboon. 


Foot - 


- dthinna. 


Good - 


- binbL 

• 


Bone - 

* 


- palpana. 


Bad - - 


- waikoo. 


Blood - 


- yirkoon. 


Sweet- 


- knpa barri, «.«., 


Skin - 


- nookaL 




honey-like. 


Fat - 


. thammi. 


Food - 


• mandtba. 


Bowels 


« 


Hungry 


- koopira. 




- goona. 


Thirsty 


- kamootchi. 


Wai^spear - 




Eat - • - 


- ukanoo. 


Reed-«pear- 


. 


Sleep - 


- oongar. 


Throwing-stick 


• meeroo. 


Drink- 
Walk - 


• 

- wakararroo. 


Shield 


- molka. 


See - 


- wanthanoo. 


Tomahawk - 


- toogoon. 


Sit - 


- nlongoo. 


Ganoe- 


• tandooL 


Yesterday - 


- karri wadtha, 


Smi - - 


- karri. 




{.6., the other son. 


Moon - 




To-day 


- errai karri, {.e., 


Star - 


- hoodthoo. 




this son. 


Light- - 


. 


To-morrow - 


- bogan-bogan, 


Dark - - 


- koora. 




bogango. 


Cold - 


- ithawa. 


Where are the andangoo bama 7 


Heat - 




Blacks? 




Day - 


- 


I don't know 


- kangoo mnbarra 
ngia. 


Night- - 


- yamba koora, <.e., 


Plenty 


D 

- mnlea. 




camp dark. 


Big . - 


- oogaL 


Rpe - 


- booyia. 


Little - 


- pit. 


Water 


- kamoo. 


Dead - 


- mai-i-ba. 


Smoke 


- toonbool. 


By-and-by - 


- ittakkOyitakoora. 


Ground 


- nanni. 


Come on - 


- oko jranna, ie., 


Wind- . 


„ 




this way walk. 


Rain - . 


- dyxoom. 


Milk - 
Eaglehawk - 


. ngammoon. 
- kooroodilea. 


God - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


. mikkooloo. 


Wife - - 


• 



64 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 151.— PEAK DOWNS DISTRICT, LOGAN 

DOWNS STATION. 

Bt Sib Samitxl Wilson and T. Mub&at, SsMiaB-ooHarABLi. 

Ths name of the tribe which inhabits Logan Downs Station 
is Yambeena. In connection with its langaage, two copies 
of my Common Vocabularies have been filled ap and sent to 
me ; one by Sir Samuel Wilson and the other by Senior- 
constable T. Murray; but as they are almost identical, only 
one of them is inserted. The Senior-constable has also 
forwarded replies to some of my questions, of which the 
following is the substance. 

The Yambeena tribe numbers about 100 persons, several 
of whom have reached an advanced age. Before the coming 
of the Whites some few of the people had opossum-rugs, 
which they only made use of at night ; the rest went naked 
day and night. At present those who can obtain clothes 
from the Whites wear them. For the purpose of ornamenta- 
tion, a mussel-shell is worn on the forehead, suspended from 
the hair, and the skin is smeared with a mixture of grease 
and charcoal. Spears are thrown by hand without the 
assistance of the wommera. Boomerangs of both sorts are 
used, and many of their weapons are colored with red ochre 
and carved with flints. Bestrictions as to the use of certain 
sorts of food are in vogue. The Yambeena do not object to 
tell their names. Of their laws of marriage the following 
particulars are given. 



PEAK DOWNS DISTRICT. 65 

The tribe is divided into two primary classes, called 
Youngaroo and WootharoOj which are subdivided as follow : 
Taungaroo into males, Koorchella; females, KoorcheU 
lagan; BunlyoOy males, and Bunbyoogan^ females; Wootharoo 
into KoobodroOj males, and Koobooragarij females; and 
Woongoogay males, and Woongoogan^ females. 

The law is that the men of each of these four classes are 
restricted in marrying to the females of a particular class, 
and that their children bear a specific class-name, in this 
way: — 



ICalei. Females. 

Koor(dieIIa marries Koobooragan ; offspring Woongooga, Woongoogan. 
Koobooroo „ KoorcheUagan ; „ Btmbyoo, Banbyoogan. 

Bnnbyoo „ Woongoogan; „ Koobooroo, Koobooragan. 

Woongooga „ Banbyoogan; „ Koorchella, KoorcheUagan. 

The marriage laws were very strictly observed. Women 
were stolen occasionally from other tribes. A widow 
generally carried about for some months the bones of her 
deceased husband wrapped in bark, and became the wife of 
a brother of the deceased. In this tribe the skin is scarred 
and the septum of the nose pierced. 

The language of the Yambeena bears a considerable 
resemblance to the Kaangooloo Thaa. In the former, as my 
correspondent observes, there is but one word to express eat 
and drink. Some terms of relationship, such as aunt^ UTwle, 
Ac., which will be found amongst the Additional Words, are 
interesting. 



voii m. 



68 



T^E AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



Additional Wobdb. 



Hoflband 


- bul-gin. 


High - 


• koor-kan. 


Wife - 


• bir-koo-nerrah. 


Short - 

• 


- kootoo-kootoo. 


Son - 


- wool-bur-rah. 


Long - 


- koor-kun. 


Daughter - 


• wool-bur-rah- 


Deep - 


- koom-bah. 




nah. 


Wet - 


- oom-bnm. 


Bees* nest - 


- kub-bah. 


Dry - 


- boor-giU. 


Honey 


- knr-moo-nah. 


Heavy 


. in-gnr-rah. 


Uncle - 


- culgn-nah. 


Light (not heavy) boonn-been. 


Aunt • 


- bippy. 


Which 


- and-jen-nah. 


Nephew 


- too-an:nee. 


That - 


- oon-nah. 


Kiece - 


- boor-koo-nerrah. 


Oh! - 


- yack-kyi 


Butcher's knife 


- kun-kurree. 


Abag- 


- woppie. 


Pocket knife 


- burran. 


Lightning - 


' ker-min-noo. 


Shirt - 


- yoon-goo-jane. 


To sing 


- bunda. 


Trousers 


- thar-rah-jane. 


To pull 


- boor-ree-mah. 


Hat - 


- kutha-jane. 


To dance - 


•'wurrah. 


Head-band - 


• mill -maun. 


To jump 


• bulkah. 


Buttei-fly - 


- booroo booroo. 


To listen 


- imbah. 


Wool 


- knittee. 


To creep 


. murrung. 


Raddle 


- ban-nee. 


To catch 


• murrah. 


Pipe-clay - 


- th&-koo-lah. 


To sew 


- bunbah. 


Wallaby 


- wyah. 


To cry 


• parree. 


Kangaroo-rat 


- birrah-moo. 


To kill 


- mung-gah. 


Wallaroo - 


- kau-kool. 


To embrace - 


- oom-bung-goo. 


Mountain - 


- ning-oo-lah. 


To wrap 


- wool-oor. 


Carpet snako 


.- coo-leree. 


To fall down 


- woor-mm-an- 


Black snake 


- kur-moo-nah. 




now. 


Tree snake • 


• koom-bull-ah. 


To dream • 


bidg-gerree. 


A maiden • 


- kum-buL 


To tie - 


- ky-goom-bel-lah. 


A boy- 


- kon-doo. 


To dig 


- buck-kah. 


A flea - 


- bindee bindee. 


To wash 


• koo-jennah. 


Flesh - 


- tyne-gee-rah. 


To follow - 


- goo-run-dah 


Whirlwind - 


- bool-boo-roo-roo. 


To turn 


- will-ar-rah. 


Sweat • 


- kul-jer-rah 


To chop 


- kool-mul-lah. 


Finger-nail - 


• mitchin. 


To cut 


- bum-boo. 


Lip 


- bee. 


To be angry 


• kool-lee. 


Forehead 


- gna-moo. 


To fly - 


- boo-rah-rah. 


Bronzewing 


mumilL 


To run 


- wauk-kur-rah. 


pigeon 




To talk 


- wur-tah. 


Strong 


- wah-lel-lee. 


To laugh 


- yath-tee. 


Weak- 


- boor-oom-bin. 


To stay 


- than-errah. 



J 



PEAK DOWNS DISTKICr. 



67 





Additional Words— con^tnuec?. 




To climb - 


yackah. 


To hurry - 


- bur-bnr-yen-nee. 


To Bwim 


woo-gar-rah. 


To go slow - 


• nng-ah-yen-nee. 


To fight 


- goon-der-rah. 


To be afraid 


bnng-gyne. 


To throw - 


■ yabbah. 


To steal 


• goon-dine-jeUah. 


To want 


• bah-ra-rah« 


A plain 


- burk-knUah. 


To give 


■ win-yee. 


A bog - 


■ boom-gnah. 


To take 


• cnnthee. 


Ascnzb 


• moon-gnrah. 


To carry 


■ cnnd-^r-rah. 


• 

Tosneese - 


- din-doo-rah. 


Tolift 


• yack-ah-rim-bah. 


Igaana 


- thuck-ine. 


To rise 


' yack-kang-ah. 


Native bear 


. wol-muL 


To lie down 


- woo-nah. 


Widow 


- thnlk-kan. 


To call 


konkkuL 


Widower - 


- koog-goo-nerrah. 



K2 



68 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 161.— PEAK DOWNS DISTRICT, LOGAN DOWNS STATION. 



Bt Sib Samukl Whjmn. 



Kangaroo 
Opoesmn 
Tame dog 
WUd dog 
Ema - 
Black duck 
Wood duck 
Pelican 
Langhing jaokaas 
Native companion 
White cockatoo 
Crow - 
Swan • 
Egg ' 

Track of a foot 
Fiah • 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Moeqnito 
Fly 

Snake- 
The Blacks 
A Blackf ellow 
A Black woman 
Nose • 



woora. 

koolijo, 

wanday. 

marrara, mowara 

goondooloo. 

barran, cooberry 

ngootoo-ngootoo. 

kamoonberriL 

kakooborra. 

karroola. 

tingarry. 

wathagan. 

koomurra. 

yelka. 

weena. 



kooaroo. 

ngnlgnaxun, 

euree. 

ungnL 

murri, pama. 

kiyoo. 

wootha. 



Hand - 

2 Blacks 

3 Blacks 
One - 
Two - 
Three - 
Four • 
Father 
Mother 

Sister-Elder 

„ Tonnger 
Brother-Eldef 



>i 



Tonnger 



A yonngman 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear < 



mnlla. 

pama boolaroo. 

pamaknrqoin. 

woorba. 

boolaroo. 

knrquin. 

koongoo. 

yabboo. 

yonnganerra, 
yonnga. 

woongoobaya. 

meecnmma. 

kathaneira, 

wiohamnlli. 
wooboonerra, 

mnrkuna. 
nnnga. 
boonwa. 
boonwan. 
yalloo. 
meekooloo. 
koondoonbnrra. 
kntha. 
dilly. 
walloo. 



PEAK DOWNS DISTRICT. 



69 



No. 151. — Prak Downs Distbiot, 


LooAN Downs Station — continued. 


Month 


- tunga. 


Boomerang • 


. waungulla. 


Teeth - 


- gnlla, yeera. 


Rill - 


• • 


Hair of the head 


I- yayle. 


Wood- 


- 


Beard- 


- unga. 


Stone - 


• 


Thnnder - 


- mookkorree. 


Camp- 


- yamba. 


Graas 


- 


Yea - 


- yaow, yo-yo. 




- talline. 


No - 


- kurra. 


Stomach - 


- ngalkoo, ba-na. 


I 


- ngia. 


Breasts 


- ngamoora. 


You - 


- nginda. 


Thigh- 


- thnrra. 


Bark - 


- kooka. 


Foot . 


- dinna. 


Good - 


- binbee, boon- 


Bone - 


- bulbnna. 




goona. 


Blood - 


- gooma. 


Bad - - 


' qneeya. 


Skin - 


- nooraknL 


Sweet - 


- 


Fat - 


- tanmee. 


Food (vegetable)- mondtha. 


Bowela 


- bannboo. 




- yuree. 


Excrement - 
War-gpear - 


- goona. 

- knnda. 


Hungry 
. Thirsty 


- kobinoo. 

- boorbunjerra, 

boogie. 


Beed-spear- 


~ 


Eat - 


- youkunna. 


Wommera or 




^^1 


w 


throwing-Btick 




Sleep - 
Drink- 


' woongara. 
- youkunna. 


Shield 


- koolmnrrL 




• • 






Walk - 


- tooa, unga ennie 


Tomahawk - 


- bnlgoo. 


See - 


w o 

- nukkuUa. 


Canoe- 


w 


Sit - 


- kamboora. 


Snn . 


• karrie. 


Yesterday - 


- kame bootho. 


Moon - 
Star - 


- kuckurra. 

- bntthoo. 


To-day 


- yedgeela. 






To-morrow - 


- birffffow. 


Light - 


- bundnrra. 

• 


Where are 


the 


Dark - 


- meetta. 


Blacks? 




Cold . 


• bdbdtherrie. 


I don't know 


. 


Heat - 
Day - 


- wnngerra, aree. 

- karrie-yamba. 


Plenty 
Big - - 


- tulkiyoo. 


Night - 


- oogoona. 


T<ittle - 


- budjerry. 


Fire - 


- boorie. 


Dead - 


- myeaba. 


Water 


- kamoo. 


By-and-by - 


- neewoolla. 


Smoke 


- tooka. 


Come on 


- kauwoo. 


Ground 


- wahkoo. 


Milk - 


- ngammoon. 


Wind - 


- towera. 


Eaglehawk - 


m 


Bun - 


- kamoo. 


Wild turkey 


- wurka. 

• 


God - - 


• 


Wife - 


• cowan-nerra, 


GhoetB 


- 




birkoo-nerra. 



70 



THE AUSTBALIAN RACE: 



No. 152.— ALICE RIVER. 



Bt Johk Ahsbn, Esq. 



This vocabaUury is akin to thoee of the Upper Thomson, Upper 

Diamantinay &o. 



Kangaroo - 


majumba. 


Hand - 


• muira. 


Opossum - 


■ tangoor. 


2 Blacks 


- 


Tame dog • 


moora. 


3 Blacks - 


« 


WUd dog - 




One • 


• wongara. 


Emu • 


koolburra. 


Two - 


• booladie. 


Black duck • 


• yallamurra. 


Three- 

« 


• koorbaddie, cour 


Wood duck- 


- mallaboonga. 




baladie. 


Pelican 


• tarra. 


Four - 


- booladie-boo- 


Laughing jackass 






ladie. 


Native compamoi 


1 toogoonoo. 


Father 


- yahoo. 


White cockatoo • 


• teekaree. 


Mother 


- yuna 


Crow • 


- worgan. 


Sister-Elder 


- kommle. 


Swan - , - 




„ Toun^ 


. 


Egg - 


- tandoo. 


Brother-Elder 


• taaffunya. 


Track of a foot 




,, Younger 


Fish . 


• narbnnnee. 




* 






A vouniT man 


• oowalaa. 


Lobster 


- boligar. 






Crayfish 


^7 


An old man 

1 , , _ 


- mogaree. 


Mosquito - 


- boonyee. 


1 An old woman 


- mogaree. 


Fly - 




A baby 


- candoo. 


Snake - 


• cabbooL 


A White man 


- ooyn. 


The Blacks - 


- cubbee-cubbee. 


Children • 


- 


A Blaokf ellow 




Head • 


- ulkey. 


A Black woman • 


• knmbee. 


Eye . 


- tillee. 


Nose - 


. uingo. 


Ear - 


- munger. 





ALICE 


RlVJfiR. 








No. 152.— Alice BivzRr-<x/rUinued, 




Mouth 


- towa. 


Boomerang • 




Teeth - 


- pirra. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head 


U knttar. 


Wood- 


- 


. toola. 


Beard- - 


- nnga. 


Stone 




- banko. 


Thunder - 


-baringa. 


Camp ' 




- yamber. 


Gran - 


- yaako. 


Yes 




- wathee. 


Tongae 


* 


No 




- kurra. 


Stomach 


- goonar. 


I 




- ngia. 


BzeastB 


- poorqna. 


Yon 




• inda. 


Thigh- 


- pnlar. 


Bark 






Foot - 


- teena. 








■v% * 




Good 




• mickan. 


Bone - 


- yaroona. 








Blood- 


- kooma. 


Bad 

• 




- angaburree 


Hkin - 


- yangoona. 


Sweet- 






Fit - 


- tommee. 


Food 




- cuppar. 


Bowels 


- goona. 


Hungry 


- cubbar. 


Bxcrement - 


- goona. 


Thirsty 




War-spear - 


- koolyar. 


Eat - 


- yooree. 


Beed'Spear - 


- 


Sleep - 


- ookar. 


Wommera or 


wonala. 


Drink- 


- youkalffo. 


throwine-stick 


• 




rf o 


Shield 


- toombooroo. 


Walk - 


• waagilgo. 


Tomahawk - 


- ballune. 


See - 


- nukalgo. 

• 


Canoe- 


. 


Sit - 


- bundelgo. 


Run - 


- toora. 


Yesterday - 




Moon - 


- kakara. 


To-day 


- nilyar. 


Star - 


- bootoo. 


To-morrow - 


- burran. 


Light - 


- 


Where are the 




Dark - 


- 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


- mittara. 


I don't know 




Heat - 


- yakal. 


Plenty 


- mooraa. 


Bay - . 


- battal. 


Big . - 


- bunya. 


Night- 


- ngoa- 


Little - 


- kio. 


Fire - 


- konrree. 






Water 


- kummoo. 


]>ead • 


- goondilla. 


Smoke 


- hatchoo. 


By-and-by - 




Groond 


^- yamber. 


Come on 


- oakoo. 


Wind- 


- yerga. 


Milk - . 




Bain • 


- moogabaa. 


Eaglehawk • 




God . 


- 


Wild turkey 




Ghosts 


- 


Wife 


- 





71 



72 THE AUSTBAUAN RACE : 



No. 153.— THE BARCOO RIVER, FORTY MILES 

WEST OF BLACKALL. 

ft 

Bt Johk Ahern, Esq. 

The following accoont of the Yangeeberra tribe and vocab- 
ulary of their language were forwarded to me by Mr. John 
Ahem. 

The country of this tribe is on the western border of the 
Eastern Division. Circumcision and the terrible rite — 
characteristics of the Central Division — are not practised in 
it. Several words, as the termination of the tribal name, 
tarn = /atf dgurdid = cockatoo, yaunga = motfier, 
inda = you, show that this tribe belongs to the Eastern 
Division. On the Diamantina River (No. 140) we find 
orra = 2, and oro on the Western River, and in the language 
of the Yangeeberra our 3. The occurrence of this word 
is proof enough that this tribe came from the North, as 
would naturally be expected from an examination of the map 
and a consideration of the watercourses in the locality, for 
language shows that throughout Australia migration was 
governed by the rivers and natural water supply. 

In Mr. Ahern's account of this tribe no novelty presents 
itself. Their country was occupied by squatters in 1861, 
and the original number of the Yangeeberra, which is thought 
to have been about 170, is now (1883) reduced to 50 all 
told. Many boys have been taken away from the tribe by 



THE BARCOO RIVER. 73 

stock-owners living in distant places, and been broaght np to 
look after stock. The Tangeeberra scar themselves on the 
breasts, loin, and shonlders; pierce the septum of the nose; 
have message-sticks, tomahawks of blnestone, and the nsnal 
arms and ntensils. 



74 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 153.— THE BARCOO RIVER, 40 MILES WEST OF BLACK ALL 

Bt John Ahebn, Esq. 



Kangaroo • 


• baoord. 


Opossum 


- tangoord. 


Tame dog - 


- oochapeni. 


wad dog - 


- ombemia. 


Emu • 


- umbaile. 


Black duck - 


- obendia. 


Wood duck 


- geeweela. 


Pelican 


- tarda. 


Laughing jackass oolbarra. 


Native companion krteertha. 


White cockatoo 


- dgurdid. 


Crow - 


- wogana. 


Swan • 


- dundurra. 


Egg - - 


- damdu. 


Track of a foot 


- pooboola. 


Fish - 


- burtabulloo. 


Lobster 


- 


Crayfish . - 


- oovarroo. 


Mosquito - 


bunyeal. 


Fly - 


- nioora. 


Snake - 


- mimda. 


The Blacks - 


- murri. 


A Blackf ellow 


- leowla. 


A Black woman 


- ambe. 


Nose - - 


- nuttoo. 



Hand- 


- 


- murra. 


2 Blacks 


- 


- murri muta. 


3 Blacks 


- 


- 


One - 


- 


. wongara. 


Two - 


- 


- muta. 


Three- 


- 


- our. 


Four - 


- 


- adava. 


Father 


- 


- ie (ai-i ?). 


Mother 


- 


- younga. 


Sister-Elder 


- wongL 


„ Younger 


- our-wonna. 


Brother-Elder 


- mudji. 


11 


Young( 


sr ougunna. 


A young 


man 


- 


An old man 


- mooi. 


An old woman 


- utherteria. 


A baby 


- 


. muorcoom. 


A White 


man 


- 


Children 


- 


- onund. 


Head - 


- 


- thungo. 


Eye - 


- 


- dilli. 


Ear 


- 


- ammga. 



THE BARCOO RIVER. 



75 



Miles West of Blaokall — continued. 



Month 


U^M^ 


- thooer. 


• 

Boomerang - 


- wongela. 


Teeth - 


- 


- dier. 


Hill - - 


- birree. 


Uair of the head 


I- minga. 


Wood- 


- boodi. 


Beanl- 


- 


- unga. 


Stone - 


- byar. 


Thunder 


- 


- amobareelnd. 


Camp • 


- yamba. 


Graas - 


- 


. ondoo. 


Yes - 


- ee. 


Tongue 


- 


' fa^lina^ 


No - - 


- arda. 


Stomach 


- 


- oodooa. 


I 


- ngia. 


Breasts 


- 


- goorgoo. . 


You - 


' inda. 


Thigh - 


- 


- thira. 


Bark - 


• mookool. 


Foot - 


- 


. dinna. 


Good - 


- weem. 


Bone - 


- 


- yaroonoo. 


Bad - 


- banya. 


Blood - 


- 


- oma. 


Sweet - 


- weem. 


Skin - 


- 


- nolollo. 


Food - 


- udi. 


Fat - 


-. 


- tami. 


Hungry 


- wongulla. 


Bowels 


- 


- munda. 


Thbsty 


- amo. 


Excrement 


- 


- thaline. 


Eat - 


- wono. 


War-spear 


- 


- bara. 

■ 


Sleep - 


- woodnano. 


Beed-spear 


- 


- bar. • 


Drink- 


- wono. 


Throwing-stick 
Shield- 


" aramend. 
- tumberoo. 


Walk - 


- yarrano. 


Tomahawk 


„ 


- baroo. 


See - 


- yabona. 


Canoe - 


- 


- wogara. 


Sit - 


- bendano. 


Smi - 


- 


- thurroo. 


Yesterday - 


- matidga. 


Moon - 


- 


- aurgunda. 


To-day 


- aimba. 


Star -^ 


- 


- bootoo. 


To-morrow - 


- yeelokknr. 


Light - 


- 


- 


Where are 


the murribulla 


Dark - 


» 


- wa, mongeend. 


Blacks? 


wondi? 


Cold - 


- 


- moorara. 


I don*t know 


- nuirda. 


Heat - 


- 


- 


Plenty 


- mooral. 


Day - 


- 


- onchoorpeni. 


Big - . 


- badbreda. 


Night - 


- 


- bonoo. 


Tiittle - 


- baythana. 


Fire 


_ 


- booree. 




w 








De^ - 


- undilla. 


Water 


. 


- awo. 






Smoke 


. 


- thugar. 


By-and-by - 


- parri-perrin 


Ground 


mr 


- yamba. 


Come on 


- wooa. 


Wind - 


- 


- yarraka. 


MUk - 


- namunoo. 


Bain - 


- 


- amobondango. 


Eaglehawk - 


- urella. 


God - 


- 


- 


Wild turkey 


- bungoonya. 


Ghosts 


• 


- wonboa. 


Wife ^ . 


- womoo. 



76 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 154.~BLACKALL-BARCOO RIVER. 

Bt Joseph L. Dudlkt, Esq., and T. S. Wiluams, Esq.- 

The following "vocabulary is made up of two imperfect ones, which 
agree in many particulars, forwarded to me from the locality and by the 
gentlemen named above: — 



Elangaroo 




• bowra. 


Hand • 


• mnira. 


Opossum 




• dungroo. 


2 Bhkcks • 




Tame dog - 




moora. 


3 Blacks J * 




WUddog 
Emu - 
Black duck 
Wood duck 
Pelican 


• 


oolbury. 

■ hooire. 

■ mungaran. 


One - 
Two - 
Three - 
Four - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder . 


- wongoroo. 
wootah. 
hoodperry. 

- mathari. 


Laughing jackasf 
Native companioi 
White cockatoo • 


1 nookoo. 
i oordatto. 
• dioordi. 


ana. 

youngemanoo 
■ miarar. 


Crow - 
Swan • 


- wogana. 


,, Younger • 
Brother-Elder • 


■ mutchemoo. 


Egg - - 


> tandoo. 


„ Younger 


wooverL 


Track of a foot - 


- deenung. 


A young man 




Fish - - . 


• biarbarrL 


An old man 


oteeri. 


Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito - 
Fly - - - 
Snake • 
The Blacks 


- acheroo. 

■ boonyi. 
nugaroo. 

- moondah. 

■ murri. 


An old woman - 
A baby 

A White man 
Children 
Head - 


oobangi. 
. guomanoo. 

weetho. 
annia. 
dungoo or 


A Blackfellow 


yanja. 




yoongoo. 


A Black woman • 


wongo, annoo. 


Eye - 


dim. 


Nose - 


> ■ 


noota. * 


Ear - - . 


mungar. 



BLACKAIJi.— BABCXK) RIVER. 



77 





No. 


154.— Blackall— E 


iLBOOO RlVEE—COJ 


lUinved. 


Month 


- 


- towah. * 


Boomerang - 


- wungnlla. 


Teeth - 


- 


- teera. 


Hill - 


- 


Hair of the head 


- woolo. 


Wood- 


• doola. 


Beard. 


- 


- unga. 


Stone - 


- barrie. 


Thnnder 
Graas - 
Tongue 
Stomach 


- 


- barringa. 

- woothanoo. 

- daUanger. 

- bnrte. 


Camp - 

Yes 

No - 

I - - 

You - 

Bark - 


- yamba. 

- yea. 

- urra. 


Breasts 
Thigh - 
Foot - 


• 


- amina, boorkoo. 

- tola. 

- denna. 


- biya. 


Bone - 


- 


- yanon, balla. 


Good - 


- weemo. 


Blood - 


- 


- ooma. 


Bad - 


- undinga. 


Skin - 


^ 




Sweet - 
Food - 
Hungry 
Thirsty 
Eat - 
Sleep - 


- abba. 

- unga. 

- abberrL 

- boogidung. 

- bnnginunga. 

- ooa. 


Fat - 

Bowels 

Excrement 

War-spear 

Beed-spear 

Wommera 


or 


- tammi. 

- moorigunda. 

- oonna. 

- bakar. 


throwingH 
Shield 


Btick 


- doombooroo. 


Drink - 
Walk- 


- ungunga. 

- yabbanoo. 


Tomahawk 


^^ 


- barroo. 


See - 


- nurrunga. 


Canoe - 


- 


- doombatung. 


Sit - 


- bindunga. 


Sun - 


- 


- dooroo. 


Yesterday - 


- vatucha. 


i ^i'Si 1 s 


m 


- howra. 

- boothoo. 

- dokkungo. 

- mungari. 

- weedurrah. 

- werequong. 


To-day 
To-morrow - 
Where are the 
Bhusks? 
I don't know 
Plenty 


- jimba. 

- munga. 

\ inicha murri ? 

- urra. 


Ni^t- 


. 


- howha. 


Big - . 


- buchana. 


Fire 


- 


- boree. 


Little - 


- aranoo. 


Water 


- 


- ammoo. 


Dead - 


- oondilla. 


Smoke 


- 


- 


By-and-by - 


- batacher. 


Qnnmd 


- 


- yamba. 


Come on 


- yobbanoo. 


Wind . 


- 


- humca. 


Milk . - 


- 


Bain - 


- 


- ammoo. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God . 


- 


- 


WUd turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


. 


. 


Wife - - 


- 



78 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE 



No. 155.— BARCOO RIVER— TAMBO, MOUNT 
ENNISKILLEN, AND RAVBNSBOURNE CREEK. 

Bt T. H. Hyde, Esq., H. L. Bell, Esq., James White Powell, Esq.* 
L. F. Dalhunty, Esq., Aim James Gbombie, Esq. 

Thb following vocabularies are specimens of the nearly- 
connected dialects of several trjbes which dwell on the 
Ravensboume Creek, and on the part of the Barcoo indicated 
above, the aboriginal name of which river in this portion of 
its course is Mokkardu 

The vocabulary forwarded by Mr Hyde, I am informed 
in a letter, was drawn up by an aboriginal trooper of the 
Native Mounted Police, born in the locality, who can write 
tolerably well. I have also written replies to my list of 
questions from the same person. 

The handwriting of this Blackfellow is irregular, but, 
though only a pencil has been used, for the most part easily 
read. The spelling is veiy faulty, and when an aboriginal 
word occurs twice it is not always spelt in the same way. 
C when it occurs I have altered to k. The terminal sound 
usually rendered by a is written er by the trooper, and the 
Italian t, ie. It is noticeable that for eat and drink there is 
but one word, and another for spear and woody both of 
which characteristics appear in other parts. 

Mr. Hyde says that a great many of the Blacks in his 
neighbourhood are employed on the stations in looking after 
stock, and work well. Mr. Powell makes the same remark. 
Mr. Hyde adds that the Black trooper spends his time 



BARCOO RIVER, ETC. 79 

reading novels and newspapers, has built himself a little 
house and detached kitchen, has a bed set on posts, and has 
become so civilized that he has lost the faculty of tracking 
and other accomplishments of aboriginal life. Of what this 
degenerate savage says, in reply to my questions on manners, 
I extract only a small part, as his contribution contains 
nothing which has not been already often told. 

The name of his tribe is Torrabnrri, which in 1862 or 
thereabouts, when the Whites first settled in the neighbour- 
hood, numbered, it is thought, some 700 persons, but is now 
reduced to 60 men, 60 women, 14 boys, and 12 girls, or 136 
persons. A few of his tribe, the trooper thinks, lived to be 
ninety, and one of that age still survives. After giving the 
nsnal information connected with weapons, utensils, and . 
ornaments, my informant goes on to say that small-pox, 
called Weeteen* existed in his tribe before he was bom, and 
that four or five persons, aU about fifty years of age, bear 
the marks of it at the present time. Polygamy prevails in 
the tribe. Marriage is both exogamous and endogamous, 
and firom what my informant says (who evidently does not 
comprehend some of my questions, seeming to understand 
by tribes what I mean by classes) I gather that class- 
marriage prevails. Neither circumcision nor the terrible 
rite are tnown to the Torrabnrri tribe, who, however, scar 
the back and shoulders, and pierce the septum of the nose. 
No marriage ceremonies exist. The dead (males) are buried 
for a time, then disinterred and their bones carried about in 
hark coffins for six months, and then finally reburied. As 
regards message-sticks, my informant replies to my question 
in these words, '^ Cut a stick and tell him (the bearer) what 
he got to say to another." Many of the men of this tribe 
are six feet high and upwards. The trooper calls the tribes 
which adjoin his own — Koparburri, Peepinburri, and Onderle- 
burri. Freemasonry is unknown. 

* It wiU be noticed that there is no likeness between the yarions eqniya- 
lents of smaU-pox, which supports the hypothesis that Australia wa« fully 
peopled prior to its introducti6n, and that this was of late date. 



80 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 165.— BARCOO RIVER. 



By T. H. Htdb, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 
Opossom - 
Tame dog - 
Wild dog - 
Emn - 
Black duck - 
Wood dnck- 
Pelican 

Laughing jackaas 
Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - - - 
Swan - - - 
Egg - - - 
Track of a foot - 
Fish - - - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito - 

Fly - - - 
Snake - - - 
The Blacks - 
A Blaokf ellow - 
A Black woman 
Nose - - 



narka. 

tangoor. 

karirer wangal. 

karirer kabin. 

kolbey. 

kobery marer. 

manaan. 

winner youerilly. 

kakoburry. 

none. 

teaerburry. 

woterkan. 

yourie. 

kubaon. 

teener. 

winner. 

bookilL 

koarow. 

ellpin. 

nemara. 

monda. 

mume. 

mume. 

kumbL 

kao. 



Hand - 


- murra. 


2 Blacks 


- mumeboolaroo. 


3 Blacks - 


- mnrrie boolaroo 




wangier. 


One - 


- wangier. 


Two - 


- boolaroo. 


Three - 


• boolaroo wangier. 


Four - 


- boolarooboolaroo* 


Father 


- yarboo. 


Mother 


- younger. 


Sister-Elder 


• buya tiller. 


„ Younger 


- waboogan. 


Brother-Elder 


- turgoon tiller. 


„ Younger waboo. 


A young man 


- kourla. 


An old man 


- watoring. 


An old woman 


• poodgan. 


A baby 


• kantoo. 


A White man 


• weeto. 

9 


Children - 


- kantoonoo. 


Head - 


- togoo. 


Eye - 


• teeley. 


Ear '- 


. manger. 



BAROOO RIVEB, ETC. 



81 



No. 156.— Babooo BivjsR^ccntinued, 



Month 


- tarr. 


Teeth- 


- teer. 


Hair of the head • woorow. 


Beard- 


• yarong. 


Thonder - 


- teegroo. 


GraaB - 


- wakoo. 


Tongue 


- tarlang. 


StODiach 


. yonillkoo. 


BreartB 


• wanker. 


Thigh - 


• pillar. 


Foot - 


- tinner. 


Bone - 


- yarrowoon. 


Blood - 


- koomer. 


Skin - 


• nomen. 


Fat - 




Bowels 


- hooltang. 


Excrement - 


- yoonner. 


War-spear - 


- baggar. 


Beed-spear • 


- weleyburry. 


Throwing-8tick 


- kottkoo, betoo. 


Shield - 


- boorkoo. 




- purow. 


Canoe- 


- weeter. 


Snn - 


- tarow. 


Moon - 


- kagerer. 


Star - 


- dundoo. 


light • 


- elierow. 


Bark • 


- kangder. 


Cold . 


- magder. 


Heat - 


- garrymully. 


Day • 


- gadrow. 


Night- 


- balkeron. 


Fire - 


- bom. 


Water 


- kammoo. 


Smoke 


- toker. 


Gnnmd 




Wmd- 


- yerker. 


Bain • 


- kammoo warber. 


God . 


- bogu. 


Ghosts 


- weta. 


VOL. Ul. 


, 



Boomerangs* 


- wongnelL 


HiU . 




Wood- 


- biggar. 


Stone - 


- pageao. 


Camp - 


- yamber. 


Yes - 


- yoo. 


No - 


• kurri. 


I 


• ler. 


Yon - 


- ender. 


Bark • 


- kooker. 


Good - 


- megin« 


Bad - 


- begar. 


Sweet • 


- tarbooy. 


Food - 


• woran. 


Hungry 


- guper. 


Thirsty 


- kogeener. 


Eat 


- yookolloo. 


Sleep • 


- wangerkoo. 


Drink- 


• yookolloo. 


Walk - 


- wotkillkoo. 


See - 


- nugiby.. 


Sit - 


- binder. 


Yesterday • 


- kaboorow. 


To-day 


- gadrow. 


To-morrow - 


- begdigoo. 


Where are the 


mum nuntder T 


Blacks? 




I don't know 


- kurri ebelli. 


Plenty 


- talkay. 


Big - - 


- muller muUer. 


Little - 


- errow. 


Dead - 


■ odelow. 


By-and-by - 




Come on • 


yaukkomunderly. 


Milk - 


- kammoon. 


Eaglehawk - 


- kotelow. 


WUd turkey 


baanguke. 


Wife - 


- koererow. 



82 



THE AUSTRAJJAK RACE 



No. 155.-BABOOO MVER. 

Bt H. L. Bell, Esq. 

In this Yocabulary the reader will notice the harmonious manner in which 
the equivalents of 1 and 2 are compounded to mean 3. His attention is 
also dk^wn to the- sound amoo in the equivalents of breaUs^ drink, and footer. 
In these districts the White man*s principal anxiety is to find grass for his 
stock, and the reader may compare the equivalents of White man and ffrass. 



Kangaroo • 


naragoo. 


Hand- 


- murra. 


Opossum - 


tungooroo. 


2 Blacks - 


- murri, boollaroo. 


Tame dog - 


mora. 


3 Blacks - 


- mum booUaron- 


WUddog - 


koombinea. 




gera. 


Emu - 


koolbi. 


One - 


- wongera. . 


Bl&ck duck - 


koobaree. 


Two - •- 


- boollaroo. 


Wood duck - 


■ munan. 


Three- 


- booUarongera. 


Pelican 


■ kararoo. 


Four - 


• boolaroo-booUa- 


Laughingjackass- 


kakaburra. 




roo. 


Native companion 




Father 


- yabbo. 


White cockatoo • 


dikkarri. 


Mother 


- younga, young- 


Crow - - 


woddon. 




amoo. 


Swan - 




Sister-Elder 


- beanoo. 


Egg 


karboin. 


„ Younger 


- 


Track of afoot - 


dinna. 


Brother-Elder 


• tarkanoo. 


Fish - 


> biabree, wiarer. 


„ Younger 


Lobster 




A young man 


- nungar. 


Crayfish - 


- boogalli. 


An old man 


- kiara. 


Mosquito - 


boodoin. 


An old woman ' 


- kooderi. 


Fly - - • 


• negeroo. 


A baby 


- kundoo. 


Snake 


- moonda. 


A White man 


- widdoo. 


The Blacks - 


• murrenooyo. 


Children - 


- kundanoo. 


A Blackf ellow - 


■ murri. 


Head - 


- tungoo. 


A Black woman • 


kumbi. 


Eye - 


- dilli. 


Nose - 


' nunderoo. 


Ear - 


- munger. 



BABCOO RIVER, ETC. 



83 





JNO. 105.~iiABCXK 


> KiVKBr-eoiumi 


uea. 


Moath 


- da. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth- 


- teea. 


Hill - - 


m 


Hair of the head- wooroo. 


Wood- 


- toolgarra. 


Beard- - 


- yarrine. 


Stone - 


- bongo. 


Thunder - 


- 


Camp- 


- 


GraoB- 


- widdooQ. 


Ves - - 


- yoo. 


ToDgae 


- tallini. 


No - 


- kartoo. 


Stomach 


- mmida. 


I - - 


- yooloo. 


Breasts 


- amoo. 


Yoa - 


. 


Thigh - 


- pillar. 


Bark - 


- beear. 


Foot - 


- deena. 


Good - 


- mikkane. 


Bone - 


- yarroon. 


Bad - - 


- iudabooia. 


Blood - 


- kboma. 










Sweet - 


. 


Skin - 


- nooman. 






Pat - 


- tommi. 


Food - 


- ngolgo. 


Bowels 


- bundoo. 


Hongry 


- kobarree. 




- gooma. 


Thirsty 


- ikomeobla. 


War-spear - 


- bnkka. 


Eat - 


- yoordoo. 


Beed-spear - 


m 


Sleep - 


• oongane. 


Wommera or 


meeroo. 


Drink - 


- kamogallo. 


throwing-stick 


• 


Walk- 


- wongandga. 


^ield- 


- borrayoo. 


See - 


- ianagalla. 


Tomahawk - 


- borroo. 


Sit - 


V9 

- binda. 


Canoe- 


- tangin. 






San - 


- taro. 


Yesterday - 


- 


Moon - 


- kogera. 


To-day 


- wychaL 


Star - 


- boodoo. 


To-morrow - 


-bedgi. 


Light - 


- yambatilli 


Where are the murriindeea? 


Bark - 


- koonda. 


Blacks! 




Cold - * - 


- medaree. 


I don't know 


- indeadee. 


Heat - 


- qoinqaeean. 


Plenty 


- molqaarlo. 


Day - - 


- goondagoon. 


Big - - 


- wigga. 


Night - 


^ 


Little - 


-kioo. 


Fire - 


- booree. 






^b ** ^0 




Dead - 


- koondilla. 


Water 


- kammoo. 






Smoke 


- togar. 


By-and-by - 


» 


Grouid 


- hmidee. 


Come on 


' koUe. 


Wind . 


- yarraya. 


Milk - - 


■ 


Bain - 


- kumbundelong. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


- 


WUd tmrkey 


- 


Ghosts 


- 


Wife - . 





vz 



84 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 155.^RAyENSBOnRNE CREEK— MOKABURRA TRIBE— 

TARAWALLA DIALECT. 



Bt James White* Powell, Esq. 

In this Yocabolary the reader may oompare t/pfor and toooef, eat and 

drvnk^ wn and day. 



Kangaroo - 

OpoBsmn - 

Tame dog - 

Wild dog - 

Emu - 

Black duck - 

Wood duck- 

Pelican 

Laughing jackaas 

Native companion 

White cockatoo - 

Crow 

Swan 

Egg - - 

Track of a foot - 

FUh - - 

Lobster 

Crayfish 

Moaquito - 
Fly - - - 
Snake - 
The Blacks - 
A Blackf ellow - 
A Black woman - 
Nose - 



- narko. 

- tangooL 

- mora. 

- koolberra. 



miarwa. 

kargooburra. 

kooroora. 

diggari. 

wawder. 

kobboo. 

tina, 

piaberri. 

boogarli, quar- 

roo. 
boothun. 
nimmoon. 
kobbool. 
malkalloo. 

kampe. 
ko. 



Hand • 


- murra. 


2 Blacks - 


- 


3 Blacks - 


m 


One • 


- wongera. 


Two - 


- boolaroo. 


Three- 


- boolaunga. 


Four - 


- nalira. 


Father 


- yarboon. 


Mother 


- yungara. 


Sister-Elder 


- pina. 


,, Younger 


- 


Brother-Elder 


- targanoo. 


„ Younger 


A young man 


- nangoo. 


An old man 


. anger. 


An old woman , 


»- gycher. 


A baby 


- kandoo. 


A White man 


- withoo. 


Children - 


- kandoo. 


Head- 


- tungoo. 


Eye - 


- dilli. 


Ear - 


- mungar. 



RAVENSBOURNE CREEK. 



86 



No. 155.— Raysnsboukns Creek — contiimed. 

Boomerang - 
Hill - . - 



Month - 


- 


- moonoo. 


Teeth - 


- 


- teer. 


Hair of the head- wooroon. 


Beaid - 


- 


. nangur. 


Thunder 


- 


- dindoo. 


Grass - 


- 


- woothnn. 


Tongne 


- 


- tallyne. 


Stomach 


- 


- 


BreaatB 


- 


- nammoon. 


Thigh . 


- 


- huUa (?). 


Foot - 


- 


- tina. 


Bone - 


- 


- yarroon. 


Blood . 


- 


- kooma. 


Rkin - 


- 


- numen. 


Fat - 


- 


- tamme. 


Bowels 


- 


- goonna. 


Excrement 


- 


- goonna. 


War-spear 


- 


- harga. 


Reed-spear 


- 


- 


Throwing-stick 


- mora. 


Shield- 


- 


- hulgoo. 


Tomahawk 


- 


- haroo. 


Canoe - 


- 


- 


Sun - 


- 


- toro. 


Moon - 


- 


- koggera. 


Star • 


- 


- boothoo, tandoo. 


Light - 


- 


- 


Dark • 


- 


- karrangalla. 


Cold - 


- 


- yakkal. 


Heat - 


- 


- boine. 


Day - 


- 


- toro. 


Kight • 


- 


- 


Rre 


- 


- boree. 


Water - 


- 


• kamo. 


SmQke- 


- 


- toongin. 


Gronnd 


- 


- nante. 


Wmd . 


« 


- yorka. 


Rain - 


- 


• kamo. 


God - 


- 


- 


Ghosts 


. 


• 



Wood- 


barga. 


Stone -■ 


woothun (?). 


Camp - 


yamba. 


Yes - 


indindi. 


No - - . 


kurra. 


I - - 


iya. 


You - - . 


inda. 


Bark - 


beer. 


Good - 


mekinni. 


Bad - - - 


banya. 


Sweet • 


jaer. 


Food - 


inde. 


Hungry 


kobbarde. 


Thirsty 


monargaUelen. 


Eat - - - 


ukalgo. 


Sleep - - . - 


onga. 


Drink - 


ukalgo. 


Walk - 


wyjalgo. 


See - 


nekalgo. 


Sit . - - 


bindalgo. 


Yesterday - 


kooleroo. 


To-day 


naler. 


To-morrow - 


kunderoo. 


Where are the 


indu bendang 


Blacks? 


malkalloo? 


I don't know 


kurra nidula. 


Plenty 


mulkerloo. 


Big - - ■ 


mulla-mulla. 


Little • 


kooger. 


Dead - 


kongella. 


By-and-by - 


- kygarroo. 


Come on 


■ wooger, wyger 


Milk - 




Eaglehawk - 




Wild turkey 




Wife 





86 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE 



No. 166.— TAMBO. 



By L. F. Dalhuntt, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 


nargoo. 


Hand - 


- murra. 


OpoeBom - 


dongeroo. 


2 Blacks 


murri bulleroo 


Tame dog - 




3 Blacks - 


- muUi bulleroo 


Wild dog - 


- goombina. 




wongera. 


Emu • 


■ koolby. 


One . • 


■ wongera. 


Black duck - 




Two '- 


- bulleroo. 


Wood dudk- 


• murraboon. 


Three- 


- bulleroo won- 


Pelicaa 


• derrarooroo. 




gera. 
• karkooroo. 


Laughing jaokass kargoobnrra. 


Four - 


Native companion kooro. 


Father 


- yakkoeela. 


White cockatoo • 


• tikkam. 




w 


Crow - 


- wardergun. 


Mother 


• youngereela. 


Swan - 


O 


Sister-Elder 


- murrangeela. 


Egg - 


- kobin. 


„ Younger 




Track of a foot 


' dennerboola. 


Brother-Elder 


- targoongeela. 


Fish - 


- weena. 


yy Youngei 




Lobster 


• 


A young man 


. nunger. 


Crayfish 


• kandera. 


An old man 


- kooba. 


Mosquito 


• hooding. 


An old woman 


- boonargun. 


Fly - 


> neemeroo. 


A baby 


- kamdoo. 


Snake - 


- kokoolo. 


A White man 


- womboo. 


The Blacks - 


- murrimulgoo. 


Children 


- kamdonoo. 


A BlackfeUow 


- murri. 


Head - 


- doongoo. 


A Black woman 


- kumby. 


Eye • 


- dilli. 


Nose - 


• noondooroo. 


Ear - - 


> munga. 



TAMBO. 



87 



• 


No. 155. — Tambo — continued. 




Month 


- moonoo. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth - 


- deeya. 


Hill . 


- 


Hair of the head wooroo. 


Wood (or tree) 


- warker, pagger 


Beaidl 


- yaring. 


Stone - 


> bnngoo. 


Thunder • 


- moongoo. 


Camp - 


- yamber. 


Gnus- 


- woodthon. 


Yes - 


- wL 


Tongae 


- tarding. 


No . 


• karra. 


Stomach 


- pontoo. 


I - - 


- iya. 


BreaatB 


. nammoona. 


You - 


- inda. 


Thigh 


- daria. 


Bark - 


- beya. 


Foot - 


- dinna. 


Good - - 


- meginee. 


Bone - 


- yarroon.. 


Bad - - 


- bunya. 


Blood- 


- kooma. 


Sweet - 


- garber. 


Skin - 


- noomun. 


Food - • - 


- euri. 


Fat - - 


- tommi. 


Hmigry 


- karberri. 


Bowels 


- 


Thirsty 


- boongerroo. 


Excrement - 


> goonna. 


Eat - 


- euri. 


War-spear - 


- pngger. 


Sleep - 


- woga. 


Beed-spear - 


- (none). 






Wonmiera - 


- (none). 


Brink- 


- komo, ngulgo. 


Shield 


- boorgoo. 


Walk- - 


- woodgealgo. 


Tomahawk • 


- baroo. 


See - 


- nugalgo. 


Canoe 


- 


Sit « 


- binda. 


Snn - 


- yooroo. 


Yesterday - 


- konberroo. 


Moon - 


- kokkera. 


To-day 


- kargega. 


Star - 


- boodtha. 


To-morrow - 


- bidgigo 


T.ight - 


. bombi. 


Where are the murri indea ? 


Dark - 


- gonda. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


- medurra. 


I don't know 


- dongodi. 


Heat - 
Day - 


- dingun. 
• bombi. 


Plenty 


- telgi. 


Kight 


' gonda. 


Big - - 


- 


Fire - 


- boori. 


Little - 


- kya. 


Water 


- komo. 


Dead - 


- goondella. 


Smoke 


- dooger. 


By-and-by 


- kurando. 


Ground 


• nnndee. 


(Dome on 


- koole, ow-wo. 


Wind- 


- yarega. 


MUk - 


- 


Bain • 


- komo. 


Eaglehawk 


- 


God - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghoettt 


• 


Wife - . 


. 



88 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 166.— MOUNT ENNISKILLEN. 

Bt Jambs Groicbib, Esq. 

In this Yocabulaiy we find the termination burri in the equiTalents of 
three and big. Also amoonoo and amoo, signifying breasts, vxUer, ram, 
and drink. 



Kangaroo - 


naralkoo. 


Opossum - 


oongeroo. 


Tame dog - 


moora. 


Wild dog - 


oombina. 


Emu - 


oorai. 


Black duck 


• oora. 


Wood duck 


oobuddi. 


Pelican 


• durra. 


Laughing jackass 




Native companion moorooella. 


White cockatoo- 


- diggari. 


Grow - 


• waugan. 


Swan - 




Egg - - . 


• parroo. 


Track of a foot • 


• 


FUh - - - 


- akroo. 


Lobster 




Grayfish 




Mosquito - 


- bothing. 


Fly - - • 


newra. 


Snake - 


- moonda. 


The Blacks - 


• murri. 


A Blackfellow 


> muni. 


A Black woman • 


• 


Nose - 


woota. 



Hand • 


• mnrra. 


2 Blacks • 




3 Blacks . 




One - 


wonga. 


Two • 


woodtha. 


Three- 


woodburri. 


Four - 


- ngithera. 


Father 


jena. 


Mother 


■ yunga. 


Sister-Elder 


ytiggoo. 


„ Younger 


• 


Brother-Elder • 


yuggoon. 


„ Youngei 


• 


A young man 


• koola. 


An old man 


■ oo-oo-gin-a. 


An old woman 


• mungini oorillL 


A baby 




A White man 


widtha. 


Ghildren - 




Head - 


yelll. 


Eye . 


dilli. 


Ear - - • 


- munira. 



MOUNT ENNISKILLEN. 



89 



No. 156. — Mount 



MoQth 


- bakka. 


Teeth - 


- thea. 


Hair of the head 


- wooroo. 


Beard- 


- yarrang. 


Thunder 


- moongo. 


Graas - 


- oonoo. 


ToDgne 


- 


Stomach 


- oorina. 


Breasts 


- amoonoo. 


Thigh - 


- boomnrra. 


Foot - 


- deena. 


Bone - 


- yamoon. 


Blood - 


- ooma. 


Skin . 


- binda. 


Fat 


- tommi. 


Bowels 


- 


Excrement - 


- 


War-spear - 


- bngra. 


Reed-spear - 


• 


Wommera or 


metoo. 


throwing-atick 




Shield - 


- toombarroo. 




- baoo. 


Canoe • 


- ooron. 


Son - 


- doonoo. 


Moon - 


- aorra. 


Star - 


- boodthoo. 


light - 


- 


Dark . 


- 


Cold - 


- moori. 


Ueat - 


- dinganna. 


Day •- 


- oonoola. 


Night - 


- ooa. 


Fire - 


- boori. 


Water- 


- amoo. 


Smoke 


- dooau. 


Groond 


- yamba. 


Wind- 


- yarga. 


Rain - 


- amoo. 


God - 


- 


Ghortis 


. 



EsmsKTLLSS^continxled, 




Boomerang - 






Hill - - 






Wood- 


doola, baa. 




Stone - 


unga. 




Camp - 


titheringalli. 




Yes - 


yea. 




No 


alia. 




I 






You 






Bark • 


beia. 




Good - 


boodi. 




Bad - 


indawannia (?). 




Sweet - 






Food - 


- nanoo. 




Hungry 


awimndUla. 




Thirsty 






Eat - - - 


daka. 




Sleep - 


ooa. 




Drink - 


- amoo. 




Walk - 






See - - 


- nangannoo. 




Sit - - . 


- bindanna. 




Yesterday - 






To-day 


- jambuginni. 




To-morrow - 


■ yellukka. 




Where are the 






Blacks? 






I don't know 






Plenty 


- ungilla. 




Big - 


- padberra. 




Little - 


- adyeri. 




Dead - 


- audinga. 




By-and-by - 






Come on 


- awae. 




Milk - 






Eaglehawk - 






Wild turkey 






Wife - 





00 THE AUSTRAIIAK RACE 



No. 156.— NOGOA RIVER 

Bt Thomas Mibdleton, Esq., and K Irvino Noble, Esq. 

I HATE received vocabularies of the dialects of two tribes 
which dwell on the Nogoa River. The first is from Mr. T. 
Middleton, and is accompanied by an account of the tribe 
which use the language, and the second from Mr. E. I. 
Noble, who does not state the particular part of the river 
from which he obtained his words. It is dear, however, that 
the two languages are nearly related* 

The name of the tribe concerning which Mr. Middleton 
writes is Bimurraburra. Their country lies twenty-five miles 
north of Springsure, and was first occupied as a station in 
1861. The people of this tribe wear a fringe, which hangs 
from a girdle round the waist, and some of them have 
opossum-rugs, which they use at night. For ornaments, 
they have necklaces of shells and others of eagles' claws ; 
also a canoe-shaped shell brought from the coast, which is 
worn suspended from the hair above the forehead, or from 
the neck. The wommera is not used by this tribe, otherwise 
their weapons and belongings are those commonly met with. 
They have the boomerang, but are not veiy skilful in its use. 
Amongst their articles of food are the bulbs of the lily and 
the seeds of a grass called jahoola^ which are reduced to 
flour by pounding between two stones, and afterwards kneaded 
with water and baked on the ashes in the same way as a 
damper. They also use the common ground oven in cooking, 
but no large accumulations of ashes are found in their 
country as in the South, where the Blacks very constantly 



NOGOA RIVER. 91 

camp and cook at fixed places. Certain restrictions respecting 
the nse of food exist. Old people, for instance, are the only 
persons allowed to eat the flesh of the emu. Other articles 
of food are forbidden to a man whose brother has recently 
died, but this custom does not extend to sisters. A father, 
on the death of a child, male or female, abstains from eating 
ignanas, opossums, and snakes, of the male sex, but nothing 
of the kind occurs on the death of a wife. This prohibition 
of animals of a particular sex as food is widely prevalent in 
Australia. 

Nothing is known by this tribe of small-pox. They do 
not object to tell their names, of which the following speci- 
mens are given: — Males: Bai^oonbingi, Nandooringi, Tana- 
rilla. Femalea: Yandao, Marleo, Moomoyo, Jarranbilli, and 
Moolabullungo. Class-marriage exists in the tribe under the 
same arrangement as at Port Mackay, as follows: — 

IfalML Females. Children. 

Wongo marrieB Bambi • - KorgiUa. 

Bambi „ Wungoon - - Koboror.' 

KoigiUa ,, Koboron - - Wungo. 

Korboron „ Korgilla - - Bambi. 

Mr. Middleton also mentions a second set of class-names, 
which, I presume, belong to some neighbouring tribe, as 
follows : — ^Nullum, Yoolgo, Bungumburra, and TeilUng. 
This tribe scar the shoulders, chest, and back. Circum- 
cision and the terrible rite are unknown. They say that 
the dead go, after some time, to the Milky Way. When 
burying a man his big toes are tied together, and also his 
knees. My informant remarks that this tribe have as 
totems the opossum, scrub turkey, dog, emu, kangaroo, 
eaglehawk, and native bee, but does not state to what they 
have reference. He further remarks that the following signs 
are used. Puffing out the cheeks indicates the absence of 
water ; placing the fist on the forehead, the presence of a 
wallaroo ; stroking the face with open fingers, a kangaroo; 
and the arm held up and hand bent down, an emu. 



92 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



Mr. Noble forwards the following Additional Worda : — 


Ant - 


- nimi. 


Husband 


. ungaila. 


Angry 


- baubobi. 


Hut - 


- oka. 


Ashes - 


- ongoit. 


Knee - 


- moko. 


Bird - 


- mangoola. 


Leaf - 


- ptala. 


Cheek - 


• dtgala. 


Neck . 


- urga. 


Chin - 


- augong. 


Club - 


• mim. 


To weep 


- badewailong. 


NostrU 


- nongoL 


Creek - 


- bulbur. 


Navel - 


- y«pi- 


ChUdbirth • 


- andorillong. 


Opossum-rug 


- ori. 


Qonds 


- tyun. 


Shoulder 


- wongola. 


Eyebrow 


• dtenbin. 


Sand - 


- nandgki 


Eyelash 


- angola. 


Saliva - 


- numba. 


Feather 


. pbagomnndella. 


Swim - 


- wa-i-ong. 


Finger 


• mardu. 


Sky . 


- banduru. 


Qum - 


- uda. 


Bring some water anunoo, yardi. 


Uoney 


- aba. 


The fire is out 






No. 166.— NOGOA RIVER. 






By Thomas M 


IDDLBTON, Esq. 




Kangaroo - 


- nurkoo. 


Hand - 


- marra. 


Opossum - 


• tangoor. 


2 Blacks - 


- 


Tame dog - 


- ngoora. 


3 Blacks - 


- 


WUddog . 


- goombeno. 


One - 


. wungara. 


Emu - 


- gondaloo. 


Two - 


- boolaroo. 


Black duck - 


- maraboon. 


Three - 


- boolaroo- 


Wood duck 


- boorgoon. 




wungara. 


Pelican 


- kongoo-gum. 


Four - 


- boolaroo-boolaroo 


Laughing jackass kakooburra. 


Father 


- yabboo. 


Native companion koar-roor. 


Mother 


- younga. 


White cockatoo 


- tikardi. 


Sister-Elder 


- wijim-byee. 


Crow - 


- wodthnn. 


„ Younger 


- warbimmera, 


Swan - 
Egg - - 
Track of a foot 


- yalbatboroo. 

- goomera. 

- deena. 


kargeem. 
Brother-Elder - weger-tarquin. 
„ Younger karoo-murgurra. 


Fish - . 
Lobster 


- weena. 


A young man 
An old man 


- kowoola. 

- wodduring, 

boongner. 


Crayfish 


- komdar. 


An old woman 


- wodduring, 


Mosquito - 


- boothing. 




boongau. 


Fly - 


- nemarroo. 


A baby 


- kandoo. 


Snake (brown) 


- moonda. 


A White man 


- mikkaloo. 


The Blacks - 


- malgarloo. 


Children 


> kandooring. 


A Blackfellow 


- mardi. 


Head - 


- kartha. 


A Black woman 




Eye - 


- dilli. 


Nose - 


- woodtha. 


Faf - 


- manga. 



NOGOA RIVER. 



93 





No. 156. — ^NoooA RpTEB^— continued. 




Month 


- moonoo. 


Boomerang • 


- wongul. 


Teeth - 


- e-eer-a. 


Hill . . . 


• pango. 


Hair of the head - wooroo. 


Wood - - '. 


- barka. 


Beard- 


- yarring. 


Stone - 


• pardi, pomgo. 


Thimder 


- moongwer. 


Gamp - 


- yambago. 


Gran - 


• waggoo. 


Yes - 


■ yoe. 


Tongue 


- tateing. 


No - 


- kara. 


Stomach 


- panba 


I - 


ia. 


Breasts 


- ngammoon. 


You - 


- inda, 


Thigh - 


- tara. 


Bark - 


koka. 


Foot - 


- deena. 


Good • 


binbL 


Bone - 


- yarroon. 


Bad . - ■ 


bineyer. 


Blood- 


- gooma. 


Sweet - 


• kauga. 


Skin - 


- niewman. 


Food - 


. aming. 


Fat . 


- tarmL 


Hungry 


• karjeno. 


Bowels 


- kalkine. 

• 


Thirsty 


- boomul. 


Bxcrement - 


- goonna. 


Eat - - • 


yoo-gomna. 


War-spear - 


- nerimo. 

4 


Sleep - 


■ wunger. 


Reed-spear- 


- meeraing. 


Drink- 


• yoo-gulga. 


Throwing-stick 
Shield- 


- (none). 

- borkoo. 


Walk - 


■r ^7 ^7 

• yeningga. 






See - - • 


- nakkulla. 


Tomahawk - 


- pam. 






Canoe - 


- weanda. 


Sit - - 


- binda. 


Sun - 


- dnroo. 


Yesterday - 


gumboiniger. 


Moon • 


- karkadda. 


To-day 


• yongarunga. 


Star - 


- boodthoo. 


To-morrow - 


• bierkow. 


T jght ■ 


- meedtha. 


Where are the 


mardi unthalgo ? 


Dark - 


- ngorkoon. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


- boodthari. 


I don't know 


- ia kara nakkulla 


Heat - 


- kooran. 


Plenty 


- yangier. 


Day - - 


- dooronga. 


Big . - . 


talgai. 


Night - 


- ngorkoon. 


Little . 


- badgeeree. 


Fire - 


- bore. 


Dead - 


■ myeela. 


Water 


- kamoo. 


By-and-by - 


- boogaroo. 


Smoke 


- chnga. 


Come on 


tanja-e-nee. 


Ground 


- nanee. 


^ ^« v^ 




Wind- 


- gowera. 


Milk • 


m 


Bain - 


- kamoo. 


Eaglehawk - 


- koradella. 


God . 


• 


wad turkey 


- wirka. 


Ghosts 


- woobin. 


Wife - 


• biergoonera. 



94 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 156.— NOGOA KIVER. 



By E. Ibvino Noble, Esq. 



It will be noticed that hiU and stone are ezpreased by one woird in thia 

vocabulary. 



Kangaroo - 


- argoo. 


Uand • 




Opoesum 


- taugni. 


2 Blacks 




Tame dog - 


- urra. 


3 Blacks 




wad dog . 
Emu 

Black duck - 
Wood duck 


- umbayno. 

- ulbaL 


One - 

Two - 
Three - 


- woDgara. 

- bulam. 

- omu. 


Pelican 




Four - 


- nganinon. 


Laughing jackan 


1 


Father 




Native companioi 


i 


Mother 




White cockatoo 




Sister-Elder 




Crow - 
Swan - 

Egg - - ■ 
Track of a foot 


abul. 


„ Younger • 
Brother-Elder 
„ Younger 




Fiah - - . 


yedi. 


A young man 




Lobster 




An old man 




Crayfish 




An old woman - 




Mosquito - 


yeri-gheri. 


A baby 




Fly - - 
Snake • 
O^e Blacks - 
A Blackf ellow - 


nimula. 

• 

abul, bumba. 


A White man • 
Children 
Head - 




A Black woman - 


amin. 


Eye - 


dili 


Nose • 


nundurra. 


Ear - • - 


manga. 



NOGOA RIVER. 



95 



No. 156.— NoooA RivEB— con^tniKcf. 



Montii 


- nmnn ormnnn(?) 


Boomerang - 


- waugul. 


Teeth - 


- drir. 


Hill - 


. bangu. 


Hair of the head 


- whir. 


Wood- 


- baka. 


Beard. 


- 


'Stone - 


- bangu. 


Xhimder 


. 




%^ 


Qnm " 


- wakn. 


Camp - ' - 


- yamboyna. 






Tea - 


^ 


Tongae 


- dtahu. 






Stomach 


- banbu. 


No - 


m 


BreastB 


- amnn. 


I 


- 


Thigh- 


- 


You - 


- 


Poot - 


- dinna. 


Bark - 


• 

- oka. 


Bone - 


- yarn. 


Good - 


- mai. 


Blood- 


- nma. 


Bad . 


• tambalai. 


Skin - 


- nnmana. 


Sweet - 


„ 


Fat - 


- 


Food - 


^ 


Bowels 


. 






Excrement - 


A 


Hungry 


- 


War-apear - 


. pamlau. 


Thirsty 


- 


Reed-Bpear - 


m 


Eat • 


- bibL 

• 


Wommera or 




Sleep ' - 


- ongounong 


throwing-stick 


• 


Drink 


- along. 


Shield - 


- 


Walk 


- mtmaoion. 


Tomahawk - 


- para. 


See - 


• 


Ganoe- 


- 


Sit - 


. 


Sun - 


• dura. 


Yesterday - 


- 


Moon - 


- 


To-day 


- 


Star - 


- dura. 

« 


To-morrow - 


« 


Light - 


- 


Where are 1 


(he 


Dark - 


" 


Blacks? 




CoU - 


- midnrra. 






^rv 




I don't know 


• 


Heat - 


- waru. 




• 


Day - 


. 


Plenty 


- 


Night- - 


. tindarilla. 


Big . . 


- djahna. 


Fire - 


- bnrdi 


Little- 


- maigara. 


Water 


- amn. 


Dead - - 


- mailong. 


Smoke 


- bnrdibirlook. 


By-and-by - 


- 


Groand 


- yamba. 


Gome on 


- 


"Wind- 


• 


Milk - 


- 


Baln - 


- amarina. 


Eaglehawk- 


- 


God . 


- 


WUd turkey 


- 


Ohorta 


• 


Wife - 





96 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE 



No. 157.— HEAD OF THE COMET RIVER, 

Bt Thomas Josephson, Esq. 

The following vocabulary and account of the Kanoloo tribe 
were kindly forwarded to me by Mr. Thomas Josephson. 

The territory of this tribe is on the head of the Comet 
River, and was occupied by the Whites, my informant thinks, 
in about 1860. At that date it is believed the tribe num- 
bered about five hundred persons ; that in 1869, when Mr. 
Josephson first resided in their country, it had been reduced 
to three hundred, and in April, 1879, the date of that 
gentleman's communication to me, to two hundred souls. 
The causes of the decrease are stated to have been the 
results of venereal introduced by the Whites, consumption, 
and a general resort to the practice of infanticide. Opos- 
sum-rugs are worn by this tribe, who smear themselves 
from head to foot with grease and red ochre on occasions 
of corroboree ; the face is daubed with pipe-clay and the 
body with charcoal when in mourning. They have buckets 
made from the kurrajong-tree ; baskets, nets, and belts made 
of grass-fibre ; and, originaUy, tomahawks of porphyry 



HEAD OP THE COMET RIVER. 97 

and trap rock, ground to an edge with sandstone. They 
have also toy and war boomerangs, shields which are carved 
and colored red, and spears which are thrown by hand« 
The members of this tribe decline to eat pork, as I have 
known the Bangerang tribes to do in the neighbourhood of 
Echnca. This is very cnrioos in tribes so far apart, which 
hardly reject anything edible. I never learnt the reason 
of it. Of coarse pigs were nnknown in Anstralia nntil we 
brought them here. 

Men only are allowed to eat the flesh and eggs of the 
emu, and on certain hunting expeditions only a particular 
sort of food i8 aUowed. In the territory of this tribe there 
is a cave fall of the bones of Blacks, who are said by 
Mr. Josephson's informant, KamungeUij to have died about 
forty years back of some disease of the nose. Some of the 
tribe, however, have a few marks which it is thought might 
be the result of small-pox.* Cannibalism seems to have 
prevailed to some extent. These people have no objection 
to teU their names, of which Mr. Josephson gives the 
following: — Males: Kamungela, Embalateloo. Females: 
Tinumburra and Wooloomungunya. Children: Wagooroo 
and Koolaroo. Marriages take place both within and 
without the tribe. Polygamy prevails, and girls have 
husbands at twelve, and become mothers at thirteen years 
of age, or thereabouts. Ornamental scars are made on the 
shoulders and thighs. Circumcision and the terrible rite 
are unknown. Teeth are knocked out, and the septum of the 
nose is pierced. Fish are taken with nets and spears. On 
the day of a corroboree the performers retire to arrange the 
performance in secret. The male youths of eighteen have 
the rights of men conferred on them by means of secret 
ceremonies. '^Messages," says Mr. Josephson, '^are sent 
orally, but the messenger is accredited by a notched stick." 

* In Yocabnlaiy No. 28 the Cheangwa tribe wiU be found caUing smaU- 
pox modya erriUya-rUl-yci, or stone (in the) nose; one instance out of many 
in which we notice tribes thousands of nules apart taking sioular views of 
strange things. 

VOL. in. O 



98 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 157.— HEAD OF THE COMET RIVER. 

Bt T. Jcnsephson, Esq. 

In thiB Tocabulary we find the yerb to drink rendered eat footer /that 
breasts^ watery rain, and mUk are expressed by words derived from the 
root amoo ; that there is bnt one word for wtfe and woman, and another for 
hetid and hill. 



Kangaroo - 


- bogoloL 


Opossum - 


- tangor. 


Tame dog - 


- wondi 


Wild dog - 


- kagargi. 


Emu - 


- meun. 


Black, duck 


• 


Wood duck 


- wya-wya. 


Pelican 


• boloin. 


Laughing jackass kokargar. 


Native companion gooroor. 


White cockatoo 


- tegam. 


Crow - 


- wyakun. 


Swan - 


- yallaboroo. 


Egg - - 


- kaboin. 


Track of a foot 


- tennar. 


Fish . . 


- weena. 


Lobster 


- yegari. 


Crayfish - 


- myngul. 


Mosquito ' 


- boordooin. 


Fly - - 


- nemun. 


Snake (carpet) 


- kabooL 


The Blacks - 


- maree. 


A Blackf eUow 


- maree. 


A Black woman 


- woa. 


Nose . - 


- koo. 



Hand - 


-mara. 


2 Blacks - 


- 


3 Blacks - 


- 


One - 


- wonga. 


Two - 


- boolaree. 


Three - 


- boolare wonga. 


Four - 


- boolaree boola- 




ree. 


Father 


- yaboo. 


Mother 


- kika. 


Sister-Elder 


- pyengela. 


„ Younger 


- mungagela. 


Brother-Elder 


- taqungekL 


„ Younger babooregela. 


A young man 


- nanga. 


An old man 


- wotoori. 


An old woman 


- munke. 

• 


A baby 


- nabooloo. 


A White man 


- koin. 


Children 


- nabooloo. 


Head - 


- toongoo. 


Eye - 


- telee. 


Ear - 


- mumra. 



HEAD OF THE OOMET RIVER. 



99 



No. 


167. — Head of thb 


CoMsnr Bjveb — continued. 


Month 


- taa. 


Boomerang - 


- wongaL 


Teeth 


- eaa. 


Hill . - 


- toongoo. 


Hair of the head- toorooin. 


Wood- 


- pagaa. 


Beaid- - 


- yarrein. 


Stone - 


- py«- 


Thunder - 


- boowoindL 


Camp- 


- yamba. 


Graae- 


- kaijnl. 


Yes - 


-yo. 


Tongne 


- talai. 


No . 


- kara. 


Stomach - 


- goona. 


I 


-ya. 


Breasts 


. amon. 


You - 


- enda. 


Thigh 


- koongaL 


Bark - - 


- kooga. 


Foot - 


- tinna. 


Good - 


- megeun(?). 


Bone - 


- magoo. 


Bad - 


- waeen. 


Blood- . 


- gooma. 


Sweet- 


- 


Skin .- . 


- moomoL 

* 


Food - - 


- gambool. 


Fat - - 


- weetha. 


Hnngry 


- boonga. 


Bofwels 


- beinjol. 


Thirsty 


- boomal. 




-goonna. 


Eat - - 




War-spear - 


- ngooroo. 


Sleep - 


- ooga. 


Reed-spear - 


. kargnn. 


Drink- 


- kama-thalgo. 


Throwing-stick 


- baga. 


Walk- - 


- mnnda. 


Shield - 
Tomahawk - 
Canoe - 
Son - 
Moon - 
Star - 
Light - 
Duk - 


- boorgoo. 

- koobar. 
• kooga. 

- thoroo. 

- kargara. 

- boothoo. 

- ngaa. 

- koonda. 


See - - - nagalgo. 
Sit - - - poinda. 
Yesterday - - mothangana 
To-day - - neela. 
To-morrow - - oongai 
Where are the maree inda b 
Bhicks? dena? 


Cold - 


. metha. 


I don't know 


- kara ranagala. 


Heat - 


- poonbol. 


Plenty 


- mulga. 


Day - . 


- thooroo. 


Big - - 


- mulgalo. 


Night- 


- koonda. 


Little - 


- kagara. 


Flre - 
Water 
Smoke 
Ground 
Wmd- - 
iUin - 


- booree. 

- kamoo. 

- tooga. 

- nanee. 

- ewa. 

- kamoo. 


Dead - 
By-and-by - 
Come on - 
Milk - - 
Eaglehawk - 


- woolunga. 

- babanathe. 
- - woo-ou. 

-^lamoon. 

- goothalla. 


God - 


• koroo-koorob. 


WUd turkey 


- warka. 


Ghosts 


- kagage. 


Wife - - 


- wooa or woa. 



02 



100 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 168.— BROWN RIVER 

Bt F. J. MuBRAY, Esq, Inspbotob of Mouhted Poucs. 

The oorreotness of some of the words of this yocabulajry is donbtfnL To 

drink is expressed eat toater. 



Hand • 
2 Blacks 
SBlacks 
One • 
Two 
Three- 
Four - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

M Tonnger - 
Brother-Elder - 
,, Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman - 
A baby 

A White man - 
Children - 
Head 

Eye - - - 
Ear - - - 



Kangaroo - 


woora. 


Opossum 


goolan. 


Tame dog • 


ngooda. 


Wild dog - 




Ebnu - 


undooU. 


Black duck- 


weena. 


Wood duck- 


gnoolia. 


Pelican 


boolin. 


Ijaughing jackass 


kamminmalli. 


Native companloi 


1 kooroor. 


White cockatoo • 


gahr. 


Crow - 


wadimn. 


Swan - 


- 3ralbooboora. 


Egg - - . 


• kooma. 


Track of a foot 


- ginna. 


Fish - - 


- dooloora. 


Lobster 


- Walloon. 


Crayfish 




Mosquito 


- meenyer. 


Fly - 


- mein. 


Snake - 


- boongaL 


The Blacks - 


- yalaari. 


A Blackfellow 


- goolboora. 


A Black woman 




Nose • - 


- wooda. 



waybee. 
boolarra. 
boolarra waybee. 
boolarra boolarra. 
yaboona. 
yarrunan. 
goonanagoo (?). 

goonanagoo (?). 

wadoora. 

wadawan. 

yanaan. 

widoo. 

undoo. 

kuddo. 

dillfe. 

waUoo, 



BKOWN BIVEB. 



101 



• 


No. 158.— Bbown BiVER— <xmftn«e£ 


1 


Moaih 


- yeera(?). 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth- 


- yeera. 


HiU - 


- 


Hair of the head 


i-aiL 


Wood- 


- dooli. 


Beard- 


- nnga. 


Stone - 


- barree. 


Thunder - 


- balhai. 


Camp- 


- yaamba. 


Graas - 


- woodoor. 


vv> 


m 


Tongue 


- daUi. 


Yea - 


- youi. 


^7 

Stomach 


- hooldi. 


No - 


- kaugoo. 


Kieasta 


- kamoo. 


I - - 


- waga. 


Thigh 


- darra. 


You - 


- deeba. 


Foot - 


- ginna. 


Bark - 


• oooka. 


Bone - 


- bolban. 


Good - 


. goonegool. 


Blood- 


- eregoon. 


Bad - - 


- waboo. 


Skin - 


- ngoogul. 


Sweet - 


- attoo. 


Fat - 


- *^s"nna^ 


Food - - 


- toomoo. 


Bowela 


- ngalgo. 


Hungry 


- cabeera. 


ESzcxement - 


' goona. 


Thirsty 


- kamoo waggara. 


War-apear - 


- nn^^^ 


Eat - 


- yoowaana. 


Reed-spear - 


- 


di 


" 


Wommera or 


medoo. 


Sleep - 


- wongara. 


throwing-stick 




Drink- 


- yoowanna 


Shield 


- goonmerrL 




kamoo. 


Tomahawk - 


- dooban. 


Walk- - • 


- yanino. 


Canoe- 


- kooka. 


See - 


- wunna. 


Sun - 


- karre. 


Sit - 


- beendau. 


Moon - 


- kiaka. 


Yesterday - 


- 


Star - 


- hoodoo. 


To-day 


- edgiga. 


light- 


- 


To-morrow - 


- boogangio. 


Dark - 


• 


Where are the haamanda? 


Cold - 


- dowa. 


Blacks? 




Heat- 


- karrunul. 


I don't know 


- aknoonilla. 


Day - - 


- 


Plenty 


- yenga. 


Night- 


- 


Big - - 


- weeirr. 


Kre - 


- booree. 


Little - 


- kurrgom. 


Water 


- kamoo. 


Dead - 


- miebba. 


Smoke 


• tooka. 


By-and-by - 


- taacoo. 


Gronnd 


- nanee. 


Come on 


- wookooauni. 


Wind- 


- yonoora. 


Milk - 


« 


Bain - 


- kamoo. 


Eaglehawk 


- 


God - - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghoata 


. 


Wife - - 


- 



102 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 



No. 169.— DAWSON RIVEE. 



Bt John O'ComroB, Esq., akb E. GmnnNOHAii, Esq. 

I HAVE received three vocabularies called after their negative 
adverbs — ^the Wokkaj Wogga^ or Woga dialects — ^two from 
Mr. John O'Connor and the other from Mr. E. Gonningham. 
The two first are said to belong to the Dawson River Blacks; 
the third Mr. O'Connor locates on the Burnett. Internal 
evidence, however, leads me to believe that though the 
Blacks from whom the vocabulary in question was obtained 
were met with on the Burnett, and said that they belonged 
to that river, as they probably do now, the language really 
belongs to the Dawson River country. 

The following Additional Words and tenses of the verb to 
go were kindly kindly forwarded by Mr. O'Connor with the 
first of his two vocabularies : — 



Left-handed 


waw-roon. 


Box-tree 


quip-pe. 


Tall - 


to-k6-ra. 


Scrub-box - 


tit-ch^men. 


To laugh 


mnn-jure. 


Scrub - - - 


bow-&r. 


Where iB it? 


in-ja? 


Bees* nest - 


kow-wair. 


Come here - 


^.jiu 


A large bees' nest 


coo-jd. 


Tree iguana 


beer-bering-ga. 


Frog - 


poor-bung. 


Grass iguana 


- na-ran. 


Angry 


baa. 


Kangaroo-rat 


- bar-roon-ga. 


Just look that way ya-roon-nea. 


Bandicoot - 


bin-noor. 


A fine day - 


ka-am-ba boo-ar 


Native bear 


■ june-d5on-noo. 


A wet day - 


jure-bai. 


Greek - 


■ tone-gay. 


Sick - 


ke-wor. 


Give me 


- nar-aiwo-ga. 


Very sick - 


ke-wor dun-de. 


Whose is it? 


• nan-ger-e-gow? 


To travel • 


y-i-wa. 


Deaf adder - 


- mun-o5m. 


To run 


gin-ning-your. 


Quart-pot - 


- newm-newm. 


To hunt 


me-a-w-a. 


Pint-pot 


- coo-tchii. 


Male wallaby 


won-goon. 


Gum-tree - 


- yar-jt-ba. 


Female wallaby - 


y-*. 


Broad-leafed iron 


• goom-bjt. 


Father's brother • 


boo-ra. 


bark-tree 




Father's sister - 


cum-e. 


Narrow-leafed 


pe-ga. 


Mother's brother- 


mum-&. 


ironbarktree 




Mother's sister • 


we-young. 


Bottle-tree - 


- pay-ung-a. 


Cousin 


goom-bo. 





DAWSON RIVER. 


iUd 




AsDinoMAL W0SD8 — conHnued. 




Patenial grand- 


mai. 


New moon - 


- mi-an-gower. 


father 




Daybreak - 


' yaiberinge. 


Maternal grand- 


nntchi. 


Firelight - 


■ goonat 


&ther 




I go away - 


■ nzea chema. 


Paternal grand- 


y-e-u. 


Lightning - 


- djunebun. 


mother 




Hailstorm - 


• moar. 


Maternal grand- 


boo-e-a. 


To talk 


• y». 


mother 




To strike - 


• boomba. 


Female kangarOo- 


griyide. 


Nnlla-nnlla (club 


\ morem. 


Female opoasmn - 


goobe. 


Be gone 


- wakakowan. 


Black cockatoo • 


neyong. 


A young woman 


- nerroom. 


Carpet snake 


booye. 


Very tired - 


boobokarwine. 


Brown snake 


bogweer. 


I want to see 


- nutchu nean. 


Black make 


mingo. 


To stop or cease • 


• wooer. 


The leg, from knee boon. 


To wait 


- woggokow. 


downwards 




Cloudy 


- coomban. 


Arm 


gineen. 


A clear sky • 


' year. 


Finger-nail - 


bingnn. 


To kill 


- boombayour. 




CONJUOATION OF T] 


OE Vkrb "To Go. 


I* 




FHJSSESn 


r TXNSE. 




Igo - 


mia mundal. 


We go 


. nunna mulgul-e. 


Thon goeat - 


yinda mnnda. 


You go 


■ youa mulgul-e. 


He goes 


noo-la mnnda. 


They go 


- nia muldalgo. 




PERFEO: 


r TBNSB. 




I went 


mia mundal. 


We went 


- nunna mulgulle 
mnndella. 


Thoa wentest 


yinda mnndella. 


You went - 


- yona mundella. 






They went - 


- nia mu-tan-gay 


He went 


noo-la mnndella. 




mundella. 




FUTUBK 


TKNSB. 




I will go 


mia pa-boo mnn- 


We will go - 


• pa-boo-ra lung- 




dalgo (by-and- 
by). 

yinda wong^ 




ga. 


ThoQwillgo 


Yon will go- 


• boo-algo mul- 

11 




mondalgo. 




guile. 


He will go - 


noo-la cor-a man- 


They will go 


- tan-a mur-a cur-a 




dalgo. 




ginda. 




IMPE&ATI 


TB MOOD. 




Let me go 


in-chay poor-ba. 


Let them go 


• tago mulgulle 


Let him go - 


poor-ba in-chay 
tago mnndalgo. 




poor-ba-loo. 


Letnsgo - 


ooon-da mnnda. 


Go - • • 


■ mnnda. 



The negative sense is given by using the word ka-ra between the pro- 
noun and the verb. 



1 



104 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 



No. 169.— DAWSON RIVER. 



Bt John 0*Connob, Esq. 
The eqiiiyalent of drink ia oompoonded of water eoL 



Kangaroo • 


- kroman« 


Hand - 


- na. 


Opoasnm - 


- grownda. 


2Bhicks - 


- booa mean. 


Tame dog - 


- bugin. 


3 Blacks - 


- kuram mean 


Wild dog - 


- kerum. 


One - 


- kumbe. 


Emu 


• wheey, murree. 

• 


Two - 


- booa. 


Black duck 


am 










Three - 


- kuram. 


Wood duck 


' junmeer. 






Pelican 


' kowanffooran. 


Four (and all 


bogo. 


Laughing jackass eurgaga. 


numbers above) 


Native companion krargong. 


Father 


- boora. 


White cockatoo 


- gear. 


Mother 


- weyoung. 


Crow • 


• waagnn. 


Sister-Elder 


- tehet-ge. 


Swan - 


- gooan. 


„ Younger 


- gundan. 


Egg . - 


• heua, meua. 


Brother-Elder 


- tehet-ja. 


Track of a foot 


- dumba. 


„ Younger gunda. 


Fish . - 


- 


A young man 


- nunga. 


Lobster 


m 


An old man 


- mogun. 


Crayfish 


- nenewn. 


A « « 


• 


Mosquito - 


- nine. 


An old woman 


- mogwme. 


Fly - 


- ding. 


A baby 


- naba. 


Snake- 


• 


A White man 


- 


The Blacks 


- mean. 


(/hildren 


- dunde naba. 


A Blackfellow 


- mean. 


Head - 


- mawwa. 


A Black woman 


- newroom. 


Eye - 


- meay. 


Nose - 


- boodgeju. 


Ear - 


. bina. 



DAWSON RIVEE. 



105 



No. 159. — Dawson RivERr— conttnuec^. 



Month 


- yeaim. 


Boomerang - 


- warren. 


Teeth 


- deyong. 


Hill - 


- 


Hair of the head 


i- bogwin. 


Wood- 


- tatdn. 


Beard 


- eka. 


Stone - 


- yie. 


Thnnder 


- merwa. 


Gamp - 


- nnnda. 


Graas 


- bnnen. 


Yes - - 


-ya. 


Tongne 


- dan. 


No - - 


- wogga. 


Stomach 


• djura. 


I 


- nye, also natchu. 


Breasts 


- nammo. 


Yon - 


- nin. 


Thigh 


- jingar. 


Bark - - 


- goondn. 


Foot - 


- bogar. 


Good - 


- kamba. 


Bone - 


- dear. 


Bad - 


- bnnda. 


Blood- 
Skin - 


- googa. 

- booeom. 


Sweet - 


- boonya. 


Fat - 


- meem. 


Food - 


- kamambadjon. 


Bowels 


. 


Hungry 


- djura. 


Excrement - 


- 


Thirsty 


- coonjum. 


War-spear - 


- doroon. 


Eat - 


- djou. 


Beed-spear - 


- 


Sleep - 


- innoar. 


Wommera or 




Drink - 


- koondjon. 


throwing-stick 




Walk- - 


- yangoa. 


Shield - - 


- goonmurray. 


See - 


- neana. 


Tomahawk - 


- birdnng. 


Sit - - 


- gundower. 


Ganoe- 


- boonde. 


Yesterday - 


- oonoonga. 


Snn - 


- booar. 

• • 


To-day 


• miing. 


Moon - 


- jeme. 


To-morrow - 




Star - 


- goonda. 


W here are 1 


;he nungwa mean 


Light - 


— 


Blacks? 


budjega ? 


Dark - 


- wnnone. 






Cold - 


- beke. 


I don't know 


- wogga nutchu 
binga. 


Heat - 


- brooka. 




Day - 


- bunba. 


Plenty 


- bogo. 


• 

Night - 


- wnnone. 


Big - - 


- dunde. 


^7 

Fire - 


- kooknm. 


Little - 


- nimbair. 


Water 


- coon. 


Dead - •- 


- tai'kal-ying-e. 


Smoke 


- djum. 


By-ahd-by - 


- cooyea. 


Ground 


• karbong. 


Gome on - 


- eja. 


Wind- 


- booran. 


MUk - - 


- 


Bain - 


. bimga. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


- 


WUd turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


- eu-ber. 


Wife . 


- 



106 



THE AUSTBAIIAK RACE: 



No. 169.— DAWSON RIVER. 
Bt E. CumoiroHAM, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 
OpOBstun 
Tame dog - 
WUd dog 
Emn - 
Black duck 
Wood duck 
Pelioan 
Laughing jackass 
Native oompanion 
White cockatoo 
Crow • 
Swan - 
Egg . 

Track of a foot 

Fish - 

Lobster 

Crayfish 

Mosquito 

Fly - 

Snake 

The Blacks - 

A Blackfellow 

A Black woman 

Nose - 



kooramin. 

kooby. 

boogikne. 

moie. 
mannang. 



woorkarkar. 
kooralbnng. 
keyarr. 
wangun. 

ngoa. 

dinnong. 

winnalL 

ninyquen. 

neenee. 

ding. 

Onega. 

meean. 

meean. 

kinbom. 

budjong. 



Hand- 

2 Blacks 

3 Blacks 
One 
Two - 
'Three - 
Four - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

„ Younger 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear 



na. 

bulla meean. 

koorammeean. 

wonga. 

bulla. 

kooram. 

yaboo. 

too. 

thudgee. 

dutha. 

kuar. 

wadyourine. 

moogoUan. 

bobo. 

obeir. 

aba-ano. 

kaum. 

milL 

binnung. 



DAWSON RIVEB. 



107 





No. 159.— Dawson BiyKB^—conlfnued, 


Mouth 


- kam. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth - 


- deeong. 


Hill - 


_ 


Hair of the head 


I- hoogwin. 


Wood 


- tatoo. 


Beard 


- narran. 


Stone - 


- taye. 


Thunder • 


. dthinhooin. 


Gamp - 


- gooyong. 


QrasB - 


- bunan. 


Yes - 


- ha-ha. 


Tongue 


- dulline. 


No - - 


- woga. 


Stomach 


- koomurr. 


I 


- odjyo. 


Breasts 


. dundar. 


You . 


- nindoo. 


Thigh 


- hooyoo. 


Bark - 


- gundoa. 


Foot - 


- dinnong. 


Good - 


- koUumba. 


Bone - 


- deea. 






«M^m m 




Bad - 


- wahin. 


Blood - 


- gOQga. 






H\m ' 


- bullim. 


Sweet - 


- booinja. 


Fat - 


- meim. 


Food - 


-3». 


Bowels 


- boondo. 


Hungry 


- dura. 


Kxcrement * 


- goonung. 


Thirsty 


- goongjum. 


War-spear - 


> dooruin. 


Eat - 


- gowwa. 


Reed-spear- 


- 


Sleep - 


- bowinninna. 


Wommera or 


murroo 


Drink- 


- goongowa. 


throwing-stick 
Shield 
Tomahawk - 


- goommurry 

- narmnff. 


Walk- - 
See - 


- nango. 

- nyah. 


Oanoe 


- gundoa. 


Sit - 


- ninnah. 


Sun - 


- chewtoo. 


Yesterday - 


- oonoonga. 


Moon - 


. goolangerra. 


To-day 


- mying. 


Star • 


- goondare. 


To-morrow - 


- oorama. 


Ught ' 


- goonay. 


Where are the newngameean? 


Dark - 


. oungyon. 


Blacks? 




Ck)ld - 


- 


I don't know 


- woga odjyo ny- 


Heat • 


- booraga. 




angee. 


Day - 


- chewtoo. 


Plenty 


- waway. 


Night - 


- oungyou. 


Big . - 


- bim. 


Fire - 


- gooyong. 


Little - 


» wandirmurra. 


Water 


- goong. 


Dead - 


- deya. 


Smoke 


- jome. 


By-and-by - 


- gwyeea. 


Ground 


• kobboug. 


Come on - 


- cow-way. 


Wind - 


- burran. 


Milk - 


- 


Bain - 


- booba. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


- 


WUd turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


- 


Wife - 


• 



108 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 





Bt John O'Connob, Esq. 




Kangaroo - 


- kroman. 


Hand - 


- na. 


OpoBsnm 


• growndda. 


2 Blacks - 


• wombnra jarl. 


Tame dog - 


- bwgin. 


3 Blacks - 


- chrommuda jarL 


VVUddog - 


• watcha. 


One - 


- karboon. 


Emu - 


- wheey vr muree. 


Two - 


- wombura. 


Black duck - 


- monaro. 


Three - 


- chrommuda 


Wood duck- 








V^ 1 • 


« • • 


Four - 


. chrommuda 


Pelican 


• maai-gwinge. 






Laughing jackass gongarga. 




karboon. 


Native compani< 


>n 


Father 


- baboon. 


White cockatoo 


• kara. 


Mother 


. memay. 


Crow - 


- waa-waa. 


Sister-Elder 


- djonn (f). 


Swan - 


- may-gwin. 


„ Younger 


^ 


Egg - - 


- heua, meaa. 


Brother-Elder 


- tchetja (?). 


Track of a foot 


- dumba. 


„ Younger 


Fish - 


. 


. 




Lobster 


^ 


A young man 


- gepara. 


Crayfish - 


•• newn*newn. 


An old man 


- keringa. 


Mosquito - 


- bree-bree. 


An old woman 


- renignn. 


Fly - 


- ding. 


A baby 


- barbay. 


Snake - 


- 


A White man 


- mi. 


The Blacks - 


- jarl. 


Children 


- newne. 


A Blackf ellow 


- jarl. 


Head - 


moun or mour. 


A Black woman 


- 


Eye - 


- may. 


Nose - 


- me. 


Ear 


- benang. 



ON THE BURNETT. 



109 



No. 150.— A WoKKA Dialect taken on the Bubnett— eofKintied. 



Mouth 


- yamhool. 


Teeth - 


. deyoing. 


Hair of the hea<3 


i- kum. 


Beard- 


- eka. 


Thunder - 


• merai. 


Grass - 


• bun. 


Tongue 


- tchunome. 


Stomach 


- djaw. 


Breasts 


- dundara. 


Thigh 


- 


Foot - 


- tchenong. 


Bone « 


- dear. 


Blood- 


- dere. 


Skin - 


- tome. 


Pat - 


- meuL 


Bowels 


« moonay. 


Excrement - 


- gownong. 


War-spear - 


- juay. 


Beed-spear • 


• (not used). 


Wommera or 


(not used). 


tiirowing-stick 




Shield 


- poonmurray. 




- mouyum. 


Canoe • 


- goondu. 


Sun • 


- tchenun. 


Moon - 


- goola, nermoon, 




gileen. 


Star - 


- googe. 


Tifght - 


- 


Dark- 


- wxmune. 


Ck)ld - 


-worn. 


Heat - 


* yarang. 


Day . - 


• genrlo. 


Night . 


. wxmune. 


Fire - 


- coo-eu-ine. 


Water 


- coon. 


Smoke 


- djum. 


Onmnd 


- djar. 


Wmd- 


- bran. 


Bain - 


- gouong. 


God - 


- 


Ghosts 


- 



Boomerang - 


- gran. 


Hill - - 


m 


Wood- 


- tatdu. 


Stone - 


- tie. 


Gamp - 


- mnraun. 


Yes - - 


- yooryoL 


No - 


- wokka. 


I - . 


. ngea or nutchu. 


You - 


- nin. 


Bark - 


- goondu. 


Qood ' 


- galang. 


Bad - - 


- wealn. 


Sweet - 


- galang. 


Food - 


- galang djou. 


Hungry 


- djure. 


Thirsty 


- goonge. 


Eat - 


- djou. 


Sleep - 


- boanda 


Drink- 


- djou. 


Walk - 


- yango. 


See - 


- neau 


Sit - 


- neena. 


Yesterday - 




To-day 


- taroo. 


To-morrow - 


- woonna woonna. 


Where are 


the wanyajarl? 


Blacks? 




I don't know 


- wokka nutchu 




banga. 


Plenty 


- mian. 


Big - - 


- dande. 


Little - 


- bure-bure. 


Dead - - 


- bonge. 


By-and-by • 


- gouay. 


Come on - 


- eja. 


Milk - - 


- 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


Wife - 


* 



no 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 159.— ADDITIONAL WORDS. 

Bt John O'Connor, Esq. 

The carrectoeae of the aooents inserted in this vocabolary ia very 

donbtfiil. 



Lightning - 
Hailfltonn • 
Carpet snake 
Blaok«nake 
Native bear 
Bandicoot - 
Deaf adder - 
Prog - 
Hawk - 
Bee 

Bees' nest - 
Large bees' nest 
Male wallaby 
Female wallaby 
Meat • 
Iguana 
Large lizard,oalled 
grass iguana 
Cloudy 
A clear sky - 
A fine day - 

A wet day • 
Moonlight - 
Club - 

A young woman - 
Left-handed' 
Tall . - - 
Kangaroo-rat 
Creek - 
Tobaooo-pipe 
Dry 
Sick - 
Very sick - 
Tired - 

Very tired and out 
of breath 



mur-JL 

mo-kr. 

boo-ye. 

goorjJe. 

goo-la. 

bin-noor. 

mun-55m. 

go-bung. 

ooo-rea. 

too-mul. 

ki-a. 

COO-jlL 

won-goon. 

y-a. 

jum. 

djune-ban. 

ma-roon. 

kow-6ng. 
woon-kr. 
gal-jmg tchen- 
nun. 

mun-&hi. 
goo-la-ra. 
tchab-beer. 
ginbum. 
waw-diUi-ga. 
gwen-ge. 
bar-roon-giL 
gerale. 
po-maL 
djar. 
tchan-go. 
d&n-de tchan-ga 
co-an-jum. 
new-rone-bong-e. 



Quart-pot - 

Pint-pot 

Gum-tree 

Broad-leafed iron- 
bark-tree 

Narrow-leafed 
ironbark-tree 

Bottle-tree 

Box-tree 

Scrub-box 

Scrub 

Angry 

White 

Black 

Red 

YeUow 

Green or blue (no 
expression for) 

To walk 

We make a start 
now 

Go away, or be- 
gone 

I am going now - 

Go quickly - 

He goes very 
slowly 
I will not go 

I will go to- 
morrow 
I went yesterday 

You went yester- 
day 

We went yester- 
day 



newm-newm. 
jung-ga jung-ga. 
mun-bur-m. 
keg-gair. 

U-e. 

bung-air. 

too-too-re. 

bom-nan. 

kow-JL 

ba-aL 

chil-ing. 

woor-ru-we-a. 

que^ que^ 

ooo-na coo-Da. 



yan-ga 
ya-an-da. 

wa-ca-go-an. 

nye-a yan-an-da. 
yan-an-da boor- 
re boor-re ma. 
jal-lai yan-go. 

woo-ka nye-a 

yan-an-da. 
woon-a woon-a 

yan-an-da. 
nye-a yan-an-da 

5nn-nai. 

nin yan-yai dnn- 
ai. 

na-am yan-yai 
5nn-ai. 



ON THE BURNETT. 



Ill 



No. 169.~ADDinoNAL Wokdb— 6on«ntie<i. 
He will go by moonlight - goo-ai yan-an-da gnn 



To talk 


J^ 


To strike - 


■ boom-miL 


I want to flee 


natchtineftn. 


To stop or ceaae • 


• ne-ro. 


Towait or delay- 


- ya-ko. 


To kill 


• hoom-djan. 


To laugh - 


■ mun-jur. 


Where ia it? 


• won-yaf 


Gome here - 


^jft. 


Whoeeiait? 


. nan-ger-e-gnn? 


I hear thunder 


• . • 



I want to sit down, aa I am tired 



Qet ration bags 



goo-la-ra. 
by-and-by will go that fellow moonlight. 

Just look that way ya-boo-na. 

To travel • waa-lu. . 

Tonm - mai-ring-new. 

To hunt • mai-du. 

I run an old-man natchti nud-du 
kangaroo by my- kro-man kar- 
self b69n dja. 

An exclamation of gnn-ben-ani 
Burpriae ! 



Give me - nar-ai wa. 

Give it to him or in-do wa. 
to her 

Don't give it - woc-kawa. 
I will give you an nut chii wug-goo 
opooaum djan-in. 

Give me a pipe - nar-iu po-mal or 

nar-ai wa po- 
mal. 



• nut-chu be-ing-a me-raL 
I hear thunder. 

- nye-a n'een-na oo-an-jum. 
I want to ait tired. 



poon-be ma-na plau-ro. 
bags get flour. 

I will give it by- goo-ai nutchu 
and-by wug-goo. 



I gave it to you nutohu woong-e 
yesterday onn-ai 

I will not give it nutchu woo-ka 
to you wug-goo. 



Conjugation ov thb Vxbb <<To €k>." 

FBESSNT TBN8B. 

Tou and I go - naam neen 

yango. 

Georgy and I go - Georgy naam 

yananda. 

Georgy and Billy yo-am yananda 
go Georgy Billy. 



Igo - 


• nea yango. 


Thou goeat - 




Hegoea 


- kunnambe yan- 






We go 


. ne yango. 


Tou go 


- neu yanda. 


Thi^go 









112 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



GoNJUOAnOK OF THE VlEB " To Go "— con(i«ttcd. 



I went 
Thou wentest 

He went 

We went 
Yon went • 

■ 

I will go 

Thon wilt go 
He will go • 
We will go - 
Yon will go 



Let me go 
Go thou 
Let him go 
Let US go 



neayanye. 

arringya neen 
yanye. 

knnnambe 
yanye. 

ne yanye. 

neen yanye. 



PRBTEBIR TENSE. 

They went - - konnambe 

yanye. 

Yon and I went - naam neen 

yanye. 

Georgy and I Georgy naam 
went yanye. 

Georgy and Billy Cieorgy Billy 
went yoam yanye. 



FDTTTBE 

nea yananda or 
nea gere yango. 

neen gere yana. 

kunambe yango. 

ne gere yango. 

neu gere yana. 



TENSE. 

They will go • knnambe yan- 
anda. 

Yon and I will go naam gere yango. 

Georgy and I will Georgy. gere 
go. naam yananda. 

Georgy and Billy yananda yaan 
will go Georgy Billy. 



• yaboo nea yango. 

• neen yanna. 

- yaboo yanga. 

- yaboo neam 

yango. 

Let Billy and me yaboo Billy naam 
go yango. 



IMPEBATIYE MOOD. 

Go yon two 



Let them go 



mooam yaboo 
yanna, vr neu 
yaboo yanna. 
yaboo mooam 
yango, or yaboo 
neu yanga. 



X see 

Thouaeest - 
He sees 
We see 
You see 
They see 

Iwill see • 

Thou wilt see 

He will see 

We will see - 
You will see 



Conjugation of the Verb <*To See.'* 

fsesent tense. 

- nutohu nanee. 

• neendu nanee. 

• knnambe nanee. 

- ne nanee. 



neu nanee. 
kunambe nanee. 



You and I see 
Georgy and I see 



Georgy and Billy 
see 



FUTUBE TENSE. 



nutohu gere 
nean. 

neendu gere 
nean. 

kunambe gere 
nean. 

ne gere nean. 

neu gere nean. 



They will see 

You and I will 
see 

Georgy and I will 
see 

Georgy and Billy 
will see 



naamboo neendu 

nanee. 
Georgy naam 

nanee. 
Billy yoamboo 

nanee Georgy. 

kunambe nanee. 

naamboo gere 
neendu. 

G^rgy naam- 
boo nean. 

Georgy Billy 
na-ang-ge. 



ON THE BURNETT. 



113 



CoirjvoATiON ov THZ VxBB '* To Sem "—Continued, 



Let me see 

See thou 
Let him see 
Letusaee • 

I do not see 
Ididnotsee 



nutchn nean, or 
nutcha yaboo 
nean. 

neendu nean. 

kainean. 

neemgeu nean, 
or neemgen 
yaboo nean. 



woka nutchn 
nean. 

woka eubnra 
nutchn nean. 



mPEBATiyB. 

Let you two see • neendu nean. 

Let them see - kai nean. 

Let Georgy and naamboo Oeorgy 
me Bee nean. 

Let Oeorgy and yoambo Georgy 
Billy see Billy nean. 

They won't see woka ginda 
his tracks jinang nean. 



GoNjvoATioir or ths Vebb **To Run." 



FRESBNT TENSE. 



Imn - 


- nea mai-ring-e. 


You run 


- 


• neen mai-ring-e. 


Thou runnest 


- neen mai-ring-e. 


They run 


- 


- gun-a-ai mai- 


Herons 


- kun-nam-be mai- 
ring-e. 






ring-nu, or gun- 
a-ra mair-gin- 


We run 


- ne mai-ring-no. 

FERTEOI 


TENSE. 




ge. 


Iran - 


- nea mai-ring-e.- 


We ran 


- 


• ne mai-ring-nu. 


Thou rannest 


- neen mai-ring-e. 


You ran 


• 


• neen mai-ring-e. 


He ran 


. kun-nam-be mai- 
ring-e. 

FUTUIU 


They ran 

B TENSE. 


* 


• mai-ringnu 
jan-e, or kun-A 
mai-ring-nu. 


IwiUmn - 


- nea ger-e mair- 


We will run- 


- ne mio mai-ring- 




ging-e. 






nu. 


Thon wilt run 


- neen ger-e 


You will run 


• neen ger-e mair- 




mair-ge. 






ge. 


He will run - 


. hun-nam-be 


They will run 


• kun-^gere mair- 




gere-e mair-gu. 

mPERATI 


[VE MOOD. 




gmg-e. 


Let me run - 


- yan-be-mung 
mai-ring-nu. 


Let us run 


- 


- yan^-ma nSa 
mai-ring-nu. 


Bon 


- nulla mai-ring-e. 


Bun (2nd 
plural) 

Let them r 


person nulla mai-ring-e. 


Let him run 


- kun-nam-be 


nn 


- kun-&-gi-na mai- 




mai-ring-nu. 






ring nur-y. 


VOL. in. 


] 


a 
f 







114 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 160.— KEPPEL BAY, CALLIOPE RIVER, AND 

CURTIS ISLAND. 

Anonymous. 

The country of the Byellee tribe stretches from Keppel Bay 
to the Calliope River, and includes Curtis Island. It was 
occupied by the Whites in 1855. The tribe at that time 
numbered about 300 persons, and is now (1882) reduced to 
32. My informant, who was amongst the first White men 
who resided in the country of the Byellee, remembers that a 
few of them were marked with the small-pox; that the tribe 
described it as having visited them about the beginning of 
the century, and carried off large numbers. It is called 
Tcanbcy. Opossum-rugs are used by this tribe. Besides 
these facts, nothing new has reached me concerning the 



No. 100.— I:EPPEL bay, calliope RIVER, AND CURTIS 




ISLAND. 






Anonymous. 




Kangaroo • 


my. 


Hand- 


mooloom. 


Opoasum - 


koommonka. 


2 Blacks - 




Tame dog - 




3 Blacks - 




WUddoff - 


meeree. 






Emu - 


nurin. 


One - 

1 


- webben. 


Black duck 


goonanga. 


Two - 


booU. 


Wood duck 


goochang. 


Three 


koorel. 


PelicaA 


parangooL 


Four - 




Laughing jackaas toonee. 
Native companion goolongan. 


Father 


■ meegan. 


White cockatoo- 


keegoom. 


Mother 


■ yaya. 


Crow - 


toonweU. 


Sister-Elder 


- darwar. 


Swan - 




„ Younger 


- koondoolan. 


Egg - 


booroom. 


Brother-Elder • 


. marm. 


Track of a foot • 


eU. 


„ Younge] 


r weegooL 


Piflh - 


goodna. 


A young man • 


- wondooL 


Lobster 




An old man 


- darL 


Crayfish 


didbee. 


An old woman 


- barbooran. 


Mosquito - 
Fly - - ■ 


boowan. 
moolum. 


A baby 


• wondoo. 


Snake 


darm. 


A White man 


- koowin. 


The Blacks 


> booma. 


Children • 




ABlackfeUow • 


kingkel. 


Head- 


■ karun. 


A Black woman • 


wooroo. 


Eye - 


. mill. 


Nose - 


piree. 


Ear • • • 


■ btdna. 



KEPPEL BAY, CALLIOPB RIVER, CURTIS ISLAND. 115 



No. 160.~Kjefpel Bat, Galliopb Riyeb, and Cubtis Lsland—coi 


Mouth 


tonka. 


Boomerang - 


- darga. 


Teeth 


puta. 


Hill - 


- biapa. 


Hair of the head 




Wood- 


- boowi. 


Beard 


• yan. 


Stone- 


• dargin. 


Thander - 


- broomgi. 


Camp- 


- koonim. 


Graaa- 


■ bowan. 


& 








Yes - 


- kooaL 


Tongae 


dahnin. 


No - 


- wondo. 


Stomach 




^ 




Breasts 


- doolgooL 


I 




Thigh 


karL 


You - 




Foot - 


• didna. 


Bark - 


- kooka. 


Bone - 




Good - 




Blood- 


• koomL 


Bad . 




Skin - 


- korral. 


Sweet- 




Fat - 


- koolkin. 


Food - 




Bowels 




Hungry 


• tooloorin. 


EiAcremeiit- 


- koodna. 


Thirsty 
Eat 




Waj>«pear - 






Reed-spear- 
Wommera or 




Sleep • 


- yeengaa. 


throwing-stiok 




Drink- 




Shield 


- koomar. 


Walk- 






- mareway. 


See - 




Canoe 




Sit - 




Srni - 


. kine. 


Yesterday 




Moon- 


- elam. 


To-day 




Star . 




To-morrow 




Tiight - 




Where ai 


e the 


Bark- 




Blacks? 




Gold - 




I don't kno 


»w 


Heat • 








Day - 
Kight 




Plenty 
Big - 


- 


Kre - 


• boowi. 


Little - 


* 


Water 


• koongo. 


Dead - 


- 


Smoke 




By-and-by 


- 


Ground 




Come on 


- 


Wind 


- beeyan. 


Milk - 


• 


Rain • 


- bonoo. 


Eaglehawk 


.- 


God . 




WUd turk< 


sy - 


GhortB 


I 


Wife - 

I 2 


• m 



BOOK THE ELEVENTH. 



BOOK THE ELEVENTH. 

PBEFATOBT REMARKS. 

This book relates to several tribes now mach redaced in 
numbers, which dwell on a tract of country in the neighbour- 
hood of Moreton Bay, which has been long in our occupation. 
As might be anticipated, their original customs have fallen 
into partial disuse, and the remnants of the tribes now use 
in common the old tribal lands of which their ancestors 
were so jealous, the boundaries of which are now but imper- 
fectly known. In the several languages of these tribes, we 
have, as equivalents of the Blacks^ the words Dan^ Tan^ 
Thun^ and other varieties of some original term. Kabi, or 
some similar word, is also the negative adverb in two or three 
of them, and it is curious to notice that Murree^ which is the 
equivalent for the Blacks in districts situated both to the 
north and south of the country occupied by these tribes, 
bears in four of the vocabularies contained in this book the 
signification of kangaroo^ a matter dwelt on in Vol. I., pp. 27 
and 28. Also, in two instances, we find head and hair 
expressed by the same term. In some of the tribes the 
custom is, or lately was, in vogue of amputating one or 
two joints of one of the little fingers of the female children. 
The same practice we know obtained in the now long extinct 
Sydney tribe. 



120 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

The principal feature, however, of this book is the long 
account of the language and customs of the Kabi tribe 
given by Mr. John Mathew. From that gentleman I learn 
that some years back he spent a short time in the country 
of the Kaiiy and I attribute the ftdness of his description 
of the tribe rather to his love of ethnological studies, which 
has led him to observe and remember what came under his 
notice, than to that ripe knowledge which results from long 
experience. 

Neither must it be overlooked that when Mr. Mathew 
knew the Kabi their customs had been much broken down 
by the advent of the Whites, and the sharp edge of 
aboriginal manners had worn off. An instance of change 
of custom I take to be contained in Mr. MatheVs state- 
ment that, when he knew the Kabi^ a widow used to leave 
the tribe of her late husband, and, taking her children with 
her, return to the one in which she was born. This cannot 
be accepted as a primitive custom, as it runs counter to all 
that we know of the marriage laws and the constitutions of 
tribes throughout the continent, which we are also aware 
extended to this particular neighbourhood. 

Notwithstanding one or two statements which refer to 
modern and not to ancient and original customs, the reader 
wiU find Mr. Mathew's contribution an able and interesting 
one. 

I may remark that in 1856 I passed a few months in the 
Bunya Bunya country, on a station called Gobongo, at that 
time my property. Whilst there, the season of the Bunya 
nuts was at its height, and, of course, I saw something of 
the Kabi. From them I learnt that the majority of the 
Blacks then in the Bunya scrubs were strangers, whom they 
had invited to their country to feast on the plentiful harvest 
of nuts, which occurs every third year, but that they were 
forbidden to help themselves to any fish, flesh, or fowl within 
the territory. After some weeks of an unbroken vegetable 
diet, an intense craving for animal food, it seems, came oh. 
One day a few of the visitors, amongst whom was a young 



PREFATORY REBiARKS. 121 

woman, arrived at my head-station, and, the evening after, 
the rest of their party, one of which shonld have been the 
mother of the young woman just mentioned. Almost im- 
mediately a sound of screams and wailings was raised by the 
women who had reached the station the day before, and, on 
inquiry, I learnt that, as soon as the young woman and her 
firiends had left the camp in the Bunya forest, the men who 
remained behind had killed her mother, and satiated their 
meat-hunger by eating her. Shortly after I heard of a 
little girl being killed and eaten. 

I found at Gobongo that the Kabi had a curious mode of 
fighting out the quarrels which arose within the tribe. It 
was this. The combatants, who probably claimed the same 
woman as wife, each put his left arm round his adversary's 
neck, and passed his right hand, which grasped a sharp flint, 
behind the back of his opponent. This position being fairly 
taken np, and the naked combatants being locked tightly 
breast to breast, at a signal given by a bystander, proceeded, 
each with fierce energy, to rip, hack, and tear with the sharp 
ragged flint he held in his right hand the back of his 
antagonist, from as high as he could reach to as low as the 
waist, untQ one crying "hold enough," the matter was 
decided, and the combatants, dripping with gore, retired to 
their respective fires. 



No, 161.— BOYNE RIVER. 

FOBWABDED BT THE COHICISSIOKEB OF POLIOE, BkISBANE. 

Thb following particulars concerning the Toolooa or Dan- 
dan tribe were forwarded to me by the Conmiissioner of 
Police at Brisbane. By whom they were compiled I am not 
aware, as the original notes are unsigned. My anonymous 
informant, however, points out that he had visited the 



122 TEE AUSTRALIAK RACE: 

territory of the tribe prior to its being occupied for squatting 
purposes, and then proceeds to give the following informa- 
tion. 

The country of the Toolooa tribe was the watershed of the 
Boyne Biver. It was occupied as squatting runs in 1854, at 
which period the tribe which inhabited it is estimated to have 
numbered 700 persons, many of whom appeared to be sixty 
years of age, and not a few seventy or eighty years and 
upwards. The presence of men and women of such ages, it 
may be remarked, is reported by many of my correspondents, 
though I have not always recorded the fact, because we 
know that it was the rule to find aged persons in every tribe 
with which the Whites came in contact. The number of 
the Toolooa tribe is now (1882) reduced to 43 persons. It 
is mentioned by my informant that dropsy was one of the 
diseases which helped to carry them off. 

Opossum-rugs are worn by the people of this tribe, who 
adorn themselves with necklaces made of reeds, cut into short 
lengths, and threaded, and also with netted bands round the 
head, each with a pearl shell attached to it. Feathers are 
also worn in the hair as ornaments. Their bags and nets are 
made of the bark of the grass-tree ; their tomahawks are 
wedge-shaped stones ground smooth. They have boomerangs 
of both sorts ; spears are thrown by hand ; and some of 
their weapons are carved, and colored with red ochre. 
Animals are cut open with a pointed stick, hardened in the 
fire. 

Many of the members of the tribe who are over forty years 
of age bear the marks of smaU-pox. On this subject the 
tradition of the Toolooa people is, that about the year 1835 
they were visited by the Burnett tribes, who brought the 
disease and gave it to them. Such great numbers died of 
it that the survivors were unable to bury them. The Toolooa 
name for small-pox is deeum. 

Polygamy prevailed, and marriages within the tribe are 
said to have been rare, the men exchanging their daughters 
and sisters for Byellee and Maroonee girls. Infanticide, 



f BOYNE RIVER. 123 

, which always existed, is now the mle. The nsnal ornamental 

scars are made, and the septnm of the nose is pierced. Cir- 
cnmcision and the terrible rite are nnknown in this tribe, 
who bnry their deceased males in the gronnd, and place the 

' remains of females in the tronks of hollow trees. 



124 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE 



No. 161.— BOYNE RIVER. 

In this vocabulary, which I received in a hand hardly legible, the 
presence of the sound wi in the equivalent of the words sun, heat, day, 
and Jire is noticeable. As in many other of our languages, there is bat 
one word for good and tweet. 



Kangaroo • 
Opossum 
Tame dog 

wad dog 

Emu • 

Black duck 

Wood duck 

Pelican 

Laughing jackass 

Native companion 

White cockatoo - 

Crow - 

Swan - 

Egg . 

Track of a foot - 

Pish - 

Lobster 

Crayfish 

Mosquito 

Fly - - - 

Snake - 

The Blacks - 

A BUckf ellow - 

A Black woman - 

Nose - 



booroo. 

kooree. 

karrang. 

mirree. 

nurra. 

mering. 

penang. 

parung. 

doonwill. 

keegoom. 

toowell. 

koonkooL 

umma. 

ditna. 

pam. 

wunmeen. 

nimkin. 

moowin. 

wonki. 

kungun dan. 

dan. 

wanmoo. 

mootoo. 



Hand - 


• peri 


2 Blacks 


- boodladan. 


3 Blacks 


• inkmimt dan. 


One - 


- karroon. 


Two - 


• boodhi. 


Three- 


• numma (?). 


Four - 


- (no word). 


Father 


- beya. 


Mother 


- nabba. 


Sister-Elder 


• yaoona. 


„ Younger 


- kontalgan. 


Brother-Elder 


- kargo. 


„ Younger kontalim. 


A young man 


- karraa. 


An old man 


- konkon. 


An old woman 


- konnooan. 


A baby 


• butcham. 


A White man 


- barram. 


Children 


- 


Head - 


• karm. 


Eye - 


• meU. 


Ear - 


• pidna. 



BOYNB RTVER, 



125 





No. 161.— BoYKZ BsvEBi—contmued, 




Mouth 


• taUi. 


Boomerang • 


• bukkan. 


Teeth - 


■ toota. 


Hill - 


• wondo-wondo. 


Hair of the head- 


- moonoon. 


Wood- 


too. 


Beard. 


- yara. 


Stone - 


• wolba. 


Thunder 


- boomga. 


Camp - 


• darr. 


Grass - 


- boogargan. 


Yes 




yooL 


Tongue 


- doonnan. 


No 




. karbi. 


Stomach 


• budloo. 


I- 




• nin. 


Breasta 


• ummore. 


You 




. innoo. 


Thigh . 


- beyoo. 


Bark 




■ durra. 


Foot - 


- didna. 


Good 




• balka. 


Bone - 


• piguL 


Bad 




■ woote. 


Blood - 


• dee. 


Sweet 




balka. 


Skin - 


• kooba. 


Food - 




dalko. 


Pat - - ■ 
Bowels 
ESxcrement - 
War-spear - 
Reed-spear - 
ThT0wing-8tl<d[ • 
Shield- 
Tomahawk - 
Canoe - 
Snn • 


> balkee. 
■ wogooway. 
' koodna. 

- koodmary. 

moogan. 
. kooga. 

witpar. 


Hungry 

Thirsty 

Eat - - 

Sleep • 

Drink - 

Walk - 

See - - 

Sit - - . 

Yesterday - 


• wyeena. 

- ebumboo. 

• dagga. 

. koonim. 

- yenna. 

■ natha. 

• ena-ena. 

■ woolko-woolko. 


Moon • 


nelan. 


To-day 


woongee. 


Star - 


kootingal. 


To-morrow - 


> wootoowa. 


T.ight - 


koogaL 


Where are the 


wontha dan? 


Dark - 


kooroom. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 
Heat • 
Day - 


nethar. 
whyoom. 
■ witeabery. 


I don't know 
Plenty 
Big • 


- darginbal. 


Night - 


■ kooroomkannum. 

• 


o 

Little - 


karkoogarkool. 


Fire - 

Water 

Smoke 

Ground 

Wmd- 


• Wl. 

■ koonkool. 
' doomoo. 

parr. 

■ booran. 


Dead - 
By-and-by - 
Come on 

Milk - 


- kunman. 

■ karra-karra. 

■ kowi 

- kokkill. 


Bain - 


■ dookoo. 


Baglehawk - 


■ nunkar. 


God - . 




WUd turkey 


- wargoon. 


Ghosts 




Wife 


. 


- woonmoolan. 



A 



126 



TEE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 162.— THE COAST FROM BUSTARD BAT TO 
RODD'S BAY AND BACK TO MANY PEAK 
RANGE. 

FOBWABDBD BT THB COMMISSIONXB 07 POUCE, BSISBANB. 

Thb accoant of the Meerooni tribe differs so little from the 
one which precedes it, that it is unnecessary to dwell on it. 
Tingai is the name by which small-pox is known in the 
tribe. They decline to eat pork. As the reader wiU notice, 
only a portion of the Common Vocabulary has been trans- 
lated. 



No. 102.— BUSTARD BAY, ETC. 



Kangaroo • 


• goorooman. 


Opoasnm • 


googina. 


Tame dog - 


- meeree. 


wad dog - 


■ karoom. 


Emu - 


• nooree. 


Black duck 


> nurra. 


Wood duok 


- mering. 


Pelican 


- parwon. 


Laughing jackaai 


1 doowaL 


Natlyecompanio] 


a 


White cockatoo 


. belim. 


Crow - 


whakoon. 


Swan - 


konkekooL 


Egg - - 


- wang. 


Track of a foot • 


• dinnong. 


Fish - 


- gooral. 


Lobster 




Crayfish 




Mosquito - 


tibing. 


Fly - - 




Snake 


• wooni. 


The Blacks- 


• daan. 


A Blackf eUow 




A Black woman- 


keen. 


Nose • 


mooroo. 



[)NKB 07 Police, 


BBI.HBANE. 


Hand- 


-gillee. 


2 Blacks - 




8 Blacks • 




One - 


- karlim. 


Two • 


- booUa. 


Three- 


- goodthina. 


Four - 


- boolla-boolla. 


Father 


- paboon. 


Mother 


- nabong. 


Sister-Elder 


• yaroon. 


„ Younger 


• narbxmgan. 


Brother-Elder 


• nooan. 


„ Younger guntaL 


A young man 


- nogoin. 


An old man 


- goorki, girkil. 


An old woman 


- goorgina. 


A baby . 


- karkar. 


A White man 


- moothar. 


ChUdren - 




Head- 


- karm. 


Eye • 


- meel. 


Ear 


- bidna. 



BUSTARD BAT, ETC. 



127 





No. 162.— BusTABD Bat, Bxa— con^tniK 


Mouth 


- karlee. 


Boomerang 


Teeth - 


- teeta. 


Hill - 


Hair of the head- monion. 


Wood- 


Beard- 


- yaree. 


Stone - 


Thmider - 


- baroongi. 


Gamp- 


Grass - 


- boogalgan. 


Yes - 


Tongue 




No . ■ - 


Stomach 




I - - 


Brea«tB 




You - 


Thigh 




Bark - 


Foot - 




Good - 


Bone - 




Bad - - - 


Blood- 




Sweet - 


Skin • 




Food - 


Fat - 




Hungry 


Bowels 




Thirsty 


Excrement- 




Eat - - - 


War-spear - 




Sleep - 


Reed-spear - 




Drink- 


Throwing-stick 




Walk- 


Shield 




See - - - 


Tomahawk - 




Sit - - - 


Canoe 




Yesterday - 


Son - 




To-day 


^ Moon - 




To-morrow - 


Star - 






Ught- 




Where are the 


Dark • 




Blacks? 


Cold - 




I don't know 


Heat - 




Plenty 


Day - 




Big - - - 


Night - 




Little - 


Fire - 




Dead - 


Water 






Smoke 


* 


By-and-by - 


Ground 




Come on - 


Wmd 




Milk - 


Bain - 




Eaglehawk - 


God - 




Wild turkey 


Ghosts 




Wife - 



128 



THE AUSTELAUAN RACE: 



No. 163.— BAFFLE CREEK. 



Anoktmous. 



My informant notices that all numbers over four are expressed by the 
word yingcUho, To drink is rendered water eat. 



Kangaroo - 


- booroo. 


Hand > 


• birroo. 


Opossum 


- nugai. 


2 Blacks 


- boola dan. 


Tame dog - 


- mini. 


3 Blacks - 


• dan boola neula. 


WUd dog - 


- garrome. 


One • 


■ neula. 


Emu - 


• moL 






Black duck • 


- ngurra. 


Two - 


- boola. 


Wood duck 


- nguloarr. 


Three - 


• boola-neula. 


Pelican 


- boolumbnllum. 


Four - 


- bomboin. 


Laughing jackass 


karrooguL 


Father 


- babon. 


Native oompanioi 


1 koolooragun. 


Mother 


• ya. 


White cockatoo 


- garre-garre. 


Sister-Elder 


• wuthim. 


Crow - 


- wong. 


„ Younger • 


■ undalgnn. 


Swan - 


■ goloin. 


Brother-Elder • 


. thet-thow. 


Egg - - 
Track of a foot 


■ dail. 
- moola. 


„ Younger 


goonmee. 


Fish - - 


- daam. 


A young man 


gadekoorrr. 


Lobster 




An old man 


wooroobalrin. 


Crayfish 




An old woman - 


mootram. 


Mosquito 


- biuam. 


A baby 




Fly - - 


- wongain. 


A White man 




Snake 

The Blacks - 


• dan. 


Children 


gooinnee. 


A Blackf ellow • 


- dan. 


Head - 


warrole. 


A Black woman • 


mouee (?). 


Eye - 


' meel. 


Nose - 


- mooroo. 


Ear - - - 


binnea. 



BAFFLE CREEK. 



129 





No. 163. — Bafvle Crbek — conHnued. 


Month 


- kairm. 


Boomerang - 


- buggnn. 


Teeth- 


- deera. 


Hill - 


- windundo. 


Hairof thehead- moningil. 


Wood- - 


- doo. 


Beud- 


- 


Stone - 


- welLie. 


Thnnder - 


• 

- hooroomga. 


Camp - 


- wibaL 


Gnas - 


- ban. 


Yes - - 


- yo-i 


Tongne 


• djienome. 


No - - 


- gooraong. 


Stomach 


- booloo. 


I 


- nge. 


Breasts 




You - 


* ngun« 


Thigh 


- bu. 


Bark - 


- toora. 


Foot - 


- djinna. 


Good - 


« 


Bone - 


- 


Bad - - 


- warang. 


Blood- 


- dee, du. 


Sweet - 


- 


Skin . 


- yulaine. 


Food - - 


- tchengarlar. 


Fat - - 


- bultree. 


Hungry 


- 


Bowels 


- maapo. 


Thirsty 


- guamboolgnn« 


Excrement - 


• goona. 


Eat - 


- thaltroe. 


War-spear - 




Sleep - 


- yoonmag. 


Beed-spear - 


- (none). 


Drink - 


- koongo thaltroe. 


Wommera - 


- (none). 


Waik- 


• tliaggo. 


Shield 


. goonmurray. 


See 


- naggim. 


Canoe- 


- Looroogoo. 

- kundole. 


Sit . 


- yinnago. 


Sun - 


- giumine. 


Yesterday - 


- woorownng. 


Moon- 


- ngaloolum. 


To-day 


- woonnee. 


Star - 


- doojoongul. 


To-morrow - 


- butchungo. 


TJght - 


- girree. 


Where are the woodthadan? 


Dark- 


- 


BkcksT 




Oold - 


- ngrrtoon. 


I don't know 


- woodthala gam. 


Heat .- 


- ngengame. 


Plenty 


- yingatho. 


Day - - 


M 


Big - - 


- 


Night - 


- ngooloo. 


Little - 


- gooninni. 


Kre - 


- ngoon. 


Dead - 


• boonithegim. 


Water 
Smoke 


- koongo. 

- boolnn. 


By^md-by - 


- kurra. 






Come on 


- kowai. 


Ground 


- dou. 






Wind 


. 


Milk - 


- maam. 


Bain - 


- boonoo. 


Eaglehawk • 


- goollae. 


God . - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- waggone. 


Ghosts 


-. ngoothoong. 


Wife - - 


- ginbellum. 


VoLb m. 


] 


[ 





130 THE AUSTRAUAN RACE: 



No. 164. 
1.— NORTH SIDE OF MORETON BAT. 

Bt thi Bbyd. William Riolbt, M.A. 

2.— MARYBOROUGH. 

Bt thb Wbitbb. 

3.— MARYBOROUGH. 

Bt Jambs MaoPhxbson. 

4.— PORTION OF THE COUNTRY BETWEEN 
BRISBANE AND GYMPIE. 

Bt Riohakd Westawat, Esq. 

6.— PORTION OF THE COUNTRY BETWEEN 
BRISBANE AND GYMPIE. 

Bt W. Lakdsbobouoh, Esq, 

6.— ERASER'S ISLAND. 

Fbom Chib7 Comhissionxb of Pouce, Brtsrawe. 

Sbveral vocabnlaries have reached me of languages spoken 
by tribes the remnants of which dwell between Moreton and 
Hervey Bays and the adjacent coantry for about fifty miles 
inland. These tribes and their languages have become so 
intermixed as the result of our intrusion that the precise 
localities occupied by each tribe are no longer known to any 
one. Under these circumstances, I have inserted under the 
present heading (No. 164) several of the vocabularies and 



NORTH SIDE OF MORETON BAT, ETC. 



181 



descriptions of tribes which have reached me from the area 
of conntry in qnestion, without any attempt to locate them 
more precisely. 

The first of the following vocabularies was sent to me by 
the late Bevd. William Ridley, author of the well-known 
work entitled Kamlaroi and other Australian Umguages. 
The name Mr. Ridley gives to this language is Dippil, and 
the area over which it is described as prevailing is ^^Wide 
Bay, north and south as far as the Burnett, over a large 
tract of country." Comparing the Dippil vocabulary in Mr. 
Ridley's work with the translation of the Common Vocabu- 
lary sent me by that gentleman, some differences will be 
found. 



ADDinOKAL WOSDS, EXTRAOTXD VBOM Mb. RIBLBT'S WoBK. 



ScazB on we chest- 

Mairied woman 

Uncle - 

Aunt 

MalecouBin - 

Female cousin 

Ejmgaroo (fnU-grown male) - 

(young male) 

(female) 

(yomig one in pouch) 
Bee (smaU) - 
„ (large) 
Honey of smaU bee 

'„ large 

Morning star 
Milky Way - 



>f 



J9 



>9 



)> 



moo^iar (in some parts =s a^ie^). 

yimm. 

immo. 

maroon. 

yimndheme. 

kumedheme. 

kroman. 

durween. 

yimmer. 

woolbai. 

dibbin. 

turbain. 

kobbaL 

gilla. 

diraiyirki.* 

muin. 



* On ttie other aide of (be oonttnent ve have jfinSta =s mofmAng «tar.— See Vol. I., 
page 40a 

12 



132 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE : 



No. 164.— NORTH SIDE OF MORETON BAY. 



Bt the Revd. William Ridlet. 



Compare canoe and bark, A canoe is made of a sheet of bark. 



Kangaroo - 


- kroman. 


Hand - 


. dumin or dak- 


Opossum * 


- narambL 




kur. 


Tame dog - 


- wutta. 


2 Blacks - 


- 


VVUddog - 


- 


3 Blacks - 


" • 


Emu - 


- nguruin. 


One - 


- kalim. 


Duck - 


- n^. 


Two - 


- bular. 


Wood duck 


. 










Three- 


- kuraVnnta. 


Pelican 


- nimnffa. 






Laughing jackass kaggoo.'- 


Four - 


- bular gira bular. 


Native companion 


Father 


• bobbin. 


White cockatoo 


- kiggoom. 


Mother 


. ngavang. 


Crow - 


- 


Sister-Elder 


- yaoboon. 


Swan - . - 


. nirring. 


„ Younger 


- 


Egg - - 


- bam. 


Brothei^Klder 


- noon. 


Track of a foot 


- jiuun daote = to 


„ Youngc 


\T woodhoong. 




foot ground. 


A young man 


- kippa. 


Fish - 
Lobster 


-billa. 


An old man 


- winyagun. 


Crayfish - 


^ 


An old woman 


- yirkun. 


If 
Mosquito - 


- boomba. 


A baby 


. methindoom. 


Fly - 


- tibing. 


A White man 


- makoron or mud 


Snake (black) 


- moolloo. 




heoB. 


The BUcks - 


- dan or tjan. 


Children - 


- 


A BUckf ellow 


- tjan. 


Head - 


- kam. 


A Black woman 


- yirum. 


Eye - 


- mi. 


Nose - 


- muru. 


FAr - 


- binunff. . 



NORTH SIDE OF MORETON BAY. 



133 



No. 164.— NoBTH Side o» 


MoBETON BAY—corUinued. 


Mouth 


- tunka. 


Boomerang- 


- berkan. 


Teeth- 


- 


Hill - 


- waikerdummaL 


Hair of the head- dhella. 


Wood- 


. 


Beard 


- yersn. 


Stone - 


- kitta, muUa, 


Thunder - 


- moomba. 




m m 


Gran 




^M 


koonkum. 


Tongue 


- doonoom. 


Gamp - 


• 


Stomach 


. gunnimg,* doon- 


Yes - 


- yoai. 




guu. 


No - - 


- kabbL 


Breasts 


- 'amoong. 


I - - 


- unna, ngaL 


Thigh 


- puiyu. 


You - 


• ngin, inta, indu. 


Foot - 


- jinnung. 


Bark - 


- knmba. 


Bone • 


- 


Good - 


- gilanggoor. 


Blood - 


- kukki. 


Bad - 


- wurang. 


akin . 


- brabra. 


Sweet - 


^^ 


Fat - 


. 






Bowels 


. 


Food - 


- 


Excrement - 


m 


Hungry 


- kandoo. 


War-spear - 


- biUar. 


Thirsty 


- 


Beed-spear- 


. kunnai. 


Eat - 


- 


Wommera or 


kootha 


Sleep - 


- mibon.« 


throwing-stick 




Drink- 


- 


Shield 


- yao-run, good- 


Walk- 


- yenna. 




mum. 


See 


- nunyin. 


Tomahawk - 


- yemar-yemar. 


Sit - 


- ninnai. 


Canoe - 


- knmba. 






Sun - 




Yesterday ■ 


- nambura. 


Moon - 




To-day 


- 


Morning star 


. dirai yirke. 


To-morrow 


- bunyirke. 


Light - 


- 


Where «re the winyo dan ? 


Dark- 


- 


Bbioks? 




Cold - 


- 


I don't know 




Heat - 


- 


Plenty 


. murrin. 


Day - - 


- 


Big - - 


- winwoor. 


Night- 


- 


Litae - 


- dummal 


Fire - 
Water 


- gira. 

- koong. 


Dead - 


- bong. • 


Bmoke 


- woolui. 


By-and-by - 




Ground 


• daoer. 


Come on 




Wind- 




Milk - 




Bain - 


- yoorong. 


Eaglehawk - 


- woorama. 


God - 


- 


WUd turkey 




Ghosts 


- 


Wife - 





134 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 



No. 164.— MARYBOROUGH. 



Bt the Wbiteb. 



Kangaroo - 
Opoesum - 
Tame dog - 
Wild dog» - 
Emu - - - 
Black duck 
Wood duck 
Pelican 

Laughing jackass 
Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - - - 
Swan - - • 
Egg - - - 
Track of a foot - 
Fiah - . - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito* - 
Fly - - - 
Snake ... 
The Blacks - 
A Blackf ellow - 
A Black woman - 
Nose . - - 



marrL 

koorooL 

waitoha. 

noroin. 

ngara. 

wyoon. 

kargoon. 
koonoorang. 
kigong. 
wawba. 

paam. 

chinong. 

andaia. 

naloro. 

poonbaa. 

dibing. 

norang. 

dchaana. 

dchaauL 

yircan. 

mooroo. 



Hand- 


> biri. 


2BlackB - 


m 


3 Blacks - 


- 


One - 




Two - 


- pooUa. 


Three- 


. koorbanda. 


Four - 


- papooro. 


Father 


- paboon. 


Mother 


- naban. 


Sister-Elder 


- yabooin. 


„ Younger 


- 


Brother>Elder 


• nyoon. 


„ Younger 


A young man 


- gibara. 


An old man 


- winyer. 


An old woman 


- winyercan. 


A baby 


- berwan. 


A White man 


- madar. 


Children - 


- nogoin. 


Head - 

• 


. kaam. 


Eye - 


- mi 


Ear - 


. penang. 



MA&YBOBOUQH. 



135 



No. 164.— Mabtbobouoh — continued. 

Boomerang - 

Hm - - - 

Wood- - - choo. 

Stone - • takhe. 

Gamp - - taa. 

Yes - - - ngi. 

No 

I 

You 

Bark 

Good 

Bad 

Sweet 

Food 

Hmigry 

Thirsty 

Eat • 

Sleep - 

Drink- 
Walk - 

See • - • 
Sit - - • 
Yesterday - 
To-day 
To-morrow - 
Where are the 
Blacks? 
I don't know 

Plenty 
Big . - 
Little - 
Dead - 
By-and-by - 
Come on 
MUk - 
Eaglehawk - 
wad turkey 
Wife . 



Mouth 


- tamboor. 


Teeth - 


- tanga. 


Hair of the head- talla. 


Beard- - 


- yarrain. 


Thunder - 


- poromgoin. 


Grass - 


- baan. 


Tongue 


- choonoong. 


Stomach 


- toonoong. 


Breasts 


- namoong. 


Thigh - 


- booioo. 


Foot - 


- chinong. 


Bone - 


• moondoo. 


Blood- - 


- kaki. 


Skin - - 


- kobara. 


Fat - 


- marom. 


Bowels 


- poorownba. 


Excrement - 


- koonong. 


War-spear - 


-bilara. 


Beed'Spear- 


- 


Wommera or 


(none). 


throwing-stick 




Shield 


- koonmarine. 


Tomahawk - 


* moguim. 


Canoe- 


- kolaro. 


Sun - 


. chiroom. 


Moon - 


- baboin. 


Star - 


- dirraL 


Ught - 


- unda. 


Dark - 


- mooloo. 


Cold . 


- wallado. 


Heat - 


- waggoo. 


Day - 


- narron. 


Klght- 


- woin. 


Fire - 


. girrar. 


Water 


- kong. 


Smoke 


- wooloiwondain. 


Ground 


- tchaa. 


Wind- *- 


- boorran. 


Bain - 


•*. yooroong. 


God . 


- 


Ghosts 


- 



Dgin. 

ngaia. 

bibin« 

kalangoro. 

waning. 

kigar. 

kakainjo. 
ngaiabolong. 
chagooba. 
yinnian, boogan- 

doo. 
chagoba. 
yauman. 
nyagoba. 
nyinan. 
n3raamba. 
kalibolanoronda. 

yiriga. 

wandja dchaan? 

wanjamba. 

pagodar. 

pagodarju. 

tamarramai. 

paloin. 

punna. 

yiinbugga. 



136 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE : 



No. 164.— MAEYBOROUGH. 

■ 

Bt Jambs MacPhebson. 

The following remarks concerning the Maryborougli Blacks 
were forwarded to me by Mr. Henry P. Somerset, who got 
them drawn up by James MacPherson, fonnerly a bushranger, 
and known by the name of the Wild Scotchman. 

MacPherson says that the Maryborough or Wide Bay 
Blacks, whom he had a good opportunity of knowing, cer- 
tainly believe in God, whom they call Birral, and who lives 
in the clouds beyond the sea; also in an Evil Spirit they call 
Moontoon, who enters into the bodies of birds and other 
creatures, and frightens them by night. 

It is a custom of this tribe to strip the bodies of deceased 
males of their skins, dry them, and carry them about for a 
time.. After the death of a man, the old men and women 
commence singing a dirge some hours before daylight, asking 
the deceased why he left them. The first sound they hear 
whilst thus engaged, whether it be the rustling of a bough 
or the cry of a bird or animal, they receive as his last &r&: 
well, and believe that his spirit, which till th6n had hovered 
about them, has taken its departure. If the deceased has 
been a bad character, he is compelled to wander over rocky 
mountains until all his earthly friends are dead, and that 
with the last of them he is aUowed to enter the spirit land. 



MABYBOBOUQH. 



137 



When a male of good character dies, he is allowed to enter 
the happy hunting-grounds at once, being first ferried over 
the wide river which bounds it by two young women in 
a bark canoe, one of whom subsequently becomes his 
wife. The following are some of the words forwarded by 
MacPherson : — 



BreastB 


- 


• nulla. 


Back - 


- 


- poondoor. 


Backflide 


- 


- moomoo. 


Stomach 


- 


- tangoor. 


Knee - 


- 


- pone. 


Heel - 




■ tinangmoomoo, 
«.«., foot back 
side. 


StODe or ] 


knife 


- takky. 


Creek or 


thigh 


- tarang. 


Water- 

* 


• 


- koong. 


Unde - 


- 


- koomey. 


BelatioiiA 


on the 


parang. 


father's 


side 




Relations 


on the 


palkoong. 


mother's 


(Side 





Brain - 


■ na. 


Tree - 


to. • 


Scrub - 


toorg. 


Philn - 


piro.- 


Forest - 


■ pompay. 


VaUey 


nookoo. 


Hole ' 


nulla. 


Good - 


- kallangor. 


Bad . 


wurrang. 


A strong man 


kivirpoota. 


An armed man • 


> kungngoon* 


A sick man - 


tookongoor. 


A poet or maker oi 


[ yowamoova. 


corroborees 





138 THE AUSTRALIAK BACE: 



No. 164.— A PORTION OF THE COUNTRY BETWEEN 

BRISBANE AND GYMPIE. 

Bt Riohabd Wistawat, Esq. 

Of the Mooloola tribe, who inhabit some portion of the 
country which lies between Brisbane and Gympie, I have 
received a very full account from Mr. Richard Westaway. 
As, however, most of the statements made by my informant 
refer to customs already often described in this work, I 
shall merely insert a few extracts from Mr. Westaway's 
paper. 

In 1863, when the country of this tribe was first occupied 
by the Whites, the Mooloola are thought to have numbered 
300 persons ; they are now reduced to 40 individuals. Mr. 
Westaway is of opinion that one of the members of the tribe 
who died lately must have been about ninety years of age 
and his son seventy. This tribe color themselves red when 
in mourning, white on occasions of corroboree, and red and 
white when about to fight. Amongst their arms, which are 
of the usual sorts, are the wommera and boomerang. For 
carrying water they make bags of the leaf of a certain 
sort of palm-tree which grows in their country. Men, when 
in mourning, fast from all food except fish. One woman is 
still alive strongly marked with small-pox, a disease which 
we know ravaged the whole of the country in this neigh- 
bourhood during the early days of our colonization. My 
informant, who knows the tribe well, remarks that he has 
often seen them skin dead men, eat of their flesh, and 
deposit their bones, tied in a bundle, in a tree. As usual. 



BETWEEN BRISBANE AND GTMPIE. 139 

the girls become wives early. Mr. Westaway says, " I 
knew Omian fifteen years ago ; she was then a baby, and 
now (1883) has a child nearly two years of age." Marriage 
is exogamoQs, and wives are obtained in exchange for 
sisters and daughters. The nsnal avoidance of mother-in- 
law and son-in-law exists. The names of the dead are never 
mentioned. Mothers nsed to bind round, at the second joint, 
the little fingers of the left hands of their daughters when 
abont ten years old with the coarse spiders' webs of their 
country, so as to stop circulation and cause the two joints to 
drop off. 

The whole of Mr. Westaway's statements have reference 
to the days when the Whites first knew the Mooloola tribe. 
At present (1883) there is but little left amongst them of 
original tribal customs. 



A 



140 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 



No. 164.— BETWEEN BRISBANE AND GTMPIE. 

Bt Bjohabd Westawat, Esq. 

. It is notioeable that fimrree, which In many langaages meuu a Black or 
the Blacks, means homgaroo in this instance. The reader may compare 
fcUher and mocnf canoe and hark, sun and heat. 



Kangaroo - 
Opossum • 
Tame dog • 
wad dog - 
Emu - 
Black duck- 
Wood duck- 
Pelican 
Laughing jackass 
Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - - - 
Swan - - - 
Ejgg - . - 

Track of a foot - 
Fish - - - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito - 
Fly - - - 
Snake- 
The Blacks - 
A Blackf ellow - 
A Black woman 
(young) 
Nose - 



- murroo. 

• narambay, koroy. 

• wata. 

• watakaroom. 

- orong. 

- nar. 

- bowallam. 



qeeum. 

wow-wa. 

nering. 

bom. 

dinang. 

murang. 



boomba. 

diblng. 

wangeye 

than. 

than. 

earang. 



- morrow. 



Hand - - . 

2 Blacks - 

3 Blacks " 
One - 
Two - 
Three- 
Four - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

t, Younger - 
Brother-Elder - 

,f Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman - 
A baby 

A White man - 
Children - 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear - - - 



qualem. 

budlow. 

kurwunda. 

budlow-bndlow. 

baboon. 

abon. 

yabon. 

nighbor. 



budi 

wtnyear. 

maroon. 

wone. 

mathar. 

kom. 

me. 

binang. 



BETWEEN BRISBANE Ain> GTMPIB. 



141 



No. 164.*Bktwein Brisb^ 


Month or hole 


- nudlar. 


Teeth 


- tonga. 


Hair of the head- tadlow. 


Beard- 


- earanne. 


Thunder - 


- mumha. 


GlBOl 


- bon. 


Tongne 


' donomme. 


Stomach 


- donong. 


BreaatB 


• among. 


Thigh 


- tnrang. 


Foot - 


- dinang. 


Bone - 


- em. 


Blood- 


- kokki. 


Skin - 


- 


Fat - - 


- marom. 


BowelB 


- dmiong. 




- gonang. 


War-spear - 


- kry. 


Beed-spear - 


- 


Throwing-stick 


• goodar. 


Shield- 


' koontanne. 




- mooyam. 


Ganoe- 


- keembar. 


Sun - 


- orone. 


Moon- 


- baboon. 


Star - 


- deari 


light - 


- nnda. 


Bark- 


- 


Cold - 


- woUi 


Heat - 


- orone. 


Day - 


- 


Night - 


- 


Rie -. 


- geara. 


Water 


- kong. 


Smoke 


- wooloy. 


Gnmnd 


• tha. 


Wind - 


- bnrra. 


Bain - 


- nnmg. 


God - 


- 


Ghosts 


- mnndur. 



Brisbane asx> Gtmpib — continued. 
Boomerang- - boranne. 



Hill - - 


- 


Wood- - 


- 


Stone 


-dokkL 


Camp- 


- turra. 


Yee - - 


4 


No - - 


- gabie. 


I - . - 


- attoo. 


You - 


- in. 


Bark - - 


- kumbar. 


Good - 


- kulangoor. 


Bad - - 


- warong. 


Sweet - 


- kulangoor. 


Food - 


- 


Hungry 


- kandoo. 


Thirsty 


- ialo. 


Eat - 


- tathin. 

• 


Sleep 


- bondoo. 


Drink 


- thow. 


VValk- 


- yango. 


See - - 


- nunyanne. 


Sit - 


- ninaman. 


Yesterday - 


- 


To-day 


- 


To-morrow - 


- nungo. 


Where are the wunneathanT 


BhicksT 




I don't know 




Plenty 




Big - - 


- weelnor. 


Little - 


- tima. 


Dead - 


- balonne. 


By-and-by - 


- bonawoppa. 


Gome on - 




Milk - - 


- amnng. 


Eaglehawk - 


- unga. 


Wild turkey 


- w-y-wong. 


Wife - . 





142 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 164.— MOOLOOLA TRIBE. 



Br W. Laitdsbobouoh, Esq. 



Mr. Landsborongh's aooonnt of the Mooloola tribe is so dmilar to Mr. 
Westaway'fl that its Insertion is unnecessary. In the yocabularies rendered 
by these two gentlemen, however, some differences occnr. 



Kangaroo - 


- murree. 


Opossum - 


- karooey. 


Tame dog - 


- kallangoor (see 




Good). 


Wild dog - 


- wottakorong. 


Emu - 


- orroon. 


Black duck- 


- 


Wood duck- 


- nar. 


Pelican 


- boolooworm. 


Laughing jackass kowonga. 


Native oompani< 


)n koondarang. 


White cockatoo 


- gayome. 


Crow - 


- woowa. 


Swan - 


- naerir. 


Egg' . - 


- baam. 


Track of a foot 


. dinang. 


Pish . - 


- mumng. 


Lobster 


. elli. 


Crayfish - 


- 


Mosquito - 


• boonba. 


Fly - - 


- dabin. 


Snake- 


- wongL 


The Blacks - 


- thun. 


ABlackfeUow ' 


- thun. 




- earang. 


Nose - - 


- murroo. 



fland- 


- berree. 


2 Blacks - 


- 


3 Blacks - 


• 


One - 


kallim. 


Two - 


-boodla. 


Three- 




Four - 


- bunguL 


Father 


- baaboon. 


Mother 


- abung. 


Sister-Elder 


- winneer yaboon. 


„ Younger 


• mybeer yaboon. 


Brother-Elder 


- nunun. 


* „ Younger yarung. 


A young man 


- butheye. 


An old man 


- winney. 


An old woman 


- marroon.. 


Ababy - 


. ooing. 


A White man 


- 


Children 


- wallum bun- 




ganne. 


Head - 


- kam. 


Eye - 


- me. 


Ear - 


• binnang. 



BETWEEN BRISBANE AND GYMPIE. 



143 



No. 164.— MooLOOLA TRiBit— continued. 



Mouth 


- 


- nudla. 


Boomerang - 


. baranne. 


Teeth - 


- 


- tunga. 


Hill - 


• tunebar. 


Hair of the head- thudler. 


Wood- 


- doo. 


Beaid- 


- 


- erang. 


Stone ' 


• kukki. 


Thunder 


. 


- moonba. 


^% 




GnsB - 




- ban. 


Camp - 


- turra. 

• 


Tongne 


m 


- tanum. 


Yea - 


- area. 


Stomach 


- 


' doon. 


No - 


- abay. 


KreastB 


. 


- amoo. 


I 


m 


Thigh- 


. 


- taran. 


You - 


' 


Foot - 


. 


- dinang. 


Bark - 


• kumbar. 


Bone - 


- 


- aime. 


Good - 


- koolangoor. 


Blood - 


- 


- kokey. 


Bad - 


- warang. 


Rkin - 


- 


- gooure. 


Sweet - 


• koolangoor. 


Fat - 


s 


- marong. 


Food - 


- wingoor. 


Bowela 


- 


- dungan. 


Hungry 


- kandoo. 


Excrement 


- 


- gunnang. 


Thirsty 


- alloe. 


War-spear 


- 


- keeree. 


Eat - 


- binadow. 


Seed-epear 


- 


m 


Sleep - 


- bando. 


vVommera 


or 


goothar. 


Drink - 


• thoo. 


throwing- 


stick 


. 






Shield- 


. 


- goodmurrim. 


Walk - 


- yango. 


Tomahawk 




- mooem. 


See 


- moginee. 


Canoe- 


- 


• kumbur. 


Sit - 


. ninaman. 


Snn - 


- 


- oron. 


Yesterday - 


- namba. 


Moon - 


- 


- baboon. 


To-day 


- kuyungaiga. 


Star - 


- 


- dirri. 

• 


To-morrow - 


- numingo. 


Light - 


- 


- unda. 


Where are 


bhe wunyathunf 


Dark - 


- 


- woon. 


Bhickst 




Cold - 


- 


- worri. 


I don't know 


- kabeegay. 


Heat - 


- 


- worringan. 


Plenty 


- binda, winure 


Day - 


- 


■ 


Big - - 


- winure. 


Night - 


- 


- voon. 


Little • 


- timari. 


Fire - 


- 


- gera. 

• 


Dead • 


. boolmotha. 


Water 


«» 


- kung. 






Smoke 


. 


^7 

- oolooey. 


By-and-by - 


- bunaywobba. 


Ground 


- 


- da. 


Come on 


- ottaba. 


Wind - 


- 


- buranne. 


Milk - 


- omo. 


Bain - 


- 


- yarung. 


Eaglehawk - 


• unga. 


God . 


- 


- 


Wild turkey 


- wawung. 


Ghosts 


« 


- mundure. 


Wife - 


- malanmin. 



144 THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 164.— GREAT SANDY OR ERASER'S ISLAND. 

Reoeived from Chief Commissioner of Police, Bbisbaits. 

The following are the principal points in the description of 
the Great Sandy Island tribes, forwarded to me by the Chief 
Commissioner of Police at Briabane. 

This island, the aboriginal name of which is Thoorgine, 
was first occnpied by the Whites in 1849. At that time the 
population, which was split into nineteen tribes, amounted 
to about 2,000 souls, of whom 300 or 400 still (in 1879) 
remain. This redaction in numbers is attributed by the 
Chief Commissioner's informant to drink, venereal, and the 
slaughter made by the Black Police. 

Originally these people were quite naked. Their imple- 
ments and ornaments differ in nothing from those so often 
enumerated. Small-pox seems never to have reached them. 
Cannibalism was practised, and stiU prevails to some extent, 
the Karbi (or No tribe) having been frequently seen eating 
human flesh. Polygamy prevails; girls become wives at 
about twelve years of age, and mothers at thirteen. In&nti- 
cide is common. The operation of scarring the skin they 
call moolgarr. Circumcision is not known. Females have 
amputated in youth the first joint of the little finger of 
the right hand. The septum of the nose is pierced. As 
usual, these tribes have doctors, who daim to make rain and 
perform the other usual feats of conjurors. Their canoes are 
sheets of bark, stripped from the ironbark-trees, and tied at 
the ends. Their corroborees present no new features. Males 



GEEAT SANDT OB FBASEB'S ISLAND. U5 

of sixteen or eighteen years of age are admitted to the rank of 
yoong men by means of certain secret ceremonies. The dead 
are buried in the ground in the usual way. Message-sticks 
are in use. In connection with these tribes I have received 
four other communications, which it is not necessary to insert. 
All of them give murree as the equivalent of kangaroo^ and 
distioct names for small-pox. The following remarks are 
extracted from The Tonm and Country newspaper of 5th 
October, 1872 :— 

" A private letter from the Bevd. E. Puller, the devoted 
Mifisionaiy at Eraser's Island, to a friend in Ipswich, has 
been placed at the disposal of the Brisbane Courier, Mr. 
FuUer gives an interesting account of the work of the 
Mission, and gives an account of some of their prejudices and 
superstitious notions. The mother-in-law must not look 
upon her son-in-law at any time; they believe that if she did 
he would go mad, and would go and live in the bush like a 
wild man. Consequently, when they all come together to 
sing at school-time, after being taught in the classes, there 
is great covering of heads by the women who happen to 
have their sons-in-law there, and you will see them ^ back- 
ing^ into their places in a most laughable manner. The 
son-in-law, at the same time, will roll himself up in his 
blanket, or otherwise hide himself from his mother's gaze. 
The young man will not sit down on the same stool or box, 
or, in fact, anywhere where a young woman has been sitting 
at any time. They imagine that the young man would 
sicken and die. So that we have to have one form or stool 
for the ladies and another for the gentlemen. The shadow 
of young women must not pass over the sleeping-places of 
young men. K a schooner is passing the Mission about sun- 
set, the natives will sometimes throw sand up into the air, 
and blow with their mouths towards the sun, in order to 
make the sun go under quickly, and thus compel the 
schooner to come to an anchor for the night in the channel, 
near the Mission, and enable them to get on bo^rd tobacco, 
biscuitSj &o., which the captains generally supply them with. 

TOL m. K 



146 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

A man cannot marry a woman belonging to his own tribe, 
and the children are Bupposed to belong to the ^ mother's 
tribe.' As a rule, the natives will not eat pork, but I cannot 
get any of them to give a definite reason why they will not 
eat it. It seems custom, handed down to them by their 
forefathers, and, like nearly all their customs and supersti- 
tious notions, they can merely say it is so, or such is the 
case, &c. They are firm believers in ghosts ; and they assured 
me that there are plenty in this island, and that they can be 
seen at certain times. As a rule, they are frightened to go 
down to the creek at night-time. They believe that there is 
a devil {rnellong)^ but they have no idea of a God. To give 
you an idea how the natives have decreased in numbers, 
since they have come in contact with Europeans, I may just 
say — that on this island, which is about eighty-five miles 
long by twelve broad, there are, I think, not more than 300 
Blacks, and yet there are no less than nineteen distinct tribes. 
But strong drink and disease, introduced among them by 
ungodly White people, have made such havoc among them 
that the tribal bond, in many instances, is almost obliterated, 
and, like a few sheep left from many flocks, they amalga- 
mate as a last resource. And, as regards chiefs, that title 
has almost died out, the strongest man, or the greatest bully, 
' takes upon himself to be No. 1. Although the aborigines 
were not in the habit of smoking before the arrival of the 
White man, yet now, since tobacco has been introduced 
among them, they are great smokers — men, women, and 
children* A little girl or boy about two, or three years old 
may be seen with a pipe in its mouth smoking tobacco; yet 
they assure me that sometimes the mother will even take the 
breast out of the child's mouth and put the pipe in. We do 
not supply them with tobacco, but they manage to get it at 
the townships and from the vessels passing. The pipe is 
scarce ever out of their mouths when they are awake. And, 
again, the Europeans not only supply them with packs of 
cards, but also take the trouble to teach them how to play; 
so that we not only have to preach Jesus to them, but also 



GREAT SANDY OR FRASER'S ISLAND. 147 

to preach against card playing^ for they get so engrossed in 
playing them that they will not leave their game to come to 
school, and sometimes neglect their food. There are parts 
and portions of the land which they look upon as individaally 
theirs; on the death of the fiither it descends to the sons. 
They are cannibals; they eat the yonng men when they die, 
and the young women if they are fiit. Bnt cannibalism is 
not so prevalent among them now as it was before the White 
man came. When a person dies, they skin him (old men 
and women excepted) ; the skin is dried, and carried about by 
one of the relatives as a sort of charm. The bones and 
other parts of the body are divided among the kinsfolk. 
Sometimes they bum the body and carry the ashes about. 
They believe that the spirits of the dead Blacks come up and 
sometimes kill their enemies. They generally shift their 
camp when one has died among them. We have a native 
doctor here, who, they positively assert, has extracted rope, 
stones, pieces of glass, &c., from natives that were sick; they 
also affirm that he can fly up like a bird, and that he can go 
in the earth here and come out again at some considerable 
distance off; and they also say. that they cannot kill him, and 
that he will never die." 



K2 



148 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. IW.— ERASER'S ISLAND. 

From the Chief Commissioner of Pouce, Brisbane. 

I should doubt the correctness "Of the translations of the words from elder 

sister to old tooman^ inclusive. 



Elangaroo - 


- koorooman. 


1 Hand - 


- birre. 


Opossum - 


- kooroy. 


2 Blacks - 


- tharn boolla. 


Tame dog - 


- 


3 Blacks - 


- tham boppoor. 


Wild dog - 


• watcher karome. 


One - 


- kalim. 


Emu - 


- ngoorin. 


Two - 


- boolla. 


Black duck - 


- ngarr. 


Three • 


- boppoor. 


Wood duck- 


m 




& & 


■M^ « ^ 




Four - 


- koorbuntar. 


Pelican 


m 






Laughing jackass- greggoom. 


Father 


- baboon. 


Native companion koontoorgun. 


Mother 


- ubong. 


White cockatoo 


- giggoom. 


Sister-Elder 


- yaboon tummi. 


Crow - 


- wahba. 


„ Younger 


- 3raboon winye- 


Swan - 


- 




year. 


Egg - - 


- paam. 


Brother-Elder 


- 


Track of a foot 


-■ 


,, Younger 


Fish - 


- untire. 


A young man 


- thamwanunye. 


Lobster 


- 


An old man 


- nnnye tharn. 


Crayfish 
Mosquito -* 
Ply - 


- teebing. 

- oro-oro. 


An old woman 
A baby 


- nunye yeargun* 

- woorgoo. 


Snake - 


- wongi. 


A White man 


- muthare. 


The Blacks - 


- gibere or tharn. 


Children - 


- ogoyne. 


A Blackf ellow 


- thamabo. 


Head - 


- karm. 


A Black woman 


- yeargun. 


Eye - 


- me. 


Nose - 


- moorol. 


Ear - 


- binnung. 



GREAT SAITDY OR FRASESfS ISLAND. 



149 





No. 184.— Fbasak's JsLAKD—<:ofUmued, 


Month 


- tnngare. 


Boomerang - 


- burrgum. 


Teeth 


- illing. 


HiU - 


- yare. 


Hair of the head - booroompore. 


Wood -. 


- thorr. 


Beard- 


- yaring. 


Stone - 


- ducko or mooloo. 


Thimder - 


- booroonkine. 






Graas - 




CSamp - 


- tharrmo. 


Tongne 


- thoneoom. 


Yes - 


- wy. 


Stomach 


. 


No . 


- karbi. 


BreastB 


- umoong. 


I 


* atchu. 


Thigh 


- thurrer. 


Yon - 


- eando. 


Foot - 


- thinna. 


Bark . 


- pibing. 


Bone 


- moondoo. 


Good - 


- gullnngore. 


Blood - 


- gucke. 


Bad - 


- wurrung. 


SHti - 


- 


Sweet - 


- kellarore. 


Fat - 


- murroom. 


Food - - 


- thnmun. 


Bowels 


- tookoo. 


Hungry 


- kamchoo. 


Excrement * 


. koonnnng. 

• 


Thirsty 


- yeppeguia. 


War-Bpear - 
Beed-«pear- 


- gum. 

- belar-guni. 


Eat - 


- thirtkan. 


Throwing-stick 


- 


Sleep - 


- boowon. 


Shield 


- koonmerri. 


Drink - 


- 


Tomahawk - 


- moorgeam. 


Walk -. - 


- thargana. 


Gajooe- 


- kooloro. 


See - 


- nioyen. 


Sun - 


- thirroom. 


Sit - 


• 

. yeanmom. 


Moon - 


- babbooyin. 


Yesterday - 


- 


Star - 


- deri. 


To-day 


- oorooner. 


light- 


- ooroonter. 


To-morrow - 


- barunker. 


Dark - 


- wooinbum. 


Where are 1 


^e tham woncher ? 


Cold - 


-worn. 


Blacks? 




Heat - 


- murrgee. 


I don't know 


- wungumba. 


Day - 


- ooroonter. 


Plenty 


- wingore. 


Night - 


- wooinbum. 


Big - - 


- wingore. 


Fire . 


- kirrar. 


Little - 


- tumurrermy. 


Water 


- koong. 


Dead - 


- barloyin. 


Smoke 


- 


By-and-by - 


- bunna-bunna. 


Ground 


- tharr. 


Gome on 


- barga. 


Wind- 


- booran. 


Milk - 


- ummoo. 


Bain - 


m 

- WTOom. 


Eaglehawk - 


- biggoo. 


God - . 


- 


Wild turkey 


- yam or woggoon. 


Ghosts 


. 


Wife - 


- melelbir. 



160 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 165.— UPPER BURNETT RIVER, MOUNT 
DEBATEABLB, AND GAYNDAH. 

Bt Robert C. Rilet, Esq., and Montaou Cubb, Esq. 

Of the langoage spoken at the places mentioned above, I 
have received four specimens— one from R. C. Riley, Esq., 
a second from my brother, Montagu Curr, Esq., and two 
others from gentlemen who have not sent me their names. 
All of these agree so well that it is only necessary to insert 
one of them. It will be noticed in this vocabulary that there 
is but one word to express head and hair. I dorCt know is 
rendered no I; also wife and woman are expressed by the 
same word. 



No. 106.— UPPER BURNETT RIVER, MOUNT DEBATEABLE, 

AND GAYNDAH. 

Bt Robert C. Rilet, Esq., and Montagu Curb, Esq. 



KAngaroo - 


- booroo. 


Hand - 


• peeroo, birroo. 


OpoBsnm 


- dtheluL 


2 Blacks 


- dthan booUa. 


Tame dog • 


- mirri or merri. 


3 Blacks - 


m 


WUd dog - 


- karoom. 


One - 


" noola, noolang. 


Emu - 


- moa, moabang. 


Two - 


- boolla. 


Black duck • 
Wood duck - 


- naap. 


Three- 


- boolangoola or 


Pelican 


- wongi. 


Four • 


noolangboolla. 


Laughing jackass karkimgoon. 


•« 


Native companion daroo. 


Father 


• papa, papuum. 


White cockatoo 


. gair-gair. 


MotheiC 


- yoo, ya 


Crow - 


- wong. 


Sister-Elder 


- watchim. 


Swan - 


- goloin. 


„ Younger 


- kakure. 


Egg - - 


- dile. 


Brother-Elder 


• dtchar. 


Track of a foot 


- dthumpool. 


„ Young 


er tapil. 


Fish - 


- goorole. 


A young man 


- gippar. 


Lobster 


m 


An old man- 


- goorawel. 


Crayfish 


- kakine. 


An old woman 


- mookine. 


Mosquito 
Fly - 


- moongoroo. 

- dthippin. 


A baby 


- dappil. 


Snake - 


- tuppoo. 


A White man 


- woo. 


The Blacks - 


- dthan, marree. 


Children - 


- dappilwarra. 


A Blackfellow 


- dthan. 


Head - 


- warrole. 


A Black woman 


- mooni. 


Eye - 


- meel. 


Nose - - 


mooroo. 


Ear - 


- binna. 



UPPER BURNETT RIVER, ETC. 



161 



No* 165. — Uppkb Bttbnbtt Riysb, Moxtnt Debateablb, and 

GAYm>AH— continued. 



Mouth 


- kaam. 


Teeth - 


- deera. 


Uair of the head 


- warrole. 


Beard- 


- yerrbi, unbay. 


Thunder - 


- boowoomga. 


Gran - 


• baan. 


Tongue 


- dthunome. 


Stomach 


- mappoo. 


Breasts 


- maam. mam. 


Thigh 


- darra, bee. 


Foot - 


- dinna. 


Bone - 


- digarl. 


Blood- 


- dee. 


8kin - 


- uline. 


Fat 


- bulgi. 


Bowels 


- koona tenta. 


Excrement - 


- koona, kun. 


War-spear - 


• kunni. 


Beed-spear - 


- 


Throwing-stick 


- mokko, makkoo. 


Shield 


- goodmarri, kole- 




marri. 


Tomahawk - 


- boorgoo. 


Canoe - 


- kundool. 


Sun - 


- kinmine. 


Moon - 


- alloolum. 


Star - 


- tookoongul. 


Tight - 


- 


Dark - 


- mean. 


Cold - 


- yittoon. 


Heat - 


- 


Day - 


- allara, tookim. 


Night - 


- mean. 


Fire - 


- moon, oone. 


Water 


- goong. 


Smoke 


- boolim. 


Ground 


- dthow, jaow. 


Wind - 


- ban. 


Rain - 


• boonoo. 


God - 


« 


Ghosts 


- barrittmne. 



Boomerang 
HiU - 
Wood- 
Stone - 
Camp 
Yes 
No 
I 

You 
Bark 
Good 
Bad 
Sweet 
Food - 
Hungry 
Thirsty 
Eat 
Sleep 
Drink 
Walk 
See 
Sit 

Yesterday - 
To-day 
To-morrow - 
Where are the 
Blacks? 
I don't know 
Plenty 
Big - 
Little - 
Dead - 
By-and-by 
Come on 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk - 
Wild turkey 
Wife - 



bookan. 

wontoo. 

dalline. 

tukkeel. 

waibay. 

yo-L 

korang, goorang. 

atchoo, yeen. 

ngini, kuga. 

doora. 

kullunguL 

worrang. 

toom. 

daingole, jalm. 

dookalli. 

iditalgo, nango. 

jalm-dalgo ? 

koonim. 

goong-dalgo. 

bego. 

giname. 
wuming. 
kalooroo. 
kamgo. . 
wintballa dthan? 

goorang atchu. 

Walloon. 

yingarra 

goonine. 

boontin. 

gurra. 

beye, yunna. 

mam. 

guUia. 

wakoon. 

mooni. 



152 THE AUSTEALIAK RACE: 



No. 166.— MARY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA 

COUNTRY. 

Bt Johk Mathbw, Esq., M.A. 

Thb watershed of the Mary River would serve as a rough 
boundary to enclose the territory occupied by the aborigines 
who call themselves and their language Kabi, this word 
being their commonest negative. The people throughout 
this area cannot, however, be regarded as of one compact 
tribe. They are split up into several sections or small tribes, 
speaking dialects which exhibit marked differences, but do 
not vary to the extent of making the speech of one section 
unintelligible to a native of another. 

In this treatise the name Eabi is restricted to one of 
these small tribes and its dialect ; to that, namely, which 
possessed a tract in the heart of the Bunya country. 

Its territory embraced the Manumbar Run in the south- 
west corner of the Burnett District, the country watered by 
the Amamoor and Koondangoor Creeks, tributaries of the 
Mary River, and the Imbil Station. While this was the 
peculiar inheritance of the tribe, it had access to the land all 
round, and was very closely allied to the natives on the 
north, south, and east especially. 

Murudhalin, the leading man in the district here called 
Eabe, declared to me that the Kabt country proper reached 
to the coast, and as far south as Mooloolah and Durundur. 



MART RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 153 

Since 1866, the tribe has been rapidly dwindling away. 
In 1881 it did not comprise a score of individuals, and 
the few survivors rarely visited their old haunts, but 
hung about the neighbouring diggings. There were, in 
1865, three or four people who appeared to be of great 
age, notably one woman who required to be carried about, 
and was tenderly cared for; now there is none very old. 
The mortality among children has been quite as great 
as among adults. Limg diseases were prevalent thirty 
years ago, before the influence of White men had been much 
felt. A slow consumption, rheumatism, and indigestion 
may fiarly be considered as inherent in the tribe. Since 
contact with White people, the effects of these complaints 
have been greatly aggravated ; strong drink and prostitution 
have undermined constitutions naturally robust, and made 
them an easy prey to concomitant diseases. On the opening 
of diggings in the neighbourhood, the demoralization of 
the Kabt natives increased terribly, and mortality with it. 

In the stature of both sexes there is great variation. 
The height of the men is from five feet to six feet, and 
of the women from four feet six inches to five feet six 
inches. The average height of the men is about five feet 
six inches, and of the women five feet. 

Both sexes are well proportioned, wiry, with good muscle, 
but rarely show superfluous flesh. 

The hair, with few exceptions, is jet black, generally 
lank, occasionally wavy or curly, and there were one or two 
cases of woolly hair. Children's hair was often brown; one 
boy had yellow hair which gradually became brown. The 
color of the infant's skin is a light copper, but the lapse of 
years and frequent coatings of grease and charcoal gradually 
make it a dark-brown. In the native opinion, the blacker 
the skin the more beautifal. The men grow bushy curly 
whiskers and a strong moustache. On the breast and limbs 
there is not much hair. The cast of features iM considerably 
varied. Generally the forehead is low and narrow, the nose 



154 THE AUSTRALIAK BACE: 

big and flat, the mouth large, the lips thick, cheek-bones 
pretty high, the &ce oval, the chin small and retreating. 
The eyes are always black and generally large. 

In most cases the eyebrows are shaggy and prominent 
Sometimes the eyes are deeply sunk, but sometimes rather 
prominent. In several cases the forehead was high and 
smooth, but narrow; the nose, although coarse, was straight 
and not flat, and the mouth of moderate size. In all cases 
the teeth are large, white, and regular ; toothache, notwith- 
standing, is prevalent. The bones are small, the wrists and 
ankles particularly fine. Both sexes are exceedingly agile, 
and very strong in proportion to their weight. There were 
no Albinos in the tribe. There were two near-sighted men, 
and one totally deaf and dumb. There were at lessst two 
cases of deformity at birth, both males. One of these had 
only four toes on one foot. It is worth noting that this youth 
was Kabe only on the mother's side. He lived with the Kabi 
people, but called himself Waka Waka after the tribe to which 
his father had belonged. The other case of deformity was 
very remarkable. This boy had the left arm perfect, but in 
the place of the right arm there was a fleshy and cartilagin- 
ous member, about six inches in length, proportioned like 
an infant's arm (from the elbow to the wrist) and terminat- 
ing in what resembled a forefinger and a thumb, each having 
a small naU. The whole limb was plump and healthy, and, 
although it appeared to be destitute of perfect joints, the 
boy could grasp with the finger and thumb. This lad, named 
Wdlar^, was one of twins; the other twin was a girl, and 
was said to have been killed by her mother, the curiosity 
being kept in preference. Doubtless, his sex saved him. 
The mother, be it remarked, was a little woman, and had lost 
the first joint of one of her little fingers, which had probably 
been cut pS purposely. 

In the Kab2 character there were many elements which, 
developed and trained, would have made the possessors very 
respectable ; but there was a lamentable lack of will, and 



MARY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 155 

this backbone wanting^ all the other parts of the moral 
character got deranged and fell to pieces nnder very slight 
pressure. They thns made fair children, but very poor men. 
Some of them were very honest, trnthfiil, and trustworthy, 
excepting under strong temptation. All were sympathetic 
and affectionate. Parents were fondly attached to their off- 
spring ; that is, after the mother had determined to rear the 
child ; and they were indulgent to an extraordinary degree. 
Children were rarely chastised at all, and never severely. 
They fully reciprocated their parents' affection. Infanticide 
was common enough, and male children were probably pre- 
served in preference to females. Both sexes in childhood 
were treated with equal attention and tenderness. As illus- 
trating filial affection, I may mention the case of a boy who 
had travelled to a distance manifesting his regard for his 
parents by sending them a pound note by post. 

The Kab2 people exhibit considerable courage, but of so 
flashy a nature that it might more fitly be termed bounce. 
They are light-hearted, good-humoured, and do not long 
harbor resentment. They are, however, subject to violent 
bursts of passion, during which they often inflict serious 
injury upon one another. In judgment they are very de- 
ficient, and their minds seem unfitted for sustained exertion. 
They are all keen observers, and have a propensity for 
mimicry, but little talent for mechanical imitation. They 
are vain and fond of approbation. Two or three appeared to 
be weak in intellect. 

Bugs were made generally of 'possum skins, sewn together 
with sinews taken from the kangaroo's tail. When procur- 
able, the soft bark of the ti-tree was also used as a covering. 
In warm weather the natives went perfectly nude. Their 
skin rugs were rudely ornamented on the under side. By 
scratching with stones curved lines were made, and also poor 
representations of emus' feet. 

These lines were colored with red clay, and two were 
generally made on one 'possum skin. The chief ornament 



156 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

they seem to have worn was a piece of sea-shell of elliptical 
shape. A hole being pierced in one end, a string was passed 
through, and the shell hung firom the neck. I have seen 
narrow bands, whitened with pipe-clay, worn like chaplets on 
the head, but am not sure whether the practice was followed 
before contact with White people. I have also seen short 
bits of reeds strong like beads, and worn. Males had their 
bodies scarred for ornamentation. No particular time of life 
seemed fixed for this practice. It was done little by little, 
and, apparently, at the option of the person to be cicatrized. 
I saw the operation being performed on a youth about eight- 
een or twenty years of age by his mother. Only three or 
four incisions were made on that occasion. These incisions 
were deepest on the back. On the trunk they are made 
horizontal; on the arms they are perpendicular, • and are 
made only above the elbow. The scars are called muhx; 
they are from one to three inches in length, and arranged in 
rows. The women also scar their bodies; but, apparently, 
only to express deep sorrow on the occasion of a death. In 
the males the septum of the nose is sometimes pierced, but 
no ornament is worn m the hole. 

They frequently anoint themselves with grease and 
charcoal; and at man-making, corroborees, and fights, the 
body is smeared with thick lines of red and white clay. 

Fur from the taiL of the flying squirrel was twisted 
into thread, with which they netted bags, making the 
meshes large or small according to the purpose for which 
the bags were required. They also made small bags by 
platting thin narrow strips of cabbage-tree, tough' grass, 
or the inner bark of the currajong-tree. Such bags were 
usually carried by a striug passing over one shoulder, like a 
school-boy's satchel, and were depositories of their valuables, 
such as bits of string, shells, sharp stones, and relics of the 
dead. 

The tomahawks which were in use were made of a bluish 
stone, like serpentine. Their length was five or six inches, 



MARY RIVER AND BlfNYA BXJNYA COUNTRY. 157 

their breadth about three inches, their greatest thickness 
aboat an inch and a half; in shape they resembled an 
imperfect ellipse. They were sharpened at one end only. A 
piece of wood, slit at the end, formed the handle. The stone 
head was made fast in the slit by means of cords and the 
resin of the grass-tree. For knives they had sharp stones. 
They had pieces of freestone for rubbing skins and dressing 
their weapons. For the latter purpose they also employed 
the shells of a large species of slug. The women kept a 
supply of sticks for the purpose of digging yams. These 
yamnsticks were about five feet long, one and a half inches 
thick, and sharp at both ends. They were also the weapons 
used in feminine combats, on which occasions the sticks were 
grasped and used like single-sticks. Another most important 
implement was a vine, to assist in climbing trees. It was 
procured in the scrubs. The bark of it was rough, and nodes 
of very small size showed at intervals of two or three feet. 
The length of a vine in use would be ten or twelve feet, the 
thickn^s about three-quarters of an inch. At one end a 
loop was made, by first making a loose single knot and 
then twining the end a couple of times through the loop. 
When an ascent was to be made, the loop was held in the 
left hand; the other end, having been slipped round the 
tree, was generally allowed to pass behind the climber, 
who, with his right hand, grasped the vine at such a 
distance from the loop held in his left as when he leant 
back would allow his body to form with the tree an angle of 
about 45°. Simxdtaneously, with every step the climber took, 
the vine was moved- up the tree. In this manner an expert 
could ascend a tree at a brisk walk, and take paces as long as 
if walking on the ground. Where a large tree forked, the 
practice was difficult and perilous ; the vine being liable to 
slip, it became necessary in such situations for the native to 
pass the hanging end of the vine into his left hand, thus 
forming a hoop, upon which his back could rest while the 
right hand was free to cut notches for the feet with the 



158 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

tomahawk. In this manner, at an; height along the stem, 
the climber coald sapport himself and use his tomahawk. In 
an emergency, I have seen a light ironbark sapling supply 
the place of a vine. 

The spears were generally of ironbark, and in length 
varying from seven to nine feet. Commonly, they were just 
the simple piece of wood, with no throwing-stick, but 
occasionally had one barb. These were not carved. The 
clubs, or kuthar, were about two and a half feet long. The 
end held in the hand was about an inch thick, and jagged to 
prevent slipping. From this end it thickened for a distance 
of two feet, where it would be two or three inches through, 
thence it tapered to a sharp point. At the thickest part it 
was frequently carved into rings of prominences, each about 
half an inch square. With the plain ones the youths played 
a game, in which the object was to throw the weapon so as 
to make it bound off the ground for a few yards, and then on 
alighting slide along the- grass head foremost in a straight 
line. The kuthar was the chief hunting weapon, and was 
also the principal weapon in hand-to-hand combats. 

Of boomerangs they had two kinds ; one returned when 
thrown, the other did not. Whether the weapon would 
return or not seemed the effect of chance, and not design, in 
the construction, for, without a trial, they seemed unable to 
tell which kind the weapon was, and the end to be held was 
indicated by a few scratches at the very extremity. In 
Eabt the boomerang is called boran, a word closely resem- 
bling bz^ran, the wind. Another weapon, much like a 
boomerang, but in shape almost rectangular, was used for 
close fighting. It does not seem to have been thrown. 

They had shields called helemon, and also from the tree of 
which they were made kwnmarim. This tree was a species of 
currajong, and its wood very soft when green, but becoming 
harder and tougher when dry. The shields were of elliptical 
shape, about two feet long by fourteen inches bi'oad, and 
about four inches through at the thickest part. In the 



MARY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 159 

centre of the back a hole was scooped, snfficiently large to 
allow the hand to pass under a longitudinal bar, which was 
left nncnt, and formed the handle. The exterior was 
smeared with clay of various colors, and sometimes had a 
mark of ownership carved on it. On old shields, many dints 
of spears and waddies could be seen. Indeed, in single 
combat, the thuds on the shield were loud and frequent, and 
yet they seemed to break but rarely. Not only did the 
warrior protect the upper part of his body, but when his feet 
were threatened he leaped up and covered them with the 
shield at the same time. 

There was hardly any animal, from a human boing to a 
giant fly, that was not considered wholesome and lawful 
food to the elder men of the tribe. Tp minors, certain 
animals were proscribed as mundha. In certain seasons, 
and on certain occasions, the women had to abstain from 
some kinds of food, which were also said to be mundha. 
In the bunya season of 1875-76, bunyas were mundha 
to the females. The food prohibited to minors is porcu- 
pine, snakes, eels, fresh-water fish, kangaroo injured in 
the chase, the eggs of the emu and scrub turkey, and the 
flying fox. Indulgence in forbidden food is supposed to be 
punished with sickness and cancerous sores. A practice 
called Narm is incumbent upon bereaved persons. This is 
mourning by fasting.. The women will frequently beg for 
meat from White people, on the plea that they are compelled 
to fast from the flesh of the native animals. That the K&hi 
people were ciannibals is certain. Individuals, ashamed to 
confess themselves anthropophagi, are ready enough to tell you 
that somebody else relished human flesh. The victims who 
fell in war seem to have been invariably eaten. If there was 
any flesh on the bones of those who died from natural causes 
it did not go to waste; and I have heard even of a child who, 
having &ttened, was devoured. The dingo contributed his 
share to the Kabt feast. A very delicate morsel was a grub 
called bu^ruga, from three to six inches long and half an 



160 THE AUSTRALIAN RACK: 

inch thick, cut out of young gum-trees. The writer can 
recommend this as excellent eating when roasted; raw, it 
is rather insipid and watery. It was not a very pleasant 
sight to see a Black woman divest of wings and legs the 
gigantic fly (the cicala), and then gobble it up alive. 

Flesh was not objected to raw, but if time permitted it 
was invariably roasted on the embers. The family did not 
wait until the joint was cooked to the centre. When the heat 
had penetrated an inch or so, paterfamilias took up the joint 
and had a few bites. It was then handed round until the 
half-roasted part was finished, when the remainder was 
exposed to the fire for a few minutes and thereafter passed 
round again. They do not appear to have used ovens. 

Honey, the product of the native bees, was a fiavorite 
article of diet. There were two varieties, gilla and ka'wai. 
The former was the more common, and the latter the more 
esteemed. In the appearance of the bees there is very little 
difference. Both sorts are much like a house-fly in color, 
but about half as large. They make a buzz just audible. 
The envelope containing the honey is like a cluster of small 
bags, of irregular size and shape. Gilla is often very thin, 
and both sorts, I beUeve, have a sourish fermented taste if 
the hive be exposed to the sun. £[a'wai more resembles the 
honey of our domestic bee, but is not equal to it in flavor. 
The aboriginal method of eating honey, although to European 
taste somewhat repTilsive, is at least frugal and ingenious, 
and was, no doubt, the best they could adopt when they 
possessed no vessels in which they could carry the semi- 
liquid nectar. The inner bark of a tree having much bast 
tissue was procured. A piece of this, about two feet square, 
having been rubbed and softened, was smeared with the 
honey, which it partly absorbed. The treat was to suck and 
chew this honeyed bark, and, like the joint already spoken of, 
it was eagerly clutched at by all the company in turn, passed 
from one mouth to another, and when sucked dry was dipped 
in the honey for further sucking and chewing. 



MARY RIVEB AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 161 

For vegetable food they used the roots of ferns, a kind of 
yam, the budding leaves of a species of palm-tree, the root of 
a plant common about the creeks, and the seeds found in the 
scales of the cones of the bftnys^tree. The plant found about 
the margins of watercourses resembled, in the shape of its 
leaf, the lily of the Nile, and was probably a lily. The root 
had to be pounded before use, as the juice was extremely 
pungent. 

But by far the most important and most valued vegetable 
product was the bunya. The bunyar-tree, or Araucaria Bid- 
willii, is a very conspicuous ornament of the scrubs in the 
Kabi country, and, by its dome-shaped crown, can be dis- 
tinguished from the surrounding trees at a great distance. 
The cones, when full-grown, are fourteen to sixteen inches in 
length, and at the thickest part about nine inches through. 
The edible portions, the seeds, or ovules rather, are an inch or 
an inch and a half long, and about half an inch thick. Their 
tissue much resembles that of a potato. They are of conical 
shape, covered with a tough envelope, and are found one on 
each scale. When the cone is young, the edible portions are 
juicy and sweet, and are eaten entire and raw. As the seed 
matures, and the embryo assumes a definite. form, the sur« 
rounding tissue becomes drier and less palatable ; the embryo 
is then rejected. When matured, the natives prefer to roast 
the nut-like seed. Before being roasted, each seed is partially 
bruised with a stone, and when it has been in the fire for a 
minute or two it gives a crack, the signal that it is cooked. 
These kernels are also pounded into a kind of meal, called 
maNUy and eaten in that form. .In laying up a store of 
bunyas, the Blacks exhibited an unusual foresight. While 
the fruit was in season, they filled netted bags with the seeds, 
and buried them generally about the beds of creeks, to be 
ready for use when the season was long past. Bunyas that 
had lain for months underground had, when taken up, a 
most offensive smell, which they imparted to all that came 
in contact with them. Nevertheless, the Blacks ate them 

VOL in. L 



162 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

with great relish. In some seasoiis, the yield was very scant. 
At the prospect of an abundant yield, tribes would come the 
distance of a hundred miles to feast upon the bunya, and to 
finish up the feasting with fighting. 

The Kabe tribe had no recognized chief. Courage, intelli- 
gence, and seniority gave a preponderating influence to their 
possessors. 

There were two or three men in the tribe, about equal in 
power, who directed the movements of the whole, controlled 
the relations with neighbouring tribes, took care that estab- 
lished customs should not be infringed, and exercised a 
fatherly interest in domestic matters. They were men of 
acknowledged courage, whose influence and prowess seemed 
both hereditary. One of them would, as a rule, espouse the 
cause of a weaker brother who was being maltreated. Pro- 
perty such as they possesssd was respected. If a man found 
a bees' nest, and did not wish to rob it for some time, he 
would mark the tree by pulling up the grass around the base, 
placing sticks against it, and so forth. It was a crime to 
rob a nest thus indicated. Quarrels were settled mostly by 
the arbitrament of the kuthar or club. 

For the regulation of marriages, each person in the tribe 
bore one of the four names — BaraN, Balkun, DhzrwEn, 
Bonda. There was also a name, Bandhur^ which was, how- 
ever, rarely used. The practice with reference to these names 
seemed to be that the names of children depended directly 
on the mother's name in fe^a/ marriages ; that a BaraN ought 
not to marry a Balkun, nor a DhsrwEu a Bonda, but a BaraN 
or a Balkun could marry either a Dhsrwsn or a Bonda. 
Then, if a man, a BaraN, married a Bonda, the children were 
DhsrwEn; if he married a DhflrwEn, the children were 
Bonda. Like results followed when a Balkun married a 
Bonda or DhErwEu. In the case of a man, being a DhErwEn, 
he«married either a BaraN, and the children were Balkun, or 
a Balkun, and the children were BaraN. Like results fol- 
lowed on a Bonda marrying a BaraN or a Balkun. Bandhur 



aiARY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 163 

seemed to be a synonyme for DhErwEn. A table will more 
clearly indicate the relations of these names : — 



Males. 


Females. 


Ohildren. 


BaraN marries - 


C Bonda 
'] or 


- DhETWBn. 

- Bonda. 




Ci^hRrwEn 


Balkvn marriefl 


CDhErwsn 
-] or 
C Bonda 


• Bonda. 
DhETWBn. 


DhsrwEn mames - 


CBaraN 
- •< or 
CBalknn - 


• Balkun. 

• BaraN. 


Bonda marries 


CBalknn - 
-] or 
(BaraN 


- BaraN. 

- Balkan. 



These restrictions have been more exactly stated to me 
thus by the best Kabi authority:-:— 

BaraN marries DhErwEn, the child b Bonda. 
Balkun marries Bonda, the child is DhsrwEn. 
DhEnrsn marries Balkun, the child is BaraN. 
Bonda marries BaraN, the child is Balkun. 

It was a favorite practice to address one another by matri- 
monial instead of proper na^mes. The regolations indicated 
above were frequently disregarded. 

K, contrary to the rules, both parents were of one name, 
the children took the same name; and if BaraN and Balkun 
or Bonda and DhErwEn intermarried, the children received 
the name they would have got had the father married legiti- 
mately. These names were, with slight variations, common 
to the surrounding tribes. Marriages generally took place 
with members of adjacent and closely allied tribes. Betroth- 
als at a very early age are customary. Youths would 
exchange sisters when they could, but the elders generally 
appropriated the young women. It was criminal for a son- 
in-law and mother-in-law to look at one another. If they 
happened to meet by chance, they turned away their faces. 
Elopements were common, and, under whatever circum- 
stances, always entailed a combat between the husband, or 
guardian, and the lover. If the latter proved himself a 
doughty combatant, the woman became his wife. Bigamy 

L2 



164 THE AUSTRAIIAK RACE: 

was common. In cases of bigamy, the two women seemed 
to agree well and shared the domestic duties. In quarrels, 
husbands occasionally beat their wives craelly from head to 
foot. I have known a wife to receive a fractore of the skull 
in a quarrel with her husband, and to become reconciled to 
him a day or two after. The females were married at a 
tender age, probably at about fourteen years. Owing to the 
practice of in&nticide, it would be difficult to say what 
number of children a woman bore, but the average was pro- 
bably five. In one instance there must have been an interval 
of about sixteen years between the births of an oldest and 
youngest child. Infants seem to have been put out of the 
way by mothers, to escape the trouble of rearing them. 
Some women lightly confessed to having killed several 
children. The practice was doubtless an ancient one. 
Ordinarily, chUdren. belonged to the father's tribe, but when 
the father died before the children had passed the age -of ten 
or twelve, the mother returned to her own tribe, taking 
her children along with her, and the inference is that the 
children became attached to it. 

Widows, after a period of mourning, received another 
husband. 

The inherent diseases have already been mentioned, 
viz.: — Rheumatism, indigestion, and pulmonary complaints. 
The first two were rarely chronic. Lung disease appeared 
in severe colds and coughs, terminating in emaqiation and 
death. I saw one case of dropsy and asthma combined, two 
men bore marks of small-pox, and syphilis had left unmis- 
takable traces on the face of one. They had no idea of the 
causes of internal complaints, but attributed all sickness to 
the malevolence of another aborigine. A pain was supposed 
to be the result of a blow with a pebble thrown by an enemy. 
A mauNwr, or doctor, would suck the aching part and profess 
to extract the pebble, or otherwise would pretend to take 
blood from it in the following manner: — The manNtnr is 
provided with a long cord made of fur, and a vessel contain- 
ing some water. One end of the cord is fastened round the 



MARY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 165 

body of the sick person immediately over the seat of paiD^ 
the other end lies in the water. The manNt^, who is seated 
between the patient and the water-vessel, holds the cord 
abont the middle with both hands, and rubs it backwards 
and forwards across his gams, causing them to bleed. As 
the saliva and blood accnmnlate, the mixture is spit into 
the vessel. This process is gone through in a slow, deliberate 
fiishion, until the water in the vessel is quite discolored. 
The blood in the frothy liquid is supposed to have been 
drawn from the patient, who drinks the contents of the 
vessel and expresses himself relieved by the operation and the 
potion. However incredible the above description may seem, 
it is quite true ; the writer has seen the bleeding in process. 

Wounds were often plastered with clay, but sometimes 
Nature was left to do all the healing herself. In cases of 
braises, sores, or boils on the limbs, a ligature was fitstened 
two or three inches above the part affected to check circula- 
tion. Mange, evidently caught from the dogs, was not 
unconomion. They had a peculiar and disgusting method of 
dealing with it. One person, using a short pointed stick, 
would very patiently prick the pustules aU over the body of 
the sufferer. The counter irritation must have afforded 
temporary relief. For headache, a band was generally fas- 
tened tightly round the temples. Fractured bones knitted 
with wonderftil rapidity. In one instance, a boy got his 
collar-bone broken* and in three days it neither impeded his 
movements, nor did it seem to trouble him at all. 

On the occurrence of a death, the wailing was horrible to 
listen to. The general cry was "N&dha Nddha mimin 
mimin wutht^N Na&uNgai balomatht gindi " ; then followed 
unearthly inarticxdate wails. 

The meaning of the first four words seems to have been 
unknown; the last four mean my brother (in some cases 
father, &c.) is dead I Women cut themselves from head to 
foot. The incisions were about an inch in length, and suffi- 
ciently deep to cause a copious . flow of blood, which was 
allowed to dry on the skin, and was not washed off. 



166 THE AUSTRAliAH BACK: 

The whole camp joined in the bunentatioiL, the sinceritr 
of which was ganged by its length and loudness. Every one 
who cried was considered to pay a great compliment to the 
bereaved friends. The latter were considered base and 
nngratefhl if they shonld afterwards injure any one who had 
joined vehemently in the wailing. Generally relics of the 
dead were preserved, such as the knee-caps, the bones of the 
toes, the whole skin, or a part of it Fleshy parts of the 
body were eaten. Logs were placed on the snrface of the 
ground at one side or other of the grave. I have been told 
that these indicated the nnmber of brothers surviving the 
deceased, the position of the logs relatively to the grave 
pointing out the direction in which the surviving brothers 
lived. Near female relatives of the departed tied small tufts 
of emu feathers to the locks of their hair all over the head. 
These were the signs of mourning, and were allowed to 
remain on the head until they gradually dropped off. Rela- 
tives fasted for several weeks. Crying was kept up every 
night for a few weeks, and thereafter on occasional nights 
for a month or two. Names of dead persons were never 
uttered. To utter them was to bring about great evil, pro- 
bably to both the dead and the living. Deaths were ascribed 
to the influence of a member of some neighbouring tribe, and 
were often avenged by fights. 

Two names — dhur, a ring^ and kivar yKNga, or man- 
making — appear to have applied to one &nd the same cere- 
mony. The young men of the present generation have not 
been subjected to the ordeal, and they have only a very vague 
idea of what it is like. About some of their practices, of 
which the man-making is one, the Blacks seem disinclined 
to give much information, or the information given is not 
very reliable. The proceedings at the k2 var yENga have been 
described to me to be as follows: — ^The young men and women 
are reddened with ochre and excluded from the camp. Elders, 
called kamaran (head-men)^ are appointed to direct the cere- 
mony. The young people of both sexes are allowed to camp 
near each other, but no intercourse is permitted. They are 



MARY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 167 

closely watched, and the slightest levity is punished. By 
all accounts the restraint placed upon them is very Severe. 
The young people call out, "Nudha Nudha Nudha Nudha 
m/fia mma ka." My infonnant did not know the meaning of 
these words, hence they are probably corrupted. As they 
are repeated very frequently during the ceremony, they seem 
to be regarded as a charm. Mi£La is very likely an interro- 
gative. 

On the first day there is a great corroboree among the 
elders. At night the mundha, or prohibited food, is handed 
round for inspection among the young people who are fasting. 
On the second day the young people are washed. The hair 
is shaved off all parts of the body but theiiead. The youths 
join hands and march about a fire, the maidens doing the 
same at another fire. On successive nights various devices 
are resorted to for the purpose of terrifying the young people. 
One of these was making a hole in the ground into which 
one of the old men went, and, by grim personations of 
animals, made himself as hideous as possible. Sham-fighting 
also took place. 

At last, on the sixth day, there is the wamaran, or gather- 
ing of all the Blacks, young and old, around three fires. A 
kind of roll-call is then gone through, each young person 
calling " kai Nai," — " here am I," in response to their names. 
The young men are asked in turn if they would like to have 
a wife, and reply in the affirmative. At night the married 
women take charge of the young men, the married men 
camping by themselves, and the ceremony is over. Circum- 
cision was not practised, nor any mutilation. 

The corroborees, or " yauar," as the Kab^ people call 
them, fall naturally into two classes, the dramatic and the 
lyric. When a grand or dramatic corroboree had been com- 
posed, the poet trained the members of his own tribe to 
produce it. The intelligence that a new corroboree had been 
composed was received with pleasurable excitement by the 
surrounding tribes, and in due course gatherings were 
convened^ at which it was performed. The poet having 



168 THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 

introduced his work to the neighbouring tribes, these in torn 
invited their allies to witness it and aid in the performance. 
In this manner a corroboree travelled, and was sung with 
great enthusiasm where not a word of it was intelligible. The 
dramatic part in these performances was sometimes very 
considerable. The story of the drama appears to have been 
exceedingly short and simple, and occasionally full of excite- 
ment. The representations were rarely free from obscenity, 
and on some occasions indecent gestures were the main parts 
of the action. I have seen a structure formed of huge forked 
sticks placed upright in the ground, the forks upwards, with 
saplings reaching from fork to fork, and boughs laid over 
all. This building was part of the machinery for a cor- 
roboree, at a cerjiain stage of which the males, who were 
located on the roof, rushed down among the females, who 
were underneath, and handled them licentiously. One cor- 
roboree I saw performed as follows: — The females sat in the 
foreground near a number of fires. There were about a 
hundred and fifty performers, all males, disposed in several 
bands. They formed in rows in the background, and advanced 
very slowly towards the fires. The composer led the front 
rank, and was conspicuous by the loudness of his voice and 
the animation of his gestures. The bodies of all were 
smeared with red and white clay, and as nearly as x>ossible 
after the same fashion. Each held a kuthar (club) in the 
right hand. There was an amazing simultaneousness of 
action, and excellent time was beaten with the feet. During 
the whole representation the women beat time. Each sat 
with her thighs close together, and beat upon the hollow 
thus formed with both her hands open, the fingers of the 
one passing obliquely over those of the other. Every one 
seemed intensely delighted. Near the close the performers 
placed the left hand on the side of their head, and bending 
to the left as one man, leant as near the ground as possible, 
remaining for a couple of seconds in this attitude, which re- 
presented sleep. Shortly after, having given three great 
yells in close succession, they retired to the background. 



MARY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 169 

The same movements were repeated, but other ranks took the 
front. 

The corroboree music is much like 9, chant. A string 
of words often runs to the one note. All the parts are 
variations of one tone, sung in different kinds of time, and 
at various rates of speed. There is a peculiar tendency to 
slide in semitones from one key into another, and the effect of 
the musiais almost invariably minor. A favorite practice is 
to raise the pitch suddenly an octave, and in order to effect 
this it is sometimes necessary to allow it to slide to a low 
pitch in the manner spoken of above. Instead of intimat- 
ing the conclusion of one part of the piece by two or three 
yells, a more musical practice is often followed of trilling the 
sound of r at a high pitch. 

In the corroboree marked No. I. there is an example of 
the dramatic kind. Only a portion iB given, bnt enfficient 
to indicate the character of the whole. The words are not 
Kabi. This is easily apparent from the feet being Iambic 
if from nothing else, as there is hardly an Iambic foot in 
Kabs. The lyrics are short simple ditties, comprising at 
most two pdrts. The subject is some exploit or custom of 
the composer, or perhaps the charms of his sweetheart. 
Such songs are only known to a few individuals, and are 
sung in private. In both examples that I give there seems 
to be an attempt at rhyme. I am pretty sure the effect is 
not accidental. If we take the words of the second example, 
which seem to be of th6 lyric kind, and is written in Kabi, 
we find a rhyme recurring containing the vowel a. That 
this is intentional is evident from the fact that the word 
kalaNa in the song is always in conversation pronounced 
kalaNt^r, that the word kariNga has not in conversation the 
hard ff sound, and that a meaningless a is affixed to the 
word Nuyum. The words of the second part of No. 11. are 
not intelligible to me. Iq the aboriginal voice there is a 
great deal of timbre^ a quality which is greatly affected in 
private singing. Falsetto and tremulo are oftien used, and the 
force and expression are much varied. 



TEE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



§ « 



Da 



[>- 



)s 



m 



■ RIVER AND BDNYA BDNYA OODNTRT. 171 

■ 8, 
S 



T' * 







THE AUSTBALUM RACE: 



S 



■ i 



HAKT BIVER lOT) BUNYA BUNTA OOUKTRT. • 178 



I I 



■m^ 




174 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

The canses of hostilities between tribes do not seem to 
have been very definite. As deaths were generally attributed 
to the malevolence of enemies in another tribe, the desire of 
vengeance sometimes led to a battle. Owing to the Kabt 
country being identical with the central part of the habitat 
of the bunya, remote tribes converged upon it when bnnyas 
were plentiful, and hence it was a thorough battlefield. The 
Kabe tribe, allied with their neighbours, made war on those 
firom a distance about the end of the bunya season. The 
opposing parties camped near each other, and, after indulging 
in mutual accusations, threats, and challenges for a few 
nights, the fighting commenced, and was conducted without 
any arrangement. The results appear to have been very 
indecisive — a man or two killed on either side, and two or 
three wounded. There was no retreating, no pursuing and 
subsequent slaughtering, owing doubtless to there being 
nothing to win or lose. Wailing and cannibal feasts ended 
the proceedings. 

The tribe used frequently to hunt in bands. They 
would form a line, and scour the country. On the sight of 
kangaroos, the hunters, by hallooing, confiised them so much 
that, instead of evading the pursuers, they rushed towards 
them. When the grass was dry enough to bum, one party 
having been distributed along the margin of a scrub, another 
party set fire to the grass some distance off; the game, 
obliged to seek shelter in the scrub, became easy marks 
for the persons posted at its edge. The kuthar, or club, 
was the most effective hunting weapon. The spoil of the 
chase was shared unselfishly, even when obtained by private 
exertion. 

The dwellings were of the very simplest description. 
Generally a sapling, ten to twelve feet long and about two 
inches thick, was procured and partially broken in the 
middle. The ends were fixed lightly in the ground, about 
six feet apart. The halves, still adhering, formed at once 
the doorposts and two rafters of the dwelling. The apex, or 



MARY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 175 

broken part, rested in a fork, terminating the upper end of 
another stick, about six feet long, the lower end of which was 
stuck in the ground: thus the framework was formed. One 
of the spaces between the rafters formed a door, the other 
two were filled up with bushes, or covered over with sheets of 
bark. A dwelling of this kind could be shifted as the wind 
changed. The fire was made in front, and when the cover- 
ing was bark, although the fire was usually small, a great 
deal of heat was reflected from the bark, and the inmates 
were very snug. Such a dwelling was intended for only 
two or three occupants. Larger structures were occasionally 
made after the same &shion by procuring two or three 
forked sticks. 

The camps were often shifted. When travelling, families 
took different routes, hunting or searching for sugar-bug 
(honey) on their way, and towards sundown converging at 
an appointed rendezvous. Unless on urgent occasions, they 
would content themselves with loitering over about five 
miles a day. Each individual had a peculiar cooee by 
which he could be distinguished as far as heard. It was 
customary for one of the tribe, if unexpectedly approaching 
a camp, to cooee; on coming up he at once engaged in 
conversation, and embraced friends, if he had been long 
separated from them. A stranger on approaching a camp 
had to sit down at some distance, with his back towards 
it, and, after remaining silent in this situation for a 
quarter or half an hour, he would draw a little nearer, and 
might then, in a very cold and formal manner, exchange 
salutations. The first salutation is Weflo dhan? — "Where 
are the Blacks?" As an adieu, the Kabg native* says, " Kai 
Nai yEudin " — " Here I go," or " I'm just off." 

Each family possessed several dogs, and when on the 
move the wife generally kept up a kind of chant calling 
upon the dogs. The call was ^, ai^, is^, ai, ai, ai, ai^, is^. 
I am not aware that these sounds had any meaning apart 
from the dog-call, and let me remark that in the is^ occurs 
the only pure sibilant I heard in the language. 



176 THE AUSTRALIAN BAGE : 

As I have already observed, friends meeting after long 
separation embrace. On snch occasions they seem much 
affected, mb faces and caress one another very fondly. They 
have no masonic signs. 

Messages were sent by a dhomka or messenger, and 
were occasionally expressed by notches cut on a piece of 
stick. The notches generally referred to nnmbers, but not 
invariably. 

Their love-letters were peculiar.. When the writer was 
once travelling with a Black boy the latter prodnced from 
the lining of his hat a bit of a twig about an inch long, and 
having three notches cut on it. The Black boy explained 
that he was a dhomka^ that the central notch represented 
himself, and the other notches, one the youth sending the 
message, the other the girl for whom it was intended. It 
meant in the words of Dickens, " Barkis is willing." The 
dhomka sewed up the love-symbol in the lining of his hat, 
carried it thus for months without divulging his secret to his 
sable friends, and finally delivered it safely. This practice 
appeared to be well known, and was .probably common. 

There were two or more kinds of pebbles in great 
estimation. By the description I got of them they were 
doubtless semi-transparent quartz of various tints, and 
were generally found in watercourses. One kind was called 
minkom; it was flat and circular. Another kind, of 
globular shape, was called indifferently Nanpai or kundtr. 
In these pebbles were the means of life and death. The 
opinion was that they were carried internally about the 
region of the stomach, and a Eabt person's vitality and 
influence was proportionate to the number of them he was 
possessed of. Eund/r was the sort generally spoken of, and 
to be "kunder boNgan" (many-pebbled) was to possess a 
charmed life, and to be able to inflict grievous harm upon 
enemies. When a person was taken suddenly ill it was 
supposed that a pebble had been launched at him. 

A young fellow named Waruindh positively assured me 
that he had been hit in the side by one of these pebbles, 



MART RIVER AND BTJNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 177 

and tliat he knew the thrower of the missile, who he said, 
although unseen, had been concealed behind a tree. He was 
troubled, apparently, with a stitch in the side. On such 
occasions the mauNtn* or magician, whose qualities I shall 
hereafter explain, was had- recourse to. The mauNz^r 
mumbled about the aching part with his mouth, and 
fl£fected to extract the pebble. 

To the Kabi mind, the rainbow, which was called dhakkan, 
was the greatest source of power. It was personified, and, 
when visible, was imagined to be in course of transit from 
one abode to another. Its haunts were small waterholes on 
elevated places. Many of these were of considerable depth, 
and, being unfathomable to the Blacks, were considered 
bottomless. The dhakkan was accused of emerging from his 
watery residence, and, like the fidries, substituting one child 
for another, which it took to its stronghold, about the 
margin of which it occasionally aired him. Thus it was 
first thought that half-castes were changelings, left by 
dhakkan in the place of Black children stolen by it. (See 
stories following vocabulary.) But dhakkan was as powerful 
for good as for harm ; it had a never failing supply of 
bnkktnr or yurn^, that is, rope. 

It exchanged hvikkur for kuudt'r with men who possessed 
the latter^ the transfer being effected in the following 
manner. A Blackfellow possessing kundir would camp on 
the margin of a waterhole known to be a dhakkan residence. 
While asleep there, a tingling sensation would commence at 
his toes, and pass all over his body. This tingling was the 
evidence of the operation of dhakkan, which had meanwhile 
drawn the sleeper under water, and, having taken from him 
kundir in exchange for bukke^, had replaced him on his 
couch a manN^CT. The tingling sensation was evidently 
mere numbness resulting from cold. 

A manN^o* possessed a charmed life, could kill and cure, 
command the elements, and, in short, perform any feat that 
imagination could suggest. Persons who had experienced 
hairbreadth escapes were reckoned either kund;r boNgan or 
mauNia-. When a man was the former, it was patent to 

VOL. m. M 



178 THE AUSTRAIJAK RACK: 

everybody; but he had to be a veiy dever, assuming 
impostor to be recognized as a manyvT. Consequently, 
manxzn^ were few. A feat of one of them is worth relating. 
A boy named Tnrandin told me that when he was a child 
the camp was one morning surprised by the Native Police. 
A BlackfelloWy a manNtnr, lifted the boy and, having tossed 
him a mile or two into the scmb, vanished ondergronnd 
himself, reappearing on the sorfiice about where he had 
thrown the child. It was current that a mauNur could draw 
from his stomach wonderfol things, even ropes of tobacco. 
ManN2^r means fuU-of-life. The rainbow is said to be 
mAmiuTSUTy that is life-possessing, life-giving, because it 
has the power of imparting vitality to men. 

A manNto*, magician or life-man, is sometimes called 
mur^^-mur^^, that is, full-of-life. The pebbles that I have 
already spoken of are sometimes called dhakk^, the general 
word for stones. It seems that a person, in order that they 
may pass into his stomach, must also be lying at the margin 
of a waterhole.* 

One who is kundsr boNgan, or better ^ill, a mauNt^r, 
will generally possess a Nuam mauNt^rN^nr, or, as the Blacks 
render it in English, a "saucy dillie-bag." Although its 
appearance doe» not differ from the ordinary dJUie-bags, it is 
supposed to be of an origin beyond human. It is found in 
waterholes. Its contents are known only to its owner, 
but to the crowd they are supposed to comprise relics of the 
dead, pebbles, and hair and excrement of enemies. The 
owner will ostentatiously hang it up on a tree in the eyes of 
the whole camp, none daring to touch it for fear of being 
overtaken by speedy death. I once saw one hanging thus, 
and as I was carelessly walking up to have a look at it, the 
Blacks, apprehensive of my danger, called out to me in 
accents of fear to keep back. After I had examined the 
exterior, and they had seen that I was unharmed, they 
accounted for my immunity by saying that I was a White- 
fellow. 

I have said that the Nuam contains the hair or excrement 
of its owner's enemies. The Kabi people believe that if you 



MARY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 179 

can procure either of these, while they decay in yonr posses- 
sion, your enemy's life will be waning to. a corresponding 
extent. Consequently, they are extremely fearful of their 
hair or faeces falling into an enemy's hands. 

They had a strange dread of passing under a leaning 
tree or even under the rails of a fence. Their reason for this, 
as explained to me, was, that a female might have been upon 
the tree or fence, and that some blood from her might have 
fiEJIen on it and might fall from it on them. Analogous to 
this fear was that of a person stepping over their body 
while they were lyiQg down. When camping out with a 
Black boy I have unthinkingly stepped over him, and have 
known him involuntarily to cry out with fear and to denounce 
the ignorance and stupidity of White people. These fears 
seem to me to point to some former laws relating to 
pollutions. 

They had a very vague belief in water-spirits, the ap- 
pearance, qualities, and habits of which I could not discover. 
They had a belief in, or more accurately an apprehension of, 
ghosts; Nwttiure^, the word for shadow, was also the word 
for ghost. A ghost was generally to be seen at night 
peering through branches or from behind trees. They did 
not seem to believe that the personality of the deceased was 
continued in the ghost, but thought that death annihilated 
personality. 

They knew nothing of a Supreme Being, and performed 
no acts of invocation or propitiation. I never discovered 
any traditions about the Creation, the Deluge, or the origin 
of the native race. 

Langitage. 

The word Eabi is a negative, and used as such by those 
who speak the dialect called by the Eevd. W. Ridley, Dippil, 
as well as by the tribe to which the name Eabe is specially 
applied in this treatise. The people who speak both these 
dialects probably formed originally but one tribe, and Were 
designated Elabe, from that negative being peculiarly theirs. 
The Eabt and Dippil dialects differ from each other but very 

U2 



180 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

slightly. One conspicuous difference is the introduction of ^ 
hard in many words in Dippil, where it does not occur or is 
elided in K&hi, such as nmrgu^ rmru^ a ffirl, bugaman, baman, 
to come, Nugt^n, Nz^in, a boy^ and so on. In consequence of 
the meagreness of the Kabt yocabulary, many words possess 
a wide range of meaning. KbI^kut, pood, may express 
almost any quality that produces pleasure ; muUt^, blacky 
means any dark color whatever, excepting red; thus green, 
blue, brown, black of all shades are mullt^. It is to be 
expected that an aboriginal dialect should be deficient in 
abstract words, and especially in words expressing nice moral 
distinctions or delicate sensations. Kabt realizes this 
expectation; it does not even take cognizance of the air we 
breathe, having no name for it. The dearth of words renders 
frequent circumlocution necessary, and much of the sense has 
to be gleaned from the context, the tone, and gesticulation. 
The orthography in which the Kabi words are written in 
these notes is based upon Professor M. Miiller's Missionary 
Alphabet, to which I have added s, and the English conso- 
nantal y. The characters, about the sound of which there 
might be any doubt, are: — 



a 


- a 


- am, psalm. 


th - thin. 


• 

1 


m 

- I 


- knit, neat 


dh - the (nearly). 


u 


- u 


- full, fool. 


N (ng) English. 


e 


- e 


- debt, date. 


y - you. 





- 


- not, note. 


ai - ire. 


B 


- 


- her, but. 


au - proud. 


fi 


(ny)E 


spafia, new. 


oi - voice. 



ou - bought. 
The Eab; people carefully distinguish two sounds of r, which 
of themselves will determine the different meanings of two 
words in other respects exactly alike. I have not indicated 
these, and to a strange ear they would scarcely be dis- 
tinguishable. The less frequent resembles the subdued trill 
in the English word pur^ if prolonged. 

Another characteristic sound is that of /, pronounced as 
if coalescing with a following y. There is also a remarkable 
sound of n. It is produced by protruding the tongue as if 



MARY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 181 

about to pronounce the word the immediately after the letter 
n. This sound might be called a dentated n. I have indi- 
cated it by ndh. 

Very often mutes are so indefinitely articulated as to 
render it doubtful whether they are surd or sonant. Thus to 
the ears of some Whites the word foj grass is party to others 
ban. Not only so, but there is a great tendency to soften 
the labials of p and d, and the labial-liquid m to Wj as in 
wtflnbandh or wtmiwBudh, old; muin or wuin, night. I 
have fidled to recognize any pure sibilant or palatal ch in 
Kabt, excepting the s in the word is^, used as a dog- 
caU. There are near approaches to such sounds, but such 
combinations as ty, dhz, or tdh fiilly express the extent of 
the hiss, as in batyin, found. The aspirate h does not occur 
except in one word helemon, a shield. From the fiwt of this 
word being the single exception, and as there is another 
word for shield, viz., kunmarim, the name of the tree from 
which shields are made, I take the word helemon to be 
foreign. 

The nasal n seems to be used very often, either to obviate 
the necessity of an initial vowel, which is not grateful to 
Kabi ears, or to separate two following vowels. Thus we 
have adht^ or Nadht^, I; aim or Nairn, we; and so on. 
Gemination is excessively prevalent, hence where letters are 
doubled both have to be pronounced. Only such consonants 
as combine easily occur in juxtaposition. Sometimes such 
combinations as pr, kr, and so on, appear to be used, but the 
consonants will be found, upon carefiil listening, to be 
separated by a short vowel. The aversion to such sounds as 
br, and also the liking for dissyllabic words, are well exempli- 
fied in naturalized English words — thus bread becomes 
BOBBA ; grog^ garon. 

The "K&hi th is exactly like the English in things dh 
indicates a sound having more of the t sound than th in the. 

Kabt has no words beginning with r or I. Its final 
letters are limited to I, m^ n, r, n, ndk^ and vowels. 

There is no article in Eabe. The substantive shows no 
distinction of number; this is true of the verb also. Thus 



182 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

the word dhu may mean wood, a tree, the tree, trees. To 
express many trees the words dhu BONgan or dhu gurwinda 
(lit. tree many) must be used. There is no distinction of sex, 
excepting by words quite diflFerent. There are some suflSxes 
indicating case, but they are used very indefinitely. The 
suffixes "TO and -no frequently express possession, but they 
sometimes occur with subjects, often with datives, and 
frequently give the sense of at. We find a termination -ni 
signifying of, and at, and in. I have heard a termination 
-ker? signifying on account of, and -mo signifying up or at. 
The subject has a termination annexed more frequently than 
has the object I have not been able to discover any regular 
definiteness in the meaning of the separable endings, and 
cannot, therefore, give any declensions, if such exist. The 
syllable -go is very often annexed to any or all the parts of 
speech, and usually expresses motion, as Nairn dhurtgo, 
jBkUgo bofieg^ — we to-the-scrub will-go for-bunyas. Some- 
times the termination -barom is attached to nouns or pro- 
nouns to express appreciation, especially to proper names. 
The addition of the syllable -Na is very common; it does not 
appear to affect the sense at all, but simply to make the 
rhythm more musical. Substantives are mostly of one or 
two syllables, and, if the latter, the accent is. almost invari- 
ably on the first syllable. There are instances of verbal 
nouns being formed by adding -ba or -na to the infinitive or 
perfect indicative of the verb, as yBlmba (witA)^Aoutinff; 
beyEll^manna, cooeeing. ' 

The adjectives are subject to no changes of form, and in 
general are not distinguishable by termination or otherwise 
from substantives. Comparison in the ordinary grammatical 
sense cannot be said to exist. Supposing that the length of 
several spears is being compared, to express this is the longest 
in Kabt they would simply say karwa goran, i.e.y this long. 
They use the word karva as an exact equivalent to our wry, 
and I believe the sense is sometimes intensified by repetition. 
That repetition does not always intensify the meaning is 
certain. Nambur is Kabe for ti-tree. There was a place to 
which the Blaoks gave the name nambur nambur, because a 



MARY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 183 

single ti-tree had been planted there. Some nnmistakable 
adjectival terminations can be pointed ont, the most note- 
worthy of which is -N2^. This termination signifies possess- 
inffj having J Uke, and so on. Thus we have wnlwi, smoke; 
wulwfNtflT, smoky; bokka, a projection; bokkaNt^r, horned; 
dhibl, noise; dhil/lNwr, noisy, I find some adjectives with 
this termination attached to a stem^ which does not appear 
to exist now separately as a substantive; such is the very 
common word kalaNe^r, good. Another adjectival termina- 
tion is -dau or -di?, e.g.^ wuin, night; wuindau, dark; buran, 
wind; burand^, stormy^ windy. Walathau, cold^ may be 
classed with these. Another ending is -ban, wandh, or 
wendh, as dhah', at present (an adv.); dhalebandh, n£W. 
There are also great numbers of infinitives used adjectively. 
Adjectives formed by the combination of distinct separable 
words will be noticed further on. 

By referring to the vocabulary it will be noted that the 
personal pronoun is iaflected to a considerable extent, and 
with some regularity. The initial nasal is often omitted. 
In addition to the terminations indicated in the vocabulary 
there are two others, -dai and -blin, sometimes suffixed to 
nominatives. They have merely a definitive force. The pro- 
noun when a subject is almost invariably expressed. Bilin 
or -blin is most commonly used with pronouns, as Ninbilin, 
thou indeed. 

The verb is neither inflected for person nor number. Tense 
and mood are indicated by inflection, very indefinitely and in 
a very small degree. The simplest part is the imperative, 
which commonly consists of one syllable, and very rarely 
exceeds two. 

The form which serves as infinitive is used also as pre- 
sent, imperfect, and future indicative, and imperfect parti- 
ciple. It is generally produced by adding to the imperative 
the terminations -man, -mathe, -thin, a connecting vowel 
being sometimes interposed. These may be regarded as the 
regular and by far the most frequent infinitive terminations, 
but there are a few others, the most noteworthy of which 
are -cue?, -aiyt^, and Aiu. Many verbs take both -man and 



184 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

-mathi, as the verb baman^ to come. Some even have the 
three forms in -man, -mathi, and -thin. There is a part 
which serves as a perfect tense, perfect participle, and, with- 
out the addition of a copnla, as a passive voice. It seems to 
be formed either by contracting the infinitive in -man or by 
adding -n to the imperative, probably in the latter manner, 
e.ff.y ban, comey from baman, to eamej or ba (imper.), eome. 
Very often the adverbs, wnru, Umg dgo; dhalt, nan>; and 
Bonna-woppa, after a little^ are employed to indicate the 
time of the action. Besides the terminations already cited, 
there are several others the effect of which is too in- 
appreciable to warrant their acceptance as expressing 
changes of mood or tense. 

On one or two occasions I have heard what appeared to 
be optative or subjunctive forms. - The passive, spoken of 
above, is very seldom used, and is occasionally a single- 
worded proposition, as kaNtm, he was cut; dhiNgan, ke is (or 
was) thrown. The distinction between active and passive is 
but faintly maintained. A prohibition, direct or indirect, is 
indicated by introducing the negative bar; in all cases of 
negation, besides, other negatives, such as wa, kabt, &c., are 
used. 

In the vocabulary four examples occur of reciprocal verbs 

having the distinctive termination -ulaiyw or -yulafyw, viz.: — 

(1.) Yathulaiyw, to converse, from yam^n or yathin 

(imper. ya), to speak. 
(2.) Baiyulaiyt^, to Jiffht, that is, to strike one another ^ 
from baiytman (imper. baiyf), to hity to beat, to 
kill. 
(3.) Kauwathulaiytf, to ctd, from kauwa, to cuty e.g.y 
dhakker£> kauwathulaiyu, to cut (presumably one 
another) with a knife or tomahawk. 
(4.) Weyulaiyw, to divide, to share, to deal out; i.e., to 
give one another, from womNan, to give (imper. wa 
or WW, perf. part, wiiiin or wtyin). The word ya 
may be reckoned as a verbal particle, being 
equivalent to the English come, when used not 
as a verb of motion, but to arouse to action. 



MAKY BIVES AND BUNTA BX7NYA COUNTRY. 



185 






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THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



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MABY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 187 

There are many defective verbs, some of them having 
only one form, as kai, / have it, I am here, it is here, or 
Bimply here* 

Many adverbs of place terminate in -ni. Another adverbial 
termination is -Nur, but words in-Nur probably were adjectives. 
A nmnber of interrogative adverbs, closely resembling the 
pronouns, are peculiar in form. The initial syllables of the 
following. deserve attention — ^wefl^, where or when; wefi<?bolla, 
when; wefi^mim, where; wandhurathin, why; wefiamba, 
whether or no; minani, minalo, why; minaNg(?, hxm. Adjec- 
tives are used adverbially. A few words that might be 
classed as conjunctions or prepositions appear in the 
vocabulary among the adverbs. The word Na is simply a 
connective, and frequently seems scarcely to be articulated. 
Bona or we&o introduce hypothetical sentences, and are then 
equivalent to if; used adverbially they signify when, at the 
time, at that time. The relations of subordinate clauses to 
the principal clauses, or to one another, have to be inferred 
in almost every instance from the context. There appear to 
be no words belonging properly to the preposition class. 
Their place is supplied by the suffixes spoken of when 
treating of the noun and pronoun, and by adverbs. 

In considering the structure and derivation of words very 
little can be said about nouns. Very few of them are 
traceable to roots. A small number are significant, such as 
mum-goran, nose (or beak) long, the ibis; dhu-narambi, ^r^g- 
possum, the bat ; yilai-lw-dhoman, crayfishreating, the crane. 
Some are onomatopoeic, as kawuN, 1/mghing jackass; wowa, 
crow. There is a noteworthy resemblance between the 
words bwran (the wind) and boran a boomerang. That they 
may have originally been identical, the difference in pro- 
nunciation does not render improbable, for we find the word 
gwran (long) sometimes pronounced goran. The adjectival 
terminations -bandh, -bathin, -boman, and -wendh or -wan 
Bje probably derived from the verb baman, to come. The 

* In this passage I think Mr. Mathew has fallen into a mistake. K(U! is 
an exclamation conmion throughout Australia, and is used as such in the 
senses noticed by Mr. Mathew, and in many others. — E. M. C. 



188 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

termination -Neo* has already been mentioned as distinctive 
of adjectives. Curiously enough, we find it doubled in at 
least one instance, the word manKto'Nta*, capable of impart- 
ing life. The stem of this word seems to be man, which is 
not now extant in its simple state. Manner is a noun or an 
adjective; as the former its meaning has been explained, as 
th.e latter it means charmed and lif editing. With another 
-Nz^r suffixed the application is solely adjectival, and the 
meaning is perhaps intensified. 

Very frequently two words are required to express an 
attribute. This is sometimes due to the want of positives, 
e.g., wa widhtman, brave; wa kawun fiKnaiiiau,«n««7tt«y. A 
noun followed by a verb generally expresses adjectively 
sensations which are described by and referred to their 
physical phenomena. 

The verb affords by far the greatest scope for distin- 
guishiDg roots and tracing them. Ya is the imperative of 
yaman, to speak. From that root are doubtless derived 
yathulaiy^^, to converse; yamN(7man, to rage^ to scold; 
yshman, to call; yfllEliman, to speak quickly; biysltman, to 
cooee. The following are groups of related words : — 

(1.) YaKg(nnan, to make; yaNgaltnoman, to allow; 

(baiyt) yaNgalithin, to cure. 
(2.) Warran, to buck; wahnaman, to chase; yauwara, 
to jump. From the same root is probably derived 
wirra, a stream. 
(3.) Wombalithin, to carry; wombathin, to put up; 

wombaltman, to fall upon. 
(4.) Dhathin, to drink; b^dhalmda, to cause to drink. 
(5.) DuNeman, to cry; duNmuxaman, to cause to cry. 
(6.) Dhomathin, to hold; dhommoman, to marry. 
(7.) NomNatht, to see; Nomba, to show; naiytlathin, 

to look. 
(8.) Marm, to bum; manman (adjective) to be hot; 
mare, a campj and probably originally afre. 
A good many adverbs are transformed to verbs by 
suffixing (1) a verb or (2) a verbal termination. The fol- 
lowing are instances of the former class : — ^Wuru-boman, to 



MARY RIVER ANT) BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 189 

ecme out; biyarboman, to come back; wnm-ytvarithin/, to 
put out; biyavindtw, to take buck. The following are of the 
latter class : — Eari-thin, to enter; kan-naman^ to put in; 
kari-ndimi, to admit; wnm-wathin, to let out; bndha-wathin, 
to strengthen; bndha means strong. Sometimes noons and 
verbs are componnded to form a verb, as kakke-baman, to 
bleed; Knyton-boman, to sweat. 

There is a striking resemblance between the words 
yiraman, to spring up, and yEraman, a horse, as also in 
these words— dhnmman, to grow, to swell; dhnnoNan, a 
tumour; dihu, a tree; dhnri, the scrub; dhura, a house 
(dhura in Eamilaroi means bark of a tree) ; dhnn, a tail; 
tnnnm, the tongue. 

In conversation, the infinitive termination -math; is often 
contracted to -mt, as bami for bamathi. 

The ending -moral appears in some imperatives given in 
the table of conjugations. As we also find an infinitive 
termination -moraman, it seems to me that -mor was the 
stem of a verb, now obsolete, which was almost equivalent to 
the verb do, and it now exists merely as an intensifying 
ending. In verbs where -iu is given as an infinitive ending, 
-f man generally is used as well, as msAiu or mab'man, Iniriu 
or knnman. It is clear that the letters m, b, and w are 
often interchanged, and particularly the last two. We note 
also that by far the most frequent and therefore regular 
infinitive terminations are -mathin, -man, -mathi, -me, 
-bathin, -wathin, -athine, -ithins. It seems probable that 
-man, -mathi, and -mi are contractions of -mathin; -mi 
certainly is of -matht, and -math; and -man are often inter- 
changeable. This hjrpothesis does not exclude the possibility 
of -man occurring as a primitive unabridged verbal ending. 
Again, -bathin is often contracted to -ban, or -bandh, and 
-wathin to -wan or -wandh. Hence, -mathin, -bathin, and 
-wathin may be essentially the same termination. Dha is 
the imperative of dhoman, to eat, but the word dhathin 
means to drink. From these and other examples it might 
be inferred that there had been two distinct verbal suffixes, 
or three, if we regard -ma and -ba as radically distinct. If 



190 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

three, they wonld be — (1) -man or -ma; (2) -ba or -wa; 
(3) -thia. In the majority of instances, -thin seems 
combined with one or other of the first two. 

As a mle, verbs in -thin have the most active significa- 
tion, and before the suffix -li or -la is sometimes interposed, 
the exact effect of which is not apparent, e.g.j wombathin, 
to lift; womba/tthin, to carry. The words kai and fiEnaman, 
which, in a general sense, respectively express having and 
being, are not exactly equivalent to have and be in Aryan 
languages. They are never auxiliaries of tense or mood. 
Eai rather means / have it, or it is here ; and flEuaman 
means to existyto remain, to live, though in the imperative 
it fairly represents be, as in ynl flEuai, be quiet. 

Eai has a demonstrative force, and perhaps it is the ter- 
mination in the possessives NanyuKgai, my; NinoNgai, thy; 
and in the interrogatives Kangai, NanyuNgai, mtfiaNgai. 
The frequency of the phrase kai KanyuNgai kai, here is 
mine, or / have mine; and the &ct that HanyuN and NinoN 
occur without the termination -gai lends color to this sup- 
position. 

Other indefinite verbal forms are mmda, to be here, to be 
there; and Nindi, or gindi, to be within. The phrase kai 
mmda occurs, and is equivalent to it is here. Eai seems to 
be the demonstrative and mmda the verbal element. 

In the adjectival termination -Neff, -nwr, or -ot, the 
essential part is -ur, and the nasal seems thrown in to 
separate two vowels ; -Nt«r is the commonest form, but we 
have "UT in bamt^r. Sometimes this suffix is contracted to 
-Nw, "HO, -u, or 0. 

To express the genitive, nouns have most commonly one 
or other of these corrupted forms affixed. But in the first 
pers. pron., plu., poss. case, the termination -Nwr occurs 
thus — nom. Nairn, poss. NalmNefl*, affording one clear J)roof 
that the termination of the genitive of a substantive is the 
same as that which forms an adjective from a substantive. 

Verbal and adjectival signs are affixed, whereas adverbs 
in forming compounds are prefixed. 



MABY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 191 

Mt means the eye or eyes; bnbai to standstill; from these, 
I think, we have mi bMwan, sleepy. From bwwan a genmdive 
is formed — buwandt?, sleeping — as in buwand(? yunmaman, to 
He sleeping, to sleep. 

The phrase noUa baNwondamoraman, to get into a rage^ 
is an example of composition by syncope, being compounded 
of nolla the stomach; bankt^, angry , sulky; wonda, to raise 
or rise; moraman, a verbal termination. The syllable 'ku is 
omitted by syncope. 

Generally the order of words in a sentence is subject, 
indirect object, object, adverb, verb — the ac^jective in almost 
every instance immediately following the word which it 
qualifies. There is, however, much diversity in the form of 
sentences. 

Very frequently a subject and adjective constitute a pro- 
position, a copula being rarely used. 

Some idioms are very remarkable, such, for instance, as 
those attributing the passions to the state of the stomach. 
Such are nolla kalaNzn:, lit., stomach good^ cheerful; nolla 
dhandarban or dhandarbathin, lit., stomach smooth or slippery, 
pleased; nolla bauwan, lit., stomcLch cutting , means to relish; 
nolla warabin, lit., stomach jumping, fearful; nolla kaiyaman, 
lit., stomach biting, &ottj. Other phrases similar to these 
will be found in the vocabulary. Deafness is confounded 
with madness, thus, pmaNgolum, lit., ears dull, means either 
deaf or mad. Many feelings are named from their physical 
phenomena, such are mi kurm, lit., eyes turning, giddy; mi 
kambtman, lit., eyes hiding, jealous; mi wuruwoman, lit., 
eyes standing out, amazed; mum wombah'man, lit., nose 
uplifted, frowning; pinaN baluman, lit., ears dead, means to 
forget; mi kakk^man, '^i.,eyes bleeding, bright. 

The verb yaNgoman is often used with an adjective to 
express action for which no single word exists, as kakkal 
yaNgalethin, to make clean. The verb llEnaman, to be, to 
exist, is used in a manner somewhat similar, as kaiwun 
fisnaman, lit., desire possessing, willing. 



192 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



The following stories, dialognes, and phrases are intro- 

dnced mainly with a view to their being of philological 

value : — 

Stobtis. 



DhaklLan. 
DhaklLan wa'nur mm'da ko'raman 
Na'in dht'kai, kai^vana wum'Nan 
mal'ltt. Kim'daro kom'iran Nu'ina 
tunlMkNonollano karin'dimi. Kol'- 
lani Nu'in fis'iiamAii; Nu'rani wn'm- 
boman. 

DhaklEan maa'Nunmr. 

Win ban'na boi'yinicr ysn'na ynn'- 
mathin knK« kara'no. Win bai'yi 
yaNgalithin. 

Bhan dhaklcanno Nan'pid wxnn'Nan, 
dhak'kan dhan'no bu'kur wu. 



Dhaklce kunda'Ntir. 

Dhan Nam dhaklcent nollani fisna- 
man. 
Ptri, Ntm, ha'yu, kam, giUin. 

Win ka'runda yin'maio idnlMkNo 

dha'imn kar'tthin. 
Win wa bai'ytro ynn'maman, Nin 

man'Ntirbathin. 

Bai'yt yaNgalithin. 

Nai wo'fto bai'yiNtfr mn' ru ma' ru 
Nan'na btinlMthin dhaklce Nan'na 
bun'mathin. 

Wan'pai bat'ytman. 
Win ynn'mai dha mo tar'yano. 
Win'dtf kni^bi vro'Na Nan'pai 
Nin1iK>la fiin'datlun. 

Wun'da'dhiltl'baNtcr fiin'daman. 
Win man'Ntir Hs'naman wabaliunan. 



(The) -Rainbow. 
(The) -rainbow (is) wicked, he stole 
(a) -boy half-caste, another ga've 
Black. He took (the) -boy (to a)- 
mountain (a -water)-hole (he) pot- 
(him)-]n« (In the) -hole (the) -boy 
is; (daring the) -day (he) -comes- 
oat. 

(The) -Rambowoapable-of -imparting 
vitality. 

Thoa when sick go lie-down (at the)- 
water's edge. Thoa (wilt) be 
cared. 

(The) -BlackfeUow (to the) -rainbow 
(Nanpai) pebble gives, (the) -rain- 
bow (to the) -BlackfeUow (a) -rope 
gives. 

(The) -Stones or Pebbles (of) Koon- 

dangoor. 
(To the) -BlackfeUow always pebbles 

(in his) -inside are. 
(In the) hands, bones, calves, head, 

nails. 
Thou floating (?) remain (to) -thee 

(in the) -stomach (they) -enter. 
Thoa (wUt) not aching lie, thoa (wilt) 

beoome-fall-of-vitality. 

Caring. 
I if sick (the man) foU-of-life me 
(wiU) -sack (the) -pebble (from) -me 
take-oat. 

Pebble-finding. 

Thoa He-down (a) -tree onder. 
Thoa (a) -whistling (wilt) •hear(the)- 

Nanpai (pebble) (to) thee (shaU)- 

go-in. 

It noisUy (BhaU)-go-in. 
Thoa faU-of-vitaUty (wUt) -be, not 

(wUt) -die. 



MARY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 



193 



Stobiss— eofi^tntiec2. 



Bhur. 



Dhtcr wiK'wtcr yxN'ga, nj'rimba 
kfnbaria'na. Bar ysiv'ga wa'tht ; 
knik'namara palnmno, kom'mtNa 
bai'ytra. Kkar'va ysn'na kar'va 
fixnai biin'diinio wa'thtnba vroM'- 
athin. 

If uin dhn'mo won'da yalmn yt'kt 
won'da. Yil'la na'rathin Nnin'na. 

Wnin ba'dhawathin tEraNwadha'ba 
dhiKgathin. 

Gil'la. 
GiTIa Hadlitf dhaN^ga won'nan ; kan 
tam'biirwaih GtTIago dhaN^gago 
bQn'na-yir^i yan'go. Wefio Nin 
kala'Nvr a'dhu Nin'na gfl'la wu. 



(The) -Ring. 

Thia Btcry probaUy rtftrn to mati' 

making, 

(A) -ring large (they) -make, in -the- 
middle (they) -light-a-fire. (Muat)- 
not cauBe laoghing; wring-the- 
neck -(will the) -fathers, (the)- 
uncles (will) -beat. Some go-away, 
others remain at-the-backs (if there 
be) -laughing to -know. 

(The) -boys (the) -trees climb, (the)- 
sisters also climb. On-the-hocks 
(they) -kick (the) -boys. 

(The) -boys fast-hold (their) -legs not 
(to the) -ground (they) -throw- 
(them). 

Honey. 
(Of the) -honey I half left; (the) -con 
was-full-to-the-lip. For -(the)- 
honey (the) -half -(of) to-morrow 
(I shall) -go. If thou -(art) good I 
thee honey (will) -give. 



Dialogues. 



YET^anoin; bnla. 
Wa'ran! ys'ramin nin'dii baN'goran 

kaNlcithin? 
TVa! ys'ramini Nai wifdhiman 
Bf in minan'ni wifdhnnan? 
Y'K'ranundo dhiN'gara, Ntm kom- 

Ka'thini. 
ITa idn, wo'irali, wE'fiamba wa'ndo. 

Win'dai ye'ramingo, Ka'lin yun'ma- 
maa dhu'rithin. 

Bon'na-wop'pa yango, Na'rau* dha 
ktan'Na kaL 



Horses; bullocks. 
Halloo I (a) -horse, (canst) thou wild 

ride? 

No I of -horses I (am) afraid. 
Thou why afraid? 
(The) -horse (might) -throw -(me), 

(my) bones (might) -break. 
Try thou, mount, (to see) whether 

(he will) -buck. 
Thou-indeed for-the-horses-go, we 

(shall) -lie in-the-scrub, i,e,, camp 

out. 
In-a-little- while (we shall) -go, (the) 

ground (is) damp at-present. 



VOL. in. 



* Na'mi, interJeotloD, eq;aiT»leni to I tay. 

N 



194 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



Warn yEn'din? . . . . 

Wam'ba i'la ysn'din 

Wa'ra wa'ra dhiN'ga kal wu'rawa- 

thin. 
Wa'ra wa'ra dhilctr, kabi bomka'- 

nmnan. 



DiALOGUis — continued, 

(Are yon) ready to-go? 

(I am) ready indeed to-go. 

(The) -rails throw-down (the) -cattle 

to-letHnit. 
(The) -railB (are too) heavy, (I can) 

not throw -(them) -down. 
(The) -cattle we to-day shall-herd. 



Kal Naltndo tallt bnwan'diman 

We'fiokaNgo? Where (shall we) take (them)? 

Ma'ktrgo ----- Far-away. 



Kal Nin'du yEr'rt ka'rtna 
Win'du kalu-vro'nai btyeritmanna, 
Kin bar pi'naN-gu'lum tlE'naL 
Wai yt'pi balun yslinba aran' ! 

Wa Na'dhn Nin'na vro'namathi 
We'fiobola biya'yindttf? - 
Bo'na ti'nim fiinda'monda 
Mt'fiama mtn'da? . - . • 
Wa kai gorwin'da - - - - 
Min bar baN'ku ftB'nai yol fls'nai - 
A'dha Nin'na Nnin yi'rtna wa nom- 
na'thi. 

Wa'lt yathu'laiytf . - - - 
Walt kam'mir ka'rtti 
Mi'naNgai yEN'ga? - . - - 
Dhu'W bam'p* . - - . 
Waltn dhu'rigo yan'go bofitgo 

Wai bam'ptra yanma'thiNa; 
wit'dharo Nan'na bar kai'ya, a'dhn 
kaln bun'ban kn'tharo, Nun'da 
yila kaln balun; bu'tharu 
dhoma'thi Nim'da. 
Ba'rtya Nan'na kaa'yaman, a'dhn 
Nun'da kt'raba-moTl>a. 
Kt'ra won'dt, wala'than balnman - 
Wuin gu'ran - - - - - 
Mi'noNgai mm'da mn'ytm 7 - 
Adhn ka'riNa wombalimaraio 



(The) -cattle thon this-way tnm. 

Thon qnickly-hear (Lt,, obey) (my) 
calling, thon (do) -not deaf be. 

I (am) throat exhausted (with) -call- 
ing ! (aran interjection). 

Not I thee heard. 

When (shall we) take- (them) -back? 

As (the) -sun is-sinking. 

How-many are-there? 

Not are-here many. 

Thon (do) -not angry be quiet be. 

I thee a-boy like never saw. 

We (shall) -converse. 

We by-the-head (shall)-go round. 

What (are-yon)-doing? 

(The) -scrub, (the) -bush. 

We (to the) -scrub (shall) -go for- 
bunyas. 

I to-the-bush (shall) -go; a -dog me 
(must) -not -bite, I quick (shall) -hit 
(him) with-a-stick, he indeed soon 
(shall be) dead ; (the) -eaglehawk 
(will)-eat him. 

(A) -jumper-ant me bit, I him (shall)- 
roast. 

Fire get, with cold (I)-am-dying. 
(The) -night (is) long. 
Thine is-there (a) -tomahawk ? 
I this shall-carry. 



MARY BIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 



195 



BlALOQUES 

MifiarnHba Nin'dt kt'rami dhan ? 

Dhan mifialo du'Ntman ?- 
Dhan naN'gaimini bai'ytNtcr? - 
Man'do ka'riNa kaN'ktman womba'- 

lin? 

Man'do Nin'na ban'wan ? 
MifLa'mano Nin wvan'du ytn'maio ? • 
Min we'fiobola ban ? 

Ti'mm ka'rin 

Tnum won'dan . . . . 
A'dhu Nnn'dabola maytm wi'flin; 

Kim'daro Nailx>la dhaklce wi'fiin. 
Mali tina'biibola ka'rui wi'fiin; 

Kaltngo tina'buro yulltt wi'fiin. 
M an'do ya'marandh ? - - - 

Miin'da yaan 

Min mtflaN'go pi'naN-bama'tht I 

Bo'na ba'raN bin'damatht bon'da 
woIImlI won'daman dhEr'wEn. 
YalLoi a'dhu Ninna ya'thin 
MinnaN'gai wil? . - . - 



AND Phbases. 

How-many are-there at-the-camp 
Blacks? 

(The) -Blacks why crying f 
Blackfellow which (is) sick ? 
Who thiB-one riding (are)-carrying ? 

Who thee speared? 

How-many thou nights wilt-stop ? 

Thou when didst-start ? 

Sun going-in. 

Sun rising. 

I to -him (a)-tomahawk gave ; 

he to-me (a) -knife gave. 
We to-them 'possums gave ; 

to-us they eels gave. 
Who said-(so) ? 
He said-(so). 
Thou how (the) -ears- come (i.e., 

dost recollect) I 
When (a) -Barang marries (a) -Bunda 

(the) -children arise Tirwin. 
Come-here, I to-thee want-to-speak. 
Thou what (thy)-name ? 



Min we'flo ba'man ? 
Mai ba'man - 
Kai irai yxn'din 



Salutations. 

Thou whence doet-oome ? 
I am-come. 
Here I go. 



N2 



196 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 166.— VOCABULARY. 

The reader will compare moiher, brtaaU, and miik, in which are aeen 
preserved the term bo common in oar languages. If there be an equivalent 
for leg in this language, it is exceptional. The rule is a separate term for 
each portion of the leg ; but if the whole leg be insistently asked for by a 
White man, the equivalent of thigh is given. — ^E. M. C. 



Kangaroo 
Opossum 

Tame dog 

wad dog 

Emu 

Duck • 

Pelican 

Laughing jack 

Nativecompanion 

White cockatoo 

Crow - 

Swan - 

Egg . 

Track of a foot 

Fish - 

Lobster 

Crayfish 

Mosquito 

Fly 

Snake- 

The Blacks 

A BUckf eUow 

A Black woman 

Nose - 



- ma'ri. 

- ku'rui or Na- 
ram'bi. 

■ wi'yidha or 
wi'dha. 

- wi'dha ka'rum. 

• Nu'ruindh. 

• nar. 

1 

ass ka'wuK. 



gtgton. 

wo'wa. 

ku'lun 

bam. 

kuan. 

ba'la. 

•lOai. 

bun'ba. 

dhip'pi. 

mu'raN or wo'KaL 

dhan. 

dhan. 

Sri'ran. 

mu'ru. 



Hand - 
2B]ack8 
8 Blacks 

One ' 
Two - 
Three- 
Pour - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head 
Eye - 
Ear 



pi'n. 

dhan bulla, 
dhan bulla 
kalim. 
kaOim. 
bulOa. 

bulla kaOim. 
bulla bulla. 
pal)un. 

a'voK or iraVoK. 

ya'bun. 

nuin. 

WUthtCK. 

kj'var. 

win'yir, 

ma'run. 

wollmi 

mothar or dht. 

woIImo. 

kam. 

mt. 

pj'naN. 



MARY BIVER AND BDNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 



197 





No. 166.— VooABULAST— conttnu^. 


L^ A^ A A V At 


Month 


- dhaNlLa. 


Boomerang - 


• bo'ran. 


Teeth - 


• dhaNlLa. 


Hill - 


kun'da or 


Bairofthehead 


- dhilla. 






tun'ba. 


Beard- 


• yjE'ran. 


Wood- 




dhtf. 


Thunder - 


' momlxL 


Stone • 




■ dhaklce. 


Grass - 


• ban. 


Camp - 




■ ki'ra or kt'ramt. 


Tongne 


- ta'nam. 


Yes ■ 




yan'ai 


Stomach 


- da'Nun. 


No 




• wa or kalw. 


Breasts 


- a'moN. 


Me 




- Nan'na. 


Leg - 


- ts'raN. 


Yon 
Bark 




- Nin or Nin'dn. 
• komlMur. 


Foot - 


- dhi'naN. 








^r\ 




Good • 




kala'Ktfr. 


Bone • 


- Ntm. 








Blood - 


- kak'ke. 


Bad • 




• wa'rax. 


Skin - - 


- ktfa)ar. 

• 


Sweet 
Food 




• gefjtar. 
- bin'dha. 


Fat - 


• ma rom. 






Bowels 


■ gtt'naN. 
• gu'naN. 


Hungry 


• gan'dho. 


Excrement - 


Thirsty 


• Naial'lo. 


^fW 


Eat - 


• dho'man ordhatt. 


War-spear - 


- kon'ni. 








Reed-spear • 




Sleep 
Drink 


* 


- bnan'do. 

- dha'thin 


Throwing-stick 
Shield 


- ku'thar. 

. knn'marim or 


Walk 


■ • 


- yul yan'man. 




he'lemon. 


See 


• « 


- nomKa'tht. 




• mn'yum. 


Sit - 


. fls'naman. 


Canoe 


kom'bar (lit. 
bark). 


Yesterday - 
To-day 


Namlba. 
dhaliorgi'lumba. 




To-morrow - 


yir'kt. 


Snn - - . 


• na'ndndh or 


Where are the 


we'fio dhan. 




tirom. 


Blacks? 




Moon - 


- ba'pun. 


I don't know 


a'dhn wa vro'- 


Star - 


- kal'bar. 




Naman. 


Tiight - 


> Ku'ruindh(nonn). 


Plenty 


- bON'gan. 


Dark . 


wnin'dhaa. 


Big - - . 


wiN'wtw. 


Cold - 


■ walai. 


Little • 


dho'maramt, 


Heat - 


- ma'riman. 




dha'ramt, or 


Day - 


Nn'ruindhan. 




dhom'me. 


Night - 


' wuin'dhaa. 


Dead - 


balun or ba'- 


Kre - 


- kt'ra. 




luman. 


Water 


• koK. 


By-and-by - 


bon'na-wop'pa. 


Smoke 


wulni. 


Come on - 


ya'koi;oomethou, 


Gronnd 


dha. 




baNin. 


Wind- 


btt'ran. 


Milk - 


a'moN. 


Rain - 


yu'ruN. 


Eaglehawk - 


bu'thar. 


God - - . 




Wild turkey 


kalar^a. 


Ghosts 


nti'thurti. 


Wife - 


m m 


malimgan. 



198 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 



VOCABULARY OP THE KAB/ DIALECT. 

Katiy« words spelt in the alphabet known as Max Mailer's Missionary 
Alphabet. 

Notes. — The dh letter has more of the t sonnd in Kabi than in Rnglish, 
Ndh represents n followed by and coalescing with a sabdned dental or 
sound produced by protmding the tongue as if about to articulate the word 
the immediately after the sound of n. 



Nouns. 



Ant (pismire) 


kiN, mon'dhur. 


Blood. 


• kaklce. 


„ (jumper) - 


ba'riya. 


Boy - - 


- Nuin. 


„ (small black] 


ba'rom. 


Breast 


. dhandar. 


„ (white) 


Na'rL 


The breasts 


- a'mon. 


„ (soldier) 


mumlMk 


Branch 


- kandir. 


Arm - 


kiniN. 


Brother (elder) 


• nuin. 


Aunt - 


yurun. 


„ (youngei 


•) WUthtfN'. 


Baby - 


wol'bai. 


Brow • 


- fiun'gaL 


Back - 


• bun'dhtcr. 


Breath 


- Naiya. 


Bag - - . 


- bun'pt. 


Bronzewing pigoonmam. 


Bank 


■ kun'na. 


Bunya meal 


- nairu. 


Bark - 


- kombar. 


Bush (the) - 


- bam'pi. 


Base - 


yauwan'ni. 


Australian bustard kalar'ka. 


Bat - - • 


dhu'naramlM, 


Butterfly • 


- balumbtr. 




Nttleyam. 


Bottom 


- dhai'rvt. 


Bee (native) 


- kflla, kawai. 


Beauty 


• mun'daimun- 


Beard- 


■ yE'ran. 




daiNa. 


BeUy . 


- dhuNun. 


Calf (of the leg) 


- bu'yu. 


Black man - 


- dhan. 


Camp - 


- ki'ra or kiramt. 


,y woman 


• yi'ran. 


Canoe - 


- kom'bar. 


Bandicoot • 


- dhun'kaL 


Cat (native) 


• yu'ruthnn. 


Bed • > 


■ nan'pt. 


Catflsh 


- bala. 


Bear (native) 


• kulla. 


ChUd . 


- woiniMd. 


Boil (a tumor) 


- dhu'nuNan. 


» (my) - 


' gum'ma. 


Bone - 


• Ntm. 


Cheek - 


• waN'gtcm. 


Bird . 


- dhtp'pi. 


Chin - 


• yik'kaL 


Black cockatoo 


- (1) wiyal, 


Circle • 


' dhur. 




(2) geyam^biau, 


Claw - 


- dht'naN. 




(3) dha'mkal. 


Collar-bone - 


- ku'ru. 


Black swan- 


- kulun. 


Coast-blacks 


- brdhala. 


Boomerang • 


• boVan. 


Cloud - 


• mon'dam. 



MARY RIVER AND BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 



199 



NoTJva-'HMUinued, 



Gonntry 


- dha. 


Creek- 


- wir'ra. 


Ck>iisin 


• yum'mtf. 


Gfioeaizig-place 


- waN'gauwan'gan- 




ba'riNa. 


Crane • 


• yilaibodhoman. 


Crow - 


- wowa. 


Centipede - 


- ki'rai. 


Crayfiflh 


. ilOat 


Cut - 


- dhim or kaimn. 


Codfish 


- tn'ktt. 


Baaghter 


- do'ranaNan. 


Danghter-in-la^ 


• fie'nanba. 


Day - 


- im'rtdndhaii. 


Daylight > 


- (l)dhaliim, 




(2) bar'btman. 


Darkness - 


• main. 


Dead tree - 


- dan'wa. 


Dillie-bag - 


• Nuam. 


Dog (domestic) 


• wi'yidha or 




widha. 


„ (native) 


• widlia kanim or 




wi'yidhakaram. 


Doctor (also per- man'Nnr. 


son with charmed 


life) 




Duck - 


• nar. 


Dung - 


- giinaN. 


Duck (diver) 


- dhubtm. 


Eaglehawk • 


• bn'thar. 


Ear - 


- pi'naN. 


Earth - 


- dha. 


Edge- - 


• kara'm or knl'lt. 


Eel - 


- ynllii. 


Bte - - 


- bam. 


Elbow 


- knn'di. 


Eye - 


• mi. 


Eyebrows - 


- tiN'gvr. 


Eyelash 


- dhi'pindyin. 


Emu • 


- im'ruindh. 


Face - 


- Ntf. 



Falcon 


- minmin. 


Fat • 


. ma'rom. 


Father 


- pabun. 


Feather 


- wunlcal. 


Fern - 


• yim'bun. 


Few - 


• dhai'ya, or bor'ra, 




or dhur. 


Finger 


• molla. 


Fence - 


- wa'ra wa'ra. 


Kre - 


- ki'ra. 


Flat - 


• bir'rtt. 


Flood - 


- Num'ma. 


Fly - 


- dhtp'pi. 


Flying fox - 


- gi'raman. 


Flying squirrel 


- baN'ku. 


Food forbidden to mun'dha. 


minora 




Foot - 


- dhtnaN. 


Food - 


- bin'dha. 


Fool - 


- fiun'dal or bor'- 




raman. 


Frog • 


- worl)a. 


Frost - 


- pi'riNga. 


Froth - 


- wor'ka. 


Fur - 


• munun'. 


Girl . 


- wu'rtt or wur'ku. 


Grandfather 


Na'thaN. 


(paternal) 




Grandfather 


fiun'dai. 


(maternal) 




Grandmother 


ko'maram. 


(paternal) 




Grandmother 


yEnan. 


(maternal) 




Grass • 


• ban. 


Gully 


- dhE'raN. 


Grub - 


- bu'niga. 


Ghost - 


- Nu'thuru. 


Guana 


- wa'rui. 


Half • 


- (1) bor'ra, 




(2) dhtar, 




(3) dhaN'ga. 



200 





'NovsB— continued. 




Half-caste - 


' dhtkut'. 
til'gonda. 


Loins - 
Log - 




Hawk (large 


- dau'wa. 


brown) 




Lungs 


- waK. 


Hair - 


dhilla. 


Uard (Jew) 


- pt'naK gc/ran. 


Hat - 


■ piN'ga. 


„ (sleepy) 


- won'dum. 


Head - 


kam. 


„ (water) 


- wa'ram. 


Headman - 


ka'maran. 


Man (adult) 


- ki'var. 


Hand - 


pi'H. 


» (old) . 


- winyir. 


Heart - 


tuklLtt. 


,, (White) 


- moihar or dhi. 


Hockfl 


• yil'la. 


Many - 


- boN'gan. 


Honey 


giVla, ka'waL 


Magpie (plover) 


- ktt'rumbuL 


Hornet (large) - 


kau'war. 


Meat • 


- ba'Nun or mn'- 


M (small) • 


jrau'wa. 




raN. 


Horse • 




Milk - 


- a'moK. 


House- 


• dhu'ra. 


Mother 


- a'voK or Ha'voN. 


Hole - 


nol'la. 


Mother-in-law 


- nu'loNgan. 


Horn - 


bok'ka. 


Mountain - 


- tuniM or kun'da. 


Husband 


dhan'dor. 


Moon - 


- ba'pun. 


Ibis - . . 


mu'ru gu'ran. 


Messenger • 


• dhom'ka. 


Inland Blacks - 


wa'pa. 


Middle 


• ntrim or Naraa'ni. 


Inside 


nollani. 


Mouth 


- dhaN'ka. 


Kangaroo (oldman) ku'ruman. 


Minnow-like fish- bu'rvm. 


„ (buck) . 
„ (doe) - 
„ -rat 
Knee - 


• mar'rt. 
yi'mar. 

pal or owar'Nur. 
dhi'mi. 


Mosquito • bunlML 
Moss • - wubtfN. 
Mourning by fast- Na'rin. 

• 


Knife - 

Lad - . . 

Laughing jackass 
Jjanguage - 
Leader 


dhak'ke. 

bo'thaL 

ka'wuN. 

bon'dha. 

ka'maran. 


ing 

Mud • 
MuUet 

,» (small) 
Murderer • 


- dhilaN. 

- ondai'ya. 

- dhu'ra. 

- mo'tharbin. 


Light - 


nu'run. 


Name 


- wiL 


Lightning - 


borbk 


Nail (of the finger) gillen or mol'la. 


(A) Uttle . 


nara'Kt. 


Neck - 


- kum'ma. 


Liver - 


ko'naN. 


Nephew and niece kon'nt or boran'- 


Lip - 


dham'bur. 




yin. 


Lie (falsehood) - 


guVdhal, 


Names regulating (1) ba'raN» 




dhalLun. 


marriages 


(2) bal'kuindh. 


Liar - 


yabo'ltman. 




(3) dhm-wKn, 


Leaves 


• wu'ruif. 




(4) bon'da. 


Leg, limb • 


tB'raN. 


News - 


- bon'dha. 



MARY RIVEE AND BUI 


TYA BU^YACOl 


JNTRY. »UJ 




KouKs— eon<f»iiec2. 




Kight - 


• wnindhaa. 


Sarsaparilla plant bo'raboran'bin. 


Koiae • 


dhi'hl. 


(aa popularly 


H0B6 - - 


- mn'ru. 


known) 




l^nlla nulla (clab) ku'thar. 


Seed - 


- dhuliir. 


Opoaram • 


NaramlM or 


Shadow 


• Nu'thum. 




kom't. 


Shepherd's com- 


. dhiN'ka dhlN'ka. 


Oatnde 


■ bun'dura, nara'- 


panion 






Ni. 


Shield- 


' (1) he'lemon, 


Owl . 


- iNlca. 




(2) kun'marim. 


Pebbles (channed) 


Shonlder - 


Nil'W. 


„ (globular 


1 Nan'paiorknndtr. 


Sinew 


- khu'ktn. 


„ (flat and min'kom. 


Sister and female yal>nn. 


drcolar) 




consin 




PfiniV 


. dhnn. 


Sky - 


- ira'ruindh. 


Faddimellon 


- bwaL 


Smoke 


- wulwi. 


Phlegm 


■ bun'yu. 


Skin ■ 


kulMur. 


Pigeon (wonga) 


- wONgalaman. 


Smell - 


• ka. 


Place - 


dha. 


Snake (generally^ 


1 mu'raN and w&' 


Platypna - 


dhor'ku. 




Nai 


Poeterior (the) • 


ma'mu. 


„ (bUick) . 


• mullu. 


Porcnpine • 


• kaklcar. 


1, (brown) 


- mu'rugjrai. 


Pnnk . 


- pa'bnnbare. 


„ (carpet) 


' wo'Nai. 


Qnartz 


• koMlcam. 


„ (deaf -adder) mnn'dalom. 


Bain > 


• ynriiN. 


„ (diamond) 


• ktVpa. 


Bainbow • 


- dhakkan. 


n (grey) 


- yil'lam. 


Bidge- 


- kun'dtf. 


„ (short) 


• gulum. 


Bib - - 


- ktf. 


„ (spotted 


dhtwan'ti. 


BedbiU (porphy 


- wa'thom. 


scrub) 




rio) 




„ (whip) . 


• yt'ywm or Nun'- 


Bedhead (smaL 


I dhu'nmkaltm. 




dar. 


bird) 




„ (yellow) . 


• mu'raL 


Bedbreast (mnal] 


I dhu'mnkalim. 


Song • 


• yau'war. 


bird) 




Spear • 


. kon'nt. 


Road or track 


- knan. 


Son • - 


• nu'ktvar. 


Rope - 


■ bnk'kur or yju^' 


Son-in-law - 


• ku'tharum. 




TU. 


Spider- 


- mothar. 


Root - 


- tE'raN. 


Spittie 


- fiuin. 


Sap - - 


- kak'ke. 


Stink - 


- bu'ga or bua. 


Scmb - 


■ dhu'H. 


Stone - 


dhak'ke. 


„ turkey 


■ wa'wtm. 


Stump 


- kam'gilu. 


Scorpion 


• ytlai 


Star - 


• kal'bar. 



* See SfadtfeUow, which is tranakted dAon.— £. M. C. 



202 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 





KouN»— oofK«Mie<2. 




Squirrel 


mubir. 


Tree honeysuckle- 


bo'tharom. 


Summit 


ba'riNa. 


„ tronbark 


dhulMm. 


Sun • 


Nu'rtdndh or 


„ (broad bullel. 




ti'mm. 


leafed) 




Sundown • 


- ti'rumka'rin. 


„ ironwood - 


nan'garin. 


Sunrise 


ti'rum won'dan. 


„ MoretonBay 


ku'randtcr. 


Sweat - 

Scar (ornamental, 


im'yKnL 
1 mu'lar. 


ash 
„ oak (silky) yullo. 
(Orevillea 


Taste - 


bon'dha. 


robusta). 




Tail . 


dhtm. 


„ oak (swamp) - 


biTlai. 


Tear - 


Ni'yuL 


„ pine - 


ku'nam. 


Thigh - 


- tB'raN or dhE'rax. 


„ red-gum - 


dhomlMt. 


Throat 


ytp'pt. 


„ stinging 


gim'pi. 


Thunder - 


- mum'ba. 


„ stringybark- 


dhu'wai. 


Tin vessel - 


- kak'kar. 


„ ti - - 


nam'bttr. 


To-day 


gt'lumba QT tali. 


„ wattle (black) dhtTgar. 


To-morrow - 


• nuin'go or yir'kt. 


„ „ (green) bu'pin. 


Tomahawk - 


• mu'yian. 


Turkey (scrub) - 


wawtm. 


Tongue 


- tu'num. 


Uncle - - - 


kom'mi. 


Tooth - 


- dhaN'ka. 


Urine - 


kal>ur. 


Top - 


• barai'ytr or ba'- 


Vein - - - 


kak'ke. 




ritha. 


Vine - 


yur'rif. 


Twilight - 


• (1) buin mulltt, 


Wallaby - 


wol'lan. 




(2) muritfbon. 


Water 


kuK. 


Track - 


- kuan. 


Water rail - 


dha'ran and 


Tree - 


- dhtf. 




dhtm. 


„ apple - 


- bu'pti. 


Watershed - 


nuk'ktt. 


„ bastard box 


- dhin'kar. 


WhUe,aUttle - 


tal'liya. 


„ blackbutt 


- dhu'lar. 


White cockatoo - 


gi'ginn. 


,, bloodwood 


- bu'nar. 


White-hooded 


kaN'ka. 


,, blue-gum 


- yir'ra. 


eagle 




„ bottle • 


- bt'nmgan. 


Whiskers - 


ys'ran. 


„ box - 


- min^ka. 


Wind - - - 


bu'ran. 


,, bunya- 


■ bon'yi. 


Wing - - 


kun'di. 


,, cabbage 


- ka'wa. 


Woman (old) 


ma'run. 


„ cabbage-pab 


n pt'btn. 


„ (White). 


dha'ran. 


„ cedar - 


- wut'dha. 


„ (generally) 


yt'ran. 


„ cherry 


- bir'ra bir'ra. 


Wife . - 


malimgan. 


„ currajong • 


- ka'yan, kim'ma- 


Wood- 


. dhtt. 




rim. 


Woodpecker 


yin'dtrtn. 


„ dogwood 


- mam'btf. 


Worm 


• kularen. 


n grass - 


- dhak'ka. 


Yesterday - 


- NamlNk 



MARY MVBR AKD BUNYA BUNYA COUNTRY, 



203 





Adjxctives. 


k/ A1 ^ *V A • i™. — ^ 


ActiTe 


pt'ritkithnm. 


Done - 


wur'pw. 


Alive - 


(1) man'Ntir, (2) 


Dry ■ 


buthuK. 




mar^rumitr'ru. 


DdII (in spirits) • 


• ytn'na. 


Amazed 


mi wn'mwoman. 


Early - 


- dhulura. 


Angry- 


(1) norU baN"- 


Easy (pace) 


Nt'ta. 




wonda mora- 


Empty 


• nolla. 




man, w 


Eternal 


Nam. 




(2) baN'kn, w 


Every - 


kom'kalim. 




(3) yam'Nan. 


Fat - - 


(1) brak'k«, 


Bad - - ■ 


■ waraN. 




(2) ma'rom. 


Bald • 


nillsaa. 


Fearful (in dread) nolla wa'rabtn. 


Black . 


• mul'ltf. 


Few - 


- nara'Kt. 


Big - . 


- wiN'wwr. 


First - 


wu'rw. 


Blind - 


• mi gnlton. 


FUt - 


ba'hin. 


Blunt - 


■ gultfm. 


Fly-blown - 


. diKan'ga. 


BraTe - 


• wawi'dhtman. 


False - 


- dhalEiffi. 


Bright 


- m» kaklLtman. 


Full - . - 


gum'ka aokd wuF- 


Brimful 


tam^burwan. 




buK. 


Broad- 


ptl)a. 


Foolish 


ftun'daL 


Bushy 


• mot'yt. 


Free (gratis) 


• yul. 


Charmed - 


man'Nur. 


Fresh 


■ dhn'ltcr. 


Cheerful - 


- nolla kala'Nttr. 


Frightened - 


• wi'dhtman. 


aear • 


• knlaNttr. 


Giddy 


■ mi ku'rin or kam 


Clean - 


• kak'kal. 




ku'riman. 


Clever - 


- bmi'ba. 


Glad - 


• nolla yaNgalin. 


Cold - 


- walai <yr wala'- 


Good - 


- kala'Nur. 




thaa. 


Grey (of the hair 


1 gi'lan. 


Cooked 


- ka'pt. 


n • ■ • 


• dha'wudha'unil. 


Cool - 


- ya'gal. 


Greedy (selfish) • 


yaN'gan gi'vir. 


Cowardly - 


■ wi'dht. 


Haughty - 


• Mir'boman. 


Costive 


- dhu'Ntm 


Heavy 


dhi'ktr. 




dhn'pon. 


Happy 


mun'dhar. 


Crooked 


- war'kun. 


Hard - 


• but'dha. 


Cruel - 


- dmna'riman. 


High - 


• Nalsan. 


Carioufl (strange) 


kar'va. 


Hot - 


ma'riman. 


Damp- 


• kum'ya. 


Hungry 


- ganMho. 


Dark - 


■ wuin'dhau. 


Humble 


- mo'rombaluman. 


Dead - 


• baliiman. 


Hunched - 


■ bul'tyin. 


Deaf - 


(l)pt'naNgaltim, 


Ill-natured - 


ku'wai go'ran. 




w (2) mi'rum. 


Impudent - 


dhal)ar. 


Dirty - 


• mollu. 


Inquisitive - 


■ bi'yan. 



204 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



InTinfiiblB - 


• wnp'pin. 




- mnn'daL 






Qokk- 


- (I) wai'yaflo. 


Jealoiui 


. mt kamlNman. 




(2) kaOM, amd 


Kind - 






(3)dhal'lt. 


lank > 


• dhn'Nun 


Qniet • 


- (I) dhilimi. 




gan'dhbo. 




(2)dhtkid, or 


liMTge- 


- wiic'wur. 




(3)konan. 


Luy - 


• ka'wankalM. 


B«ady 


• Nam. 


Lean - 


• ba'inindom or 


B«d - 


- bothar cr ku'thi- 




daa'wan. 




Nvr. 


Left-handed 


• wi'dhOHgar. 




- bn'rimoraman. 


Life-possening, 


man'Ntmriir. 


Beetleas • 


- Nudliulii. 


life^Ting 




Bight (not wrong) yam'ba. 


Light (in weight) nan'dimatht. 


Ripe . . 




„ (not dark) 


Nn'roindhan. 


Rotten 


-bu'thi. 


Lively 


- kak'ka. 


Scowling, sneering mn'ru wombalt- 


Longing 


- nolla galnmbo 




man. 




man. 


Shady- 


• bnr'pM. 


Load • 


- wop'paro or 


Sharp - 


- mun'dfi go'raa. 




pin'artt. 


Short - 


- dhal^ur. 


like (in appear- 


(1) yi^iman. 


Sick - 


- bai'yiKicr. 


ance) 


(2)yfrtna. 


Slippery, smooth dhan'dar. 


Luatful 


- war'ralo. 


Skinned 


• dhtm. 


Mad • 


- pt'naN gulton. 


Sleepy- 


- mtbuwan. 


Many • 


- bON'gan or gur- 


Slow - - 


- yuL 




win'dha. 


Soft - 


- dhnhilit. 


More • 


- yan'ga. 


Sour - 


- taMlcanL 


Narrow 


• dhallncr. 


Sorry - 




Near-sighted 




Small - 




New - 


• dha'ltbandh. 




or (2) dha'rams 


Noisy - 


- dhiltTNur. 




or (3) dhom'm€. 


None - 


• kalH. 


Spotted 


- ku'nubar. 


Old - 


• wu'rubandh or 


Stinking 


- (I) bu'ga, or 




wtf'mwEndlL 




(2) bna, or 


One - 


• kalim or 




(3) boga'ntir. 




kwa'lim. 


stm - - 


• dht'kia. 


Other - 


- kar'va or dha'ra. 


Stndght • 


• dhu'rtcn. 


Overmaoh • 


- bam'gnna. 


Strong 


- (1) bufdha, 


Painful 


- ktg'yar. 




(2) bau'thar w 


Pleased 


• nolla dhan'dar- 




bau'guthar. 




ban. 


Stupid 


• finn'daL 



205 



« 




ADJBonYEB — eontmuecL 




Surpriaed 


- 


• nolla wnlaman. 


True - 


■ gi'vtr. 


Snlky- 




- bairl^tf. 


Ugly - - 


- ta'Nunha or 


Snnny- 




- nni'yim. 




mofyt. 


Sweet • 




• ge'yar. 


Unwilling - 


• wa ka'wun ft'Ena- 


Swollen 




- dhn'mmi or 




man. 






wnl'bQ. 


Wall-eyed - 


• miwulwiNur. 


Tall . 




- gnran or goran. 


Wanting - 


• gulum. 


Tame - 




- k</nan. 


WeU (m health) 


. man'Ntirbathin. 


Thick - 




- wiN'wttr. 


Wet - 


- di'Kan. 


That - 




- mo'raNa. 


Weak- 


• na'man mokkan. 


Thin - 




- na'ran. 


White- 


- ka'kaL 


Thirsty 




- Naiyallo. 


Wild - 


- (1) ka'rum, or 


ThiR . 




- ka'riNa. 




(2) baN'goran. 


Ticklinh 




- wi'rtman. 


Willing 


- ka'wun fixna- 


Tired - 




- Nat'yabalnn. 




man. 


Tight - 




• bnt'dha and 


Whidy 


- bu'rando. 






pi'naru. 


Withered • 


- hu'thtfN. 


Two - 




- holla. 

Pbon 


Wicked, wrong 

0UN8. 


• wa'raN. 


I 


- 


- Nai, a'dhtf, cr 
Ka'dhtt. 


We - - 


- Naltn. 


My or mine 


• Nan'ynKgaL 


You and I - 


- Naltnidn. 








Our or ours - 


- Kalino or 
naltnNicr. 


Me - 


- 


- Nan'na,a'dhn, cr 
Ka'dhu. 


Ub - - 


- Naltn. 


Thon - 


- 


- Nin'dtf or Nin. 


You - - 


- Nulam. 


Thy or thine 


- Ni'noKgai 


Your or yours 


- Nulamo. 


Thee - 


- 


- Nin'na, Min'bola. 


You - 


- Nulambola. 


He, she, or it 


- mm'da or mon'da. 


They - 


- dhi'nabu. 


His, hers, ita 


- Nui'dano. 


Their, theirs 


- dhinalKOio. 


TTlTn. IkA. 


ad I 


- mm'dabola. 

- Nolom. 


Them - 
Anyone, everyoi 


" dhinalwhola. 


Another ai 


Le, kar'yandhtlum. 


You two 
Yon all 
Own - 
SeH - 


- 


- bnla. 

- Nu'ptf. 

- irtllca. 

- mif dhi. 


everybody 
Another's - 
Alone - 


- dhomkai'yir. 

- mit'dhino. 


This one 


• 


- ka'riKa. 


Other - 


- kar'va or dhar'ra. 


That one 


- 


• ko'radhu. 


Some . . others kar'va . . kar^ya. 



206 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



Pbomouns— Imtkbboqativb. 



Who - 


m 


- Nan'do Nan'gaL 


What - 


> Nan'do or mi fiaN- 

• 


Whose 


- 


- Nan'yuNgai. 


How many - 


gai. 
mifia'ma or miii- 


Whom and which Nan'gaimint. | 




am'ba. 






Veb&s. 




Ache - 


- 


. bai'yi. 


Come - - - 


ba'man. 


Allow - 


- 


- yaNgali'noman. 


.. in . . 


ka'rt. 


Aniiwer 


- 


- yt'ki ya'man. 


„ out - 


wu'ruboman. 


Awake 


- 


. kin'ma. 


» back- . 


btyalMman. 


Bathe- 


- 


. ku'Ntt Willi. 


Cooee - 


WyKlU 


Be . 


- 


- flE'naman. 


Cover - 


• (l)kam'biman, or 


Be there 


- 


- Nin'dt or min'da. 






Believe 


- 


- gt'vir wun'- 


Cross - 


waN'goman. 






bomba. 


Cry - - - 


• du'Ntman« 


Bite - 


- 


- kai'yathin. 


Cut - - - 


■ (1) kau'wan, or 


Boil - 


- 


- ma'rtnga. 




(2) wuOathln. 


Bleed (intrans.) 


- kak^ke ba'man. 


Cure - 


• bai'yi yaNgali- 


Be bom 


- 


- (1) dak'aman, 




thin. 






(2) won'doman. 


Divide (or deal 


wiyulaiyu. 


Break - 


- 


- (1) kom'Nan, or 


out) 








(2) bu'riman. 


Delay - 


• wON'gali. 


Be quiet 


- 


- yul ftB'naman. 


Desist - 


• wonai. 


Bring- 


- 


• ba'riman. 


Die . - • 


• baluman. 


Buck - 


- 


- war'ran. 


Dislike 


- wonai. 


Bum (trans.) 


- wa'raba. 


Dismount - 


• liEndaio. 


ff (intrans.) 


- ma'rin. 


To be done - 


• ka'biroman. 


Borst - 


- 


- bulunirra. 


Draft - 


- bun'gaman. 


CaU - 


- 


- yEliman. 


Dream 


- ba'riwundaman. 


Catch - 


• 


- dhom'ma. 


Drink- 


• dha'thin. 


„ fish 


• 


- kau'wamathi. 


Dnve away 


- milMumna. 


Care - 


- 


- ka'wun. 


Drown (pass.) - 


■ (1) ka'ruman, or 


Carry - 


- 


- wombalfthin. 




(2) ka'ron. 


Converse 


w 


- yathu'laiytf. 


Dry - 


• dhalinan. 


Change 


- 


- ka'rtNa ma'lttt. 


Eat - - - 


(1) dhati, or 


Chase - 


- 


- (l)dht'rtthin,afi^ 




(2) dho'man. 






(2) wari'naman. 


Enter - 


- ka'rithin. 


Chew - 


- 


- dhin'ptman. 


FaU . - . 


' bumbalin. 


Chop • 


- 


- ka'Ntthin, 


„ upon - 


• womba'liman. 


Climb - 


- 


- (l)bon'yindan,or 


Feel - 


- bon'dhoman. 






(2) won'dan. 


Fetch - 


• ba'riman. 


Cause to drink 


- bfdha'ltnda. 


Fight - 


' baiyulaiyu. 



MAKY mVER AND BXINYA BUNYA COUNTRY. 



207 





ysBB&--con^iiec2. 




Find - 




Lift . 


- bun'ma. 


Fly (as birds) 




Lie (speak falsely) (1) dhalLun ya, 


Forgot 


- (1) pTnaN bain- 




(2) yaboltman. 




man, or 


yy (recline) 


• yun'maman. 




(2) Karaloman. 


Like • 


- ka'wun. 


Forgivo 


• bon'na konan 


Look • 


• nai'yilathin. 




wo'nimba. 


Lose - 


• Naraloman. 


Gape - 


- wullal. 


Love - 


- balu'raman. 


Give - 


- wum'Nan. 


Make - 


- yaN'goman. 


Gnaw • 


- dhan'dhoman. 


Make cry 


duNtnu'raman. 


Go - 


- yan'man. 


Mark • 


• bandh'Nto:. 


Go home 


yan'mare. 


Marry 


- (1) bin'dhamathi, 


Grasp - 


- korhathin. 




or (2) dhom'mo- 


Grow • 


• dhn'ruman. 




man. 


Haste • 


• Nam (impera- 


Mend - 


- (l)yt'lvafia, or 




tive). 




(2) bau'waman. 


Hate - 


• waka'wun. 


Mount 


- wo'Nalt. 


Have - 


- (1) kai, or 


Obey - 


• kalu vro'Naman. 




(2) min'da. 


Play - 


- biwa'thin. 


Hold - 


- dho'niathin. 


Perambulate 


- wak'karin yan'- 


Help - 


- Ku'ponathin. 




diriu. 


Hit - 


- bunlMunan. 


Prepare 


• nau'waptra. 


Issae - 


- bt'raman. 


Pull - 


- yu'ri. 


Joke - 


' dha'Hthin. 


Put • 


- ytvari. 


Jump - 


- (l)yauwara, and, 


„ away - 


- mivari. 




(2) war'raL 


„ in- 


• (l)kart'naman, or 


Kick - 


- na'ruman. 




(2) mo'aman. 


Kill . • - 


- bai'ytman. 


„ out 


- wuruytva'rithtnt. 


Know - 


- vro'Naman. 


11 lip 


- womba'thin. 


KiM • 

Laugh 
Leave - 


- dhamlnar bunlH- 

thin. 

- wa'thiman. 

• wo'naimatht 


Relish 
Remember - 


- nollabau'wan. 

- (1) wapt'naNba'- 

luman, or (2) 
pt'naN bama'tht. 


„ (abandon) 
L^od - 


yiva'ri. 
won'damatht. 
- timba'rowa. 


Resemble - 
Return 


- ytlLtman. 

- (1) btyam'gaiyo, 

or (2) bom'ko- 


Let (allow) - 


- wum'Nan. 




man, or (3) btya'- 


If go 


- btn'dha. 




boman. 


„ out 


- wu'mwathin. 


Revolve 


- ku'riman. 


Light (kindle) 


• ba'raiyo. 


Ride - 


- kaN'kithin. 


„ (intrans.) 


- Nan'daboman. 


Rise - - 


• won'doman. 



Zi)^ 


THK AUSTK 


yjAN RAGE: 






Vbbbs — contmued. 




Boast • 


' ki'raba morlMu 


Stop (remain) 


- fixnat 


RoU > 


' dhtndaltman. 


„ (arrest) 


-kakka'ri«. 


Ron • 


• bidhalithin. 


Stand ' 


- bvliai or btfwan. 


Scold - 




Strengthen, hold ba'dhawathin. 


Scratch 


• dhtf'ma. 


fast 




Search 




Sack • 


- bnnlwthin. 




(2) waluuraio, 


Sweat • 


• Ntf'yianboman. 




or (3) kanwalttf* 


SweU - 


- dhu'rumi. 


See • 


. nomNa'tht. 


Swim - 


• yuNga'thin. 


Seek • 


• nar'riii. 


Take - 


- (1) kaN'go, or 


Send - 


• bin'dha. 




(2)kom'Nan, or 


Separate 


• ban'yaa. 




(3) bnnmalL 


Sing • 


- dop'pathin. 


„ back . 


- btya'yindtu. 


Shake - 


• dhn'wa. 


„ in (admit) 


- kartn'dimi. 


SheU - 


• milnra. 


Taste - 


. yavan'dha. 


Shoot - 


> btmlMtfa. 


Teach - 


- Nutanalttf. 


Show - 


- KOmlMk 


Think. - 


- yro'imman or 


Sink ■ 


• Ain'daman. 




TTONaman. 


Sit - 


- fiE'naman. 


Throng 




Skin - 


- Nollawnlla. 


Try - 


• Natant. 


Sleep - 


- bnan'do ynn'ma- 


Tom (trans.) 


- knri'naman. 




mn.n. 


Tire - 


- Nai'ya baluna. 


Smell - 


- baltman. 


Throw 


- tlNga'thin. 


Smoke (a pi] 


m) - kaiya'thin. 


„ down 


. bomka'numan. 


Smaah or str 


ike • bon'dhtra. 


Wait - 


- won'mtman. 


Speak - 


• ya'man. 


Walk- 


- yulyan'man. 


„ quick 


ly - ysls'ltman. 


Want (require) 


• wandha'roman. 


Spear - 


- baa'wa. 


Warm- 


. wa'kobora. 


Spring up - 




Wash - 


- kaklcal yiTa'r*. 


SpUt - 


- wul'la. 


Watch 


. fiinan'dimao. 


Squeeze 


- (1) nan'waman. 


Whisper - 


- wop'payElli. 




(2)bnluni'raman, 


Whistle - 


- km^U. 




(3)wo'raba'dha- 


Wipe - 


- kak'kal gira'Nilt- 




man, (4) im'mra. 




thin. 


Steal - 


• kor'raman. 


Work - 


- yuaN'biniltu. 


Sting - 


Advi 


Wring the neck 

EBBS. 


- ku'namara. 


Above- 


- ba'ritha. 


Almost 


- bar. 


After or beh 


ind - btya'nt. 


AUo - 


- ytki. 


Afterwards - 


- bonagt'ra. 


Always - * 


• Nam. 


Alone • 


• kalim. 


Back • 


-bi'ya. 



MAEY BIVER AND BUNYA BUNTA COUNTRY. 209 



Adybbbs — continued. 



Before- 
By-and-by • 
ao8e . 
Directly - 
Early - 

Eternally - 
Ererywhere 

Far - 
Farther 
Fast . 
Firmly 

First - 
For - 
Gently 
Headwards, 
the head 
Here - 



n 

How - 
Jnstnow 
Late - 
More - 
Near . 
Never - 
No - 

Nolaily 
Not - 



AU right > 
By no means 
Halloo 
Indeed 
Jnstsoso - 



- wn'nmi. 

- bon'na wop'pa. 

- Nolla. 

- dhalt. 

- (1) dhaU; or 

(2) dhulnra. 

- Nam. 

• (1) kola Na kola, 
or (2) we'flo Na 
we'll©. 

- mnktr. 

- kOa'thnnda. 

- kaltf. 

- (l)bufdha, or 

(2) pt'naru. 

- wu'ru. 

- ka'ri, 

- wop'pa, 
by kam'Nur. 

- (1) ka'ri, (2) kai, 

(3) ka'dhi, (4) 
malt. 

- (1) we'fio, or 

(2) bo'na. 

- mt'naNgo. 

- kai. 

- Nam. 

■ yaN'ga. 

- pira'ni. 

- wa. 

- (l)wa,(2)wa'ka, 

(3) ka'bi. 

- dhiltl'baNttr. 

- (1) wa, (2) ka'bf, 

(3) bar (gene- 
rally with im- 
perative). 



Nowhere 
Often . 

On horseback 
On foot 
Other side 
Out . 
Slowly 
There - 
That side 



This side • 

Thus - 

Top - 

Under- 

Vainly, in vain, for 

nothing 

Very, very much- 
WeU, rightly - 
When (interrog. )- 
When (at that 

time) 

Whether or not - 
Where 

Whither - 
While - 
Why - 



Yes 



- ka'bt. 

- (1) kir'wa, and 

(2) Nam. 

nan'Nur. 
> dhi'naNgo. 
gun'mant. 
wu'rw. 

wop'pa or yul. 
kola or mola. 

(1) fion'da fion- 
da'ni, or (2) 
ko'la dhu'nmt. 

(l)ba'riNa, or (2) 
ka'ri dhu'rtoit. 

(1) yt'ri, or 
(2) yi'rin. 

(1) ba'riNa, or 
(2) ba'ritha. 

tar'vano. 
yuL 

kar'va. 
yam1)o. 
we'fLobolla. 
(1) we'flo, or 

(2) bona, 
we'flamba. 

(1) we'flo, or 

(2) we'fiomint*. 
Nan'gaibola. 
bo'na. 

(1) mina'nt, (2) 
wan'dhurathin, 

(3) mlnalo. 
(l)yau'ai, or 

(2) yaau. 



iNTSBJEOnONS. 



yan'ai yauai. 

wa wa. 

aran. 

t'Na. 

(1) e'yila, or 

(2) tU, or 

(3) yau'aimba. 



Well done 



Signifying — 
Credence - 
Pleasure - 
Regret 
Surprise - 



(1) kala'Ntir, or 
(2) kaburau. 



YOU TO* 



O 



- tmlm. 

- a'rirom. 

- e. 

• (1) gin'di, or 
(2) Nrrrr. 
Self-satisfaction- moun. 



210 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE 



Xo. 167.— UPPER BRISBANE RIVER. 

Bt W. Laitdsbobough, E9Q.» axd Montagu Cubb, Esq. 

Two vocabolaries of the language of the Upper Brisbane 
River, forwarded hj the gentlemen named above, differ so 
little that only one of them is inserted. The reader may 
compare the translations of Black/elloto and kangaroo. 

The following Additional Words were supplied by Mr. 
lAndsborough :— 



Hnaband 


- nnim. 


OpoBBom-cloak 


- kobinga. 


Wife - 


' nomgang. 


Lightning • 


- mira. 


Uncle - 


- noma. 


TofaU 


- bowman. 


Girl - 


. una. 


To swim - 


• kauyoo. 


Onuunental scan- 


• bimdara. 


When - 


- wungang. 


Chin • 


yakka. 


Here • 


- kunma. 


Bil» - 


- koongara. 


White 


. chilling. 


Neck - 


- bimbay. 


Black - 


- meer. 


Frog - 


• inba. 


Pine-tree - 


. koonin. 




So. 167.— UPPER BRISBATiE RIVER. 


Bt W. Landsbobovgh Esq. 


, AKD Montagu Cubk, Esq. 


Kangaroo - 


' dgin. 


Hand 


■ bay or bee. 


Opo88um - 


- dthooan, koom- 


2 Blacks 




Tame dog - 


bay. 
boo-gin. 


SBlackB - 




WUddog - 




One - 


• karro. 


Eimu • 


' moee. 


Two - 


• booyoo, yerio. 


Black dnck - 


. nyem. 


Three- 




Wood duck - 




Four - 




Pelican 


• bloognllnm. 


Father 


boba. 


Langhing jackaaa 


koaka. 


Mother 


- mwang, kame. 


Native companioi 
White cockatoo • 


1 

' gaira. 


Sister -Elder 


■ thadje. 


Crow - 


• wawa. 


„ Younger 




Swan • 


- meweean 


Brother-Elder - 


dooda. 


Egg - 


• maa or moa. 


,, Younga 


r 


Track of a foot 
Fish . 


• nnda. 


A young man 


• gibbar, keeburra. 


Lobeter 


■ eeL 


An old man 


• yanyar. 


Crayfish 




An old woman • 


yanyarin. 


Mosquito 


• munyagamm. 


A baby 


- barree. 


Fly - - . 


• din. 


A White man 


• moee, mybay. 


Snake • 


• booyee. 


Children 


- yunam. 


The Blacks - 


■ dthun. 


"rr a 


V 


A Blackfellow • 


• dthnn. 


Head - 


• ma. 


A Black woman • 


• booberim. 


Eye ■ 


• mia. 


Nose - 


mi-i. 


Ear - 


> pinxmns. 





UPPER BRTR] 


SANE RIVER. 


'xSl 


No. 


167.— Upper BBiSBAms Bivmir'Hxmtinued, 


Month 


• tamboor. 


Boomerang • 




Teeth 


• ding, taynang. 


Hill - 




Hair of the liead- 


- ma. 


Wood- 


- dnattoo. 


Beard- 


• eka, mollngin. 


Stone > 


- doee, teya. 


Thnnder - 
Grass - 
Tongae ' 
Stomach 
Breasts 
Thigh - 

Foot - 

Bone . 
Blood • 


■ meera. 

■ bnn. 

• bokoor. 

• moo. 

- dnndnr, amoo. 

- dthongnr. 

• dinnmig, chin- 

nang, 

- geera. 

- deeL 


Gamp • 
Yes . 

No - 
I 

You - 
Bark - 
Good • 
Bad - 
Sweet - 


- kauime. 

- yow. 

- woka cr yaka. 

- goin, boon. 

- nga. 

• koondoo. 

- kallang. 

- y6ng> weeang. 


Skin - 


• bun. 


Food - 


■ gooyoor. 


Fat - 


- mem. 


Hungry 


- dthurrii. 


Bowels 


- na. 


Thirsty 


- goonbero. 


Excrement • 


- goonang. 


Eat • 


- dthowa 


War-spear - 


• nyam, gooranga. 


Sleep - 


- wondo. 


Reed-spear - 




Drink - 


• dthow, goon- 


Throwing-stick • 


daddoo. 




barro. 


Shield 


• koomarri. 


Walk - 


- yango. 


Tomahawk - 


• mooyim. 


See - 


- ka, nga. 


Ganoe- 


koondoo. 


Sit - 


- yinne. 


Snn - 


• weeim. 


Yesterday - 


- moona* 


Moon - 


- kaknrra. 


To-day 


- ming. 


Star - 


- mnrringnm. 


To-morrow - 


- tomo, gango. 


Light - 


- koonee. 


Where are th 


e wundjadthun? 


Dark - 


- nwore. 


Blanks? 




Cold - 


■ nyaar. 


I don*t know 


- waka natchi 


Heat - 


• mnrra^ gimow. 




benga. 


Day - 


• kitter, maybing. 


Plenty 


- yoorun. 


Night - 


• djoo. 


Big - - 


- mooanina. 


Fire - 


• kooyoom. 


Little - 


- nunana. 


Water- 


• goong. 


Dead - 


- bootir, bonja. 


Smoke 


thoom. 


By-and-by - 


- quay. 


Ground 


dtha. 


Come on 


- eaba, kow-wy. 


Wind - 


■ boorun. 


Milk - 


• 


Bam - 




Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - - . 




Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 




Wife . 


- numgang. . 



/ 



oz 



212 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 168.— BRISBANE RIVER. 



TURRUBUL LANGUAGE. 



Bt the late Revd. William Ridlbt. 



Thb translation of my Common Vocabulary which follows 
was kindly made for me by the late Revd. William Ridley. 
In the Kamilaroi of that gentleman, Turrabol is one of the 
languages treated of, and from it I make the following 
extracts : — 

Nouns. 

dn- (suffix) signifies agency, and distinguishes the nomi- 
native which has a verb from the simple name. 





EXAMPLE. 




Ist nominative:' - 


- duggai 


• a man. 


2nd nominatiye - 


- duggaidu 


- a man (foUowed by a verb) 


Genitive 


- dnggainUbba 


- of a man. 


Dative 


- duggazm 


- for or to a man. 


Accusative - 


- duggana 


- aman. 


Ablative 


- doggaibuddi - 


- with a man. 


»» 


- duggaiti 


- ataman. 


»> ■ " 


- duggaida 


- from a man. 


Plural- 


- duggatin 


- men, people. 



Gender. 

Difference of gender is expressed sometimes by using 
different words, as krurrum^ a male kangaroo (largest spe- 
cies); yimmoby female kangaroo. 

Sometimes the suffix -gun or -un gives a feminine signi- 
fication, as in the proper femily names, ^.^., derroainj 
derwaingun; bundavy bundargun; bandur, bandurun; also 
nurring (son), nurringgun (daughter). 



BBISBANE RIVER. 213 

Verbs. 

The most remarkable feature in the grammar of the 
Australian languages is the very extensive inflection of the 
verbs. The voices, active, reciprocal, cansative, permissive, 
&c.y are numerous; and the tenses are adapted to express 
various slight modifications of past and future. 



BOOK THE TWELFTH. 



BOOK THE TWELFTH. 

PBEFATOBY REMARKS. 

Of the tribes dealt with in this book, those which inhabit 
the shores of the mainland show in their languages a close 
relationship, and remind ns of the fact that every tribe 
prefers the neighbour whose customs, food-supply, and mode 
of life resembles its own. 



220 



THE AUSTBALIAK BACE: 



No. 169.-€ONDAMINE AND CHAELET'8 GREEK— MUBBUM- 

NINGAMA TBIBE. 

FOBWABDBD BT THX COMMISSIONEB OF POUGB, BbISBANS. 



In thlB langnage bone and 8Ume may be compared. 

appears as dry on the Barooo. 



i= thirUy, 



Kangaroo - 


groomon. 


Opossmn • 


groona. 


Tame dog - 


buggin. 


wad dog - 


wage. 


Emu - 


mooe. 


Black duck - 


moonrm. 


Wood duck - 


■ 


Pelican 


giteum. 


Laughing jackasi 


1 kakkage. 


Native companioi 


1 mendra. 


White cockatoo • 


• gera. 


Crow - 


■ wa. 


Swan - 




Bgg . . . 


• mor. 


Track of a foot • 


• tumba. 


Fish - - . 


• marea. 


Lobster 




Crayfish 




Mosquito - 


- ding. 


Fly - - ■ 




Snake - 


- booe. 


The Blacks - 


• booa. 


A Blackf ellow • 


• garoon. 


A Black woman 


• geran. 


Nose - ■ 


• mia. 



Hand - 


- ma. 


2Blacks 




3 Blacks ■ 




One - 




Two - 


grogna. 


Three - 


grunda. 


Four - 




Father 


babo. 


Mother 


. moang. 


Sister-Elder 


momn. 


„ Younger • 




Brother-Elder • 


• towin. 


„ Youngei 




A young man . 


- kipper. 


An old man 


. gringa. 


An old woman 


- bnbram. 


A baby 


■ gugroo. 


A White man 


- krabe. 


Children 




Head - 


- mow. 


Bye . 


- maye. 


Ear 


- binang. 



GONDAMIKE AND CHABLET'S CREEK. 



221 



No. 109. — CONDAMINE 



AND Ghaslet's Creek — MuBBUMinKOAMA 
Tribe — continued. 



Mouth 


- kam. 


Teeth - 


- deang. 


Hftir of the head 


kamee. 


Beard- 


• eka. 


Thnnder 


- meera. 


Grass - 


- bonn. 


Tongne 


- pnnnan. 


Stomach 


- knmde. 


Breasts 


• dundara. 


Thigh- 


- genar. 


Foot - 


■ ginang. 


Bone - 


- dea. 


Blood- 


- dunde. 


Skin - 




Fat 




Bowels 




Excrement - 




War-spear - 


ngea. 


Reed-spear - 




Throwing-stick • 




Shield - 


■ gmnnrry. 


Tomahawk • 


• nyam. 


Canoe - 


• kundnng. 


8nn - 


- genan. 


Moon - 


- gooea. 


Star - 


■ koge. 


Light - 


- koomi. 


Dark - 


■ molkan. 


Ck)ld - 




Heat • 


• agga. 


Day - 


• daroo. 


Night - 


■ mulkan. 


Fire • 


- kooinim. 


Water- 


- koom. 


Smoke 


• dumda. 


Groimd 


• jaw. 


Wind - 


- buran. 


Bain - 


■ merria. 


God - - . 




Ohosts 


• mooeimng 



Boomerang 
Hill 
Wood 
Stone 
Camp 
Tes 
No 
I 

Yon 
Bark 
Good 
Bad 
Sweet 
Food 
Hnngry 
Thirsty 
Eat 
Sleep 
Drink 
Walk 
See 
Sit 

Yesterday 
To-day 
To-morrow 
Where are 
BhLoks? 
I don't know 
Plenty 
Big . 
Little - 
Dead - 
By-and-by 
Come on 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk 
Wilk turkey 
Wife - - 



buramna. 

doodoo. 

die. 

murrun. 



tundo. 
kulang. 

kambora. 
doeo. 
tiroy. 
knngi. 



the 



bonang. 



woun. 
numgun. 



222 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 170.— STRADBROKE AND MORETON ISLANDS. 

GOENPUL, WOGEE, AND NOONUKUL TRIBES. 
Bt Gbobob Watkin, Esq., Ain> J. E. Hamilton, Esq. 

Thb following information relative to the three tribes named 
above was forwarded to me by Mr. (Jeorge Watkin ; a second 
vocabulary also of the Jandai language, which it has not 
been thought necessary to insert, was kindly sent to me 
by Mr. J. B. Hamilton. An incomplete vocabulary of the 
Moondjan language, which much resembles Jandai^ which 
Mr. Watkin forwarded, is also omitted. 

The Goenpul tribe occupies the central and southern 
portion of Stradbroke Island, and its language is called 
Jandai. The Noonukul tribe owns the northern portion of 
that island, and its language is called Moondjan. The 
Wogee tribe occupies Moreton Island, and its language is 
called GooToar or Gooar. The name of the language, in 
each of these cases, is the equivalent of noy as the reader will 
see in two instances by turning to the attached vocabularies. 



STBABBBOKE AND MORETON ISLANDS. 228 

The following particulars apply to the remnants of the 
three tribes who now live pretty much together. Their 
nnmber amounts to abont 65 persons. Many of them are 
half-castes, others qnadroons, and females largely predomi- 
nate. Since the year 1868, Mr. Watldn remarks that their 
numbers have fallen off at least one-half. Beading over that 
gentleman's replies to my questions, little information is to be 
gathered which has not been already laid before the reader in 
connection with other tribes. It may be remarked, however, 
that ornaments are worn made of the nautilus shell ; that 
spears are thrown by hand, and boomerangs of both sorts are 
in use. Water is carried in the sheaths of the Seaforthia 
pahn. Fish, honey, and snakes are amongst the principal 
articles of food, as well as the fern-root {bungwat)^ which is 
(or was) beaten into a pulp between two stones, and then 
baked like a damper in the ashes, or cooked on the coals. 
Particular sorts of food were forbidden to the males at certain 
ages, others to the women in general, and others to women 
whilst pregnant. ' Many years ago small-pox is reported to 
have ravaged these islands; our occupation of which took 
place in 1824 or 1825, at which period a branch penal settle- 
ment was formed on Stradbroke. Class-marriage still prevails, 
and in the Goenpul tribes the names of the classes, male 
and female, are Bandoor, Bandoorookun; Bunta, Buntagun; 
Barang, Barangun; Darawan, Darawangun. Marriages take 
place both within and without the tribe. Children, of course, 
belong to the tribe of the father. Males are scarred for 
ornament on the chest, back, and arms; females on the arms 
and legs. The last joint of the little finger of one hand used 
to be taken off. Preparatory to burial, the corpse is made 
into the shape of a ball. In these tribes, as in all others of 
which accounts have reached me, consumption is the general 
cause of deaths. A messenger sent to another tribe carries 
a notched stick with him, the size of one's finger. The custom 
prevails of an old man in times of illness sucking the part in 
pain, and pretending to extract by his lips or teeth a piece of 
wood, which he spits out. The people of these tribes have no 



224 



THE AUSTRALIAK RACE: 



objection to tell their nameSy as we know nianj others have. 
The following is a list of them, male and female: — 



Names of Men. 


Names of Women. 


Konjo. 


Nuranemn. 


Peeamareeba. 


Knranpin. 


Ttknkka. 


Gnnrradjn. 


Ween. 


Boonbinpin. 


Nasffin. 


Gootenoo. 


Qnelbeean. 


Weedjumpare- 


Toompanee. 


Pjorpoorbadjor. 


Kmgalmoon- 
jipimba. 


gun. 
Kooroo. 


Doodaree. 


Carreewurryba. 


Kindara. 


Nnndgily. 


Nookembar. 


Gnoonoopi 


Atta-cairara. 


Gnoonappee. 


Pabbal. 


Mndloomba. 


Paddlin, 


Ngamingba. 


Wiumycunny. 


Pimnpurinba. 


Commoa. 
Bnddla. 


Mumbyeeba. 
Djarcowan- 


Nonko. 


Boodlnmberr. 


Biteeri. 


oowan. 


G^ra. 


Boodjoombirree- 


Wilcoonareeba. 


Dimbal. 


Eeree. 


bar. 


Timbin. 


Djilmorr. 


Pimbeean. 


DoomaUee. 


Treppen. 


Djaium. 


Kinta. 


Kunaroombar. 


Yaggojay. 


Weenebba. 


Tchilper. 
Gindareeba. 


Ngoomgarroo. 
EiUUkiim. 


Goobee. 
Beemee. 
Oonto. 


Millingirr. 
BiUoonga. 
Djoonabin. 


QoombiUeba. 


TimgU. 


Kooloom. 


Wapumareeba. 


Boodjarpin. 


Waggon. 


Wyan. 


Tudloalbun. 


KuttageerL 


Tcharcheedon- 


Boondooba. 


Coora. 


Yillaroon. 


areeba. 


Djungeenm. 






Additional Wob 


LD6 AND Ph&ASBS. 




WaUaby - 


• boogaL 


Brother-in-law • 


• kabakerie. 


Bandicoot • 


yagooL 


Aunt - 


. maran. 


Rat - - ' 


■ koorlL 


Uncle - 


- kame. 


Flying fox - 


kieraman. 


Husband 


• noogoonping. 


Dngong 


• yimgan. 


Wife . 


- noogoonpingon. 


MuUet 


■ andekaL 


North wind 


> tinbin. 


Sohnapper • 


■ pimba. 


South wind 


booran. 


Stingaree • 


• bangko. 


East wind - 


• winchia. 


Oyster 


• kinyingarra. 


West wind • 


■ tchoongie. 


Pearl oyster 


• koanpe. 


Creek- 


• warriL 


Crab ■ 


■ yeerin. 


Qouds 


• kalen. 


Black snake 


■ doomgoor. 


Native flax - 


' imboon. 


Whip snake 


■ deerooyn. 


Leaves 


• kajaL 


Carpet snake 
Deaf adder - 


- kabooL 


flhtf^'W W ^^AP 


■ mooloomkuL 


Woman's bag 


■ goolay. 


Elbow 


- goontie. 


Yam-stick - 


- kalgooro.* 


Want - 


■ wangie-wangie. 


Bed (blood) 


- kowan. 


Forehead 


■ yelim. 


Stringybark-tree 


goondool. 


Widower - 


• boorgoon. 


To strike • 


- bomar. 



* In other dialects we have kaaXt, meaolncr wood and lUao apear. 



STBADBROKE AND MOBETON ISLANDS. 



225 



Additional Wosds 

Ton go, I will Qobana inter, 

oome by-and-by ntcha baro 

balgalpin. 
I dreamed about Utchainebiboon 

yoa mare. 

Who told yon? - Ando ine yare? 
Sit (down) . - Tinila. 
Getnp - Balka. 

What (are) yoa Minango inter 

laughing at? gindan? 

Where (are) you Wunya inter 

going? yeranya? 



AND Fs&ASEa— continued, 

I will cat yoa - Utcha ine kabale- 



Who cut yoa? • 

Gat it - 

Have yoa eaten? - 

Tell yoar father • 

You Ue 

How many did 

you get? 
Let go- 
Are yoa awake? • 
I Uaghed (till I) 

died and stank 



Andoo ine kabal? 
Eapa. 

Tchare inter ? 
Bing inter yalwa. 
Nyalangken inter 
Minyambo inter 
maan? 
Wia. 

Meal-panye inter? 
Gindan atcha 
kangere booghor. 



TOL. nz. 



226 



THE AUSTRAUAK RACE i 



No. 170.— STRADBBOKB AND MORETON ISLANDS-<K)ENPUL 

TRIBE, JAKDAI LANGUAGE. 



Bt Gboboi Watkin, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 
OpoiBom 

Tame dog • 

Wild dog - 

Black duck - 
Wood duck 
Pelioan 

Langhing jaokaas 
Native oompanion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - - - 
Swan • - - 



goopee. 

mee. 

ungaL 

moonuL 

ngon. 

tchoongarra. 

kakoom. 

tchoongee. 

keara. 

wokkon. 

maroochle. 

kongkong. 



Track of a foot 
Fish - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito - 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks - 
A Blackf ellow 
A Black woman 

Nose - 



- joon. 



dibbing. 
poolooloom. 
kabooL 
malar, 
malar, 
tchundal, 
jnndab. 
mooroo. 



Hand- 


- murra. 


2 Blacks - 


- 


3 Blacks - 


- 


One - 


- kunara. 


Two - 


- boodla. 


Three- 


- boodla kunara. 


Four - 


- boodla boodla. 


Father 


- bing. 


Mother 


- budjong. 


Sister-Elder 


- djuddin. 


„ Younger 


. mungakuL 


Brother-Elder 


- nabong. 


„ Younger goanguL 


A young man 


- goominguin. 


An old man 


- budjaar. 


An old woman 


- wollingar. 


A baby 


. nrnmlmii. 


A White man 


- degga. 


Children 


- numil-numll. 




kin-kin. 


Head - - 


- magooL 


Eye - 


• mel. 


Ear • 


- pidna. 



STRADBBOKE AND MOBETON ISLANDS. 



227 



No. 170.— Skradbboks and Moskton Islands— Ctoekpul Tbibb, 

Janbai JjASQVAQ^—conHnued, 



Month 


- wnngaw. 


Boomerang - 


* barengun. 


Teeth- 


- deea. 


Hill - - 


- beppo. 


Hair of the head - magool. 


Wood- 


- bummaL 


Beard- - 


- yerren. 


Stone - 


- mudlo. 


Thunder - 


- moo-gara. 


Camp - 


- oompi. 


Graaa - 


- binglL 


Yes - - 


- yawoi. 


Tongue 


- djnrgoom. 


No - - 


- jandaL 

« 1 


Stomach 


- diggorL 


I 


- naree, utcha. 


Breasts 


. nmmoo. 


You - 


- inta, ine. 


Thigh- - 


- booyoo. 


Bark - 


• woodgooroo. 


Foot - 


- tchidna. 


Good - 


- maroomba. 


Bone - 


- tcheerben. 


Bad - - 


- wadley. 


Blood- - 


- kowan 


Sweet - 


- kubba. 


Skin - - 


- moyen* 


Food - 


- tohindgen. 


Fat - 


- dingaL 


Hnngry 


- waara. 


Bowels 


- 


Thirsty 


- kudna. 




- koodna. 


Eat - 


- tudleba. 


War-spear - 


- knni 


Sleep - 


- boogun. 


Beed-spear - 


- 


Drink- 


- tudleba. 


Throwing-stick 
Shield- - 


• 

- koontaw. 


Walk - - 


- yieba. 


Tomahawk - 


* waggar. 


See - 


- neemgeeba. 


Canoe - 


- koondooL 


Sit - 


- w^niliL. 


Sun - 


- biggee. 


. Yesterday - 


- nooboogooboo. 


Moon - 


- killen. 


To-day 


- booren. 


Star - 


- mirreegen. 


To-morrow - 


- koodgoondaboo. 


Light - 


- dudlen. 


Where are 


the wunniamalar? 


Dark - 


- koodgoom. 


Blacks? 




Cold - - 


- tantan. 


I don't know 


- atcha djookoora. 


Heat - 


- nunka. 


Plenty 


- munyal. 


Day - 


• biggee. 


Big . - 


- kroomba. 


Night- 


• koodgoom. 


Little - 


- beerpa. 


Fire - 

Water 


- djarlo. 

- tobba 


Dead - 


- kungera. 


Smoke 


- tchnmmoo. 


By-and-by - 


- baro. 


Qroond 


- djara. 


Come on 


- bulka. 


Wind - 


- kubbee-knbbee. 


Milk - - 


. ummoobin. 


Bain - - 


• 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


Ood - 


- 


wad turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


- 


Wife - 


- noogoopmgun« 



Tt 



228 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 170.— MORETON ISLAND— WOGEE TRCBE, GOOWAR 

LANGUAGE. 

Bt Gbobob Watkin, Esq. 



EAngaroo - 


- maree. 


Hand - 


kining. 


Opoflsnm - 


- goopee. 


2 Blacks 




Tame dog - 


- ngaagum. 


3 Blacks - 




wad dog - 


m 


One - 


• kurraboo. 


Emu - 


- 


Two - 


• boodla. 


Black duck - 
Wood duck- 


- ngou. 


Three- 


' mudjen. 


Pelioan 


- tchoongara. 


Four - 


• boodla boodla. 


Laughing jackaaa kakoognn. 


Father 


> be-en« 


Native oompanion killilkilliL 


Mother 


• ngabbon. 


White cockatoo 


- gaya. 


Sister-Elder 


• butanga. 


Crow - 


- warbaen. 


„ Younger • 


' wuppoonga. 


Swan - 


. kingoyung. 


Brother-Elder - 


> kouren. 


Egg - 


- kubooee. 






Track of a foot 


- tchinda. 


„ Younger punnaba. 


FUh - - 


- djaloom. 


A young man 


• goommgan. 


Lobster 


- 


An old man 


. meendoora. 


Grayfiah - 


- 


An old woman • 




Mooquito - 


- woondoondoo. 


A baby - 


' whyen. 


Fly - - 
Snake - 


- djoomgoo. 


A White man - 


• kurrapee. 


The Blacks - 


- mugee. 


Children - 




A Blackf ellow 


• mugee. 


Head - 


- kumbee. 




Eye • 


• mee. 


Now - 


- baar. 


Ear • - • 


. pinnung. 



MOBETON ISLAND. 



229 



No. 170.— MosBTOK Island— WooBK Tbibb, Goowab Lanouaoe— 

ccnJtMW/ed, 



Month 


- yoDin. 


Boomerang- 


- ngarrenga. 


Teeth- 


- deemn. 


Hill - 


- 


Hair of the head - kumbee. 


Wood- 




Beard- 


- yurreu* 


Stone - 


- gooeean. 


Thnnder - 


- moogara. 


Camp- 


. dinom. 


Gran - 


- weedjun. 


Yea • 


- yooL 


Tongae 


- djnrgDom. 


No - - 


- gooar or goowar 


Stomach 


. nnnemboo. 


I - - 


- nga. 


BreaatB 


- nmboouL 


Yon - 


- ngin, ine. 


Thigh - 


- booyoo. 


Bark - 


^ 


Foot - 


- djinimg. 


Good - - 


. kooemba. 


Bone • 


- tchiggil. 


Bad - 


- worrang. 


Blood- 


- goora. 


Sweet- 


• kooemba. 


Skin - 


- mooren 


Food - - 


. tchindjen. 


Fat - 

Bowels 


- dhaga. 


Hungry 


- kubeerL 


Bxcrement - 


„ 


ThizBty 


- boonynn. 


War-Bpear - 


- tchingoor 


Eat - 


- tndlaar. 


Beed-spear- 


m 


Sleep - 




Throwing-stiok 


m 


Drink- - 


- towaar. 


Shield 


' bringabunga. 


Walk- 


- yudni 


Tomahawk - 


- meerangnn. 


See - 


- ngaigga. 


Canoe - 


- oobnm. 


Sit - 


- yinnaar. 


Snn - 


- boodlooar. 


Yesterday - 


- woaraboo. 


Moon - 


- killen. 


To-day 


- woondjer. 


Star - 


- meennn. 


To-morrow - 


- koondjakaboo. 


light- 


- boodjoora. 


Where are the 


i 


Dark - 


- knppee. 


Blaoksr 




Cold - - 


- wareng. 


I don't know 


- gooar natchoo 


Heat - 


- oolbillee. 




knnee bumba. 


Day - - 


- boodloongnn. 


Plenty 


- mnnyaL 


Night - 


- knppee. 


Big - - 


- gooraba 


Kre 


- dargee. 


Little - 


- ngnmbaar. 


Water 


- knppeng. 


Dead - - 


- kunneer. 


Smoke 


- djoonbar. 


By-and-by - 


- moota. 


Qronnd 


- boobeemn. 


Come on 


- buggaar. 


Wind- 


- 


Milk - - 


- nmboonbin. 


Bain - - 


- pnnna. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - - 


- 


Wild tnrkey 


- 


Ghosts 


- 


Wife - - 


- oopar. 



230 THE AUSTRALIAK RACE: 

In this langaage, the Groowar, we find maree^=^ kangaroo 
and mtigee = Blackfellow^ both words probably cormptions 
of murri; also ngabbon (nffoboon ?) =mother one of the 
many variations we meet of the word amoo or ammoo^ cir- 
cnmstances to which attention has already been directed 
more than once. For head and kair there is likewise but 
one equivalent, another common Australian feature. The 
negative adverb in this case is the name of the language 
and not of the tribe. 



BETWEEN THE ALBERT AND TWEED BIVEBS. 281 



No. 171.— BETWEEN THE ALBERT AND TWEED 

RIVERS. 

Bt T. de M. M. Fbiob, Esq., W. Landsborouoh, Esq., W. G. White, 

Esq., and J. 0'Ck>NNOB, Esq. 

Thb Yocabnlaries attached are from the closely-related dia- 
lects spoken by the tribes whose country extends from the 
Albert River nearly to the Tweed. From the replies to my 
questions given by Mr. Landsborough I learn that smaU-pox 
killed off a large portion of these tribes, both prior to the 
appearance of the Whites in this part of the continent and 
subsequently. Children^ as in all other cases which have 
come to my knowledge, belong to the tribe of the father. 
Qirls have the little finger of the left hand cut off in infancy. 
The equivalent of the Blacks^ meebin^ means Eaglehawk. 
To drink is rendered ea^ water. 



232 



THE AUSTRALIAK RACE: 



No. 171.— BETWEEN THE ALBERT AND TWEED KCVEBS. 



Bt T. ds M. M. Pbiob, Ebq. 



Jn. this Yooabnlary, fire, wood, and camp are all rendered^ and I haTe 

doubt oorreotly, by the word loyftara. 



Kangaroo • 


munni 


Hand - 


tnngan. 


Opossum 


noun. 


2 Blacks - 


bnlabe mibin. 


Tame dog - 
WUddog • 
Emu • • • 


moggnm. 


3 Blacks • 
One - 


yabaro mibin. 


Black duck - 


mar. 


Two - - . 


bnlabe. 


Wood duck 
Pelican 

Laughing jackass 
Native companion 


oombawir. 

tangara. 

gagon. 

L 


Three • 
Four - 
Father 


yabaro. 
. biol. 


White cockatoo • 


' gwa. 


Mother 


wardcm. 


Crow - 
Swan • 
Egg 


oolumbnm and 

colgrow. 
morgoutche, 

pigaraqin. 
• unga, cobin. 


Sister-Elder 
„ Younger • 

Brother^Elder - 
,, Younger 


• manou. 
. oagou. 


Track of a foot • 


goulgan. 


A young man 


- gibara. 


Fish - - . 
Lobster 
Crayfish - 
Mosquito - 


• mondura. 


An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 


- gidou. 

- merougan. 

> yourangan. 


Fly - • 


■ tumbara. 


A White man 


• carabie. 


Snake - 

The Blacks- 

A Blackfellow • 


■ woralba. 

mibin, bigaU. 
- mibin. 


Children 
Head - 


. didum. 
- borow. 


A Black woman • 


• dngalgan. 


Eye - 


- me. 


Nose • 


* moran. 


Ear 


• binum. 



BETWEEN THE ALBERT AND TWEED RIVERS. 233 



No. 171.— Between the Albert and Tweed Bxvma'-ccnHnued. 

Boomerang - 
Hill . - - 

Wood- 



Month 
Teeth - 

Hair of the head- 
Beard- 
Thnnder - 
Graas 
Tongne 
Stomach 
Breasts 
Thigh - 

Foot - - . 
Bone - . . 
Blood - 
Skin - 
Fat - 
Bowels 
Excrement - 
War-spear - 
Beed-spear- 
Wommera or 
throwing-stick 
Shield 
Tomahawk - 
Canoe- 
Son - 

Moon . - . 
Star - 

light - - . 
Dark - 
Cold - 
Heat - 
Day - 
Night - 
Fire - - - 

Water 
Smoke 
Gnmnd 
Wind- 
Rain . . - 
God . - - 
Ghosts 



jarbe. 

gidnn. 

condor. 

yaran. 

migobal, dogaL 

yethong. 

doronm. 

moon. 

ama. 

dOTOO. 

ohinang. 

goonar. 
yoYura. 
codgaro. 
gidgora. 
toroo. 
doan. 
(not osed). 
(not nsed). 

boga. 
bondan. 

yalgan. 

giboo. 

ombron. 

borrabil. 

alo. 

waring. 

boo. 

manga. 

yooan. 

wybara. 

yong. 

doom. 

dagom. 

borogin. 

gwom. 



- wybara. 



Stone - 


- dao. 


Camp- 


- wybara. 


Yes - - 


- ewewy. 


No - - 


- wona. 


I - - 




You - 


- walo. 


Bark - 


- baroo. 


Good . - 




Bad - - 




Sweet - 


- bagaL 


Food - 


- U^**^ 


Hongry 


- cobry. 


Thirsty 


- boricoot. 


Eat - - 


- tala. 


Sleep . 


- moram. 


Drink- 




VValk- 


- yamba. 


See - 


- nani. 


Sit - 


- yangalla. 


Yesterday - 


- moko. 


To-day 


- baiad 


To-morrow - 


- mobo. 


Where are 


the 


Blacks? 




I don't know 


- yagam oanaba. 


Plenty 


- caraL 


Big . - 




Little - 


- bigaot. 


Dead - 




By-and-by - 




Come on 


- goal 


Milk . - 


- 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


Wild torkey 


- 


Wife - - 


• 



234 



THB AX78TRALIAK &ACB 



No. 171.— BETWEEN THE ALBERT AND TWEED BIVEBa 

FOBWABDBD BT W. LaNDSBOBOUOH, Es<)., AND W. G. WhITX, EbQ., 

OOKJOniTLT. 



EAngaroo - 


. mnnni 


Opoanim 


' qnini. 


Tame dog - 




WUddog • 


• umgin. 


Eniii 




Black duck - 


• mara. 


Wood dnok - 




Pelican 




Laughing jaokaaa 


kaagoon. 


Native oompanioi 


imnrlrole. 


White cockatoo • 


. kirra. 


Crow - 


> wanghan. 


Swan - 


• diilla. 


Egg - - 


• kongan« 


Track of a foot 


- ohirrada. 


Flflh - 


• ohalloouL 


Lohster 




Crayfiflh 




Mooquito 


• mendura. 


Fly - - - 


toonbom. 


Snake - 


• derin« 


The Blacks - 


. chinaba. 


A Blackf ellow • 


' meebin. 


A Black woman • 


■ 4^hft1g""- 


Nose - . . 


> murra. 



Hand • 


- tongan. 


2 Blacks - 


• budlameebin. 


3 Blacks 


. budla yabberoo 




meebin. 


One - 


• yabberoo. 


Two - 


- budla. 


Three- 


- budla yabberoo. 


Four - 




Father 


• peeung. 


Mother 


- wadjung. 


Sister-Elder 




„ Younger 


. yeragoong. 


Brother-Elder 


- kogung. 


„ Younger bunang. 


A young man 


- keeburra. 


Aw old man 


* keejom. 


An old woman 


- mamngan. 


A baby - 


- jargnm. 


A White man 


- daggie. 


Children - 


• mooyum. 


Head - 


- boweroo. 


Eye - 


- mee. 


Ear - 


- binnang. 



BETWEEN THE ALBERT AND TWEED RIVEBS. 285 



No. 171.— B 

Moath 

Teeth - 

Hiur of the head 



Thunder 



Tongae 
Stomach 



THE Albxbt 

chang. 

titang. 

baraogh. 

yireen. 

moogarra. 

yeechang. 

tirrajong. 

moo. 



Thigh- 
Foot - 
Bone - 
Blood- 
Skin - 
Fat - 
Bowels 
Szcrement - 
War-ipear - 
Beed-epear- 
Throwing-stick 
Shield 
Tomahawk - 
Canoe- 
Sim - 
Hoon - 
Star - 

Ught - 
Dark - 
Cold - 
Heat - 
Day - 
Night- 
Fire - 
Water 
Smoke 
Groond 
Wind- 
Bam - 
God > 

GhOBtB 



- cherang. 
. chinnang. 

- dnrrigan. 

- koom^a* 

- nollin. 

- kadjeroo. 

- giddirra. 

- goonang. 

- toowan. 

- (none used). 
• jabberee. 

- kootan. 

- pondan. 

- koondooL 

- yangay. 

- keebom. 

- qweeonggnng. 

- qangay. 

- nandiddi. 

- warring. 

- noong. 

- jTungai. 

- nandiddi. 

- wyebra. 

- koong. 

- choim. 

- chagoon. 

- yirragay. 

- qnang. 

- mangeoi. 



AND Tw^ED BiyxBS— eon^Ked. 
Boomerang - • borragan. 



Hill - 
Wood- 
Stone - 
Gamp - 
Yea - - 
No - - 
I - - 
You - 
Bark - 
Good - 
Bad - 
Sweet - 
Food - - 
Hungry 
Thirsty 
Eat - 
Sleep - 
Drink 
Walk- 
See - 
Sit - 
Yesterday • 
Today 
To-morrow 



- toolagal. 

- challe. 

- bunding. 

- teemun. 

-yo. 

- ugunL 

- nunyee. 

- wallo. 

- koonjooL 

- bnnyarra. 

- chang. 

- bnnyarra. 

- koobberi. 

- naywin. 

- chaUalla. 

- woorwan. 

- challalla koong. 

- jringalla. 

- ni-in. 



- byein. 

- nooboo. 



Where are the yellameebinT 
Blacks? 



I don't know 
Plenty 
Big . - 
Little - 
Dead - 
By-and-by - 
Come on 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk - 
Wild turkey 
Wife - 



- yoogumniga. 

- kurruL 

- kum. 

- peechanggullan. 

- koorooboo. 

- yoojang. 

- quowee. 

. meebun. 

- waagoon. 

• neebungan. 



236 



THE AUSTRAUAH BACE : 



No. 171.— BETWEEN THE ALBERT AND TWEED BIVEBS. 



Bt J. O'GoHKOB, Esq. 



Eanganx) • 


money. 


OposBum 


newung. 


Tame dog • 


nugem. 


WUddog . 


yeroging. 




wooring. 


Black dnok- 


• mara. 


Wood duok- 


• oombabin. 


Pelican 


jungara. 


Laughing jaokaas 


kagorim. 


Native oompanioi 


1 dumbel. 


White cockatoo • 


• kaira. 


Crow - 


• waagnn. 


Swan ■ 


- date. 


Egg 


• kabnn. 


Track of a foot 


. goolgnn. 


Fiah . 


- (no general tenn) 


Lohster 


- (not known). 


Crayfiah 


- galoom. 


Moeqaito - 


- mnnjur. 


Fly ■ 


- djunburra. 


Snake - 


- dnnnara. 


The Blacks • 


. mebing. 


A Blackf ellow 


- bigul. 


A Black woman • 




Nose - 


- morro. 



Hand - 


kongaL 


2 Blacks 


boolaroo bigol. 


3 Blacks - 


boolaroo yabora 




bigoL 


One - 


- yaboro. 


Two - - 


- boolaroo. 


Three- 


' boolaroo yabnm. 


Four or more 


' guniL 


Father 


■ benng. 


Mother 


weathnng. 


Sistei^Elder 






yeargong. 


Brother-Elder • 


■ kagoon. 


„ Tonngei 


r bonam. 


A youigman 


• jebnr. 


An old man 


• kedjnm. 


An old woman • 


• merroongon. 


A baby 


- tchadmn. 


A White man 


■ togi. 


Children 


- tchadnm. 


Head - 


• bowro. 


Eye • 


- me. 


Ear - - 


• benang. 



BETWEEN THE ALBERT AND TWEED BIVERS. 237 



No. 171.— Between the Albert and Tweed ILpnaa~<onUnued, 


Month 


• jaim. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


• derung. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head- 


- goendum. 


Wood- 


talle. 


Beard- 


■ yamnd. 


Stone • 


• yeron. 


Thunder 


- maigweL 


Camp - 


y-bur-a (lit. = 


Grass - 


- eedung. 




fire). 


Tongue 


• djergung. 


Yes - . 


yo. 


Stomach 


- djulba. 


No - - . 


yacum. 


Breasts 


■ dumerognn* 


I 


. nio. 


Thigh- 


• taryung. 


You - 


• waaloo. 


Foot - 


• tchenung. 


Bark - 


• bnrwool. 


Bone - 


• taregun. 


Good - 


• bowgal. 


Blood - 


- goomera. 


Bad - . • 


• tchung. 


Skin - - • 


- ulun. 


Sweet - 


• bowgul. 


Fat - - • 


- kudgera. 


Food - 


• nungun. 


Bowels 


• bulen. 


Hungry 


■ oobbere. 


Excrement - 


• goonung. 

• 


Thirsty 


- coonge. 


War-spear - 
Beed-spear - 


• joan. 

- (not known). 


Eat - - • 


- tchabbe. 


Wommera or 




Sleep - 


■ noram. 


throwing-stick 




Drink - 


■ coontohabbe. 


Shield 


• buga. 


Walk . 


• yanbe. 


Tomahawk • 


. bundan. 


See - 


- narbe. 


Canoe- 


- gundooL 


Sit . . 


- yaanbe. 


Sun 


- yalgun. 


Yesterday - 


• wooboo. 


Moon - 


• gireum. 


To-day 


• burang. 


Star - 


- kuroomgun. 


To-morrow - 


• wooboo. 


light of day 
» fire 
Dark - 


■ burbiL 

• tchalgL 

■ nullu. 


Where are the 
Blacks r 


yillim mebing f 


Cold - 


- waring. 


I don't know 


> yeleyou. 


Heat - 


• numgul. 


Plenty 


• gurul. 


Day - 


• numagera. 


Big . . . 


• cumi. 


Night- 


• woolaroon. 


Little - 


> bitcha-gul-ung. 


Fire - 


■ y-bur-a. 


Dead - 


• gilungwend. 


Water 


• coon. 


By-and-by - 


• uyou. 


Smoke 


djum. 


Come on 


• gooway. 


Ground 


• igoon. 


Milk - 




Wind - 
Bain • 


yarga. 
• goo-ong. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - 




Wild turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife . - 





238 



THB AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



In addition to his vocabolary, Mr. 0'C!onnor sends me 
the following tenses of verbs^ from the language of the 
Ipswich tribe, which I do not think are perfectly correct .- — 



To RuK. 





FBBBBNT INDIGATIYB. 




Iron • 


- niogowraUa. 


We run 


• nulegowrea. 


Thou numeBt 


* 


You run 


• waaloo gowrai. 


Herons 


• gillegowrin. 


They run - 


• kaam gowrin. 




PSBFICT TBNSI. 




Iran - 


- nio gowrin. 


We ran 


- nule gowrin. 


Thouranneet 


• 


Yon ran 


- waaloo gowrin. 


He ran 


. giUe gowrin. 


They ran - 


- kaam gowrin. 




FUTUKB TKNSB. 




IwiUnm • 


• gowrailanio. 


We will ran 


• nuleboo gowrea. 


Thoa wilt run 


- 


Yon will run 


- waaloo nure gow- 
raL 


He wiUnin 


. giUe nure gow- 


They wiU run 


• kaam nure gow- 




raL 


rai. 




IHPERATiyS MOOD. 




Run - 


• gowraL 


Let US run - 


- nnlinegowruma. 


Let him run 


. gilane gowraima. 


Let them ran 


- kaam gowraima. 



Igo - 

Thongoest 
Hegoea 

We go 
You go 



To Go. 

PBESEMT TENSE. 



- galong nio yan- 

m 

' giUe wangoor 
yanna. 

- nule yango. 

- neremum yanna. 



They go - kaam jangooroo 

yangala. 
You and I go - nule waaboo 

yanbe 
Qeorgy and I go - nule boolung 

Qeorgiyangalla. 

Georgy and Billy boolagnm jaa- 

go gooroo yangalla 

GeorgiBillL 



BETWEEN THE ALBERT AND TWEED RIVEBS. 289 



To Go— oonttfitie(2. 

FXRFBOT TXN8X. 



I "went 
TfaoQ wentest 

He went 

"Wo went 
Ton went - 

I willgo - 

ThoQ wiltgo 

He win go - 
We wiQ go- 
Yon willgo 

JjBt me go - 

€k>thon 
liethim go 
lietnago - 



nioyaane. 

gala waaboo yea- 
nee. 

gille wangoor 
yaane. 

nnle yaane. 

waaloo yaane. 

FUTUBB 

nio warnwe yan- 
galla. 

waaboo nore 
yaane. 
giUeyanbe. 
nnla nore yanbe. 
goremnng yanbe. 



They went - - kaam wangoor 

yaane. 

You and I went - nolo waaboo 

yaane. 

Qeorgy and I went nnle boolnng 

yeaneeGeorgL 

Georgy and Billy boolagnm jan- 
went gooroo yeamee 

QeorgiBilli 

TXNSE. 

They will go • kaam jnngooroo 

yangin. 

Yon and I will go nnle waaboo nnre 

yanbe. 

Georgy and I will nnleboolungnnre 
go Georgiyangaba. 

G^rgy and Billy gille jansooroo 

yanflsla booba- 
jnn Georgi BillL 



willgo 



gnUnm nio yan- 
gen. 

waaloo jraana. 
gnlnm yangen. 

gnlnm nnle boo- 
lnng yangen. 



Let Georgy and gnhzmnnle boo 
me go 



Go yon two 
Let them go 



Inng Georgi yan- 
gen. 

• boolagnm gnlnm 
jraana. 

- gnlnm kaam yan- 
oeenma. 



laee - 

Thonaeeat 
He Bees 
We see 
Yon see 



I will see 
Thonwilt 
He will Bee 
We will see 
Yoii will see 



To Sbb. 

PBESBNT TBNSS. 

nionanee. 
waaloo nanee. 
gUle nanee. 
nnle nanee. 
nnremnng gondn 



nanee. 



They see - - kaamboo nanee. 

Yon and I see - nnle waaboo 

nanee. 

Georgy and I see- nnle Georgi 

nanee. 

Georgy and Billy Billiboolagnndoo 

nanee G€^gi 



PITTUBE. 



nio woolongnabe. 
waaboo nabe. 
gUlenabe. 
nnle nabe. 
naremnng gandn 
nnrewa. 



They will see • gala yonngwe 

nanee. 

Yon and I will nnle waaboo nnre 
see woolong nabe. 

G^rgy and I will Georgi nnle nabe. 



Georgy and Billy Georgi Billi boo- 
will oee lagnndoo nanee. 



240 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 172.— NERANG CREEK. 

Bt F. Fowlkb, Esq. 

From this neighbourhood a second yocabnlary, which I have 
not thought it necessary to insert, was kindly forwarded to 
me by F. Nixon, Esq. Mr. Fowler gives the following 
Additional Words. The words canoe and bark may be com- 
pared. The canoe is a sheet of bark, shaped in a particular 
way: — 



Fresh-water 


• tchemn. 


Iguana 


• yowgerer. 


Salt-water • 


- yeengeree. 


Wood grub - 


• tabbun. 


Mud - 


' tullung. 


Oysters 


- moonguL 


Gorroboree • 


- arrL 


Mussel 


■ piggara. 


Long - 


• yerribil. 


River - 


- boUnn. 


Swimming - 


■ wy-woni 


Creek- 


• kuraby. 


Honey 


- kudja. 


Flood tide - 


• yangi. 


Fifihing net - 


• irribun. 


Ebb tide - 


• koongajurar. 




No. 172.— NERANG CREEK. 






Bt F. Fowlkb, Esq. 




Eanganx) - 


- groman. 


Hand - 


> tungun. 


Opoflsnra 


• gueyan. 


2Blacks - 


boolara mibbin. 


Tame dog - 


• nogum. 


SBlacks - 


boolraybara mib- 


Wild dog • 


• uragin. 




bin. 


Eimu • 


> ooroon. 


One - > - 


yabroo. 


Black duck • 
Wood duck - 


' maira. 

• 


Two - - - 


• boolsra. 


Pelican 


- tchungarry. 


Three- 


• boolrayabra. 


Laughing jackaas 


- kagoon. 


Four - 


boola-boola. 


Native companion moorlmum. 


Father 


beeyung. 


White cockatoo 


• kaara. 


Mother 


wyung. 


Crow - 


• wagun. 


Sister-Elder 


nunoog. 


Swan - 


- kmigroo. 


II Younger - 




Egg 


• oobyoon. 


Brother-Elder - 




Track of a foot 


- ohurria. 


„ Younger 




Fiah - - 


- tulum. 


A young man ■ 


murrowgwun. 


Lobster 


- mooban. 


An old man 




Crayfish - 


• moolan. 


An old woman • 


C3 

mirritfwun. 


Mosquito - 

van 


- moongero* 


A baby - - 


oharchum. 


Fly - 
Snake - 


• wogan. 


A White man - 


duckering. 


TheBlacks- 


- mibbin. 


Chndren - 


oharchum. 


A Bhickf eUow • 


■ bagaL 


Head - - . 


kungier. 


ABlaokwoman • 


- chalgaa. 


BJye - - . 


mee. 


Kose - . 


. mooroo. 


Ear - - 


binnung. 



NERANG CREEK. 



Mouth 


tumbroo. 


Teeth - 


dirmng. 


iHurof thehead- 


• poweroo. 


Beard- 


yerrin. 


Thnnder - 


moogerer. 


Graos • 


■ ejung. 


Tongue 


yebbin. 


Stomach 


• moong. 


Breasts 


. omma. 


Thigh- 


murrung. 


Foot - 


tchinnong. 


Bone - 


- terragnn. 


Blood- 


• pudgeL 


Skin - 


nlan. 


Fat - - . 


wadgery. 


Bowelfl 


muggi. 


Bxcrement - 


goonnong. 


IVar-Bpear - 


pelarra. 


BeedHspear - 




Wommera or 


porragnn. 


throwing-fltick 




SUeld 


• bugga. 


Tomahawk - 


• bundan. 


Canoe - 


- oondool. 


Sun - 


- nunga. 


Moon - 


■ kebum. 


Star - 


- koomungnn. 


Light - 




Dark ■ 


• underra. 


Cold - 


• warring. 


Heat - 


• boon. 


Day - 


• nunga. 


Night - 


- underra. 


Fire - 


■ wyburry. 


Water 


- coong. 


Smoke 


tuUo. 


Grourid 


• chuckoon. 


Wind- 


- burrigm. 


"R^iin . • 


. quong. 


God • 




Gho0tB 




TOL. m. 


<; 



'jBJtXK— continued. 


• 


Boomerang - 




Hill - 




Wood- 


tchally. 


Stone - 


pundan. 


Camp - 


dimmun. 


Yea . - 


yoe. 


No - - . 


gucum. 


I - . 


io. 


You - 


warlo. 


Bark > 


condool. 


Good - 


punyarra. 


Bad . . . 


- ohung. 


Sweet - 


puragun. 


Food - 


• chungool. 


Hungry 


- oobery. 


Thirsty 


■ neragin. 


Eat - - • 


• tchar. 


Sleep - 


. woorum. 


Drink- 


' tchienda. 


Walk - 


• yunbela. 


See - - • 


• nyenda. 


Sit - - . 


- yanna. 


Yesterday - 


• obo. 


To-day 


- baan. 


To-morrow - 


- obo. 


Where are the 


illymibbin? 


Blacks? 




I don't know 


■ cunitchum. 


Plenty 


• oommijung. 


Big - - 


' oomL 


Little - 


- bijungalung. 


Dead - 


- tarbillyan. 


By-and-by - 


- goobangung. 


Come on - 


- woomgunna. 


Milk • - 




Eaglehawk - 




Wild turkey 




Wife - 





241 



242 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 173.— TWEED EIVER AND POINT DANGAR. 

By Joshua Bslay, Esq. 

Mr. Brat, from whom I received my information concerning 
the language of the Tweed River tribe (which differs but 
little in its vocabulary from No. 172), points out that there 
is but one word to denote the children of a man's brother 
and those of his sister. He also remarks that there is bat 
one word — wobba — to express to-marroWy the day after to- 
morrow, and yesterday; and also but one word — ehunff — ^to 
express bad, old, and thin; neither of which statements 
have I any difficulty in believing. He also notices that if 
you say to a Black — ille mebin = where are the Blachs ? 
his reply, if he does not know, will not be ingha = I dofCt 
know, but ille? = where? laying the accent on the last 
letter instead of the first. 



No. 173.- 

How many? 
A great many 

A few - 
What? 
Where T 
There - 
Here - 
I don't know 
Take care 1 - 
Exclamation of 
surprise 
I am going now 
Let us go home 
Pretty 

The other one 
You scoundrel 



Additional Words 

minyungbooT 

kurralboo or 

kommiboo. 

pidjung boo 

minyung? 

lUe? 

kiUe. 

kuUe. 

wunna. 

wa ! 

kraighl 

yan-ba-la-la. 

yan-ba-lan-je. 

pa-na-ra-gun. 

kibey. 

yOncum mldgeu. 



AND Phbases, bt Mb. Brat. 

To strike - - bo5mar. 
To give a beating bSomamee. 

Early in the mom- wo5dgeraboo. 
ing 
To arrive - - wGrrigin. 

Annmberof Blacks karalboo mebbin 
are coming w5mgin. 

Get up (from b5Sgagee. 
sleeping) 



Crooked 
Straight 
A lon^way- 
„ road 
Deep water • 



- kur-rone. 

- bombi 
' kiole. 

- kiole kooligan. 

- kioUkoobg. 



Stick for propel-' tabdlguit 
ling canoe 



TWEED RIVER AND POINT DANQAR. 



243 



No. 173.— Additioval Wosdb and Phra8b&— oon<tniie^. 



Forest- 


• babbera. 


Moustache - 


yerrin. 


Scmb vines - 


• woggL 


Arm - 


kOngilL 


XHiylight - 


- woQdgera. 


Elbow 


kCSrln. 


Getnp at daylight bSSgagee wS5d- 


Finger 




to-morrow 


geraboo woebbo. 


Rib - - . 


tnnnera. 


A clear sky or billnbera. 


Heart - 


toolgo. 


fine day 




Knee - 


kindil. 


In front 


- nllong. 


Kidney 


- moongora. 


Look out ahead I 


- i^one nUongl 


Chest - 


toomooragan. 


A dead woman 


- tfirragan. 


Leg - - - 


(no word for the 


,» man 


• tOkkL 




whole limb). 


I>irectly 


• wSoloongmi 


Face - 


noogal. 


Hip - 


- wen. 


Whisker - 


(the same as beard 


Thigh - 


- tSrrung. 




and moustache). 


Knee - 


- kindill. 


A plain 


- ooonoongi. 


Ankle - 


• wooloo. 


Tree - 


• taUy. 


Heel - 


- to5nnm. 


Trf«f - 


- woorang. 


Toes - 


- bribin. 


Yam - 


• tum. 


My son 


- myone. 


Mud . 


■ tullugara. 


Handsome woma 


n pOnaragun. 


Flower 


• budgerabin. 


„ man 


- barloogSn. 


Pine-tree 


■ pimbul. 


Break of day 


- deelby. 


Sandhill • 


. kooigum. 


Bird - 


- noongnnbel. 


Lagoon 


• kowung. 


Bill - 


- chaung. 


Ashes - 


• boolare. 


Wing. 


- knnggil. 


Gum - 


• neeum. 


Feather 


- biom-biom. 


Waterhole - 


' kiawang. 


Bill - 


- biole. 


Eaglehawk • 


. meebun. 


Sky . 


- billnbera. 


Parrot 


- billen-billen. 


Sand . 


- yemmg. 


Pigeon 


• woo-loo-loo-in. 


Clond- 


- toongoon. 


Nest - 


- chindee. 


lightning 


- chungon. 


To tell 


- kaar. 


Grave - 


- toanee chock- 


♦, give 


• woolangee. 




nnda. 


„ speak - 


- mo-ai. 


Tired - 


• camlen. 


„ hear 


- cunnarangee. 


Long - 


- coorara. 


„ steal 


• weora. 


Short - 


- mul-guMong. 


n fight 


- boomalengee. 


Alive • 


- mun-me-ra-boo. 


„ kill . 


- toolang. 


Husband 


• newbtmg. 


„ die - . 


- tuck-ki-an. 


Wife - 


- newbnngnn. 


„ sing 


• yerrabil. 


Body - 


- moonng. 


„ bum 


. quebullen. 


Back - 


- mooborongh. 


„ break 


■ oowin. 



Q2 



244 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



Ko. 173. — Additiokal Wokds and Phrases — continued. 



Who U that Black ? - 

I don't know - 

I cannot see his face - 

IX> you see that one (woman) ? - 

I saw (her) yesterday 

She (has a) pretty (face) - 

(That) old woman (is) ugly 

By-and-by plenty Blacks will come 

I see them now 

Where? 

A good way off - 

(On the) plain > - ■ • 

A great many . - . - 

IX> you see that one ? - - 

Long ago he speared me in the back 

I will kill him to-moirow - 

I see a kangaroo 

There (he is) .... 

(Be) quiet 

Don't speak . « . . 

1*11 spear him by-and-by - 

He*8 coming to water 

He's going to eat 

I believe he is fat 

No (I believe) thin - 

Now m spear him ... 

All right ; now he's dead - 

He's fat 

Gome on, make a fire 

(There is) no wood 

Well ! carry him to the trees - 

I'm hungry - - - . 

Let us eat him . . - - 

111 eat him directly - 

Where (are the) Blacks ? - 

I don't know . - - - 

Nonsense ; why do you tell a lie ? 

How many (are there) ? 

Plenty 

Which Blacks ? - 



. killingang ? (mibbin understood). 

- ang kille (Ut. = << Who there?") 

- hebro narbidgum. 

- warlo nionee killamey. 

- nio nionee wobbo. 

- kille pnnnarregan. 

- memmg chung-chung. 

• wooloongmi womgin mebbinkommL 

- kille nione nio (Ut. = There see I). 

- ille? 

- kiole. 

. ooonoongi. 

- karalboo. 

- warlo nionee killamey ? 

- wiaraboo moobera pow-wun-nee. 

- nio pumgarlo wobbo. 
. nione nio kroman. 

. kille. 

- kingle. 

- kingle moimuUium. 

- nio puggarlo kooba. 

- koongga nulla walarla. 

- tabbigo. 

• kille wudgera (lit. = There fat). 

- uccum chung. 

- how nio powgun. 

- koorooboo ; bungen. 

- wudgerago. 

- qui wibrama. 

- ncumboo wibra. 

- warra wibra chumbar. 

- nio kobberen. 

- nubbe tubbela. 

- wooloongmi talala. 

- lUe mebbin ? 

- 1116? (Ut.= Where?) 

- warlo andrangeen minarago? or 

warlo andra mullen ? 
. minyimgboo? 

- karalboo. 

- ang kille mebbin ? 



TWEED RIVER AND POINT DANGAR. 



245 



No. 173.— Additional Wokds and VHRASsA—continued, 

'What (do) they eat ? - - - * minyung kille talala ? 

What woman is that ? - - - ang kille chulgun (which that 

woman)? 
Has Tommy a wife now ? - - - chnlgun noroe Tommy ? 

Yes ! - yoe ! 

Who gave her to him ? - - - amdo woolane ? 
Is she a yomig woman ? - - - kille woolbung ? 
No! old woman! .... uooum ! murrongin ! 
When will the Blacks come here ? - wingeegun mibbin worngun ? 
In three days . - . - . bulla yabra nnnga. 
Where is your wife ? - - - - Die biargun chulgun ? 
Coming to-morrow .... womgin woebo. 
Haye you seen my wife? - - - warlo nionee chulgun unyar ? 

Yes ! yoe ! 

Where? ille? 

On the plain .... - kille ooo-noong-gi (lit. = There plain). 

What's she doing? .... minyung elala ? 

I believe getting jrams - - whear wunye nullawalala. 

Come, make the camp ... kowar quinmar demmon. 
It will rain by-and-by • quong wooloongmi. 

Wliere are all the women ? - - ille boo chulgun. 
Piflhing ...... tallum bar. 

One woman is at camp - * - tabra-ba chul-gun dem-mon da. 

Two women are at my house - - bulla kar-gan chu-ar. 

Where is Tommy ? . - - - ille Tommy. 

I have not seen him to-day - - ucum nio-nio-nee biam. 

I am hungry ----- kobbi-dy en nio 

Give me some food ... - nio-nung-en mug-gar. 
Here it is - - - - - kuUen-ya. 

Come and fish kowar tallum narl-lee. 

No, let us hunt opossum - - - ucum tallum-quam narUee. 

By-and-by I will eat opossum - - wooloongmi nio chien quam. 

Opossum is no good . - - . quam chung. 

fish is the best - - - - - tallum nulle pun-ya-ra. 

Come and swim . . - - kowar kia jun. 

Go away — ^be oflP - - - - yunga. 

Where are you going ? - - - winge-go warlo ? 

I will go too ... - - nio nur-ra yan-ba-la-la. 

Are you tired ? - - - - warlo kur-rool ? 

Yes, I am very tired ■ - - - yoe-pun-ya pun-ya-ra kur-rool. 

Well ! go to sleep - * - - nubbe unera. 



246 



THE AUSTRALIAN EACE: 



No. 173.— ADomoKAL 

By-and-by 111 sleep • 

Where u my hosbaad 7 

You will see him by-and-by 

I see two women 

Where is my spear? - 

I haye not seen your spear 

Give me one spear - 

Give me two spears - 

Come and see my oanoe - 

Don't talk . . . . 

I do not know . . . . 



WoBM AND TjOAsn—cotUmuaL 

• kooba nio nna-ran-gee, 

- ille un-ya new-bong t 

- warlo kooba nam kooba. 

- nio nionee bnl-la chnlgon. 

- ille nnyar chu-nn? 

- uonm nio nar-bid-jnm. 

- ni-ai yabra cha-on. 

- niai bulla ohn-un. 

- ko-ga-na unyar kunniole. 

- kingle moi-mnl-li->um. 
. ing-he. 



No. 173.— TWEED MVER AND POINT DANGAE. 



SLangaroo - 


kroman. 


Opossum - 


quam. 


Tame dog - 


noggun. 


Wild dog - 




Emu - 




Black duck • 


marra. 


Wood duck- 




Pelican 


chungera. 


Laughing jackass 


kargoon. 


Natiye companion 


I woorgilie. 


White cockatoo - 


> karra. 


Crow • 


wargun. 


Swan - 


tooley. 


Egg 


kubbin. 


Track of a foot • 


kulligan. 


Fish . . • 


■ tallum. 


Lobster 




Crayfish - 


ninge-ninge. 


Mosquito • 


• munjura. 


Fly - - - 


• chun, borough. 


Snake - 


. dimn. 


The Blacks 


• mibbin. 


A BUckf ellow 


• yabbru mibbin. 


A Black woman • 


• woolbnng, chul- 




gun. 


Nose • 


■ morro. 



Hand - 




2 Blacks - - 


bulla mibbin. 


SBhtcks 


bullayabbru mib- 




bin. 


One - 


yabbru. 


Two - 


bulla. 


Three - 


bullayabbru. 


Four - 


bulla bulla. 


Father 


■ beung. 


Mother 


• wudjung. 


Sister-Elder 


nunung. 


„ Younger 




Brother-Elder 


. punnam. 


„ Younger< 




A young man 


' kabera. 


An old man- 


- kudjune. 


An old woman • 


. mumingin. 


Ababy 


- yargarie. 


A White man 


- tuckki. 


Children 


- chargum. 


Head - 


• kungera. 


Eye - 


- me. 


Ear 


. pixmunir. 



TWEED RIVER AND POINT DANGAR. 



247 



Month 
Teeth - 
Hair of the head 
Beard- 
Thimder - 
Graas - 
Tongae 
Stomach 
Breasts 
Thigh - 
Foot - 
Bone - 
Blood • 
Skb - 
Fat 

Bowels 
Excrement - 
War-spear - 
Reed-spear - 
Wommera or 
throwing-stick 
Shield 

Tomahawk - 
Canoe 
Smi - 
Moon - 
Star - 
light - 
Dark - 
Cold . 
Heat - 
Day - 
Night - 
Fire - 
Water 
Smoke 
Gromid 
Wind - 
Rain - 
God - 
Ghosts 



No. 173.— TwBED RivxB AND PoiNT Danoas — cofUifmed, 

Boomerang 
Hill 



- jenig. 

- timmg 

- bowra. 

- yarran. 

- muggera. 

- ejung. 

- tellin. 

- moong. 

- nmma. 

- jurung or terrung 

• chinnung. 
' turragon. 

- budjul. 

- yooliu. 

- wndgeree. 

- mokki. 

- koonung. 

- jume. 

mummbin. 

- buggar. 

- bnndau. 

- condool. 

- nunga. 

- gibbim. 

- kiomegun. 

- darm. 

- untidy. 

- wurring. 

- nunggalgary. 
. nunga. 

- untidy. 

- wibra. 

• koong. 

- dallo. 

- chockim. 

- buroogin. 

- quong or koong. 

- mnggi. 



Wood 
Stone 
Camp 
Yes 
No 
I 

You 
Bark 
Good 
Bad 
Sweet 
Food 
Hungry 
Thirsty 
Eat 
Sleep 
Drink 
Walk 
See 
Sit 

Yesterday 
To-day 
To-morrow 
Where are the illemibbin? 
Blacks ? 



biola. 
talley, wibra. 

boodin. 

demmon. 

yo, cam. 

ukum. 

ngio. 

warlo. 

yoolin (lit. skin). 

punyara. 

chung. 

burrakun. 

polora. 

kobbity. 

nirigin. 

talala. 

woram. 

tchoar. 

yonbar. 

narlala. 

yanna. 

wobbo (?). 

bam. 

wobbo (?). 



I don't know 
Plenty 
Big - 
Little • 
Dead - 
By-and-by 
Come on 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk 
Wild turkey 
Wife - 



ille (?). 
karalboo. 
kommi. 
pidjung. 

boo-ong. 
wooloongmi. 

qui. 

umarbil. 

meebun. 

newbungun. 



BOOK THE THIRTEENTH 



BOOK THE THIRTEENTH. 

PREFATORY REMARKS. 

In connection with this book, the points which seem most 
worthy of remark are, that in the Additional Words No. 178 
we meet with distinct tenns for riffht hand and le/t handy 
which may or may not exist in the other languages. In No. 
177, also, we find war-spear and tree reported by two of my 
correspondents as being translated by one term. As tree is 
not in the Common Vocabulary, but only met with here and 
there in the Additional Words, there is no means of deciding 
whether this is a conmion characteristic or not. In Mr. 
Myles* vocabulary. No. 176, we find the eqtiivalents of spear y 
woody and stone bear some resemblance. Looking at the 
languages of Australia as a whole, there is reason to believe 
that formerly there was bnt one word to express stonCy bonSy 
woody spear y treey and^r^. Head and hairy it will be noticed, 
are several times expressed by one word, and yesterday and 
Unnorrow by another. 



No. 174.— PART OF THE MARANOA RIVER, AND 

COUNTRY ROUND ROMA. 

Bt Robert Shsbidan, Esq., Ain> F. B. Bat, Esq. 

Of the languages of the Maranoa, abont Roma, two specimens 
are given, which agree pretty well, but, no donbt, belong to 
different tribes. Two others were forwarded by Mr. Montagu 
Curr and Mr. J. T. Little, which I have not thought it neces- 
sary to insert. Mr. Sheridan remarks that a Black child 
having died on his run several months before the date of his 



252 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

letter, the corpse was rolled up in a blanket, and was still 
being carried from camp to camp by the parents. 

From Mr. Bay I learn that the Maranoa Blacks frequently 
live to be sixty or seventy years of age. They use opossum- 
rugs at night, and occasionally in the day time. The women 
wear as ornaments reed-necklaces and mussel-shells, which 
hang in front of the breasts. This tribe smear the person 
with a mixture of grease and red ochre on occasions of cor- 
roboree ; make bags of the fibre of the currajong ; and toma- 
hawks of a heavy green stone, which they grind to an edge on 
sandstone. They have also boomerangs, occasionally carved 
on one side, some of which return when thrown. The boom- 
erang used in battle is made so as not to return. Their spears 
are projected by hand. Animals are roasted in the ashes 
with the skin on, and what are called ovens in the South do 
not exist. Males between the ages of ten and twenty, or 
thereabouts, are forbidden to eat emu, kangaroo, and carpet 
snakes, and possibly other articles. Mr. Bay remembers to 
have seen, some eight years back, two Blacks pitted with 
smaU-pox, but whether they belonged to the tribes in question 
he does not say. He is of opinion that the Maranoa tribes 
were never cannibalB. They marry in their own tribe; some 
men have as many as four wives. In&nticide is not 
practised. In numerous instances, he says, ''I have seen a 
middle-aged Black, with or without a wife, bring up a young 
girl, who became his wife when old enough." In what Mr. 
Bay says in connection with cannibalism and in&nticide I am 
unable to concur. 

Pulmonary diseases are those which are most prevalent. 
The tribe scar the back, breast, and arms by way of orna- 
ment, and pierce the septum of the nose, but do not knock out 
any teeth. Kangaroo are surrounded and kUled with clubs, 
and emu hunted with spears. Fish are taken with nets seven 
feet long and five deep, each end of which is supported by a 
Blackfellow swinmiing. Males are made into young men at 
about twenty years of age, with secret ceremonies, which no 
White man has been allowed to witness. Mr. Bay says, in 



MARANOA RIVER, NEAR ROMA. 



253 



reply to my question as to whether message-sticks axe used 
by the tribe^ that he has in his possession a reed-necklace 
attached to a piece of flat wood about five inches long ; that 
on the wood are carved straight and curved lines, and that 
this piece of wood was sent by one portion of the tribe to 
another by a messenger, the two parties being about 60 miles 
apart. The interpretation of the carving was, " My wife has 
been stolen; we shall have to fight — ^bring your spears and 
boomerangs." The straight lines, it was explained, meant 
spears, and the curved ones boomerangs; but the stealing of 
the wife seems to have been left to the messenger to tell. 



No. 174. 


—Additional Words, bt R. Shzbidan, Esq. 


Box-tree 


malar. 


White 


oba. 


Gum-tree - 


dangon. 


Red - ■ . 


hotegothy. 


line-tree - 


bandte. 


To fight with 


oneymealgo. 


GiuTajong-tree - 


nonga. 


clubs 




Bottle-tree - 


mindarie. 


To fight with 


bapeymealgo. 


Brlgalow 


okoro. 


spears 




Old man kangaroo 


mubragolla. 


To keep 


yongolmongo. 


Kangaroo-rat 


bardy. 


„ give away 


ombalgo. 


Wallaby - 


wya. 


„ exchange 


ombimea. 


Bandicoot - 


weeaUa. 


„ run 


wakandie. 


Wombat 


toyne. 


River - 


barroo. 


Bed kangaroo 


bowra. 


Sand ridge - 


urdera. 


Carpet snake 


abol. 


Leaf - 


dalla. 


Curlew 


oelbine. 


Cloud - 


yonkine. 


Hawk - 


oomon. 


Where are you 


intea inda mur 


SwaUow 


boondoongean. 


going? 


dal? 


QuaU - 


boonjolgey. 


Where did you 


intea inda on 


Black - 


ooborogoobra. 


camp last night? 


dungo yamba ? 



254 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 



No. 174.— MABANOA MVER, NEAR ROMA. 



Kangaroo ■ 


narraooo. 


Hand - 


- 


- murda 


Opossum • 


tangaroo, also 


2 Blacks 


- 


• bullardoo murdi. 




Ottther. 


3 Blacks 


. 


- bullardoo wongra 


Tame dog - 


noora. 






murdi. 


Wild dog - 


wantie. 








^7 

Emu • - - 


moorine. 


One - 


~ 


- wongra. 


Black duck - 


beberoo. 


Two - 


- 


- bullardoo. 


Wood duck 


mnneroo 


Three - 


- 


- bullardoo 


Pelican 


burunth. 






wongra. 


Laughing jackass akoongur. 


Four - 


- 


- bullardoo bullar- 


Native companion 


L booroor. 






doo. 


White cockatoo 


thickery. 


Father 


• 


- yaboda. 


Crow - 


watha. 


^ V « 1 




• 






Mother 


- 


- yangi. 


Swan - 


oweroorecan 










(long neck). 


Sister-Elder 


- baringiUa. 


Egg - - . 


- aboyne. 


„ Younger 


- 


Track of a foot • 


bandil, teen- 


Brother-Elder 


- takongiUa. 




doone. 


>i 


Younger 


Fish - 


- 00. 


A young 


man 


- owoola. 


Loheter 




An old man 


- lara. 


Crayfish 
Mosquito - 


• boothan. 


An old woman 


- yangi jara. 


Fly - . 


■ ngemim. 


A baby 


— 


- naryloo. 


Snake 


• munda. 


A White 


man 


- withoo. 

■ 


The BUcks - 


• murdindoo. 


Children 


- 


- andoono. 


A Blackf ellow 


■ murdL 


Head - 


- 


- dongo. 


A Black woman 


• amby. 


Eye - 


- 


- dilly. 


Nose - 


- oh. 


Ear - 


• 


• muna. 





MABANOA RIVEB 


No. : 


174.— Mabanoa Biveb 


Moath 


- da. 


Teeth- 


- yera. 


Hair of the head - atha. 


Beard- 


• munga. 


Thunder - 


- dingaroo. 


Grass - 


- wnthon. 


Tongue 


- dallin. 


Stomach 


- hondam or 




bungaroo. 


Breaats 


- namon. 


Thigh- 


- moko. 


Foot - 


- dina. 


Bone - 


- nagoo. 


Blood - 


- onma. 


Skin - 


- beery. 


Fat - 


- nngoo, wamoo. 


Bowels 


- nna. 


Excrement - 


- una. 


War-spear - 


- bogga. 


Beed-spear- 


- 


Wonmiera or 




throwing-stick 


k 


Shield 


- booragoo. 


Tomahawk - 


- baloyne. 


Ganoe- 


- 


l3nn - 


- durdu. 


Moon- 


- dilgan, obera. 


Star - 


- dandura. 


Light - 


- durdoonga. 


Dark - 


- oundangoo. 


CJold . 


- yakol. 


Heat - 


- obnndunga. 


Day - 


- yambiathana. 


Night- - 


- oundangoo. 


Fire - 


- boorde. 


Water 


- amoo. 


Smoke 


- tooka. 




- dundL 


Wind- 


- yarakoo. 


Bain - 


• amoowerrel. 


God - - 


- 


Ghosts 


m 



255 



Boomerang - 


- wungaL 


Hill - - 


- 


Wood- 


- werakL 


Stone • 


- bangoo. 


Camp - 


- yambakoo. 


Yes - - 


- yo-i. 


No - 


• hurda. 


I 


- ngaia. 


You - 


- inda. 


Bark - . 


- beya. 


Good - 


- makine. 


Bad - - 


- ungarra. 


Sweet - 


- erybachan. 


Food - 


• munda. 


Hungry 


- boongari. 


Thirsty 


- boongar. 


Eat - 


- yukalgo. 


Sleep - 


- wookawoonal. 


Drink 


- amoo yukalgo. 


Walk 


- munduL 


See - 


- nukuUa. 


Sit - 


- benduL 


Yesterday - 


- durdungo. 


To-day 


- neyla. 


To-morrow - 


- mukarro. 


Where are th< 


) - ingia murdi? 


Blacks? 




I don't know 


- hurdania berool 


Plenty 


- bunyarie. 


Big - - 


- mulgiga. 


Little - 


- jumberri. 


Dead - 


- woolaca. 


By-and-by - 


- aboouthy. 


Come on - 


- okourabaL 


Milk - 


- 


Eaglehawk - 


- othalla. 


WUd turkey 


• bongaa. 


Wife - 


. 



256 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 



Ko. 174.— MABANOA BIVEB. 



Bt F. B. Bat, Esq 



Kangaroo - 


- narragoo. 


Hand • 


- murtha. 


Opossum 


- tangul. 


2 Blacks 


- boolardoo murrL 


Tame dog - 


- moora. 


3 Blacks - 


• boolardoo won- 


WUddog • 


- wandte. 




gara murri. 


Emu - 


- ngoorin 


One • 


- wongara. 


Black duck - 


- maneroo 


Two - 


boolardoo. 


Wood duck • 


- warraoubba. 


Three- 


- boolardoo won- 


Pelican 


- booroonda. 




gara. 


Laughing jackasi 


1 aggul-gagguL 


Four - 


- boolardoo boo- 


Native companioi 


I orood. 




lardoo. 


White cockatoo • 


• teecarry. 


Father 


■ yabboo. 


Crow - 


watta. 


Mother 


- younga. 


Swan - 




Sister-Elder 


■ burrL 


Egg ■ 


• avooin. 


„ Younger • 


• munqaL 


Track of a foot 


. tinner. 


Brother-Elder • 


• daaquin. 


Fish . 


oyoo. 


„ Youngei 


r wodwoodie. 


Loheter 




A young man 


boonjar. 


Crayfish 




An old man 


- nottL 


Mosquito 


• pootteen. 


An old woman ■ 


ayardqun. 


Fly - 




A baby - 


andoo. 


Snake - 




A White man • 


widdoo. 


The Blacks • 


murrL 


Children - 


aambnrrL 


A Bhickf ellow - 


murri. 


Head - - 


doongo. 


A Black woman • 


moorangoo. 


Eye . - - 


dilli 


Nose - - - 


oh. 


Ear - - . 


munga. 



IfABAKOA RIVER. 



257 





No. 174.— Mailai«oa Rivkr— con<tnw<Z. 


Month- 


- taa. 


Boomerang - 


- wangal. 


Teeth - 


- yerra. 


Hill - 


- bango, waagalgo 


Hair of the head- atta. 


Wood- 


- boordi. 


Beaid. 


- nunga. 






Thunder - 


D 

- mooloongooloo. 


Stone - 


- bungoo. 


Grass - 


- oot-toon. 


Camp • 


- yamba. 


ToDgae 


- talle. 


Yes 


- yo. 


Stomach 


- bangoor. 


No - 


- arda. 


Breasts 




I 


- dya. 


Thigh- 


- 


You - 


- inda. 


Foot - 


- dinna. 










Bark - 


- oka. 


Bone - 


- narco. 






Blood- 


- oma. 


Good - 


- megun. 


akin - 


- wooman. 


Bad - 


• waain. 


Fat 


- widta. 


Sweet - 


- mellamella. 


Bowels 


• ngalle. 


Food - 


- ugalga. 


Excrement - 


- tootarre. 


Hungry 


• boongarra. 


War-spear - 


- bufirga. 


Thirsty 


- doombalgo. 


Beed-spear - 


- 


Eat - 




Wommera or 




Sleep - 


- oonalgo. 


throwing-stick 




Drink- 




Shield - 


• boorooo. 


Walk - 


- mundalgo. 




• obar. 






Canoe - 




See - 


- nagalgo. 






Sit - 


- bindulu. 


Son - 


- tooroo. 






Moon - 


- delgun. 


Yesterday - 




Star - 


' tandooroo. 


To-day 


- ngilla. 


Light - 


- dooroo. 


To-morrow - 


- moorgarro. 


Dark - 


- ooda. 


Where are ti 


le beetoo mum ? 


CJold - 


- yaagal. 


Bhicks? 




Heat - 


- owanda. 


I don't know 




Day - 


- flla. 


Plenty 


- mulga. 


Night - 


- oonalgo. 


Big - - 


- mulgagu 


Kre - 


- booree. 


Little - 




Water- 


- ammoo. 


Dead - 


- woolala. 


Smoke 


- dooya. 


By-and-by - 


- aboo. 


Gromid 


- tnnde. 


Come on 




Wmd- 




Milk - 


- awarra. 


Bain - 




Eaglehawk • 


- ootalla. 


God . 




Wild turkey 


- boonqun. 


Ghosts 


- mennmmoo. 


Wife - . 


• ambe. 


VOL. III. 


1 


I 





258 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 175.— THE BALONNE, BALEANDOON, NOGARA, 

AND NERRAN|RIVERS. 

Bt H. Hammond, Esq.; 

AND 

WEIR AND MOONIE RIVERS. 

Bt James 0*Btbnb, Esq. 

The following vocabularies are specimens of two dialects of 
the Wolleroi or Yerrakroi language, in use in the localities 
given above. The name of the language is derived from 
Woll=^No. Besides the contributions to the Wolleroi 
dialects received from Mr. Hanmiond and Mr. O'Byrne, a 
third reached me from Mr. W. H. Looker, which I have not 
thought it necessary to insert. Mr. Hammond says there is 
but one word to express dtiat and smoke, which reminds me 
that the Bangerang used to speak of there being smoke in 
the Murray when its waters were discolored by a flood. 
There is also but one word for head and hair, and a distinct 
term to express three. On the Balonne River several Blacks 
of one fimaily have been met with without a particle of hair 
on their bodies. Baron Miklouho Maclay visited the locality 
and minutely examined and described a man and woman of 
this family. I am indebted to Mr. Lawrence Byrne, of 
Brisbane, for photographs of this man and woman, who 
certainly have reached the upper stage of human ugliness. 



No. 175.— Additional Words, bt Mb. Hammond. 



Blow-fly - 


- koomoo-koomoo. 


Old - 


- yambooU. 


Carpet snake 


- neebee. 


Chest - 


- kuUander. 


My mother 


- ngnmbathi. 


Daylight - 


- keba. 


„ sister - 


- bocathi. 


Lightning - 


- mnrrimi. 


,, brother 


" xniaithL 


Run - 


- bnnnaki. 



259 



No. 


175. — ^ADDinoKAL WosDS, BT Mb. O'Btbns. 


ABhes- 


- kerin. 


Grave 


- tanmor. 


AntB (small) 


- ketar. 


Green 


- illoowedi. 


„ (large) 


- boomying. 


Gun - 


- mergin. 


Boots- 


. nangino. 


Knee • 


• tinbirr. 


Bread- 


- dwir. 


Lame - 


• danggoor. 


Be«f - . 


- teh. 


Medicine 


- booda. 


Blind man - 


- mooko. 


Pig . 


' piggooi^ 


„ woman 


- mookangnno. 


Porcnpine 


. pikebaUo. 


Book . - 


- boodeL 


Bice - 


- jrarrar. 


Black- - 


- kawbo. 


Bed - 


- qni-qtd. 


Bees (natiye) 


- moone. 


Revolver 


-beredil. 


Bine - 


- kaw-wnr-o-wnr. 


Reed - 


• direel. 


Brigalow - 


- porrenbo. 


Six - 


- kaUibo-kollibo. 


Box-tree - 


- rebiU. 


Salt - 


- daraL 


Cow - 


. millembri. 


Tree - 


- ginye. 


Gheek 


- tal. 


Turtle 


- wabo. 


Oat 


- budge-e-gnr. 


Wool 


- dooroon. 


To fight - 


- boomaley. 


White 


- balo. 


Fire*«tick - 


- mulloo. 


wad horse 


- bnunbi. 


Feathers - 


• yethar. 


,, horsei 


1 • brumbinor. 


Grog - 


• uramo. 


War-paint 


- pedi. 



HZ 



260 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 175.— BALONNE, NERRAN, ETC., RIVERS. 
Bt H. Hammond, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 


bowra. 


Opossum 


moott 


Tame dog - 


marthi. 


wad dog - 




Ehnn 


dthenoon. 


Black duck 


kumigai. 


Wood duck 


> burga-bnrga. 


Pelican 


karraga. 


Jjaughing jaokasi 


1 gookergaka. 


Native companioi 


1 bralga 


White cockatoo • 


mihai. 


Crow - 


won. 


Swan - 


• knnnadal. 


Egg . . . 


■ kow. 


Track of a foot • 


ghaiee. 


Fish - - . 


tukkaL 


Lobster 


• keend. 


Crayfish - 


> einga. 


Mosquito - 


> mungin. 


Fly - - - 


• bunial. 


Snake 


yabba. 


The Blacks - 


thane. 


A Blackf ellow - 


thane. 


A Black woman - 


inner. 


Nose - 


mooyoo. 



Hand 


- ma. 


2Bbick8 - 


- boolar thane. 


3 Blacks - 


- koolebar thane. 


One - 


- bee-er. 


Two - 


• boolar. 


Three - 


- koolebar. 


Four - 


- boolar-boolar. 


Father 


- yabbo, yooke. 


Mother 


- ngnmba. 


Sister-Elder 


-boa. 


„ Younger 


- 


Brother-Elder 


. thiar. 


„ Toung< 


er 


A young man ' 


- kobbora. 


An old man 


- whymathooL 


An old woman 


- moogathooL 


A baby - 


-birrili. 


A White man 


- wonda. 


Children - 


- 


Head - - 


- taikaL 


Eye - 


- mill. 


Ear - 


- binna. 



BALONNE, NEERAN, ETC., BIVEBS. 



261 





No. 175 


.-— Balovnb, NxBBAir, Kia, Bxtsbs— continued. 


Month 


' ngo. 


Boomerang 


- 


Teeth - 


- eea. 


Hill - 


- 


Hair of the head- 


taikal. 


Wood- 


- guinea. 


Beard- 


■ yam. 


Stone • 


- moorilla. 


Thunder - 


• thollome. 


Camp - 


• woUaL 


Grass - 


• boomo. 


Yes - 


- yo, geero, keer. 


Tongae 


• pthalU. 


No ■ 
I 
You - 


- woll. 

• 


Stomach 


> moopal. 


- ngia. 
• inda. 


Breasts 


- ngummo. 


Bark - 


- dater. 


Thigh 




Good - 


- binnal, kubba. 


Foot • 


• dinna. 


Bad - • 


- kokle. 


Bone - 


■ booyoo. 


Sweet 


- kopba. 


Blood- 


- quay. 


Food - 


- dhoar. 


Skin - 


• yootai. 


Hungry 


- habberandiUa. 


Fat - - 


• wommo. 




* 


T% « 




Thirsty 


- ngaigay. 


Bowels 


• goonna. 


Eat - 


- tuldinna. 


Excrement - 


• goonna. 


Sleep - 


- tundooee, babee. 


War-spear - 


- meerignama. 


* 

W * 1 


• 


Beed-spear - 


- beelar. 


Drink - 


- ngagai. 


Throwing-stick • 


• boondee. 


Walk- . 


- yan. 


Shield - 




See - 


- nurruldinna. 


Tomahawk - 


• yowindoo. 


Sit - ■ 


- wollaia. 


Canoe - 


- boondurra. 


Yesterday • 


- goondoo-goon- 


Snn 


. 


• tooni, yeeigh. 




doo. 


Moon 


. 


- barlo. 


To-day 


- gungalunda, 


Star 




■ kowberri. 




eelal. 


Light 




• dooeyi. 


To-morrow - 


- boolooyo. 


Dark 




• boolooe. 


Where are 


the thalla thane ? 


Cold ■ 




boolea. 


Blacks? 




Heat 




• bo51aid. 


I don't know - wol ngia. 


Day 




burrawurrilla. 


Plenty 


- booral. 


Night 




• bogoora. 


Big - . 


- booral. 


Fire 




• wi. 


Little - 


- toochidool. 


Water 


goongon. 


Dead - 


- boologi. 


Smoke 


• boowilla. 


By-and-by • 


- ilal, Ualoo. 


Groond 


- taurL 


Come on 


- boori. 


Wmd - 


• miera. 


Milk - 


- 


Bain - 


• yeo. 


Eaglehawk • 


- 


God - 




wad turkey - 


Ghosts 


. 


- wonda. 


Wife - 


- 



262 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 176.— WEIR AND MOONIE BIVEBS. 



Bt James 0*Btbns, Esq. 



Kangaroo 
Opoaeum 
Tame dog 
WUddog 
Eimu • 
Black duck 
Wood duck 
Pelican 
Laughing jackass 
Native companion 
White cockatoo 
Crow - 
Swan - 
Egg 

Track of a foot 
Fish - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito - 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks- 
A Blackf ellow 
A Black woman 
Nose - 



bnndar. 

moote. 

ware. 

mianba. 

dinoyn. 

korangye. 

koonumbL 

kuUialli 

kooket, koka. 

bralga. 

moori. 

whon. 

beeboo. 

ko. 

naloor. 

nolaka. 

yingo. 

mongeen. 

winigal. 

yindobo. 

pootlo. 

dane. 

muroo. 



Hand - 


• ma. 


2 Blacks . 




3 Blacks . 




One - 


• ber. 


Two - 


■ blar. 


Three- 


• kuUibo. 


Four • 


. blar-blar. 


Father 


■ beno. 


Mother 


> numbade. 


Sister-Elder 


- boade. 


„ Younger • 




Brother-Elder • 


- diade. 


„ Younger 




A young man 


ookaL 


An old man 




An old woman • 




A baby 


- yadeena. 


A White man 




Children - 


perillegiL 


Head - 


tiguL 


Eye - 


- mill. 


Ear 


• beno. 





WKTR AND MOONIE 


RIVEBS. 


No. 


176.— Wjuk and Moonis BiWBA-^ofUinued, 


Month 


- mygh. 


Boomerang- 




Teeth- 


- ero. 


Hill . 




Hair of the head 


- tigul. 


Wood 




• wumbion. 


Beaxd- 


- yarre. 


Stone 




• maramo. 


Thunder • 


- tulloomey. 


Gamp 




- wooli. 


Ones • 


- knpoa. 


Yes 




- yo. 


Tongue 


- taU. 


No 




- woll. 


Stonuu^h 


• kowriU. 


I 






Breasts 




You 




• ninda. 


Thigh - 


- boy-yoo. 


Bark 




- tarthar. 


Foot - 


- deena. 


Good 




- mooribo. 


Bone • 




Bad • 


« 


- kugeel. 


Blood- 


- qui 


Sweet 




- wodle. 


Skfn - 


- nle. 


Food • 






Fat - 


- wonuno. 


jk \^%^\jk 




Bowels 




Hungry 




Excrement - 


- dikkar. 


Thirsty 




War-spear • 


- hilar. 


Eat 






Reed-spear - 




Sleep • 






Throwing-stick 




Drink 






Shield 


• bureen. 


Walk 








- indoo. 


See 




. 


Oanoe - 




Sit 




^ 


Son - 


- doone. 


Yesterday ■ 


- kikkaling. 


Moon - 


- poloor. 


To-day 


- illal. 


Star - 


- kawburri. 


•f 








To-morrow • 


- kawbokaw 


light - 


- dei. 






^* 




Where are 


the 


Dark - 




Blacks? 




Cold - 


- boolya. 






Heat - 


w 


I don't kno\ 


V 


Day - 




Plenty 


- bootla. 


Night - 




Big - 


- poodlili. 


Kre - 


- wee. 


Little - 


. tookidool. 


Water 


- koongin. 


Dead - 


- baloonye. 


Smoke 


- too. 


By-and-by 




Ground 


- dimmar. 


Gome on 




Wmd- 




Milk - 




Bain - 


- koongin. 


Eaglehawk 




God - 




wad turke: 


r 


Ghosts 




Wife 


m 


m 



263 



264 



TAB AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 176.— DUMARESQUE OB UPPER MACINTYRE 

RIVER. 



By David Tubbatne, Esq., Jamxs Lawlob, Esq., and G. Mtles, Esq. 

The following information in connection with two dialects 
spoken on the Dumaresque or Upper Maclntyre River was 
forwarded to me by the gentlemen named above. The 
vocabolarieSy as &t as we can jadge, differ bat little from 
the Pikumbul language, of which a specimen is found in 
the Kamlaroi of the late Revd. W. Ridley, who notices 
ihskipika signifies yea: — 





ADDinoNAL Words, bt Mb. Jaxbs Lawlob. 


Turtle- 


- talbugon. 


Bite - 


- 


- mubboL 


Porcupine - 


• bigubiUa. 


Sew - 




- munbolly.. 


WaUaby - 


- wangun. 


Make - 




. weemully. 


PaddimeUon 


• bogguUa. 


Back - 




- murcaw. 


Deaf adder - 


- tamby. 


Loins - 




- gumbuL 


TocaU 


- gongolly. 


Forehead 




- wenda. 


„km 


. bungey. 


River • 




- wUe. 


„ spear - 


- togy, tarry. 


Plain • 




- goonigaL 


1, 8wim 


- gumbec. 


Boy - 




. tingolL 


„ run 


- yanny. 


Girl . 




• mickay. 


„ talk 


. yally, yall (did 


Husband 




- nubun. 




talk). 


Wife - 




. nubungan. 


„ UBk 


- bongolly, ben- 


Son - 




- bandyale. 




goU (aaked). 


Daughter 




- bandyane. 


Flood - 


- warroo. 


Friend 




- maygon. 


Scrub - 


- birby. 


Stranger 




mailwon. 


Mountaiu - 


- borry-amborry. 


A young woman 


L - bamburr. 


Strong 


- borroo. 


Sky - 


- 


- cawn. 


Weak 


- ooddara. 


High . 


- 


- cawnba. 


light (not heavy) cumbun. 


Low - 


- 


- narmoo. 


Fear - 


- boorabilga, bo- 


Bottom 


- 


. gundoo. 




raby. 


Blosfsom 


- 


- gurry. 



DUMABESQUE OB UPPER MACINTTBE RIVER. 265 



Additional Words, bt Mb. Jambs Lawlobt— coutinited. 



Cany. 


- canngey. 


To smell 


bandy. 


Canymg - 


- cannga. 


„lie- - 


- ngally. 


Ouried 


- canneU. 


liar • 


ngal-ngal. 


GcneioiiB 


- wntaigoL 


Truth - 


moorey. 


Stnpid 


- bondan. 


Poor thing - 


connanbrilla. 


Par - 


- waannn. 


A cripple - 


wambnn. 


aoae - 


- tycan. 


A sand ridge 


corry. 


Soon • 


- talin. 


A forest 


wallumboor. 


How many ? 


- monamboll? 


Black cockatoo • 


yerrangoran. 


What? 


. minna? 


To wash 


bibbilly. 


To hang 


- wambilly. 


„ cover - 


■ gundabolly. 


„ dimb 


- wandally. 


>* bury 


- nomboUy. 


1) poll 


- bmmolly. 


„ fight 


- bungindilly. 


f> break 


- oommoUy. 


„ finish 


nambolly. 


A doad 


- bnronngy. 


Bandicoot - 


inoomaw. 


Summer 


- kylugnnda. 


Rat • 


. dirangonny. 


Winter 


- kowlba. 


Natiyecat - 


- giggwee. 



266 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 176.— DUMABESQUE OR UPPER BfACINTTRE RIVER— 

BIGAMBEL LANGUAGE. 

Bt Dayid Tubbatnb, Esq., and Jaxbs Lawlob, Esq. 

In this language the eqoiyalent of Uhday seems to be a compound of the 

equivalent of aee and day. 



Kangaroo - 


- bamburr. 


Hand - 


• mahr. 


Opossum - 


- koobi. 


2 Blacks - 


- maU booloL 


Tame dog - 


- mirree. 


3 Blacks - 


. 


Wild dog - 


- ngolgoL 


One - 


- biada. 


Emu - 


- oorun. 


Two - 


- booloL 


Black duck 


- boonaba. 










Three- 


- boolol biada. 


Wood duck 


- gurrooba. 






Pelican 


- ffooleeffalee. 


Four - 


- goonimbiUa. 


Laughing jackass kagumn. 


Father 


- booba, wobbill. 


Native companion gehrr. 


Mother 


- kooroonga, gun 

• 11 


White cockatoo 


- gairabun. 




mill. 


Crow 


** 

- wawkoo. 


Sister-Elder 


- wondilL 


Swan - 


- beeboo. 


„ Younger 


• 


Egg - 


- gingol. 


Brother-Elder 


- mugon. 


Track of a foot 


- tamboll. 


„ Younger 


Fish - - 


- gooL 


A young man 


- tongoll, tooga* 


Lobster 


%^ 




billa. 


Crayfish - 


. gnrinein. 


An old man 


- doora. 


Mosquito - 


- burrL 


An old woman 


- dooragona. 


Fly - 


- krelungan. 


A baby 


- karr. 


Snake • 


- timba. 


A White man 


- goon. 


The Blacks - 


- mail. 


Children 


- karrgirran. 


A Blackf ellow 


. Hft-tiTii^i), 


Head 


- kobbye, kabuL 


A Black woman 


m tamma. 


Eye - 


- mill. 


Nose - - 


- murroo. 


Ear - - 


- binna. 



DUMARESQUE OR UPPER MACINTYRE RIVER. 267 

No. 176. — DUHABBSQUS OB UfPBB MagImTTBB RiVEBr-BlOAMBBL 

Lasqvaq*— continued. 



Month 


- ngonda. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth- 


- dirra. 


Hill - - 


m 


Hair of the head- mo. 


Wood- 


- 


Beard- 


- yerran. 


Stone - 


- bori. 


Thnnder - 


- boorong^r^umee. 


Gamp - 


- noora. 


Graae- 


• mnra. 


Yes - . 


- kolloo. 


Tongne 


- talin. 


No - - 


- yaga. 


Stomach 


- dikki. 


I 


- ona. 


Breasts 


- ngombi. 


Yon - 


- inda. 


Thigh- 
Foot - 
Bone - 
Blood - 
Skin - 
Fat - 
Bowels 


- booyoo. 

- tinahr. 

- gnlloo. 

- gima. 

- irgeer 

- marroo* 

. dikkiba, goonna. 

- goonna. 


Bark - 
Good - - 
Bad . - 
Sweet - 
Food - 
Hungry 
Thirsty 


-giUi 

- weimba. 

- womboo. 

- kobbyba. 

- dallibrenga. 

- dilgee. 

- kolling. 


War-spear - 


- bolgoo. 


Eat - 


- dalli. 


Reed-spear - 


- boggoo-domgill. 


Sleep - 


- deba. 


Throwing-stick 


- waneebrenga. 


Drink - 


- beinga. 


Shield ' - 


- bolga. 


Waik- 


- yebbL 




- weka. 


See - 


- namulli 


Canoe - 


- gillee, welbon. 


Sit - 


- inni. 


Sun - 


- killee. 


Yesterday - 


- granall. 


Moon - 


- dnrroongan. 


To-day 


• nakilleeda. 


Star - 


- koogee. 


To-morrow - 


• noolinkabooga. 


Light - 


- kinn. 


Where are the wonda nandullo 


Dark - 


- noolinga. 


Blacks? 


maU? 


Cold - 


- 


I don't know 


- yaga noda woo- 


Heat - 


- moddnn. 




inga. 


Day - 


• killeeda. 


Plenty 


• toogulba. 


Night - 


- nooloo. 


Big - . 


m 


Fire - 


- wee. 


Little - 


- koggul. 


Water 


- kollee. 


Dead - 


- moon. 


Smoke 


- tngga. 


By-and-by - 


- 


Ground 


- taree. 


Gome on 


- yerri, yebbooga. 


Wind - 


- meen. 


Milk - 


- 


Rain - 


- tobbill, koUee. 


Eaglehawk • 


- dooey. 


God - 


- 


wad turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


" 


Wife - - 


- nubungan. 



268 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 176.— HEAD WATERS OF THE BfACINTYRE RIVER— 

PREAGALGH LANGUAGE. 



Kangaroo 
Oposmim 
Tame dog 
wad dog 
Emu - 
Black dnok 
Wood duck 
Pelioan 
Laughing jackass 
Native companion 
White cockatoo 
Crow - 
Swan • 
Egg - 

Track of a foot 
Fish - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks 
A Blackf ellow 
A Black woman 
Nose • 



Bt G. Mtlbs, Esq. 

bonboo. Hand • 

koopi. 2 Blacks 

meera. 3 Blacks 



moorin. 

goor-mooringa. 

goor-aba. 

gooralga* 

kamgoongoon. 

berralga. 

gerbin. 

woggin. 

beebo. 

goobun. 

gooL 
gannoon. 

booree. 

yalgun. 

woorin. 

woorin. 

womo. 

mooroo. 



One • 
Two - 
Three- 
Four - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

„ Younger 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 

Bye - 
Ear - 



ma. 

boolar woorin. 
boolar bather 
woorin* 
bather, 
boolar. 

boolar bather, 
boolar boolar. 
wobb. 
goa. 
warringun. 

wooremla. 

tallinba. 

doora. 

doorangan. 

kagooL 

goon. 

koinbnre or kom 
buri. 
mel. 
binna. 



HEAD WATEBS OF THE MACINTTRE RIVER. 



269 



No. 176. — ^Hbad Waters of the MagInttbe RmcBr—PBEAOALOH 

Lanouaos — continued. 



Month 


• nnndra. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth 


deera. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head • 


• kaboon. 


Wood 


- bagoora. 


Beaid- 


- magon. 


Stone - 


• goora. 


Thvnder - 


- boormga. 


Camp ■ 


• moora. 


Graaa • 


• within. 


Yes - ■ 


■ yooL 


Tongae 




No - - 




Stomach 


■diga. 


I - • 


nathuna. 


BreastB 




You • 


- wonda. 


Thigh- 


• booyoo. 


Bark - 


gilla. 


Foot . 


dinna. 


Good - 


karmba. 


Bone - 


• goolgoo. 


Bad - - . 


• wombo. 


Blood- - - 


• gnnera. 


Sweet 




Skin - 


- neera. 


Food - - 




Fat - - • 


marroo. 


Hnngry 


diUgri 


Bowels 


knllin. 


Thirsty 




Excrement • 


goonna. 


Eat - . ■ 


- taleba. 


War-spear - 


bogo. 


Sleep - 


- mordeba. 


Reed-spear- 








* 

Throwmg-stick • 


(not used). 


Drink 


koUi beela. 


Shield- 


• binninbera. 


Walk - 




Tomahawk - 


• koomee. 


See • - • 


- niela. 


Canoe • 


■ (notnsed). 


Sit - - . 


- ninaba. 


Son - - 


■ grali 


yesterday - 




Moon • 


• debir. 


To-day 


• tullun. 


Star - 


googee. 


To-morrow • 


- thallingurrin. 


light - 


giUi. 


Where are the 


wooti woorin? 


Dark - 


- moorla. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


• neetha. 


I don't know 




Heat - 


- marthoL 


Plenty 


dooglebiUa. 


Day - 

Night - 


gillibun. 
- moorla. 


Big - . - 
Little - 


mogoonba. 
kagool. 


Fire - 


- wee. 


Dead - 


■ woomune. 


Water 


koUi. 






8moke 


- dooga. 


By-and-by - 




Qronnd 


^7 

■ deree. 


Come on 


arri. 


Wind - 


padoona. 


Milk - 




Bain - 


koUi-bothi. 


Eaglehawk 




God - - . 




wad turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife - 





270 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 177.— PAROO AND WARREGO RIVERS NORTH 
OF LAT. 2r 30', AND MUNGALELLA CREEK. 

Bt W. H. Looker, Esq., W. R. Conk, Esq., L. M. Plattaib, Esq., 

and j. hollingswobth, esq. 

From the attached vocabalaries the reader will find that on 
the above-named streams, and north of Lat. 2T 30' or there- 
abouts, the languages have so much in common that they 
might almost be called one. Indeed, some of my correspond- 
ents speak of them as one ; and if the reader will compare 
the first dozen words in the several vocabularies, he will see 
how similar they are. They are not, however, identical, and 
the differences in their negative adverbs and their equiva- 
lents for the Blacks show that there are several distinct 
tribes in the locality. 

Besides the vocabularies inserted, I have received four 
others from Mr. Cameron, Mr. David Campbell, Mr. Donald 
Mackenzie, and Mr. Vincent Dowling, which offer but few 
points of difference. Two of these gentlemen, however, and 
Mr. Looker, translate the term " the Blachs " by the word 
Murri or Murray which is no doubt incorrect, as we find 
that term is the name of one of the classes into which each 
of these tribes is subdivided. 

In addition to the vocabularies received from Mr. Play- 
fair, Mr. Hollingsworth, Mr. Conn, and Mr. Looker, which I 
have inserted, I have also been favored by these gentlemen 
with replies to my printed QuestionSy which agree so well 
together that I have compressed the whole into one account, 



I 



PAEOO AND WABRBGO RIVERS, ETC. 271 

which embraces the many tribes which occupy the country I 
am dealing with, and which was, I am told, first squatted on 
in from 1860 to 1864. Indeed, as regards some portions of 
the Warrego frontage, I believe they were occupied as cattle 
stations some years earlier. 

The name of the Mungalella Creek tribe, described by 
Mr. Hollingsworthy is Peechera. Their language is called 
Goughi. Many of the members of these tribes lived to be 
grey-headed, and Mr. Playfair notices one as being bald; but 
imported diseases, infanticide, and debauchery are &st ex- 
terminating them. Originally the females wore round the 
waist a fringe of spun opossum ftir, but the men went 
entirely naked. Against cold, flies, and mosquitos, the 
usual daubings with grease and mud during the day, and at 
night the usual smaU fires and smoke, are had recourse to. 
The women plaster themselves with clay during the period of 
menstruation. The tribes have amongst them the common 
nets, weapons, and implements, the boomerang included, but 
the wommera is not used. Their weapons are often colored 
with red ochre, and with the front tooth of the opossum and 
the shell of the mussel ground to an edge are executed (or 
were before we introduced iron) the often elaborate carving 
with which they are decorated. Not unfrequently their meat 
and roots were cooked in ovens, but these were only tem- 
porary constructions, if I may so call them, which never grew 
into mounds, as in the South. 

Mr. Playfair informs me that the tribes with which he is 
acquainted are divided each into four classes, called Murtiy 
CombOy Cuba, and Ippaij with the object of restricting 
marriage in the following way, viz.: — 

Ifalea Femalea Children. 

Any Mnrri may marry any Combo; o£bpring IppaL 
,, Combo „ ,, Muni ; ,, CnbbL 

„ Cnbl^ „ „ Ippai; ,, Combo. 

„ Ippai „ ,, Cnbbi; „ Mnrri. 

Mr. Play&ir does not give the feminine names, and I 
give his version as he sent it, bat he adds: — Tkaj have also 



272 THE AUSTRAUAK RAGE: 

the following clasB-names (no doubt subdivisions) viz., 
opossum, snake, kangaroo, emu, crow, and eaglebawk, but 
he does not enter into any particulars concerning them. 

Mr. Looker's account of the classes into which the tribes 
are divided is as follows. Their names in both sexes are: — 



Males. 


Fomales. 


Morri - 


- Matha. 


Combo - 


> Botha. 


Wongoo 


. Wongo-gaa. 


Umbree 


- Umbreegan. 


Cubbi • 


- Gnbbotha. 


Hippi • 


- Hippatha. 


OgiUa - - 


- OgeUegnn. 



The marriage relations and classification of children, as 
fiir as he enumerates them, are these: — 

A Murri marries a Botha. Their children are — Males, 

Hippi; females, Hippatha. 
A Cubbi marries a Hippatha. Their children are — 

Males, Combo; females, Botha. 
A Combo marries a Matha. Their children are — 

Males, Cubbee; females, Cubbatha. 
A Hippai marries a Cubbotha. Their children are — 

Males, Murri; females, Matha. 

Marriage in these tribes is generally endogamous, in 
accordance with the above system, but on rare occasions a 
woman is stolen from some other tribe. Polygamy is preva- 
lent, and one man at present has as many as eight wives. 
Females are often betrothed in in&ncy, become wives at 
seven, and, they say, mothers at ten or eleven years of age, 
but this I think is a mistake. Males are allowed to get 
wives, if they are able, after they have undergone the cere- 
monies by which they are raised to the rank of young men; 
but if they have no sisters to offer in exchange their case is 
all but hopeless. Infanticide prevails largely. 

The ornaments worn are necklaces made of stout grass- 
stems or reeds, cut into short lengths and strung; also shells 
which hang over the forehead suspended from the hair. These 



PAROO AND WARREGO RIVERS, ETC. 273 

shells are said to come from tribes somewhere to the north or 
north-west. Bestrictions regarding the use of food exist. 
Mr. Play&ir notices on this subject that women of the Mnrree 
class are not allowed to eat golden bream; and that black 
perch are forbidden to Combo women; that emu, emus' eggs^ 
and snakes are reserved for the elders of the tribe; and that 
a young woman will fairly run away from an emu's egg or 
even its shell. Young men and boys are forbidden to eat 
ducks^ turkeys, and opossums in some of the tribes. As 
regards cannibalism my informants are not agreed; but, 
judging from what they say, I believe it exists (or did prior 
to the arrival of the Whites) as an occasional practice. Oph- 
thalmia is and was very prevalent. In making young men 
the custom in some of the tribes is to pluck out by the roots 
aQ the hair on the aspirant's body. Early in youth the skin 
is ornamentally scarred in various parts, and the septum of 
the nose pierced. In some of these tribes, both males and 
females have a front tooth or teeth knocked out; but in others 
this practice is confined to the females. It is a novel feature 
that the Paroo tribes object to White people witnessing their 
corroborees. 

The dead are disposed of in various ways; some are 
burned, with everything belonging to them; others are made 
into mummies, which are carried about for several years, 
and then dropped down the hollow pipe of a standing tree. 
Not unfrequently the hair is cut off the body of a corpse, and 
its face daubed with wet clay before interment. I learn 
from Mr. Hollingsworth that pitcheree is occasionally 
obtained from the neighbouring tribes to the north-west. 

Bude drawings are made on bark. Message-sticks are in 
use on the Paroo, and Mr. Playfair has at my request taken 
the trouble to make many inquiries concerning them. The 
use of message-sticks, he says, certainly does not amount to 
a system of writing or hieroglyphics, but that occasionally 
two individuals agree upon signs by which notices of such 
things as the occurrence of a death, the existence of plenty 
of food, can be sent. But as the bearer of the stick would 

VOL. m. s 



274 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

be certain to retail the news from the camp he had left, of 
what use ifl the stick ? 

Wars are carried on by night attacks in the nsnal way. 
Disputes within the tribes generally originate in jealousies 
about the women, and are settled by single combat, one of 
the warriors being, as a mle, knocked senseless. 

In sickness yarious treatments are had reoonrse to. 
Sometimes the sick cover themselves with mud ; at others, 
one end of a string is tied ronnd the affected part, and 
the other an old woman see-saws across her gnms till the 
blood comes from them ; she then washes the blood from 
her month with water into a vessel which she has at hand, 
and it is believed that the blood is conveyed inside the 
string from the seat of pain to the woman^s month, and that 
its abstraction will most probably cause a cure. The toy 
known as the ^' bull-roarer'^ is in use amongst these tribes 
when making young men, as Mr. Hollings worth informs me. 
To it are ascribed mysterious qualities, and the women fly 
from the sound. When leaving a camp, it is common to lay 
on the ground a bundle of twigs, pointing in the direction 
in which those departing mean to go, for the information of 
other members of the tribe who may come that way. 

The name of Coomi Paroo, as applied to the Bulloo, Mr, 
Flayfair informs me is a misnomer. 

The most interesting fact connected with these tribes is 
that they form a portion of the western outposts of that 
section of the race which inhabits Eastern Australia. That 
they are related to the eastern, and not to the central section 
of the race, is shown by the names which they use in con- 
nection with their marriage classes, which are simply those 
of the Eamilaroi tribes, whose country is 250 miles away to 
the south-east. Language testifies to the same fact, as the 
reader will see if he compares from the annexed vocabularies 
the words botvera = kangaroo; tangocrt = opoamm; ko = nose; 
yabboo =/atAer; yoonga = mother; doongo = head; with their 
equivalents in other eastern and north-eastern languages. 



PAROO AND WARREGO RIVBRS, ETC. 276 

The term inga or inca = a small species of crayfish^ is also in 
use, as I remember, on the Lachlan River. It is enrions to 
find in some of these vocabnlaries and additional words bnt 
one word to express spear and tree. 



82 



276 



THE AU3TBALIAK RACE : 



Ko. 177.— MX7NQALELLA CREEK. 
Bt W. H. Lookxb, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 
Opoflsnm - 
Tame dog - 
Wild dog - 
Emu - - - 
Black duck - 
Wood duck 
Pelican 

Laughing jackaas 
Natiye companion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - - - 
Swan - - - 
Egg - 

Track of a foot - 
Kah - 
Lobster 

Crayfish (small) - 
Mosquito - 
Fly - - - 
Snake 
The Blacks 
A Blackf ellow - 
A Black woman - 
Nose - - - 



poora. 

koothed. 

woora. 

ballon, knooing. 

monaroo. 

burga-burga. 

kokan, krue. 
bralga. 
tickaree. 
watha. 

kobwee. 
nulla. 



inga. 

bootie. 

neemoon. 

murray. 
mnrray. 
muggee. 
whoe. 



Hand- 

2 Blacks - 

3 Blacks - 
One - 
Two - 
Three 
Four 

Father 

Mother 

Sistei^-Elder 

„ Younger - 
Brother-Elder - 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman - 
A baby 

A White man - 
Children • 
Head - - - 
Eye - - - 
Ear - - - 



murra. 

boolaree murray 
kokobra mnrray 
wongra. 
boolaree. 
kokobra. 
boolaree- 
boolaree. 
yaba 
younga. 
mungunee. 

wabuld. 

koola. 

wayama. 

moogken. 

withoe. 

birralee. 

bungoon. 

tilly. 

munga. 



MTTNGALELLA CBEEE. 



277 



No. 177.— MuKGALBLLA Cbixk— cofUtnttecI. 


Moath 


ta. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 




Hill - 




Hair of tiie head 


. popa. 


Wood- 




- tullgarh. 


Beard 


• nungea. 


Stone • 




• pungoe. 


Thunder - 
Graae • 


- tekol 
• bogan. 


Camp • 
Yes 




yamba. 
> ma. 


Tongue 


• tnllee. 


No • 




• urda. 


Stomach 


. bungute. 


I 




• nya. 


Breasts 


- Onega. 


You 




• inda. 


Thigh 




Bark • 




• yumboo* 


Foot • 


- dinna. 


Good 




• durree. 


Bone - 


• knak-ko. 








^ Blood - 


- kooma. 


Bad 




• wynee. 


Skin - 


' ooman. 


Sweet 




> bitterra. 


Fat • - • 


thomee. 


Food - 


. bunthunL 


Bowels 


• kurree-kurree. 


BLungry 




Excrement - 


• goonna. 


Thirsty 


• obundarra. 


War-epear - 


- pugga, merring- 


Eat - - 


■ thullee. 




ham. 


Sleep 


p • 


' wooga. 


Reed-spear- 




Drink 


■ « 1 


- yoo-gal. 


Wommera or 




Walk 
See 






throwing'Stick 




■ * 1 




Shield- 


- burrgo. 


» m 




Tomahawk - 


• bulloa. 


Sit . - 




Canoe - 


• kooka. 


Yesterday • 


• nilla, ninda. 


Son - 


. durro. 


To-day 




Moon - 


• tillgan. 


To-morrow - 


• burdell. 


Star - 


- tandool. 


Where are the 


wondtha dun 


Light- 


> turban. 


Bhhcks? 


derth? 


Dark - 


• noo-ong. 


I don't know 


- wondtha ma. 


Cold - 


- mitha. 


Plenty 


balla. 


Heat - 


• opan. 


Big - . ■ 


bunga. 


Day 


' dooringha. 


C7 

little • 


^7 

• ky-e-u. 


Kight- 


- noo-ong. 


Dead - 


' whoetan. 


Fire - 


• boodee. 






Water 


• kommo. i 


By-and-by - 


• nilloe. 


Smoke 


- toga. 


Come on 


ogo gurree, koa 


Ground 


dnnthee. 




koa. 


Wind- - 


- earka. 


Milk - 




Bain • 


tOlaring. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - 




Wild turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife 


m • 





278 



THE AUSTRAUAK RAGE: 



Ko. 177.— THE UPPEB WABBBQO AND PAEOO BIVEBS. 

Bt Whllui R. Cosix, Ba^ 



Kanguoo • 


> bowra. 


Hand- 


. murda. 


Opossom • 


tanurd. 


2 Blacks • 


- boolardo murdie. 


Tame dog - 


ngoora. 


SBlaoka • 




wad dog • 


• wantL 


One - 


wongarra. 


Emu • 


- goolby. 


Two - 


- boolaido. 


Black daok 


- munara. 


Three 


- boolardo- 


Wood duck 








Pelican 


• boolooon. 


Four - 


wongaira. 
• boolardo- 


Laughing jaokaai 


1 karcoburra. 




boolardo. 


Native companio 


nooordodo. 


Father 


■ yabbono. 


White oook&too< 


• teeourrL 






Crow - 


watta. 


Mother 


• youngardL 


Swan - 


• bigooio. 


Sister-Elder 


' tagoono nyarra. 


Egg - 


■ carboon. 


„ Younger • 


wabboononyarra. 


Track of a foot 


. dinna-y-ohulla. 


Brother-Elder 




PiBh - . 




„ Toungei 




Lobster 




A young man - 


■ oowwoola. 


Crayfifih 


- bowgili. 


An old man 


- kaiara. 


Mosquito - 


■ boottoin. 


An old woman 


• coble-ooble. 


Fly - - • 


nimmnn. 


A baby 


- cando. 


Snake 


munda. 


A White man • 


• wittee. 


The Blacks 




Children • 


canelo. 


ABlackfellow - 


murdie. 


Head- 


- doongo. 


A Black woman - 


kambi. 


Eye - 


• till!. 


Nose - 


• ko. 


Ear • 


. munga. 



UPPER :WARREQO ASD PASOO BIVEBS. 



279 



No. 177.— The Ufpkb Warrrgc 


^ Am> Paboo Biyvaa—eatUinued. 


Month 


tha. 


Boomerang • 


- wongaL 


Teeth- 


• yearra. 


Hill . 


• bancurda. 


Huroftiiehead- 


monga. 


Wood - 




Beard • 


• nunga. 


Stone - 


- bangoo. 


Thunder - 


nnllo-nnllo. 


Camp - 


- yamba. 


GrasB - 


woottoon. 


Yes . 


- yoe. 


Xongne 


dniline. 


No . ■ 


' curda. 


Stomach 


bangord. 


I- 


^ •„ 


BreaotB 


namoone. 


- ngia. 


Thigh - 


balla. 


Yon - 


• yenda. 


Foot - 


• dinna. 


Bark - 


- peea. 


Bone • 


■ narco. 


Good - 


- mickineberrL 


Blood . 


oooma. 


Bad • 


- kungardi. 


Bkin - 


■ gerring. 


Sweet - 


• yeara. 


Tat - 




Food - 


- urdie. 


Bowels 




Hungry 


- cabardi. 


Bzcrement - 


• goonna. 


Thirsty 




War-spear - 


• barca. 


Eat - 


- ooknng. 


Beed-spear - 




Sleep - 


- wookawonnng. 


Wommers or 


mooro. 


Drink • 


. oarmo-ookung. 


throwing-stiok 




Walk - 


- wychung. 


Shield - 


- booro-coo. 


See - 


- nnckuuff. 


Tomahawk • 


■ bnrroo. 




w 


Canoe - 




Sit - 


- beendung. 


Sun - 


- doordo. 


Yesterday • 


- goolieure. 


Moon • 


- knckardo. 


To-day 


- neilga. 


Star - 


■ neeworra* 


To-morrow 


• goondarro. 


Light - 


• boyn. 


Where are 


the inter murdie? 


Dark - 


- noorundL 


Bhicka? 




Gold • 


yakknl. 


I don't kno^ 


7 - interraangabe. 


Heat - 


• boeyoo. 


Plenty 


. muUa-muUa. 


Day - 


- neelga. 


Big . . 


- bunga. 


Night - 


■ goobega. 


Little - 


. - kioo. 


Fire 


' boordi. 






Water - 


- carmo. 


Dead - 


- goonteela. 


Smoke- 


- dookan. 


By-and-by ■ 


- kickardo, babo. 


Ground 


- nanthe. 


Come on 


- wooko-wicka. 


Wind . 


- yarraca. 


Milk - 


- namoone. 


Bain - 


- carmo bathing. 


Eaglehawk • 


- ooothalla. 


God - - 




wad turkey 


• bookine. 


Ghosts 


• bmooon. 


Wife - 


. 



280 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 177.— THE UPPER PAROO. 



Bt L. M. Plattaib, Esq. 



Kanguoo • 


bowra. 


Hand • 


- madda. 


OpoBsmn • 


■ tangort. 


2 Blacks - 




Tame dog - 


• oura. 


3 Blacks • 




Wild dog - 


■ wante. 


One • 


• wongara. 


Emu - 


- koolberrl 


Two - 


boolardoo. 


Black duck - 


• manganu 


Three- 


• koorbara. 


Wood duck- 


• koumma. 


Four - 


• boolardoo- 


Pelican 


- tarta. 




boolardoo. 


Laughing jackaaa 
Native companiox 


kakonbur. 
1 kountara. 


Father 


- yabino. 


White cockatoo • 


- tigarde. 


Mother 


• yangarde. 


Crow - 


• wagin, wada. 


Sister-Elder 


. maiara. 


Swan - 


• kotero. 


„ Younger 


baimo. 


Egg . . . 


■ kapoin. 


Brother-Elder 


- takkoin. 


Track of a foot - 


- tena. 


„ Younger wabardo. 


Fiah - - . 


ude, munge. 


A young man 


• nauka, kowla. 


Lobster 




An old man 


. kaira. 


Crayfish 


• bogally. 


An old woman 


. kamin. 


Mosquito 


boithon. 






Fly - 


- nemon. 


A baby 


• barko-de, kando 


Snake - 


• munta. 


A White man 


• wedo. 


The Blacks - 


' walla. 


ChUdren 


- yauga. 


A Blackf ellow • 


• made. 


Head - 


- toogo. 


A Black woman • 


• madda, kambL 


Eye - 


- tille. 


Nose - - 


ko. 


Ear 


- manga. 



THE UPPER PABOO. 



281 



No. 177.~Thx Ufpbb Paboo— €orUift«e(2. 



IConth 


- 


- be,ta. 


Boomerang- 


- wangaL 


Teeth - 


- 


- yeta. 


Hill - - 


- morella, banko. 


Hair of the head - tarom. 


Wood- 


- baka. 


Beard- 


- 


- nauka. 


Stone - 


- barre, banko. 


Thunder 


m 


-barri. 


Camp - 


- yamba. 


Graes - 


- 


- woton. 


Yes - . 


- yoko. 


Tongue 


- 


- talain. 


■^T 




Stomach 


m 


- parby, baindur. 


No - - 


• yamma. 


Breasts 


- 


- namoon. 


I 


- ngai-ia» itu. 


Thigh- 


- 


- tara. 


You - 


- idno, yinda. 


Foot - 


- 


- tena. 


Bark • 


- beya, morgoin. 


Bone - 


- 


- nagOy emo. 


Good - - 


- murga. 


Blood - 


• 


' kooma. 


Bad - - 


- warwano. banya. 


Skin - 


. 


- dunte. 




' w 


Fat - 


» 


- wommo, tame. 


Sweet - 


- godja. 


Bowels 


. 


- teduro, bamdaL 


Food - 


- ukulgo, yude. 


Excrement 


. 


- koonna. 


Hungry 


- kabid, kuliatxn. 


War-spear 


- 


- mmgoo, baka, 


Thirsty 


- koballa,mariatin. 






babaino. 


Eat - 


- ukal, pautein. 


Beed-spear 


^ 


- 


Sleep - 


- uga. 


\Vommera 


or 


morro. 


Drink- - 


- tappa, wadya. 


throwing- 


stick 




Walk- - 


- tala, wegauga. 


Shield 


* 


- bongo, nba. 


See - 


- naga, neinne. 




- 


- paloin. 


Sit - 


- binda, begauge. 


Canoe - 


- 


- 


Yesterday - 


- urindia. 


Sun - 
Moon - 


* 


- todo. 

- kokkarra. 


To-day 


- iimba, nelya. 


Star - 


„ 


- neo-do. 


To-morrow - 


- kundaroo. 


T.{ght - 


. 


. boain. 


Where are 1 


bhe yinda waga ? 


Dark - 


. 


. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


- 


- yakuL 


I don't know 


- yamme. 


Heat - 


- 


- yattin, poath. 


Plenty 


- waintu. 


Bay - 


- 




Big - - 


- mulla-muUa. 


Night - 


- 


- pitta. 


Little - 


- kioo, kapoin. 


Fire - 


- 


- boodl, wee. 


Dead - 


- kuntine. 


Water 


- 


- koommoo,kallan. 


By-and-by - 


• baboo. 


Smoke 


- 


- toga, tuka. 


Come on 


- wadyinko, kuga. 


Ground 


- 


- taka, tante. 


Milk - - 


- pathan. 


Wind- 
Bain - 


^ 


- yerga. 


Eaglehawk - 


- koothalla. 


God . 


* 


- 


Wild turkey 


- bungain. 


Ghosts 


• 


- wanbo. 


Wife . . 


- querda. 



282 



THB AUSTRAIIAK BACE: 



No. 177.— THB WABJEtBGO AND PABOO BIVEBS. 



Bt JO8SPH HoujiroswoBiTH, BSQ. 



Kangaroo - 


• boweira. 


Opoasmn 


- dongooreL 


Tame dog - 


- ngoora. 


Wild dog - 


- wunthie. 


Kmn - 


- goolbae. 


Black dnok • 


- monborra. 


Wood duck - 


* 


Pelican 


• 


Laughing jackass 


Native companion 


White cockatoo 


- teecaddy. 


Crow - 


- wotthar. 


Swan - 


- 


Egg . 


- carboon. 


Track of afoot 


- thinner. 


Fish - - 


- gooioo. 


Lobster 


a 


Crayfish - 


-bookillee. 


Mosquito - 


- boothoon. 


Fly - 


- neemon 


Snake - 


- moonta. 


The Blacks - 


. murringo. 


A Blackf ellow 


- mardie. 


A Black woman 


- wyanbina. 


Nose - - 


- koar. 



Hand - 


- marda. 


2Blacks - 


- paulludy mardie. 


3 Blacks 


- paulludy won- 




kera mardie. 


One - 






kera. 


Two - 


- paulludy. 


Three- 


- paulludy onkera. 


Four - 


- paulludy paul- 




ludy. 


Father 


- yabboon. 


Mother 


- wobboodoo. 


Sister-Elder 


m 


„ Younger 


- 


Brother-Elder 


- 


„ Younger 


A young man 


- coul, coweL 


An old man- 


- kyearroo. 


An old woman 


- yungun-kyear- 




roo. 


A baby 


- camdoo. 


A White man 


- coign. 


Children 


• carroo. 


Head - 


- thoonggoo. 


Bye - 


- teelee. 


Ear - 


- munger. 



THE WAKREGO ANB PAfiOO BIVEBS. 



283 



No. 177.- 

Month- 

Teeth - 

Hair of the head 

Beajrd- 

Thunder 

GrasB " 

Tongue 

Stomaoh 



The Wabbxoo and Paboo BsTKaB—eontinwd, 



Thigh- 
Poot • 
Bone - 
Blood - 
Skin - 
Pat - 
Bowelfl 
Bzcrement - 
War-spear or tree 
Beed-spear - 
Wommera or 
throwing-stick 

Shield or back 
Tomahawk - 
Ganoe- 
Sun - 
Moon - 
Star - 
light - 
Dark - 
CJold - 
Heat - 
Day - 

Night - 

Pire - - ■ 
Water- 
Smoke 
Ground 
Wmd - 
Bjun - 

God - - - 
Ghosts 



thar. 


Boomerang - 


yeer. 


Hill - - 


thooroo. 


Wood- - . 


ngcmga. 


Stone - 


noola-noola. 


Camp - 


ootthoon. 




thalUng. 


Yes - - - 


yandL 


No - - - 
I- - . . 

You . - - 


thana. 




Bark - 


thinna. 


Good - 


ngarkoo. 




coomma. 


Bad - • - 


beer. 




thamia, wammo. 


Sweet - 




Food • 


goonna. 


Hungry 


barga. 


Thirsty 




Eat - - - 


mooroo. 


Sleep - 




Drink- 


banroogoo. 


Walk - - 


ballone. 


See - - - 




Sit - - - 


thoodoo. 


Yesterday - 


kakada. 


To-day 


ngnardoa 


To-morrow - 


teeleebookooroo. 




gobear. 
ynckuU. 


Where are the 
Blacks? 
I don*t know 


booine. 




nnlyambo goon- 


Plenty 


daroo. 


Big - - ■ 


gobear. 


Little - 


- booardie. 


Dead - 


kammo, ammo. 


By-and-by - 


thook. 




> thondy. 


Come on 


yarraga. 


Milk - 


cammotyingoora. 


Eaglehawk - 




Wild turkey 


• weettho. 


Wife - 



wongeL 

bungo carripooi 
(stones high). 

bargar. 

bungo. 

yumba, yum- 
borra. 

yowie, ngowa. 
curther, yumma. 
ngia, nginya. 
inda, yourra. 
biar. 

mickanberri, 
mooricar. 

curthee, warrioo-' 
warrioo. 

mooricar good- 
yar. 

yuddy, muntha. 

cobertabae. 

oanmio yuokerrer 

uckerrer, uga. 

oga. 

uckerrer. 

wygella. 

knarkulla. 

pinda, 

coollerie moock- 

erroo. 

goonderroo, 

mookerroo. 
inthamdoo 

mardie? 
curther ngyer 

imbella. 
mulla-mulla. 
gooricanbe. 
kyeu, thippo. 
woollul. 
bobo, ngeely- 

ambo. 
ookoo cuntha. 

kootthulla. 
boongie. 
- cooeearter. 



284 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE 



No. 177.— Addrcional Wosds, bt Mb. J. Hoxxinoswobiih. 



What . 


• annee. 


More - 


• oullar. 


Together or 


fleilpau. 


To do again 


ouUaro. 


sweetheart 




Gidya-tree - 


- cobardoo. 


Fish-hook - 


• au. 


Gum-tree - 


> carooolsy caicoo- 


Wallaby • 


- barapa. 




lin. 


Fresh-water 


beerdee. 


Bloodwood-tree - 


cambooL 


turtle 




Rug, clothes 


- corrie. 


Mussel 


• bothereronr. 


A long distance • 


■ cumbnnie* 


ToUte 


- bothilla. 


Tired - 


- ooolyarlar. 


„ cut 


- bobeUar. 


A stink 


• cutcha. 


Dew - 


• bauanee. 


Frightened - 


- cullulla. 


Scrub - 


• bardoo. 


Short - 


ooongoon. 


To dig 


- barcuUa. 


Net - - - 


coolin. 


„ get up . 


• boorangee. 


To pretend - 


ootthingella. 


„ pant - 


- booeeyar. 


If coooo 


■ oooleUa. 


Currajoug-tree • 


bingee. 


Nasty 


■ curtee. 


Box-tree 


• barooora, koola- 


A rainbow • 


cutchun. 




bar. 


North - 


• carrlpooL 


Bun 


bawdinya. 


To throw - 


. coochamyar. 


Big - . 


bunyarty. 


A yam-stick 


> cuntha. 


Directly 


bobbo. 


To spit 


. cunther. 


To carry 


- bungiL 


A stranger - 


- coongaL 


Wild orange 


- bumble. 


A kite (blood) • 


• coomma. 


Deep - 


• bootchoo. 


To cook or bum • 


• oobella. 


wad - 


• booramby. 


Louse - 


• carra. 


To chop out 


■ bungel. 


Golden bream 


• cuarree. 


The sky 


- bundara. 


Warrego River 


- curdeela (ie., 


Birds - 


DOO'Oea 




river of sand). 


Girdle 


• beera. 


To whistle • 


- coobeeL 


To exchange 


buck-kin. 


Gently 


• ee-ik-carra. 


Red ochre or red 


oootthae. 


To smell 


- eer-ai-bae. 


Husband 


- coongul. 


You and I - 


- ngulli. 


Throat, to be bIcIi 


i cower. 


A Uttle girl 


■ gumbee. 


Calabash 


- cookar. 


Plain country 


• goonni. 


White 


• coba-coba. 


Black color 


• gooroL 


Sand - 


• curdeer. 


Honey, sweet 


• gootcha. 



THE WAKREGO AND PAROO KIVEBS. 



285 



No. 177.— Additional Words, bt Mb. J. Holukgswobth— con^vecf. 



House 


goondy. 


Tears 


■ meelyarty. 


Belonging to a 




Old, worn out 


■ mutcha. 


honae 


goondy-gallo. 


Take hold • 


• murrel. 


Catae 


gareriL 


Stay - 


■ muttha. 


Mine - 


■ ngatchu. 


HaO - 


• mookooloo. 


Name - 


ngy. 


A spring 


■ moontangurra. 


What name? 


. annee ngy? 


Frost - 


• meetharra. 


To ahoot or kill • 


gooniU. 


Gum - 


- mookine. 


Begone 


- goondoo. 


A friend 


noola. 


To give 


• goombul. 


East • 


- nararparamdoo 


y, steal 


goonthama. 


Flowers 


• oba. 


Tall - ■ 


• goorriccan. 


Seed - 


• pulpart. 


Hard - 


- gurrikill. 


To dream - 


- pigeelar. 


Broken 


. goondllla. 


Mulga-tree 


• pindeea. 


Bald : 


- goorpin. 


Pine-tree - 


- pyingemu 


Sonth - 


- gooramdoo. 


To cry 


- pamn. 


To itch 


■ gidgeela. 


West 


• parramdoo. 


Simheams - 


■ gangara. 


listen 


■ qooroo. 


To cover 


• gumbun. 


Iguana 


- quarrin. 


), swim 


• gnoombula. 


Blow-fly 


■ qoodooroo. 


,. talk ■ ■ 


• goolparra. 


Kangaroo-grass 


quoilpin. 


,, perspire 


• gnumbnrra. 


seed 




Boot of water-Ill} 


r gobbeer. 


To taste 


' thallal. 


Perch 


- oo-oooroo-ooora. 


Leaves of trees • 


• thallar. 


Who?- 


- oonthooroo? 


A watercourse • 


■ thulla. 


Bandicoot - 


- omee. 


Bun quick 


• ty-ty. 


Where? 


• inthamdoo? 


Evening star 


• tar. 


To hear 


• imbella. 


Quandongs (red) 


thianburra. 


Native weU 


> incnrra. 


„ (white; 


1 theewau. 


„ bee - 


- meemun. 


Beeds 


- teecull. 


The bat 


• mutchanbirra. 


The liver - 


- thibba. 


A chib 


• mooroo. 


The heart - 


- woolcoo. 


Leeches 


- moonquin. 


Unwell 


• wee-wee. 


Blind 


• mootchoo. 


Always 


• wundoo. 


Big-toe, thumb • 


• mookillee. 


Long since 


- wiearra. 


Magellan clouds 


• milleme. 


To roast 


- wat-thooL 


Hair, feathers - 


moonchoo. 


Yarran-tree 


- weelbala. 


Bottle-tree 


- minderra. 


To laugh - 


- yat-thin. 


A shade 


mullo. 


Clouds 


■ yo-gan. 


Soft . - . 


mooning. 


Truly 


* yangger 



286 



THE AUSTRAUAN RACE: 



No. 177.— Additional Wobds, bt L, M. 'Bllywaib, Eaa 

Native bee - gndja. 

North-east wind - kaaymo. 



Ant 

March-fly 
Husband 
Son - 
Dangfater 



- bnnge. 

- koongal. 

- tirgi 





Uncle 


- kaogemo 




Net - 


• koolL 




Gam-tree - 


- kaoola. 




Tgn^^^ft 


- bama. 




Sand-fly - 


-bea. 




Tree - 


■ Po«g»-* 



No. 178.— RICHMOND RIVER. 

Bt Chablbs Edwabdb, Bsq., E. Ross, Ea^, akd Danixl 

HooAK, Esq., CP.S. 

• 

The three following vooabnlaries are from the Richmond 
River, and though they differ but filightly, they belong, 
I believe, to distinct tribes. In two of the vocabolaries we 
find bat one word to express yesterday and t(Hnofron, on 
which point I have frequently noticed Blacks a little 
pnzzled. Mr. Edwards gives the following Additional 
Words: — 



Codfish 


- youngaun. 


Girls - booyoom too- 


Turtle 


. bingin. 


pagin. 


Eel - - 


• erouL 


Any number over goombL 


Perch 


- mogim. 


four 


Demon 


- gimmong. 


The name of a TegairL 


Boys 


- goombi ohunga- 


Black 




gun. 


Name of his son- Nlnkinbam. 



Names of three brothers 
Names of two brothers - 
Names of women 
Class-names of Ettrick Blacks - 
Class-names of Usmore Blacks 
Male calls his sister's son 
Male calls his brother's son 
A woman calls her brother's son 
Her husband calls the same person 



Qrooraban, Beeyan, Guybun. 

Tulean, Nginkinbaun. 

Delairy, Toobi, Tarlum. 

Wyangari, Widjir, Warloo. 

Eyogle, Weeya, GoomuUi. 

boorchum. 

mooyum. 

newgoon. 

brigum. 



* The reader wfll notioe thst this rendering of (re< does not differ much from that of 



RICHMOND RIVEB. 



287 



The following words were sent by Mr. Ross: — 



Black snake 


• momha. 


WMp snake 


. eringh. 


Iguana 


• dixrawong. 


Chin 


• yeinderra. 


Bight hand 


. thnninha. 


lAift haod- 


• whooram. 



Lightnmg- 


- thnnkan. 


Walkon - 


- yennakL 


On the spot 


. knoki 


iStmnp 


- knnomb. 


Iron • 


. tinkUbiU. 


Sailing veMel 


- mmnuigc 



From this list we see that the tribe has distinct 
snbstantiye terms for right hand and left hand. 



\ 



288 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 178.— RICHMOND RIVER. 



Rt Ghablbs Edwabds, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 


- groomon w 


Hand - 






kroomon. 


2 Blacks 


- booroora baygoL 


Opoasom 


- ereking. 


SBlacks 


- booroora yabra 


Tame dog - 


- tobury. 




bayguL 


wad dog - 


• 


One 


- yabra. 


Emu - 


- ooring. 






Black duck - 


- mara. 


Two • 


- booroora. 


Wood dnck 


- boorabignl. 


Three- 


- booroora yabra. 


Pelican 


• tungera. 


Four - 


• booroora 


Laughing jackass karkoon. 




booroora. 


Native companion kooralkmn. 


Father 


■ marmong. 


White cockatoo 


• karie. 


Mother 


• kooning. 


Crow - 


- waugaun. 


Sister-Elder 


• nanung. 


Swan - 
Effff . 


- ginabee. 
■ moongaralm. 


„ Younger - 


o 


Track of a foot 


** 

• koolgun. 


Brother-Elder • 


- bunum. 


Fish - 




„ Younger 




Lobster 




A young man 


keebra. 


Crayfish 


bonragin. 


An old man 


kitchome. 


Mosquito ' 


' mundura. 


An old woman • 


waurong. 


Fly - - - 


toonburra. 


A baby 


chachum. 


Snake (carpet) • 


- yumba. 


A White man - 


• tuckL 


„ (black) ■ 


• koongai. 






The Blacks • 


baygul. 


Children 




A Blackf ellow • 


baygul. 


Head 


bowra. 


A Black woman • 


doobury. 


Eye - - - 


me. 


Nose - 


• mooro* 


Bar 


binung. 



RICHMOND RIVER. 



289 





No. 178.~BiOHMOin> RLYVBr—^ontmued, 


Month 


- chaimg. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth 


- dedung. 


Hill - - 


- 


Hair of the head- koondnn. 


Wood- 


- gallee. 


Beard- 


- yerin. 


Stone - 


- tharo. 


Thimder - 


- mdgara. 


Camp- 


- weabra. 


GrasB - 


- withirung. 


Yes - - 


- yoey. 


Tongue 


- yalling. 


No 


- ughun. 


Stomach 


- doolgo. 


I 


- ngie. 


Breaats 


- groom. 


You - - 


- weaya. 


Thigh - 
Foot - 


- terung. 
. chinnung. 


Bark - 


- bagooL 


Bone - 


- derrigona. 


Good - 


- boogol. 


Blood- - 


- koomara* 


Bad - - 


- thung. 


Skin . - 


- ulung. 


Sweet - 


- berrygan. 


Pat - 


- bnnraragun. 


Food - 


- 


Bowels 


- muckai. 


Hungry 


- gobbeme. 


Excrement - 


. koonung. 


Thirsty 


- nooai 


Warmpear - 


- taung or tewang. 


Eat - 


- tallala. 


Beednspear- 


- kiung, birala. 


Sleep - 


- wouram. 


Wommera or 


kunaL 










Drink- 


- tokalaila. 


throwing-Btick 








Shield 


. buckar. 


Walk- - 


- yangarla. 




- moogin. 


See - - 


- narala. 


Ganoe- 


- burcooL 


Sit - 


- 


Snn - 


- yalgun. 


Yesterday - 


- nobau. 


Moon - 


- giboom. 


To-day 


- byan. 


Star - 


- cooyumgun. 


To-morrow - 


- nobau. 


Light - 


- bubbin. 


Where are the chirbaygulT 


Dark - 


. mundery. 


Blacks T 




Cold ■ 


- worung. 


I don*t know 


- yoogum. 


Heat - 


- boorogo 


Plenty 


- coombee. 


Day - 

Night - 


- noomgara. 

- tupin. 


Big - - 


- gidyoon. 


Fire - 


- weebra. 


Little - 


- bidung. 


Water 


- koong. 


Dead - 


- youbun. 


Smoke 


- chume. 


By-and-by - 


- yow. 


Ground 


- chuckun. 


Come on 


- gouay. 


Wind- 


- booragin. 


Milk - 


- 


Bain - 


. koong. 


ESaglehawk - 


- 


God (Creator) 


- muckoolum. 


Wild turkey 


- 


GhoetB 


- yanyangala. 


Wife - - 


- 


TOL. m. 


. 


r 





\ 



200 



THE AUSXRALIAK RACE: 



No. 178.— BALLINA. 



Bt E. Boss, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 

OpoBsiun 

Tame dog - 

Wild dog - 

Emu - 

Black duck - 

Wood dnck 

Pelican 

Laughing jackass 

Native companion 

White cockatoo 

Crow • 

Swan - 

Egg 

Track of a foot 

Fish - 

Lobster 

Crayfish 

Mosquito 

Fly 

Snake (carpet) 

The Blacks - 

A Blackf ellow 

A Black woman 

Nose - 



kurmman. 

quean. 

aggum. 

wooring. 
marra. 

thungara. 
kargau. 
chinnon garrara. 

wogan. 

kinnabee. 

kobing. 

kulgan. 

thallum. 

bnraicum, muiry . 

mundumu 

thumbnny. 

coble. 

kununbeen. 

bygle. 

morrow. 



Hand - 
2Blacks 
3 Blacks 

One • 
Two - 
Three - 
Four - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

,f Younger 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 

A young man 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear 



tonguon. 
barroro bygle. 
barroro yabbro 
bygle. 
yabbro. 
barroro. 
barroro yabbro. 
bulla bulla, 
mamong. 
nabbnng. 
nanigh. 

bonnuarm. 

keebra. 
wiengbuU. 
meerong. 
tharthum. 



congarra. 

mee. 

pinnong. 









BATJiTKA. 


'4\ii 




No. 178.- 


-BALUNA-^conHnued, 


Mouth 


• thang. 




Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


- diddong. 




Hill - 




Hair of the heac 


I- bowrra. 




Wood- 


' thalley. 


Beard • 


- yerring. 




Stone - 


• thorrow. 


Thunder • 


- mograa. 




Camp • 


• himbing. 


Graas - 


• mnndroo. 




Yes - 


■ yoe. 


Tongae 
Stomach 


. yelling. 
- moikne. 




No - 


•r 

• yuoumba. 


Breasts 


. meerang. 




I 


- yabmgin, nye. 


Thigh- 


• Idndle. 




Yon - 


- weear. 


Foot - 


- chinnang. 




Bark • 


- boolomb. 


Bone - 


- dadigon. 




Good - 


• bungarra. 


Blood • 






Bad - 


- yell-yell, thung. 


Skin . 


- ynndra, yooling. 


Sweet - 


. bcurragan. 


Pat 


• bunjnrakan. 




Food - 




Bowels 


- moiky. 




Hungry 


- cobbiree. 


Excrement • 


. cnnnang. 




Thirsty 


• nirrigan. 


War-spear ■ 


• chuang. 




Eat - 


• theelala. 


Reed-spear - 






Sleep - 


- wooram. 


Wommera or 
throwing-gticfa 


chnnong. 




Drink - 


- thuguong. 


Shield - 


- healeman. 




Walk - 


- yenna. 


Tomahawk • 


• woggara. 




See • 


- nad. 


Canoe- 


• kindul. 




Sit - 


- yeanna. 


Snn - 




- yelkin. 




Yesterday 


- wobbo. 


Moon - 




• ngnibom. 




To-day 


■ byang. 


Star 








To-morrow 


• wobbo. 


Light 




- bobbing. 




Where are 


the illebygleT 


Dark 




- narlow. 




Blacks? 




Cold 




- warring. 




I don't knoi 


w - yuoombe nony- 


Heat 




- woon. 






gnmble. 


Day 




- nnmgnra. 




Plenty 


• kennebygong. 


Night 




- narlow. 




Big . 


- kiguong. 


Fire 




- wibra. 




Little - 


- biguong. 


Water 




- cnung. 




Dead • 




Smoke 


- tallow. 




By-and-by 


- wooboo. 


Ground 


- nyle. 




Come on 


- que. 


Wind- 


• borrigan. 




Milk - 




Raan - 


- dnrram dorrum. 


Eaglehawk 




God - 


- tunky. 




Wild turke; 


y 


Ghosts 


• 


- kimmong taoky. 


Wife - 


• 



T 2 



292 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 178.— USMORE. 
By Dasjel Hooak, Esq., CP.SL 



Ejuigaroo - 


- knraman. 


Hand - 


- tnnkau. 


OpoMum • 


- koogan. 


2 Blacks - 




Tame dog - 


- angham. 


3 Blacks - 




wad dog - 

^fj^ 




One • 


• yabra. 


jfima - 


- nnron. 










Two - 


• bullaa. 


Black duck - 


- mara. 




m^ «^^i^i«^n^PV 


Wood duck - 




Three- 


- bulla yabra. 


Pelican 


• kinnibee. 


Pour • 


- balla bulla. 


Langhing jackaai 


1 cargaom. 


Father 


• mamuL 


Native companioi 


1 kiogle. 


Mother 


• qulnuin. 


White cockatoo • 


• kayra. 


Sister-Elder 


- nunung. 


Crow • 


- waughnn. 


„ Younger - 




Swan - 




Brother-Elder • 


- bunnam. 


E^pf - 


- cobbin. 


„ Toungei 




Track of a foot 


- tharrana. 


" D 




FUh - - . 


• tollum. 


A young man 


- keebra. 


Lobflter 




An old man 


kidjune. 


Crayfiah 




An old woman • 


■ mummg. 


Moaqnito - 


• mnnjook. 


A baby 


thaduin. 


Ply - - - 


• bnan. 


A White man • 


thagheradge. 


Snake • 
The Blacks - 


• uanba. 
bygaL 


Children - 




A Black! ellow - 


bygal. 


Head - 


• pooera. 


A Black woman • 


toobia. 


Eye - 


mlL 


Noae . 


mnrrock. 


Ear • - . 


binnong. 





USMORB. 




^\ 




No« 178.— LiflMOBS— «)nttfit(«({. 




Month 


• moolang. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth- 


• tretong. 


Hill . 


. 




Hair of the head 


- poora. 


Wood- 




thalby. 


Beaid- 


• yarring. 


Stone 




- tharoo. 


Thimder - 


• mnkkera. 


Camp 






Graaa - 


• weatchong. 


Tes 




■ yaway. 


Tongue 


- jrulhan. 


No 




• yukkum. 


Stomach 


• moong. 


I 




• ngi 


BreastB 


- ngama. 


Yon 




• walbo. 


Thigh- 


- tchering. 


Bark 




bookall. 


Foot - 


. tchinnong. 


€k)od • 






Bone - 


- dntcheroo. 


XiM^^^^^A 






Blood - 


• kamerok. 


Bad 




. chang. 


Sldn . 


• yoolin. 


Sweet 




. bewkin. 


Fat - 


- watoheroo. 


Food • 


• ngagune. 


Bowels 


- mnokii 


Hungry 


• kabbora. 


Excrement - 


• knnnnng. 


Thirsty 


- nirkin. 


War-spear • 


• tchnan. 


Eat • 




• thangeay. 


Beed-spear - 


• commii. 


Sleep 




• newram(?). 


Wonmiera or 


thannnng. 


Drink 




• chookyan. 


throwing-stick 




Walk • 




• yonbie. 


Shield- - • 


• bankkar. 


See 










^u m M 




m m 


Ganoe - 


- knndooL 


Sit - - • 


• yelna, yundur. 


Snn • 


• yalknn. 


Yesterday - 


- nooba. 


Moon - 


- knbboon. 


To-day 


piiyan. 


Star - 


- qnanthou. 


To-morrow - 


- noobathong. 


flight - 


• bobon. 


Where are the 


yubae bygal T 


Dark - - . 


• ngnbboa. 


BlaoksT 




Cold - 


• wnrring. 


I don't know 


• yubaangony. 


Heat • 


• ngone. 


Plenty 


- karral. 


Day - - 


• nnngnrri. 


Big . - . 


kukune. 


Kight- 


■ 


Little - 


beeohang. 


Fire • 


' wibbera. 


Dead - 


- kuUung. 


Water 


• koonk. 




^p 


Smoke 


thallo. 


By-and-by - 


yooknr. 


Gronnd 


• thackoon. 


Come on 


- qua, kurr. 


Wind - 


bnirgoon. 


Milk - 




Bain - 


. koo-nng. 


Eaglehawk • 




God - - • 




Wild turkey 




Ghosts 


- knba-waaki. 


Wife 


■ • 





294 



THE AUSTRALIAM RACE: 



No. 179.— TENTERFIELD, NEW ENGLAND. 

AKONTMOUa 

GLEN INNES, NEW ENGLAND. 

Bt C. B. Lows, Esq. 

Thb two vocabularies which follow are specimens of the 
dialects of New England. The first is called Yticomble. Mr. 
Lowe, who contributes the second, gives the following Addi- 
tional Words: — Uncle = alepoan; aunt = munga; and 
cousin = nungarab. He adds that on addressing an aunt 
the equivalent of mother is often used. The only native 
name of a person with which Mr. Lowe is acquainted is 
Combo. 



No. 179.— TENTERBTSLD, NEW ENGLAND. 

AKommous. 



Kangaroo 

Opoflsum 

Tame dog 

WUd dog 

Ehna - 

Black duck 

Wood duck 

Pelican 

Laughing jackass 

Native companion 

White cockatoo 

Crow • 

Swan - 

Egg 

Track of a foot 

Fish - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks 
A Blaokf eUow 
A Black woman 
Nose • 



kooraman. 


Hand • 


- jrama. 


koopi. 


2 Blacks - 


- boother gibber. 


mir. 


3 Blacks - 


- boother duar gib- 
ber. 


moorin. 


One - 


- duar. 


gooralba. 


Two - 


- boother. 


gooraba. 


Three- 


- boother duar. 


doorabilla. 


Four - 


- boother boother. 


kargool. 
goorala. 
garabin. 


Father 
Mother 


- pape. 


waugan. 


Sister-Elder 


* 


bonalbe. 


„ Younger 


- 


kamboa. 


Brother-Elder 


- 




,, Younger 


goorl. 


A young man 


- kipper. 


ganoon. 


An old man 


- durra. 




An old woman 


- 


gurmura. 


A baby 


- ongaly ongura. 


kaka. 


A White man 


- 


gibber. 


Children - 


- 


^0 

gibber. 


Head - 


- kopuL 


hekita. 


Eye - 


-mil. 


nurin. 


Ear • 


- ema. 



TENTEKniiLD, NEW ENQLAKD. 



296 





No. 


179.~TBNTEBnE]:iD, New Enolakd— continuecf. 


Month 


- 


- eyra. 


Boomerang - 


« 


Teeth 


- 


- era. 


Hill - - 


- 


Hair of the head - gonyal. 


Wood- - 


- nunda. 


Beard- 


- 


- nokan. 


Stone - 


- tarro. 


Thunder 


m» 


- boogoon. 


Camp - 


- moora. 


Graas- 


. 


- onthan. 


Yes . - 


- yoor. 


Tongne 


- 


- 


No - - 
I 


- yakka. 

- mina. 


Stomach 


- 


- mnoha. 


You - 


- inda. 


Breasts 


•• 








Thigh - 


. 


- bongon« 


Bark - 


- goola. 


Foot - 


. 


- dinna. 


Good - 


- pepan. 


Bone - 


. 


- nimbra. 


Bad - 


• nantha. 


Blood - 


. 


- gooma. 


Sweet - 


- 


Skin - 


- 


- ingal. 


Food - - 


- talta. 


Fat - 


- 


- komba. 


Hungry 


- tooloominga. 


Bowels 


- 


- kullinga. 


Thirsty 


- 


Excrement 


• 


- goonna. 


Kat - 


- yooa. 


War-spear 


• 


- pathin. 


Sleep - 


- woom. 


Reed-speai 


i ^ 


• (not used). 


Drink- 


- korilta. 


Throwing-i 


itlck 


- (not used). 


Walk - 


- mannila. 


Shield 


. 


- menge. 






Tomahawk 


^ 


- wakur. 


See - 


- malgu. 


Canoe - 


. 


- (not used). 


Sit - 


- narela. 


Sun - 


. 


- talgai. 


Yesterday - 


- 


Moon - 


- 


- guir. 


To-day 


< talin. 


Star - 


m 


- megan. 


To-morrow • 


- tagree. 


Light - 


- 


- magool. 


Where are the 




Dark - 


- 


- mooroo. 


Blacks T 




Cold - 


m 


- 


I don't know 


„ 


Heat - 
Day - 


^ 


- wegar. 

- tarar. 


Plenty 


- melinga. 


Night- 


« 


- noom. 


Big - - 


- magin. 


Fire - 


- 


- wee. 


Little 


- tawoni. 


Water 


- 


- kookoo. 


Dead 


- watoona. 


Smoke 


- 


- dooral. 


By-and-by - 


- 


Ground 


- 


- tarn. 


Come on 


- ethemaa. 


Wind- 


m 


- buran. 


Milk - . 


m 


Bam - 


m 


- yoorin. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


- 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


- 


- 


Wife - 


- 



296 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE : 



No. 179.-OLEN INNBS, NEW ENGLAND. 
Bt C. B. Lows, Esq. 



Ejuigaroo 
OpoBsnm 
Tame dog 
Wild dog 

Black duck 
Wood duck 
Pelican 
Laughing jackass 
Native companion 
White cockatoo 
Crow • 
Swan - 
Egg - 

Track of a foot 
Fish . 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito 

Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks - 
A Blackfellow 
A Black woman 
Nose • 



groman. 

koope. 

merri. 

ngoornng. 

gondereba. 

goorowburra. 

wngil. 

gargoon. 

ngeura. 

geearabeL 

wahgnn. 

bnrabora. 

kaboa. 

gidena. 

goorooL 

naloan. 

giwin. 

borlo. 

goorara. 

goonawl. 

gibbera. 

akitchera. 

moro. 



Hand • 

2 Blacks 

3 Blacks 

One - 

Two • 
Three- 
Four - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

», Younger 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
ChUdren 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear 



yumma. 
boola gibbera. 
boolagereara 
gibbera. 



boola. 
boolagereara. 

papieL 

munga. 

wundeaL 

gubbeaL 



booraby. 

gldoonga. 

gookama. 

margue. 

oongarleen. 

karpooi. 

meUL 

beidna. 





GTiFN INNES, NEW ENGLAND. 


:ffdi 




No. 179.— <}lin Innbs— coit^nKei. 




Month 




Boomerang- 




Teeth - 


0^ 


Hill . - 




Hair of the head • 


• heab. 


Wood- 


gate. 


Beard- 


nukkim. 


Stone - 


goodno. 


Thunder 


• boorongi 


Camp - 


ngoora. 


GrasB • 


withnn. 


Yes - - . 




Tongne 


- galbain. 


No - - . 


• ooka. 


Stomach 


• wia.Wt 


I - . 


atoha. 


Breasts 


• ngamoo. 


Yon - 


inda. 


Thigh- 


gana. 


Bark - 


goolo. 


Foot - 


• gidda. 


Good - - 


- bepan. 


Bone - 


• nimbe. 


Bad - - 


- ngaraga. 


Blood- 


gongera. 


Sweet • 


• galer. 


Skin - 


■ ynngera. 


Food - 


• ewi. 


Fat - - ■ 
Bowels 
Bxcrement - 


• komba. 
> galleenga. 
■ goonna. 


.Hungry 
Thirsty 


• boongere. 
-boL 


War-spear - 


bithin. 


Eat - • • 


■ enL 


Beed-spear - 


■ wurre. 


Sleep - 


• nooroombiba. 


Throwing-stick • 


• doangagat. 


Drink - 


gokogolba. 


Shield- 


. gongi 


Walk- 


' manelba. 


Tomahawk - 


- wakara. 


See • - • 


• ngamgeba. 


Canoe - 




Sit . . ■ 


garL 


Snn - 


galgL 


Yesterday - 


• ngoroongra. 


Moon - 


• gewarra. 


To-day 


• galan. 


Star • 


• mageen. 


To-morrow - 


- mooraga. 


light - 


. galgi, gnppnngi 


Where are the 


) wongagibberaT 


Dark - 


• ngoro. 


Bhicks? 




Cold - 


wnlli. 


I don't know 


ooka atcha inan 


Heat - 


- galgarga. 




gange. 


Day - 


- ynllooeenga 


Plenty 


• goonootan. 


Kight - 


• ngonmga. 


Big - - 


• maggim. 


Fire - 


wi. 


Little - 


• jowar. 


Water 


■ goko. 


Dead - 


■ battoonye. 


Smoke 


- jaw. 


By-and-by - 


• baUok. 


Gronnd 


- garra. 


Come on 


• yatte manna. 


Wmd- 


• boorau. 


Milk - 




Rain - 


• yuro. 


Eaglehawk 




Gk>d - 




Wild torkey 




GhoeU 




Wife - 





298 



THE AUSTRALIAN BAGS: 



No. 180.— QUEENBULLA, ASHFORD, AND QUININGUILLAN. 

Bt the DiSIBIOT BINOH of IfAOISTRATBS. 



Kangaroo • 


maronL 


Hand • 




Opo68iim • 


koopL 


2Blaok8 




Tame dog - 
WUddog - 
Emu - 
Blaok dnck 
Wood duok 


menni. 

gawriL 

- grober. 


3 Blacks 
One • 
Two • 
Three- 


tonway. 

boobia. 

boobUthL 


Pelican 


woohoodoo. 


Four • 




Laughing jackass 


gookooya. 


Father 


- parpinga. 


Native oompanion 


I gooriatti. 


Mother 


- kuppenea. 


White cookatoo • 




Sister-Elder 


■ wonde. 


Crow - 
Swan - 
Egg - 

Track of a foot • 
Fish . 


• wakan. 
willar. 

■ gungi. 

• winnia. 

• garo. 


„ Younger • 
Brothei^Elder 

„ Youngei 
A young man 


• kownonbL 
- towanbulla. 


Lobster 


• gonon. 


An old man 


• brubbL 


Crayfish 


- gindangia. 


An old woman 


- mooberrL 


Mosquito 
Fly - - 
Snake 

The Blacks - 
A Blackf eUow 


• moneUlia. 
- barloo. 
. thunni 

. thukkin. 


Ababy 
A Wliitenuui 
Children • 
Head - 


- gow. 

• goone. 

- taUiwakin. 
. bookia. 


A Black woman • 


koUeria. 


Eye . 


- meine. 


Nose - - 


- mario. 


Ear 


. buUekin. 



QUEENBULLA, ASHFORD, AND QUININGUILLAN. 



299 



No. 180.~QUEENBULLA, ASHTORD, 

Mouth - - yeire. 

Teeth- - - teeiia. 
of the head- bookia. 
- yani. 

Thunder - - toloomatine. 

Grass - - - woone. 

Tongae - - thathi. 

Stomach - - theethia. 

Breasts - - moonbi. 

Thigh - - beeyo. 

Foot - - - winnier. 

Bone - - - yemU. 

Blood - - kooninber. 

Skin - - - yooti. 

Pat . - - knmbia. 

Bowds - - neria. 

Excrement - - biritlay. 
War-spear - - karki. 

Beed-spear - - wari. 

ThrowingHBtick - pankin. 

Shield- - - marombi. 

Tomahawk- * bebia. 

Canoe - - - walkia. 

Son - - tooni. 

Moon - - - gethi. 

Star - - - meria. 

light . - - tooni 

Dark - - - muther. 

Cold - - - yeither. 

Heat - - - galthra. 

Day . - - thallan. 

Night- - - muther. 

Kre - - - myee or wyee. 

Water - kooki. 

Smoke - - wothL 

Ground - - thakoo. 

Wind- - - wollar. 

Rain - - - neUther. 

God - - - 

Ghosts 



AND QunoNOUiLLAN — continued. 

Boomerang - 
Hill - ■ - 
Wood- 
Stone - 
Camp - 



- thundler. 

- thrawe. 

- woora. 



Yes - 

No - 
I 

You - 
Bark - 
Good - 
Bad - 
Sweet - 
Food - 
Hungry 
Thirsty 
Eat - 
Sleep - 
Drink- 
Walk - 
See - 



-- yoi. 

- koi. 

- ninda* 

- numba. 

. gunnoogulki. 

- munluba. 

- yooriwia. 

- munluba. 

- wekia. 

- thwring* 

- gookoowing. 

- ginyeadowngi. 

- noriwa. 

- numbulla. 
. mumllia. 

. nilli. 



Sit - - - 
Yesterday - - thanlungulla. 
To-day - - thallian. 
To-morrow- - baralballurgl. 
Where are the bumbrininil 
Blacks? yonni ? 

I don*t know 

Plenty - - woUigooki. 

Big - - • wolli. 

Little - - - kuthier. 

Dead - - - bartmee. 

By-and-by - - barloi. 

Come on - - kowi. 

Milk - 

Eaglehawk - 

Wild turkey 

Wife - 



BOOK THE FOURTEENTH. 



BOOK THE FOURTEENTH. 

PREFATOBT REMARKS. 

The langnage and marriage customs of the Kamilaroi tribes 
Lave been treated of by the late Revd. William Ridley in his 
work entitled Kamilaroi and other Australian LanguageSj 
which volume in turn has formed the principal groundwork 
of Messrs. Fison and Howitt's volume Kamilaroi andKumai. 
As the marriage customs of the Kamilaroi tribes have already 
been considered in Chapter 4 of the present work, they are 
not referred to in what follows. 

Of the Common Yocabulary eight Kamilaroi translations 
have been given, with a view of enabling the reader to judge 
of how small are the differences of speech which occur within 
the area in which this tongue prevails. It wiU be noticed 
that Murri = Blackfellom^ and Kamil = No, are found in each 
of the eight translations. In these dialects affinities will be 
noticed in the equivalents of tongue and eat. 



304 THE AITSTRAIIAN BACE: 



No. 181.— THE BARWAN, GWTDER, AND NAMOI 

RIVERS. 

MOBEE, NUin>LB, WXE-WAA, BARRABA, BOQABBIE, AMD 

M KICK K^ 



THE KAMILABOI LANGUAGE. 

Bt thb latb Rkyd. William Ridlet, M.A., J. Mosblbt, Esq., 

Fbank Buoxnbll, Esq.; 

Thb Bbnch of MAoisntAina at Mobu, Nuvdli, Wxb-waa, Bakhaba, 

AND BOOABBB. 

Eamilaboi^ the name of this language^ and of one at least 
of the tribes which speak it^ is derived horn Kamil or Gumily 
the negative adverb of the tongue. In the Eamilaroi coontiy 
there still exist the remnants of several independent tribes 
which no doubt used to belong to more than one association. 
Of one of these tribes which dwell on the Gwyder^ Mr. Frank 
Bucknell has forwarded me an account, which is to the 
following effect. 

The name of the tribe says Mr. Bucknell is Kdmilroi.* 
Since he first became acquainted with it, it has greatly 
decreased in numbers, owing to the use of ardent spirits, the 
result being generally lung disease, which is the prevalent 
disorder. Some individuals of the tribe seem to have reached 
the age of eighty years. Besides waist-belts, the Eamilroi 
wear as clothes rugs made of opossum skins and occasionally 
of the skins of young kangaroo. For ornaments they wear 
(or used to do, for at the present time, 1874, they have but 
few of their native customs left) in their hair on festive 
occasions shells and the yellow crest of the white cockatoo. 
To the same end they also smear the person with red ochre, 

* Mr. BnckneU speaks of this particular tribe as Kamibroi. Describera 
of related tribes generaUy speU the word KcmUaroi, — ^E. M. C. 



BARWAN, GWYDEB, AND NAMOI RIVEBS. 305 

on which lines of pipe-clay are painted. Before we intro- 
dnced iron, their implements were the usual tomahawk and 
knife made of stone or flint. They still have bags and nets 
made of tough grass or of the bark of the currajong-tree, 
some of them being prettily and all of them substantially 
manufactured, for the savage, as long as he works for himself, 
never scamps his work. For weapons they have boomerangs 
of both kinds, dubs, spears which are thrown by hand and 
not with the wommera, many of these implements being 
elaborately carved. 

In this tribe the young of both sexes have to submit to 
certain restrictions in connection with food; some being 
forbidden to eat honey and others the opossum. When Mr. 
Bucknell first knew the Kamilroi, in 1853, there were 
amongst them two men and one woman slightly pitted with 
small-pox. This disease seems to have visited the tribe 
about the year 1830, and to have cut o£f many. Their name 
for it is booert. Grown persons in this tribe had a strong 
objection to being called by the names of their infancy, 
which was sometimes resorted to for the purpose of annoy- 
ance. Kidgella, Mungilla, and Wemeya are the names of 
three of the women. 

The subdivision of the Eamilaroi tribes into classes has 
already been mentioned in a former chapter, and I learn from 
my informant that marriages were entirely regulated by these 
classes. Mr. Bucknell also says that each male and female 
is (or was) allowed to marry into one of two classes, but that 
children always belonged to the class of their mother. Girls 
were often betrothed in infancy, and became wives at about 
fourteen years of age. Like other tribes, they scar the body 
for ornamental purposes, and knock out one of the teeth of 
the males at the booray or secret ceremony by which they are 
admitted to the rank of young men. They also wear a bone 
through the septum of the nose. 

Mr. Bucknell agrees with the late Eevd. William Ridley 
in stating that the Eamilaroi tribes believe in the existence 
of an Almighty Creator. They also believe in spirits, and 

VOL. m. u 



306 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



are fearM of going near graves at night. Fishing is carried 
on with nets and spears, and by means of weirs constmcted 
with bonghs and stakes, to the opening of which is affixed a 
long bag-net. As a sign of mourning, they plaster the head 
with mud. 

For colds, the Eamilaroi of the present day use, as a 
drink, water in which wild mint has been steeped, and for 
an aperient water in which bark of the wild lavender-tree 
has been steeped. Whether they used remedies of the sort 
before they became acquainted with the Whites seems very 
questionable. I do not think our Blacks had any idea of the 
use of purgatives. With outward applications they undoubt- 
edly had some acquaintance, and Mr. Bucknell notices that 
pains of the stomach are treated with an application of 
heated eucalyptus leaves. For snake-bite, a ligature is tied 
above and below the wound, and the part bled and sucked. 
If a bed of small red ants be at hand, the patient takes his 
stand on it, and endures the sharp bites of the insects for 
about an hour. 



No. 181.— Additional Wobds, by the late Bxyd. W. Ridlbt. 



Son - 


- wunune. 


Daughter - 


- ngnmnnga. 


Uncle 


- pamandi. 


Nephew 


• wurumnngadi, 




karugSndt 


Niece - 


- ngumungadL 


Man*8 breasts 


birri. 


Cheek - 


• wa, kwatL 


lips - - 


• iUe, kumai. 


Chin - 


- tal. 


Moustache - 


- bnti. 


Throat 


- wuru, dUdil. 


Neck - 


- nan. 


Back • 


• guria, baoa. 


Arm - 


- bungon. 


Heart- 


-ki. ri. 



Longs- 

liver - 

Kidneys 

Knee - 

Leg 

Ankle - 

Heel - 

Verily 

FuU (after eating) 

Wonderful - 

Term ezpresaiye 
of interrogation 
placed at the be- 
ginning of a sen- 
tence 



kaogi. 
kanna. 

mnkar, mognr. 

dinbir. 

boiyo, poiyn. 

ngor. 

tanga. 

gir. 

ynlarai. 

ngipaL 

yaouna? 



BARWAN, OWYDER, AND NAMOI RIVERS. 



807 



Additional Wokds, bt the latb 

Qod verily made man ; first man 
Adam. God said: " Not it is good 
for man alone to dwell ; I for man 
woman will make." Then Qod 
woman made; first woman Eve; 
Eve wife of Adam. 

Adam &iher of Blackfellow, father 
of Whitefellow, father of all. Eve, 
mother of Blackf ellow, mother of 
Whitefellow, mother of all. 



Rbvd. W. Ridley— coiUtntted. 

Baiame gir giwir giombi; mal 
giwir Adam. Baiame go«: " Ka- 
mil morruba giwir ngandil ngad- 
delago; ngaiagiwirgoinar gimbille." 
Ha Baiame inar giombe; mal inar 
Iva; Iva gulir Adamn. 

Adam bnba mnrringu, bnba won- 
dangn, bubakannngo. Ivangmnba 
murringn, ngomba wondangn, 
ngmnba kanimgo. 



Additional Words vobwabdbd bt the Benoh at Wsb-waa. 

Annt • - booriaili (?). 

Cousin - board! (!). 



Names of women Gibilga, Tan- 

goma. 

Family names - Cubbi, Combo, 

Hippi, Mnrri. 

Uncle • • carrondi. 



Demon • - wonda. 
Sonthem Cross - birubi 



U2 



1 



808 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 181.— NAMOI AND BARWAN BIVEBS. 



Bt the Revd. Wiluam Ridut. 



Kangaroo - 


bnndar. 


Hand- 


murra. 


Opossum - 


• mute. 


2 Blacks • 




Tame dog - 


bumma. 


3 Blacks 




VVUddog - 


mnrren or yuggi. 


One - 


- maL 




dinoun. 










Two - 


bular. 


Black dnok - 


kurroncd. 






Wood dnok- 


ngnnumbL 


Three- 


gOlSbft. 


Pelican 


guleale. 


Four 


• bularbular. 


Laughing jackaaa 


kukuraka. 


Father 


buba. 


Native compamoo 


L buralga. 


Mother 


ngumba. 


White cockatoo • 


• biloeta, morai 


Sister-Elder 


■ boadt 


Crow • 


. warn. 


„ Younger 


- buri. 


Swan - 


barianmuL 


Brother-Elder 


• daidi. 


Egg 


ko. 


., ITounfler 


• guUami 


Track of a foot • 


tnrabul. 


• ' %^ 


^9 


Fish • 


guia. 


A young man 


• kubura. 


Lobster 




An old man 


• diria (grey). 


Crayfish 




An old woman 


- yambulL 


Mosquito • 


- mnngin. 


A baby 


> kaindul. 


Fly - - - 


- bumlu. 


A White man 


- wunda. 


Snake (black) • 


- nurai. 


Children 


- kai. 


The Blacks • 


- murrL 






A Blackf ellow • 




Head - 


■ kaoga, gha, ga. 


A Black woman 


> tnar cnr yennar. 


Eye - 


• mil. 


Nose • 


• muru. 


Ear 


- binna. 



NAMOI AND BARWAN RIVERS. 



309 



No. ISI.^Kamoi and Babwak Rivkbs — eonHnued, 



Moath 




- yari 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth - 


- 


- yira. 


Hill - - 


• 


Hair of the head • tegul. | 


Wood- 


- tulu. 


Beard - 


• 


- yare. 


Stone - 


- yarul. 


Thnnder 


- 


• tolnmi. 


Camp - 


- wolai. 


Gnun - 


- 


- gera, yindal, 


Yes - 


-yo. 






goaror. 


No - - 


- kamlL 


Tongae 


- 


- tulle. 


I - - 


- ngaia. 


Stomach 


- 


- mubal. 


Yon - 


- inda, nginda. 


Breasts 


- 


- ngummu. 


Bark - 


- tura. 


Thigh - 


- 


- dorra. 


Good - 


- murruba. 


Foot - 


m 


- dinna. 


Bad - 


- kagil, kuggil. 


Bone - 


- 


- borra. 


Sweet - 


- murruba. 


Blood - 
Skin - 


" 


- gue. 
-yuU. 


Food - 


- yul. 


Fit - 


^ 


- ghorL 


Hungry 


- yulngin. 


Bowels 


. 


o 


Thirsty 


- kollengin. 


Eixcrement 


- 


. 


Eat - 


-tali. 


WaiHipear 


- 


- pilar. 


Sleep - 


-babL 


Reed-spear 


- 


- 


Drink- 


- ngarugl. 


Wommera 


or 




Walk - - 


- yani. 


throwmg-i 


stick 




See - - 


- ngummi. 


Shield- 


• 


. borin. 


Sit - - 


- nguddela. 


Tomahawk 


- 


- ynndu. 


Yesterday - 


- gimiandi, 


Canoe- 


- 


- kambilgal. 

• 




ngaribu. 


Son - 
Moon - 


• 


- yarai. 

- gille. 


To-day 


- yeradtha, ilaunu. 


Star - 


„ 


^9 

- mirri. 


To-morrow - 


- nguruko. 


Tiight - 


• 




Where are 


the tullamum 


Dark - 


m 




Blacks? 


nguddela 7 


Cold - 


m 


- karil. 


I don't know 


- kamil ngaia 


Heat - 


. 






winungL 


Day - 


- 


- yeradtha. 


Plenty 


- burrula. 


Night - 


- 


. ngurn. 


Big - - 


- burul. 


Fire - 


• 


- wi. 


Little - 


- kai. 


Water 


. 


- kolle, wollun. 


Dead - 


- balun. 


Smoke 


- 


- du, dhu. 


By-and-by - 


- yerala. 


Qroond 


- 


- taon. 


Come on 


- yanilla. 


Wind- 


- 


- maier. 


Milk - 


m 


Ram - 


- 


- yuro. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


- 


- baiame. 


WUd turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


. 




Wife - 


- 



310 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 181.— NAMOI, BARWAN, MEEH^. 



Kangaroo • 


• boonda. 


Hand - 


• mnrra. 


Opossum - 


■ moothe. 


2 Blacks 


boolamnme. 


Tame dog • 
WUd dog - 
Emu - 
Black duck - 
Wood duck- 
Pelican 


booroomine. 

theenoon, maree. 
koorangee. 
goonambee. 
goola, allee. 


3 Blacks 
One • 

Two - 
Three - 
Four - 


koolabar mnxrie. 

mahl. 

boola. 

koolabar. 

boola-boola. 


Laughing jaokasi 


( kookooburra, 


Father 


boobar. 




kwrra-warra. 


Mother 


womba^ numba. 


Native companioi 


1 booralga. 


Sister-Elder 


booradie. 


White cockatoo • 


■ eenboona. 


„ Younger • 


bugandie. 


Crow - 
Swan - 
Egg - 
Track of a foot • 


waroo. 
booroondal. 
■ kow. 
deena. 


Brother-Elder - 
„ Youngei 
A young man 


koolarmee. 
oolkald, biree. 


Fish . - . 


goo-ya. 


An old man 


teeya, dirarl- 


Lobster 


kary. 




dooL 


Crayfish 


■ kary. 


An old woman 


. oomballee. 


Mosquito • 


■ moogin. 


A baby 


■ kee-e-i, kindooL 


Fly - • • 
Snake (brown) 
The Blacks - 


■ boorooloo. 
- noorai. 

■ murrie. 


A White man 
Children 


- wonda. 

• booroola,wee-e-i 


A Blackfellow • 


- mahl murrie. 


Head - 


gar, kar. 


A Black woman • 


■ eena, inna. 


Eye - 


- mil. 


Nose - 


■ mooroo. 


Ear 


■ binna. 



311 





No. 181.— NamoIi Babwan, ^bxh£— continued. 


Month 


- 


- ungee. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth- 


m 


- eera. 


Hill - - 


- 


Hair of the head 


I- yarraga. 


Wood- 


- thooloo. 


Beard- 
Thimder 


• 


- yarre. 

- thooloomo. 


Stone - 


- yarrel. 


Qraas - 


• 




Camp - 


- wolli, ngoora. 


ToD^e 


- 


- talla. 


, Yes - - 


- yeo. 


Stomach 


- 


- moorhaal. 


No - - 


- kommeL 


Breasts 


- 


- thnamoo. 


I - - 


- ngeia. 


Thigh 


- 


- hoo-i-oo. 


Yon - 


- eenda. 


Foot - 


m 


- deena. 


Bark - - 


- toora. 


Bone - 


- 


• hoora. 


Good • 


- murooba. 


Blood- 


- 


- gooaL 


Bad - 


- bane. 


Sinn - 


. 


- nla. 






Fat - 


• 


- wommo. 


Sweet - 


- kupper. 


Bowels 


. 


- moobaal, kgol- 


Food - - 


- tooa. 






leen. 


Hungry 


- yoonquil. 


Excrement 


- 


- goonna. 


Thirsty 


- woUeenquU. 


War-spear 

• 


- 


- beelar. 


Eat - 


- tarlee. 


Reed-spear 


•■ 


• waree. 


Sleep - 


- barbee. 


Wommera 


or 


wommora. 


Drink - 


- ngarooki. 


throwing- 


stick 




Walk- - 


^m 


Shield 
Tomahawk 




- mungan. 

- yoondo. 


See - 


- ngoomilli. 


Canoe - 


. 


- wyardka. 


Sit - 


- ngareel. 


Sun - 


- 


- yeearaL 


Yesterday - 


- ngorra, kagool. 


Moon - 


- 


- gillee. 


To-day 


- marl. 


Star - 


- 


- mirrie. 


To-morrow - 


- mooroogko. 


Light - 


- 


- narran. 


Where are 


the aUar murri? 


Dark - 


« 


- nooroo. 


Blacks? 




j Cold - 


- 


- waheel. 


I don*t know 


- kommillar. 


Heat - 


- 


- boolarte,taweela. 


Plenty 


- booroola. 


Day - 


- 


- bolla. 


Big - . 


- boorooL 


Klght- 


- 


- ngooroo. 


Little - 


- kindool. 


Fire - 


« 


- wee. 


Dead - 


- boUoo. 


Water 


• 


- wollee. 






Smoke 


„ 


- too. 


By-and-by - 


- eerarloo. 


Gronnd 


. 


- towon. 


Come on 


- tianowa. 


Wind- 


. 


- mathe. 


Milk - 


- 


Ram - 


- 


- kollee. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


• 


m 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


. 


. 


Wife - 


. 



312 



THE AUSTRALIAK BAGE: 



No. 181.— GWYDER RIVER. 



Bt Fbank Buokksll, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 


- bundah. 


Hand - 


- muira. 


Opossum - 


- mootta. 


2 Blacks - 


- boolar murry. 


Tame dog - 


- boorooma. 


3 Blacks - 


- cooleebar murry 


WUddog - 


- murrain. 


One - 


- marL 


Emu •• 


. dinown. 


Two - 


- boolar. 


Black dnck 


. curringa. 


Three - 


• ooolebar. 


Wood duck 


- gunumba. 


Four - 


- moolamboo aiid 


Pelican 


- coola-arlee. 




boolar boolar. 


Laughing jackass cooooocarcar. 


Father 


- pian-dool« boyd 


Native companion boralgar. 




jurt, poopar. 


White cockatoo 


• mowri 


Mother 


- ngumbar. 


Crow - 


- warrow or mine- 


SisteivElder 


- powarthey. 




gar. 


„ Younger 


- prainarthey. 


Swan - 


- parrear mel. 


Brother-Elder 


- tyarthey. 


Egg - - 


- CO. 


„ Young< 


Br oollyningarthey 


Track of a foot 


- dinner. 


A young man 


- cobbora wnd 


Fish . 


- guir. 




ongarL 


Lobster 


- 


An old man 


• waim-mar. 


Crayfish 


- geary. 


An old woman 


. yamboolee. 


Mosquito - 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks - 


- noongin. 

- boorooloo. 

- noum. 

- murry. 


A baby 

A White man 

Children - 


- kirrakar. 

- wonda. 

- ki>kul-ka. 


A Blackf ellow 


- murry. 


Head • 


- ko-kar. 


A Black woman 


- innurt. 


Eye • 


- miU. 


Nose - 


- mooroo. 


Ear . 


- binnar. 



GWYDER BIVER. 



313 



No. 181. — GwTDEB BiYES — coniinued. 



Month 

Teeth 

Hair of the head 

Beard 

Thimder • 

Grass 

Tongae 

Stomach 

Breasts 

Thigh 
Foot - 
Bone • 
Blood- 
Skm - 
Fat - 
Boweb 
Excrement - 
WarHBpear• 
Beed-spear 
Wommera or 

throwing-stick 
Shield 
Tomahawk 
Canoe 
Sun - 
Moon- 
Star - 
light - 
Dark • 
Cold - 
Heat - 
Day - 
Night 
Fire - 
Water 
Smoke 
Ground 
Wind 
Bain - 
God - 
Ghosts 



ngeh. 

yeara. 

ca. 

yerra. 

dooloomra. 

kean. 

tolley. 

moobnl. 

ngnmmoo. 

tarrar. 

dinner. 

boorar. 

gaoy. 

enlie. 

wommo. 

goolo-lar. 

goonar. 

belar. 

(have none). 

moorooler. 

booreen. 
ynandoo. 

yarri. 

gilla. 

mirree. 

yirree. 

nooroo. 

knrreel. 

boolate. 

yarrigee. 

nooroo. 

wee. 

colley. 

dhoo. 

maite. 

colley par in ya. 

biamma. 

ghmeet-bee. 



Boomerang 
Hill - 
Wood 
Stone- 
Camp- 
Yes - 
No . 
I 

You - 
Bark - 
Good- 
Bad - 
Sweet 
Food ■ 
Hungary 
Thirsty 
Eating 
Sleeping 
Drinking 
Walking 
Seeing 
Sitting 
Yesterday 
To-day 
To-morrow 
Where are the 
Blacks? 
I don't know 
Plenty 
Big - - 
Little 

Dead- 
By-and-by - 

Come on • 

Milk . 
Eaglehawk 
Wild turkey 



Wife 



bur-rum. 

cub-ba. 

dooloo. 

yarral. 

waUi. 

ah-yoo. 

commil. 

niah. 

indur. 

nundar. 

cubber. 

wnn-ghu. 

warril-it. 

youl. 

youn-ning. 

collinguin. 

talden. 

boonna cowin ya. 

ngarroo giller. 

yan-nay-bur. 

omilder. 

whurrillar. 

gimmeanyo. 

nore yarrijur. 

noo, ro-go. 

tul-lar-murry T 

tuUar mar. 

boorool wealar. 

booral. 

kianjole. 

bollonney. 

yerralon. 

tyannuga. 

ngummel. 
mullion. 
burrowar (plain 

turkey), 
wirraller (scrub 

turkey), 
goolear. 



314 



IHK ACSnUIlAX BACE 



No. ISL^MORER. 



Br Bkkch or Maoisikatis. 



Kuigiroo - 


> bandar. 


Opoflram - 


' mooty. 


Tame dog - 


> boolomo 


WUddog . 




Emu - 


. thinnoo. 


Black dack 


• kurrongey. 


Wood dnok 


- goomby. 


Pelican 


• koolyalle. 


Laughing jaokaaa 


kookoborro. 


Native companion booralga. 


White cockatoo • 


- moorL 


Crow - 


> meauga. 


Swan - 


- koolamballee. 


Egg . . . 


• kow. 


Track of a foot • 


' theena. 


FUh - - . 


• gooea. 


Lobater 




Crayflth - 


• keery. 


Moiquito - 


. moongin. 


Ply - • 


> poodeloo. 


Snake- 


• thi. 


The Blaoka- 


> boolamurrL 


ABlaokfellow • 


• murrL 


A Black woman - 


> eenar. 


KOM . - • 


' moora. 



Hand- 


- mora. 


2B]acks - 


- boolar mum. 


3 Blacks - 


- koohba mum. 


One - 


- maL 


Two - 


- boolar. 


Three- 


• kooliba. 


Four - 


- 


Father 


- boobady. 


Mother 


- umbady. 


Sifltei^Elder 


- boady. 


„ Younger 


- 


Brothez^Elder 


- theady. 


„ Younger 


A young man 


- kure. 


An old man 


- theera. 


An old woman 


- theera. 


A baby - 


- kiangle. 


A White man 


- wonda. 


Children 


m 


Head - - 


- yagh. 


Eye - 


. miL 


Ear 


• bena. 



MOREB. 



315 





No. 181.— MoBBB— con^Ktt^. 


Month- 


. nigh. 


Boomerang 




Teeth • 


- eeara. 


Hill - 




Hair o£ the head 


- kowga. 


Wood 




- iho6loo. 


Beaid - 


• yarry. 


Stone 




- yerrul. 


Thunder - 


- toolomi. 


Gamp 




- waUi. 


Graas - 


- yrar. 


Yes 




- yoe. 


Tongne 


thily. 


No 




• komil. 


Stomach 
Breasts 


- kea. 


I 

Yon . 




- ngia. 


Thigh- 
Foot - 
Bone - 
Blood • 
Skin - 
Fat - 
Bowels 


• bnyo. 

- thinna. 

- boora. 
guoy. 

• nly. 

■ wammoo. 


Bark 
Good - 
Bad 
Sweet • 
Food • 
Hungry 


J 


- tooro. 
• koba. 

- kogiL 

- ungiL 


Excrement • 


- goona. 


Thirsty 


- galligin. 


War-spear - 


- peelar. 


Eat 




- tally. 


Reed-spear • 




Sleep • 




- babee. 


Wommera or 
throwing-stick 
Shield . 
Tomahawk - 
Canoe - 
Snn - - ■ 


tholowaly. 

> yoondo. 
- eri. 


Drink - 
Walk ■ 
See - 
Sit 
Vesterc 


lay ■ 


- nomguy. 

- yenni. 

- omi. 

- norree. 


Moon - 


killi. 


To-day 


- ilia. 


Star - 


meeree. 


To-morrow - 


. morrogo. 


light - 




Where are 


the thalla mum 7 


Dark - 


moro. 


Blacks? 




Cold . 


koreaL 


I don't knoTi 


7 - komil wingan 


Heat - 


boolet. 




ella. 


Day 




Plenty 


- boodela. 


Night - 


muroo. 


Big . - 


- burr. 


Fire - - 


■ wee. 


Little • 


- kirri-mnira. 


Water - 


kally. 


Dead • 


- balomey. 


Smoke 


■ thoo. 


By-and-by - 


- eeralu. 


Groond 


thoun. 


Come on 


- tianiuga. 


Wind - 


meed. 


Milk - 




Rain - 


kollee bally. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - - • 




Wild turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife - 


• 





316 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 181.— NUNDLE. 
Bt Bxnoh of Maoistraxbs, Nundlb. 



Kangaroo - 
Opossum - 
Tame dog - 

Wild dog - 
Emu 

Black duck • 
Wood duok- 
Pelican 

Laughing jackass 
Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - 

Swan • . . 
Efeg - - - 
Track of a foot - 
Fish . 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito - 
Fly - - - 
Snake - . . 
The Blacks- 
A Blackf ellow - 
A Black woman - 
Nose - ' - 



bundar. 
gooee. 
myi, mini, 
wanti. 

mooree. 
koorangee. 



kookooburra. 
bralga. 
geeray. 
waro. 



thinna. 
gooya. 



burrillo. 

nebe. 

mnrri. 

muni. 

goolear. 

mooroo. 



Hand - 

2Blacks - 

3 Blacks - 

One - 

Two - 

Three- 
Four - 

Father 

Mother 
Sister-Elder 

,, Younger - 
Brother-Elder - 
>i Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman - 
A baby 

A White man - 
Children 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear - . . 



blamurrL 

kooliba murri. 

marl. 

bla. 

kooliba* 



- gunnyja. 



bugandi. 



gny- 

wunda. 

gunga. 

meel. 

binna. 





^UNDT.K. 








No 181.^Nx7NDLE— con^intieci. 




Month 




Boomerang - 




Teeth - 




Hill - 




Hair of the 


head- ga. 


Wood 






Beard- 


- yarri. 


Stone 




■ guUa. 


Thnnder 


• toolooma. 


Camp 






Grass - 




Tes 




geyro. 


Tongue 




No 






Stomach 


- moobul. 








Breasts 




I 




ny-ya. 


Thigh- 


- buyo. 


You 




- inda. 


Foot - 


- thinna. 


Bark 






Bone - 




Good 




- mundaba. 


Blood - 




Bad 






Skin • 




Sweet 






Fat - 




Food ■ 






Bowels 


• moobuL 


Hungry 




Excrement • 


• goonna. 


Thirsty 




War-spear 


- too)oo. 


Eat • 




Eeed-spear • 




Sleep 




- barbeo. 


Wommerao 


r 


Drink - 






throwing-81 


tick 






Shield - 




Walk• 


• 




Tomahawk 


• yundoo. 


See 


B • « 


■ ngamilu. 


Canoe - 




Sit - - • 




Sun - 




Yesterday - 




Moon - 


- geelee. 


To-day 




Star - 




To-morrow - 




light - 




Where are the 


thela mum 7 


Dark - 




Blacks? 




CJold . 


- kreel. 


I don't know 




Heat - 








Day - 




Plenty 




■r 

Night - 




Big - - . 


murroweL 


Fire - 


- wee. 


Little - 


• ki-indual. 


Water 


- kalley. 


Dead ■ 




Smoke 




By-and-by • 




Ground 


- down. 


Come on' 

• 




Wmd- 




Milk - 




Rain - 


• woUa. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - 




WUd turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife 


■ « 





317 



318 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 181.— NAMOL 

Bt Bknoh of MAOiarraATEs at Wee-waa, 

If the reader will look" at the tranBlation of no in this yocabulary and 
also at that of / doiCt know^ he will find the first of these terms made into 
a verb. 



Kangaroo - 


- boondar. 


Hand - 


• murra. 


Opossum 


• moota. 


2 Blacks - 


• boolamurri. 


Tame dog - 


- boorooma. 


3 Blacks - 


. koolaba murrL 


WUddog - 


- 


One - 


- marL 


Emu ■ 


• dinoon. 






Black duck - 


• kurange. 


Two - 


- boola. 


Wood duck 


- goonambe. 


Three- 


- koolaba. 


Pelican 


• goolalli. 


Four - 


- boola boola. 


Laughing jackass kurrali, warra. 


Father 


- booba. 


Native companion boralga. 


Mother 


- nunba. 


White cockatoo 


- emboona. 


Sister-Elder 


- warublll. 


Crow - 


- worL 


„ Younger 


- booardL 


Swan - 


• booroonda. 


Brother-Elder 


- booraL 


Egg - 
Track of a foot 


• kow. 






. dinna. 


„ Younger koolermL 


Fish - - 


- kooya. 


A young man 


- oolkald. 


Lobster 


- karee. 


An old man 


- terriga. 


Crayfish - 


- karee. 


An old woman 


- nunbooli 


Mosquito - 


- nomqui. 


A baby 


. ket 


Fly - 


- boorooloo. 


A White man 


- wonda. 


Snake - 


- noora. 


Children - 


- boorookie. 


The Blacks - 


. mum. 






A Blaokfellow 




Head - 


- kur, gar. 


A Black woman 


* ^jninfc. 


Eye - 


- mil. 


Nose - 


- mooroo. 


Ear 


. binna. 



NAMOI. 



319 



Month 


- 


- ngni. 


Teeth - 


- 


- eera. 


Hair of the head- kar. 


Beard- 


- 


- yarra. 


Thnnder 


- 


- thorooli. 


Grass - 


- 


- 


Tongue 


- 


- taUa. 


Stomach 


- 


- moobal. 


Breasts 


- 


- namoo. 


Thigh 


- 


- booro. 


Foot - 


- 


- dinna. 


Bone - 


* 


- boora. 


Blood - 


- 


- gooaye. 


Skin - 


- 


- ula. 


Fat - 


- 


- wommo. 


Bowels 


m 


- kolleen-koUeen. 


Excrement 


- 


- gunna. 


War-spear 


- 


- bela. 


Beed-spear 




- warree. 


Wommera 


or 


moondoola. 


throwing- 


stick 




Shield 


- 


- brun. 


Tomahawk 


- 


- woondoo. 


Canoe- 


- 


- wyardka. 


Sun - 


- 


- earreye. 


Moon - 


- 


. gillee. 


Star - 


- 


- merree. 


light - 


- 


- torree. 


Dark - 


■ 


- mooroo, bela. 


Cold . 


- 


- kureel. 


Heat - 


- 


- poolati. 


Day - 


"- 


- 


Night - 


- 


- ngooroo. 


Fire 


- 


- wee. 


Water 


- 


- kollee. 


Smoke 


- 


- too. 


Gronnd 


- 


- town. 


Wind- 


- 


- maybe. 


Bain - 


- 


- kollee. 


God - 


- 


- 


Ghosts 


- 


- goowaa. 



No. 181. — Namoi — continued. 

Boomerang - 
HiU - - - 
Wood- 
Stone - 

Camp - - - 
Yes - - - 
No - - - 
I - - - 
You - - ■ 
Bark - 
Good - 
Bad - 
Sweet - 
Food - 
Hungry 

Thirsty 

Eat - - • 
Sleep - 
Drink - 
Walk- 

See - - - 
Sit - - ■ 
Yesterday - 
To-day 
Tomorrow - 
Where are the 
Bhicks? 
I don't know 
Plenty 
Big - - 
Little - 
Dead - 
By-and-by - 
Come on 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk - 
Wild turkey 
Wife - 



tooloo. 

yarraL 

wolli. 

yeo. 

thomil or kommiL 

ngera. 

einda. 

torral. 

moorooba. 

kokiL 



yeonaL 

boola. 

tallee. 

barbee. 

narroke. 

yanna. 

nurinee. 

naraila. 

narrakognl. 

moorooko. 
talla murri? 

kommillar. 

booroola. 

booroL 

kindoo. 

bollo. 

eerarboo. 

tianowa. 



I 



320 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 181.— BARRABA 



Ry nievmr o» MAOTfrr&ATn at llAnnAiiA. 


Kangaroo • 


bundar. 


Hand - 


• murra. 


OposBom 


- kooi, mooti. 


2 Blacks - 




Tame dog • 


- boorooma. 


3Blaoks - 




Wild dog ■ 




One • 




- mart 


Emu - 


- dirrawan. 


Two - 




• boola. 


Black dnok - 


- kurrungl. 


Three • 




- kooleba. 


Wood duck ■ 


- ffOonnmbL 








Pelican 


goolamboolin. 


Four • 




boolar-boolar. 


Laughing jackaai 


1 ghoor-gha-gha. 


Father 




booba, poopa. 


Native companioi 


ibooralga. 


Mother 


ngumba, ham- 


White cockatoo 


- mori. 




ooth. 


Crow - 


- waro. 


Sister-Elder 


- bowadL 


Swan - 


boorh-boorh. 


„ Younger - 




Egg . 


kow. 


Brother^Elder - 


• tiade, tyar. 


Track of a foot • 


- wario. 


„ Youngei 


' kuUaminga, kul- 


Fish - - 


gooyah. 




lamL 


Lobster 


. (none here). 


A young ^f^mi 


berL 


Crayfish 


keerie. 


An old man 


- deiradooL 


Mosquito - 


moongin. 


An old woman • 




Fly - 


- boorooloo. 


A baby 


• kenegal. 


Snake - 


' neebi, neeri. 


A White man 


- wanda. 


The Blacks • 


- mum. 


Children 


• ghi, kenegaldooL 


A Blackf ellow 


• kew-ihr. 


Head • 


gha. 


A Black woman 


- yinnar. 


Eye - 


mil. 


Nose - 


- mooroo. 


Ear • 


m 


- binna. 



BARRABA. 



321 



No. ISh^BAEOLABA,— continued. 



Mouth 


- ngnL 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth 


- yeera. 


Hill - - 


- 


Hair of the head - kowgha. 


Wood 


- tooloo. 


Beard 
Thunder - 


- yari. 

- tooloomi. 


Stone - 


- yarrul. 


Grass - 


- goora. 


Camp • 


- wain, tuharma. 


Tongue 


- thalli. 


Yes . 


- kert. 


Stomach 


- moobaL 


No - . 


- kummil or gum- 


Breasts 


- ngamoor. 




mil. 


Thigh - 


- purru. 


I - - 




Foot - 


- dinna. 


You - 


- inda. 


Bone - 


- boora. 


Bark - 


- booroor. 


Blood - 


- gooi. 


Good - 


- murraba. 


Skin - 


- bowarh. 


Bad - - 


- kuggil. 


Eat - 


- wammo. 


Sweet- 


- warrooL 


Bowels 


- goon. 


Food - - 


- yula. 


Etxcrement * 


- goona. 


Hungry 


- yulegin. 


War-spear - 


- belar. 


Thirsty 


- koUingin. 


Beed-spear- 


- 


Eat - 


. theldinu. 


Wommera or 


boondi, moorolu. 


Sleep - 


- ngooraroo. 


throwing-stick 




Drink - 


- ngarroogi. 


Shield 


- bumm. 


Walk- - 


- yumbul, tarrowi. 


Tomahawk - 


. yandoo. 


See - 


- ngummile. 


Canoe - 


- 


Sit - 


- ngari. 


Sun - 


- yarri. 


Yesterday - 


- gimmandL 


Moon - 


-gilli. 


To-day 


- yelatho. 


Star - 


- meri. 


To-morrow - 


- noorookou. 


Light - 




Where are the menarimurri? 


Dark - - 


- boolooi, ngooroo. 


Blanks? 




Cold -. - 


- karil. 


I don't know 


- kummil nghi 


Heat - 


- ingU. 




wirrangillan. 


Day - 


- ngurmn. 


Plenty 


- woorook, booroo- 


Night 


' ngurroo. 




looba. 


Fire - 


- wi, kooyung. 


Big - - 


- boorool. 


Water 


- koUi, wallan. 


Little - 


- kindool. 


Smoke 


- thoo. 


Dead - 


- mooran, ballingi- 


Ground 


- town. 


By-and-by - 


- yeral. 


Wind- 


- myar. 


Come on 


- kiarbar. 


Bain - - 


- yooroo, wallan. 


Milk - . 


- 


God - . 


- bhiami. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


Ghosts 


- wanda, ghirmm- 


WUd turkey 


- 




bella. 


Wife - - 


m 


VOL. in. 


X 







322 



THS AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 181.— BOQABRIE. 



Bt Binoh of Maoistbatbs at Booabbib. 



Kangaroo • 


boondar. 


Opoasam • 


mutty. 


Tame dog - 


boorama. 


wad dog - 




MjIHti 


. tinoun. 


Black duok 


■ turugal. 


Wood duck 


. koonambL 


Pelican 


• nummbin. 


Laughing jackaaa 


kooyagigo. 


Native oompanioi 


i booralga. 


White cockatoo 


- mori. 


Crow - 


- meanga. 


Swan - 


• booromba. 


Egg - 


- pooremaL 


Track of a foot 


- dinna. 


Piflh - 


- gooya. 


Lobater 


- koorey. 


Crayfiah - 


- 


Moaquito - 


. mnnging. 


Fly - 


- onegal. 


Snake - 


- nnrri. 


The Blacka - 


- mum. 


A Black! ellow 


- 


A Black woman 


- enatt. 


Noae . - 


- mum. 



Hand • 


• murra. 


2 Blacka 




SBIacka 




One - 


- maL 


Two - 


- poolara. 


Three - 


- koolipa. 


Four • 


- poolera poolera. 


Father 


- poopadde. 


Mother 


- umpadde. 


Siater-Elder 


- powadde. 


,, Younger 


- 


Brother-Elder 


- thual. 


„ Younger 


A young man 


- koopera. 


An old man 


• munber. 


An old woman 


- yambuUe. 


A baby 


• koy. 


A White man 


- wanda 


Children - 


-kially. 


Head - 


- koka. 


Eye - 


- mill. 


Ear - - 


- binna. 





BOOABRIE. 






No. 181.— Booi 
- nigh. 


jxBJS'^-conUnued. 


Month 


Boomerang 




Teeth- 


- eela. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head 


• koka. 


Wood- 


- thullu. 


Beard- 


• yarrie. 


Stone - 


- yattle. 


Thunder - 


- thooroone. 


Camp - 


- walle. 


Grass - 


- gerrett. 


Yes • 


- kurough. 


Tongue 


- thuUe. 


No . 


- kummil. 


Stomach 


- mobil. 


I 


- nunna. 


Breasts 


■ berry. 


You - 


- indu. 


Thigh - 




Bark - 


- dunna. 


Foot - 


- thanna. 


Good • 


- miappali 


Bone - 


- bora. 


Ba^ - 


• kogil. 


Blood - 
Skin - 


• gooiti. 
- yuU. 


Sweet - 


- miappalL 


tS X 


ff 


Food - 


• thu. 


Fat 


• wamma. 






Bowels 


- goonna. 


Hungry 


- ungun. 


Excrement • 


- konna. 


Thirsty 


• kallegan. 


Wai^spear - 


- billar. 


Eat - 


• thalle. 


Beed-spear - 




Sleep • 


• babL 


Wommera or 


gut- thro. 


Drink- 


- nurrupee. 


throwing-stick 




Walk - 


- yanni. 


Shield - 


■ boorin. 


See - 


- namilL 


Tomahawk - 


- yondo. 


Sit - 


- naree. 


Canoe - 








^ 


• 


Yesterday • 


* 


Sun - 
Moon - 


■ yarrai. 
kiUe. 


To-day 


• murrago. 


Star - 


> mirri. 


To-morrow - 




light - 


yarraL 


Where are 1 


bhe tallamum? 


Dark - 


ngooroo. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 




I don*t knoTf 


r - konmul. 


Heat - 




Plenty 


• pootoola. 


Day - 


wooraroo. 


Big - - 




Night • 


noora. 


Little • 




Fire - - - 


wee. 


Dead • 


- ballunke. 


Water 


kalle 






Smoke 


thoo. 


By-ond-by - 


- yeerelda. 


Ground 


thone. 


Come on 


• thuganna. 


Wind - 


malt. 


Milk - - 


m 


Bain - 




Eaglehawk • 


- 


God - - - 




Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosto 


wantapaL 

X 


Wife - - 

2 


- 



323 



BOOK THE FIFTEENTH. 



BOOK THE FIFTEENTH. 

PREFATORY REMARKS. 

In the Culgoa vocabulary, which occurs in this book, Meyne 
will be noticed as the equivalent of BlackfellaWj and 
Mai-i-^n in the Wailrmn language; and turning back the 
reader will find Mearma on the Cape River, some 600 miles 
to the north, and Mean on the Belyando and Dawson in the 
same sense. 

In this book will be found a long and interesting 
vocabulary, which was drawn up more than thirty years 
ago, and forwarded to me by Mr. John Branch. In our 
young Australia, amidst the marvellous changes which are 
always taking place, one looks on a manuscript of thirty 
years with a feeling akin to that with which one regards 
a European document of half-a-dozen centuries. 

In the Hawkesbury Eiver and Brewarrina languages it 
will be observed that yesterday and Uhmorram are expressed 
by the same term, a not uncommon feature in our 
languages. 



\ 



328 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 182.— THE CULGOA RIVER 



By J. W. FooTT, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 


koola. 


Opoesnm • 


kooki. 


Tame dog - 


goondahL 


wad dog - 




Emu - 


woorin. 


Black duck - 


• 


Wood duck 


bnrga. 


Pelican 


yoolira. 


Laughing jackass 




Native qompanioi 


1 


White cockatoo - 




Crow - 


- waukin. 


Swan • 




Egg • 


- kuppin. 


Track of a foot • 


. tinna. 


Fish ■ 


• kooya. 


Lobster 




Crayfish 




Mosquito 


. bothine. 


Fly 


- mookine. 


Snake - 


- kalin. 


The Blacks - 




ABlackfellow • 


> meyne. 


A Black woman 


- mookln. 


Nose • 


• wooroo. 



Hand - 


■ myra. 


2 Blacks - 


kubbo meyne. 


3 Blacks 


- booragoolam 




meyne. 


One ' 


. yahumun. 


Two . 


• kubbo. 


Three- 


- booragoolam. 


Four - 


knbbo-kubbo. 


Father 


- buthine. 


Mother 


■ kya. 


Sister-Elder 


-bubba. 


„ Younger 




Brother-Elder • 


- moen. 


„ Voungei 




A young man 


• yarragoonya. 


An old man 


- watoon. 


An old woman 


- mookin. 


A baby 


- koothara. 


A White man 


• goen. 


Children 




Head - 


• bambo. 


Eye - - 


■ maeL 


Ear • 





THE CULGOA RIVER. 



329 



No. 182.~Thx Culgoa TSLprKBr-contkiMd. 


Month 


tha. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth - 


thirra. 


Fill - 


m 


Hair of the head- 


• mnUine. 


Wood- 


- wahn. 


Beard - 


' yerine. 


Stone- 


. 


Thunder 


• woolnoolno. 


Camp • 


- noora. 


Graas • 


• yowy. 


Yes - - 


- kyla. 


Tongae 


- tnlline. 


No - - 


- wulla. 


Stomach 


- toogoo. 


I - - 


- nathu. 


BreastB 


- nnmma. 


You ■ 


- yindoo. 


Thigh- 


- thurra. 


Bark - - 


- toomgoon. 


Foot - 


- ^!^^lln»- 


Good - 


- murringull. 


Bone - 


• minga. 


Bad - - 


• yooraL 


Blood - 


• gooine. 


Sweet - 


• 


Skin - 




Food . - 


• 


Fat - 


- tnndy. 


Hungry 


- kundool. 


Bowels 




Thirsty 


- 


Excrement- 




Eat - 


- thakoo. 


War-spear - 


- miUayra. 


Sleep - 


- woonadra. 


Beed-spear - 


- not used. 


Drink • 




Throwing-stick • 
Shield 


■ not used. 

■ hoorgoo. 


Walk - 


- yendra. 


Tomahawk - 


- thowin. 


See - 


' nengera. 


Canoe 


• toongoon. 


Sit - 


- nee endera. 


Sun - 


■ thoory. 


Yesterday - 


. kunyagoonda. 


Moon - 


keean. 


To-day 


- kunya. 


Star - 


- mirrin. 


To-morrow - 


- kunyabuttia. 


Light - 


- beea. 


Where are the 


theaminda 


Dark - 




Blacks? 


meynet 


Cold . - 


- munda. 


I don't know 


- wulla nahree. 


Heat - 


■ wirm. 


Plenty 


- thoo. 


Day - 




Big - - 


- thara. 


Night - 
Rre - 


■ wee. 


Little - 


-kidya. 


Water 


- nappa. 


Dead - - 


- booga. 


Smoke 


• thoo-ga. 


By-and-by - 


- hurray. 


Ground 




Come on 


- thinala. 


Wmd - - 


■ yerga. 


Milk - . 


■- 


Bain - 


• boordoo. 


Eaglehawk • 


- 


God - - ■ 




wad turkey 


- 


Ghosts 




Wife - - 


. 



330 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 



No. 183.— BREWARMNA AND BARWAN RIVER-THE WAILWUN 

LANGUAGE. 

Bt the BsNOH of MAQIflfTRATSS AT BbXWABBINA. 

It will be noticed that yeHerday and to-morrow are expressed by the 
same word. In the vocabolary of the Bogabrie language, No. 181, we had 
murri = the Blacks; in this language we have murrrU = kangaroo. 



Kangaroo - 


- murrui. 


Hand- 


- murra. 


OpoBsom - 


- kooragi. 


2BIacks - 


- 


Tame dog - 


- mirri. 


3 Blacks - 


- 


WUddog - 


- 


One - 


- mago. 


Emu - 


- ngoori. 


Two - 


• booUaga. 


Black duck - 


- buthumba. 


Three- 


- gulliba. 


Wood duck - 


. koonambL 


Four - 


- booUaga-bool- 


Pelican 


- wimga. 




laga. 


Laughing jackass koogabnrra. 


Father 


^9 

- bnba or baba. 


Native companion boralga. 


Mother 


- floonnee. 


White cockatoo 


- murral. 




o 


^^ 




Sister-Elder 


- kadi. 


Crow - 


- wargun. 






Swan - 


%0 

- burrima. 


,, Younger 


- gidurai. 


Egg - 


- kabbo. 


Brother-Elder 


- knkka. 


Track of a foot 


- thinna. 


„ Vounger kallumee. 


Fish - 


m 


A young man 


- yamba. 


Lobster 


' winga. 


An old man 


- dhnrrayunguL 


Crayfish 


- thumal. 


An old woman 


- mogeemar. 


Mosquito - 
Fly - 


- kommogin. 

- boomal. 


A baby - 


- girrra. 


If 


a « « 


A White man 


- wunda. 


Snake 


- dhurgh. 




• 


The Blacks- 


- dhoon. ' 


Children - 


- warroogar. 


A Blackfellow 


- mai-L 


Head - 


- kuboga. 


A Black woman 


. yennega. 


Eye - 


- miL 


Nose - 


-^mooroo. 


Ear - 


• gurrengara. 



BBEWARRINA AND BARWAN RIYEE. 



331 



No. 183. — ^Bbswabbina aitd Babwan Riysr— The Wailwuk Lakouagb — 



oomliiwutd. 



Mouth 

Teeth - 

Hair of the head 

Beard- 

Thunder 

Grans - 

Tongue 

Stomach 

Breasts 

Thigh 
Foot 
Bone 
Blood 
Skin 
Fat 
Bowels 
Eizcreinent * 
War-spear 
Reed-spear 
Throwing-stick 
Shield- 
Tomahawk 
Canoe - 
Sun - 
Moon - 
Star - 
Light - 
Dark - 
Cold - 
Heat - 
Day - 
Night - 
Fire - 
Water 
Smoke 
Ground 
Wind - 
Rain - 
God - 
Ghosts 



ngnndal. 
wirra. 
walla, 
geer. 
baukee. 
gurun. 
dullang. 
burru. 

nammo or ngum- 
moo. 
darra. 
thinna. 
nimba. 
goa. 
ubay. 
guthal. 
biboo. 
gonna, 
billar. 
warm. 

guUoya, muthau. 
murga. 
wagar. 
mungar. 
thunuL 
geewa. 
girila. 
yowir. 
boolool. 

thunni-walliL 

errier. 

boolool. 

wL 

kullee. 

boothoo. 

doogan. 

mur. 

gunda. 



Boomerang 




Hill 




Wood- 


- mutau. 


Stone - 


- garoon. 


Camp - 


- ngura. 


Yes - 


- minag. 


No - 


- wail. 


I 


• ngaau. 


You - 


- indoo. 


Bark • 


- ridgi. 


Good - 


- yadda. 


Bad - 


- wum* 


Sweet - 


- yadda. 


Food - 


• widga. 


Hungry 


- yarragm. 


Thirsty 




Eat • 


- dulla. 


Sleep - 




Drink 


- narungarL 


Walk ■ 


- unagrL 


See 


' nagarL 


Sit 


- wigirru. 


Yesterday • 


- kombara. 


To-day 




To-morrow - 


- kombara. 


Where are 


the wan doonama? 


Blacks? 




I don't kno^ 


1 


Plenty 


' wallu-wall. 


Big - - 


- 


Little - 


• boothug. 


Dead - 


- goomugi. 


By-and-by - 


- wonduga. 


Come on 


- kowL 


Milk - 


- 


Eaglehawk - 


- mullion. 


Wild turkey 


r 


Wife - 


- nguan. 



332 



THE AUSTRALIAN BAGS: 



No. 184.— THE CLARENCE RIVER. 



FOBWABDSD BT AliBZAin>BB BbUOB, EsQ. 

The aonnd of eh is common In thia vocabulary. 



Kangaroo • 




Hand • 


m 


OposBom 
Tame dog • 


gwiain. 
wanki. 


2 Blacks 

3 Blacks 


' boolaboo negarr. 
- boolaboo chararr 


WUddog . 
£Smu • 
Black dnok- 
Woodduck- 
Pelican 


ngakkum. 

ngoroin. 

maar. 

gilowal. 

yukar. 


One - 
Two - 
Three- 
Four - 


negarr. 

- charrar. 

• boolaboo. 

- boolaboo-charazr 

negarr. 

- boolaboo boola- 


Laughing jackau 


kakoon. 




boo. 


Native companioz 


1 bowlkum. 


Father 




White cockatoo - 


kaar. 




nilkooin. 


Crow - 




Mother 


- waiTong. 


Swan - 


ginnepL 


Sister-Elder 


- worojar. 


B;gg • 


kaaboin. 


„ Younger 


- nan. 


Track of a foot • 




Brother-Elder 




FiBh • - 


- woolooywen. 


„ Younger 


Lobster 




A young man 


- marookan. 


Crayfiah 


boorkoom. 


An old man 


- maapaang. 


Mosquito - 


. dinnilowan. 


An old woman 


- meeroong. 


Fly - - 


■ joonbon. 


A baby 


- chaapaan. 


Snake - 




A White man 


- yirrelli. 


The Blacks - 


- negarr. 


Children - 


- chaajamgin. 


A Blackf ellow 


- bykool, yeagarr. 


Head 


- baukine. 


A Black woman 


- meroong. 


Eye - 


- djeeon. 


Nose . 


- mow. 


Ear - - 


- binnang. 



THE GLABENGE BIVER. 



333 



No. 184.-^Thb Clasbncb "RrrKBr—eorUinued. 



Month 


- jeeang. 


Boomerang- 


- 


Teeth - 


• dirrang. 


Hill - . 


- 


Hair of the head • kow. 


Wood- 


- challee. 


Beard- - 


- yarrain. 


Stone - 


- charoo. 


Thunder - 


- mookarL 


Gamp - 


- ngoia. 


Graas - 


- wopang. 


Yes - - 


- ya-oo-i. 


Tongue 


• joonkoong. 


No - - 


. yookom. * 


Stomach 


- mo<mdoo. 


I - - 


- ngL 


Breasta 


- mirran. 


You - 


-boobla. 


Thigh 


- 


Bark - 


- yakoo. 


Foot - 


- djinnang. 


Good - - 


- bowkal. 


Bone - 


- dtarigan. 


Bad - 


- tchang. 


Blood- 


. goomar. 


Sweet - 


' - darooi. 


Skin • 


• 


Food - 


- yai-i-go. 


Fat - 


- kombang. 


Hungry 


- moolaroo. 


Bowels 


- choolpa. 


Thirsty 


- yaloinkin. 


Excrement - 


- goonang. 


Eat - 


- ylyiego. 


War-spear - 


- jnan. 


Sleep - 


- unala. 


Beed-spear • 


- kommi. 


Drink- - 


- ngabago. 


Throwing-stick 


- 


Walk- - 


- yangalala. 


Shield 


- bnkka. 


See - - 


- nala. 


Tomahawk • 
Canoe - 


- wakkan. 

- bakool, wolloo. 


Sit - - 


- yeangala. 


Sun - 


- yalkan. 


Yesterday - 


- ngobo. 


Moon - 


- kibboom. 


To-day 


- baiyain. 


Star - 


- willeriankin. 


To-morrow - 


- chaloo. 


Tifght - 


- mikan. 


Where are 


the yillabykoUt 


Dark- 


- ngakkoorL 


Bhicksr 




Cold - - 


- warring. 


I don't know 


- yookom ngi 


Heat - 


- witohomerL 




kaurigaU. 


Day - 


- yarraki. 


Plenty 


- 


Night - - 


- ngakquon. 


Big - - 


-djirri. 


Fire - 


- wyber, wakki. 


little- 


- birrang. 


Water 


- koong. 


Dead - 


- balaan. 


Smoke 


- ngarraquoin. 


By-and-by - 


- youe. 


Ground 


- ngiol. 


Come on - 


- yaaki. 


Wind- 


- booriyooein. 


Milk - - 


- 


Bun - - 


- bookooL 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


. 


Wife - - 


- 



334 



THE AUSTRALIAN BAGS : 



No. 185.— THE LOWER MACLEAY RIVER. 

Bt Chabuu Spkhckb, Ea^ 

Thb following specimen of the language of the lower part of 
the Macleay (some of the words of which resemble those in 
nse on the Macqnarie and Manning Rivers) was forwarded to 
me hj Mr. Charles Spencer through the Bench of Magistrates 
at the Macleay. Glass-marriage exists in this locality. The 
following are names of persons : — Males : Koonal, Bilpil, 
Tirriwil, Karra-karra, Komnni, Wobbra, Dalower = rain- 
bow, Meedure = wall-eyed, Teggi-mookoo = deaf, and Dill- 
mnrree = eyebrows. Females: Meetur, Weenan, Kalla, 
Ekoro, Barrab, Yellang-bangi, and Geami. 





Names of 


A Family. 




Wobbra - 
Oomboogiwenni 
Menniarki - 


- the husband. 

- the wife. 

- female child. 


Willnnm - 
Moongrenni 


- female child 

- male child. 




Akotheb 


Familt. 




Kominm - 
Toroogoro - 
Yemb-arrin 


. the husband. 
- the wife, 
-girl. 


Merrowi 
Karra-karra 


- girL 

- boy. 




No. 185.-- Addi 


TioNAL Words. 




Whale 


• kallone. 


Mackerel - 


- yalioorL 


Shark 


- wirrewy. 


Flathead - 


- ugai. 


Schnapper - 


- geangeree. 


Blackfish - 


- warrakang. 


Barracoota - 


- kyena. 


Mullet (salt- 


mandara. 


Perch 


- maton. 


water) 




Eel - 


- korrikkan. 


MuUet (fresh- 


kowong. 


Sting-ray - 


- billon. 


water) 




Crab - 


• karra. 


Porpoise - 


- badaroo. 


Shrimp 


- dokkin. 


Oockle 


- aUi. 


Whiting - 


- dooroowin. 


Bream 


- kooeri. 



THE LOWER MAGLEAY RIVER. 



335 



No. 185.— Additional Wg&d^— continued. 



Jewfish 
FUh-spear - 

Uncle - 

Aunt - 

Cousin 

All small birdfl 

Teal - 

Pigeon (bronze- 
winged) 

Green pigeon 

Wonga-wonga 
pigeon 

Flock pigeon 

Redbill 

Bmsh turkey 

Lyrebird 

Red - 

Black - 

White 

Iguana 

Native cat - 

Horse - 

Flying fox - 

Native bear 

Frog - 

Black snake 

Cockchafer - 

Neck - 

Throat 

Lips - 

Jaws - 

Chin - 

Collar-bone * 

Back • 

Heart - 

Fingers 

Forearm 

Arm - 

Shoulder - 
Leg 



- allooin. 

- kallkarro, kum- 

mi-mootikin. 

- kandoo. 

- koondi. 

- kan. 

. teebin. 

• pikoro-pikoro. 
barboo. 

- moorooa. 
kammoori. 

- buttowong. 

- wUbong. 

- ooroowin. 

• narran. 

- gerree-gerr^e. 

- koorool-koorool. 

- burrapine. 

- men. 

- dooleum. 

- karr. 

- ballowrL 

- yarri. 

- yattangun. 

• mootoo. 

- dirrigoon. 

- yukooL 

- koogooroo. 

- wittoo. 

- andar. 

- kottin. 

• kal. 

- kerri, moonon. 

- boonoo. 

- yukun. 

- tallara. 

- koopay. 

- kowarrin* 

- ooreroo. 



Toes - - - ukoro. 
Knee - - pingaroo, goo- 

ton. 
Thigh (outside) - dirray. 

- billa. 

- doogay. 

- murroo. 



„ (inside) 
Ham - 
Brains 
Elbow 
Ankle 

Calf of the leg 
Eyebrows - 
Tail of bird 
Evening 
Boat - 
Vessel 
Mast • 
Blind - 
Deaf - 
Tobacco-pipe 
This - 
That - 

Young woman 
Male orphan 
Female orphan 
Hunchback 

Nonsense I - 
Fishing net 
Deaf adder - 



- kooroong. 

- kol, welbi-welbi. 

- ooloo. 

- dilmurree. 

- doon. 

- beemaL 

- olpino. 

- marendoi. 

- wingi-wingi. 
meemookoo. 
teggimookoo. 
bubbolo. 
ditti. 
windi 
golbon. 
nappine. 
bolbi. 
pikilka, pikiloo- 

too. 

- goorembattil 

- werral. 

- hammL 
He (or she) sleeps nannoonba. 
I want to sleep - nannoolow. 
Qo to sleep - - inde nangir. 
Good-by - innittiay. 
Whero are you warrunga inde ? 

going? 

- kogoil damma. 
. demmenba. 

- karbyoogoin. 

- yoomenerai inde. 
wenoondi 

manalli? 



Come and eat 
I have eaten . 
I have drunk 
Qo away 
When will yon 
return? 



} 



336 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 186.— THE LOWER MACLEAT RIVER. 



KaDgunoo - 


- womboin. 


Hand - 


. yemmi. 


OpoBBom - 


- witto, wille. 


2 Blacks - 


- keori bolodi. 


Tame dog - 


- mirre. 


3 Blacks - 


- koori arkam- 


wad dog - 


- kykum. 




barra. 


Emu - 


M 


One - - 


- wardo. 


Black duck 


- maragan. 


Two - 


-bolodL 


Wood duck 


- gooarlL 


Three- 


- arkambaira. 


Pelican 


. menako. 










Four - 


s 


Laughing jackass kargooka. 
Native companion kooyerakan. 


Father 


- papa, miander. 


White cockatoo 


- kerrebi. 


Mother 


- nangooi narki. 


Crow - 






nuki. 


Swan - 


. arbootero. 


Sister-Elder 


- narbooe. 


Egg - 


- karbnl. 


„ Younger 


- towera. 


Track of a foot 


- yoppong. 


Brother-Elder 


- bingi. 


Pish - - 


- 


II Younger 


Lobster 


- 


A young man 


- marangaL 


Crayfish - 


- kottingerL 


An old man 


- karakundan. 


Mosquito - 


• mungin. 


An old woman 


. ullarki 


Fly - 


- booroolong. 


A baby - 


- talL 


Snake 


• (no general name) 


A White man 


- bamibo. 


The Blacks • 


- koori, molong. 


Children - 


- talL 


A Blackf ellow 


- koori. 


Head - 


- bokk|bo. 


A Black woman 


- myangri. 


Eye - 


- Tni. 


Nose - - 


- ammoro. 


Ear - - 


- tegt 



THE LOWER MACLEAY RIVER. 



337 



No. 

Moath 
Teeth - 

Hair of the head- 
Beard 

Thunder - 
Grass - - - 
Tongae 
Stomach 
Breasts 
Thigh 
Foot - 

Bone - - - 
Blood- 
Sldn - 
Fat - - - 

Bowels 
Excrement • 
War-spear - 
Reed-spear - 
Wommera or 
throwing-stick 

Shield 

Tomahawk - 

Canoe 

Snn - 

Moon - 

Star - 

Light - 

Dark - 

Cold - 

Heat - 

Day - 

Night - 

Fire - - - 

Water 

Smoke 

Ground 

Wind - 

Rain - - - 

God - 

Ghosts 

VOL. m. 



185.^LowEB Maglbat BjYza^—cotUmued. 

Boomerang - - kowiL 



tirn. 
meggL 
yaggiri. 
mooroongai. 
borral. 
dalline. 
pingil. 
nobbong. 
ooreroo. 
dinde. 
embing. 
kangara. 
yettoina. 
mebong, noora, 
wommo. 
boonong. 
koomboing. 
knmmi, loo-oi. 
yooma. 
ookorowba. 

koonmir. 

bibi, boggo. 

woi. 

doorookein. 

gitten. 

gelleneroo. 

gelein. 

oongen. 

dallang. 

booyoobarra. 

oongen. 

gooyeL 

koong. 

doong. 

bargi. 

booron. 

kergi. 



HiU - 
Wood 
Stone - 
Camp - 
Yes - 
No - 
I 

You - 
Bark - 
Good - 
Bad - 
Sweet - 



- kereki, 

- targoo. 

- wattoo-garin. 

- ya- 

- koklmbo. 

- maiyai, eaka. 

- inde. 

- wattoon. 

- margook. 

- dolo, narko. 

- kangarang. 



Food (vegetable) wiggi. 



„ (animal) 


- baggara. 


Hungry 


- gegelligan. 


Thirsty 


- karbyoo. 


Eat - 


- 


Sleep - 


- 


Drink- - 


* 


Walk- - 


- 


See - 


- 


Sit - - 


- 


Yesterday - 


- oonoon. 


To-day 


- yoorin. 


To-morrow - 


- undarbo. 


Where are the kooriwa? 


Blacks? 




I don't know 


- achitta. 


Plenty 


- delemba. 


Big - - 


- yarriki. 


Little - 


- bootte. 


Dead - 


- bookargen. 


By-and-by - 


- koombigL 


Come on - 


- kogoi. 


Milk - 


- 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


WUd turkey 


- 


Wife - 


- 



338 THE AUSTRALIAK RAGE: 



No. 186.— PORT MACQUARIE. 

Bt John Branch, Esq. 

The following vocabulary and long list of Additional Words 
were forwarded to me by Mr. John Branch. The docmnent 
from which I have transcribed them, that gentleman informs 
me, is now more than thirty years old, and, to judge from the 
clearly written text, seems to have been compiled with much 
care. Who the painstaking collector was I am not aware, but 
the words, as Mr. Branch remarks and as the manuscript 
itself makes evident, are taken indiscriminately from several 
neighbouring dialects. The principal portion of them, how- 
ever, belong to the Bripi or Port Macquarie tongue. 

Amongst the Additional Words the ethnologist will meet 
with several which are interesting, and some invented for 
European objects, &c., such as boongenaiy to shoot or strike 
with a gun. Then we have boongor or boonyar^ to strike^ 
and bongalar^ to Jighty which reminds one of a similar word 
in Western Australia, as well as of the common origin of 
our languages. We find names, too, for the principal 
colors. There are terms also expressive of mental emotions, 
such as fear, joy, sorrow, jealousy, treachery, greediness, and 
so on. We are also led to notice that, though generally 
wealthy in substantives, and more plentifully supplied than 
ourselves with names for animals and plants, the tribes 
which speak this language have words with several mean- 
ings. Thus, tenhwin signifies indifferently brains^ marrow^ 



PORT MACTQUABIE. 330 

nmeus from the nossj matter ^ fly-blowsy and maggots. The 
designation of these particular objects by a single term I 
have noticed in other Australian languages, and believe it 
to be general. 

The occurrence of the sound of the letter v is very 
common in this language. 



T2 



340 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 



Kangaroo • 


- warperer (fe- 


Hand - 


^ 




Opossum • 


male), wom- 
boine. 
• bango,wotto, 
wutting. 


2 Blacks 

3 Blacks 
One - 


- 


• warool, woiyel. 


Tame dog - 


• mokaa, kookang. 






wartho. 


wad dog - 
Emu - 
Black dack- 


- meni. 

m 

- mnmingi. 


Two - 

Three- 


m 


- blanro, blorable, 

- blarvo-warooL 


Wood duck- 


• 


Four - 


- 


- blanro-blarvo. 


Pelican 


- 


Father 


- 


• beanger, be-er. 


Laughing jackass kocundy, karko. 


Mother 


- 


- nango, nigegur. 


Native compani< 


>n 






niyeri 
- narrendo. 


White cockatoo 
Crow - 


• carapii 
- warcon. 


Sister-Elder 


Swan - 


- kolewonnia. 


„ Younger 


- owaru, airiendo. 


Egg - - 


- kappooe. 


Brother-Elder 


- bingarro. 


Track of a foot 
Fish - 
Lobster 


- 


A young 


Younger 

man - caywarar, won- 


Crayfish - 
Mosquito - 


.. yingar. 

• cooperl, non- 


An old man 


garar. 
- bootoen. 


Fly - - 
Snake - 


gorar. 

- barrayler, burro- 
long. 

• dungen. 


An old woman 

A baby 

A White man 


- durrogan. 

- cappargo, tallL 


TheBlacks- 


- 


ChUdren 


- 


- 


A Blackf ellow 


- korry, kory. 


Head- 


. 


• borr, wallong. 


A Black woman 
Nose - 


- kalaban, murri- 

kin, murkin. 
. noffffera, namro, 


Eye - 
Ear - 


- 


- mee. 

- morkko, pinna- 




nang. 






kon. 



PORT MACQUARIB. 



841 



No. 186.— PoBT Maoqvarie— continued. 



Month 


- kalerer. 


Boomerang - 


- barragan, barra- 


Teeth - 


. 




can. 


Hair of the head- dlrring, morray. 


Hill - . 


- bocal, yoogo. 


Beard- 


- yerang. 


Wood (also iron) carrumun, cam- 


Thunder - 


- malloo. 




ban, daddro. 


GrasB - 


- murrang. 


Stone - 


- buckan. 


Tongue 


- t^-^^*^". 


Camp- 


- mooray. 


Stomach - 


- bittun, mlngee, 


XT 


gokeray. 




togul. 


xee - 


- yor, yeary, 


Breasts 


- burring, nappuk. 


No - . 
I - - 

You - . 


yaven. 


Thigh 
Foot - 


- darry, ooloo. 

- tinner. 


- korang. 

- iya, mee, motto. 

- inder, indo. 


Bone - 


• 


Bark - 


. cammg, watton. 


Blood - 


- kungara, mar- 


Good - 


- marroong. 




rong. 


Bad - - 


- burrowang. 


Skin - 


- kooroo, gorron. 




mooneyang, 


Pat - 






wombon. 


Bowela 


. konung, pindi- 


Sweet - 


- greekar, gillee. 




vung. 


Food - 


- tammar. 


Szcrement - 


- konung. 


Hungry 


- cobbree, kine, 


War-epear - 
Beed-epear- 


- kumi. 


Thirsty 

Eat - 


githelgin. 

- cappii. 

- tnnneller, tuck- 


Wommera or 
throwing-stick 




Sleep - 


enay, tammar. 
- brickelar. 


Shield 


- korrail, kim- 


Drink - 


- bittar, umbiL 




mary. 


Walk- - 


- munnar. 


Tomahawk - 


-bibL 


See - 




Canoe- 


- 


Sit - 


- innaar. 


Sun - 


- eurokar, tomee, 


Yesterday - 


- bemarar. 




tocan. 


To-day 


• bungL 


Moon - 


- killen. 


To-morrow - 


- botongor, 


Star - 
Light - 


- merring, wopo. 
. parvargan. 


cumbergor, 
undarwo. 
Where are the 


Bark - 


- buttons, brimi, 
koombar. 


Blacks? 
I don't know 




Cold - . 

TT A. 


- tackrar. 


Plenty 


- delambang. 


Heat - 


■ 




marrowang. 


Day - 


- 




marroambo. 


Night - 


- brfmi. 


Big - . 


• tuckal, kattan, 


Fire - 


- kouyel, koyel. 




wootow. 


Water 


- batto, bardo. 


Little - 


- mitgey, mittee. 


Smoke 


- doong. 


Dead - - 


- baleler. 


Ground 


- hurray. 


By-and-by - 


- 


Wmd- - 


- bewal. 


Come on 


- kowie, koggi. 


Bain - - 


- kooray, moo- 


MUk - 


- nappung. 




korar. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


Ck)d - . 


- goonyoorie. 


Wild turkey 


- murrowan. 


Ghosts 


- goin. 


Wife - - 


. mongundre. 



342 



THE AUSTRALIAN BAGB: 



No. 180.— Additional Wobds. 



AiTopolone- 


. qaaiL 


Booner 


- aeabeach* 


Armong 


■ give. 


Barmmar • 


- to nntie, loose. 


Armong wooker 


• giyetome. 


Bookaroorar 


00 - yellow. 


Allammar - 


- to feel. 


Boonmar • 


- pull tight. 


Allo-omber • 


• yon and I, or be- 


Booooimar - 


- alack, or let go. 




tween us. 


Bnngial 


- new. 


Annomber • 


- mine. 


Boottoen 


- old. 


Arting 


thick. 


Bing - 


- pure solid honey. 


Aree moriller 


• go away. 


Buiran 


- oordamadeof 


Booro carxillay 


take the line and 




hair. 


mnaner alti 


catch some 


Bongar 


- to beat. 




perch. 


Boculbe 


- aeed of oak-tree. 


Bing - 


piga. 


Burrowang - 


- a dead log. 


Boongar 


to kill or strike. 


Burrann 


- daylight. 


BooDgar dangen • 




Bittar - 


. drink. 


Bookar, boyaar • 


• toatink. 


Boyye- 


- breathe. 


Boton • 


black. 


Bucartucal • 


- very angry. 


Botongan • 


- the day after to- 


Borri - 


- boy. 




morrow. 


Batto biller 


- river water. 


Bayal bongenayo' 


' fire the gun. 


Bunbun or bi 


mbul a path. 


Bocayeaeller mar' 


• doae the hand. 


Bucar- 


- angry. 


Booton ooreyler • 


■ bring the net. 


Bingi - 


• oouain. 


Bowerow - 


• bald head. 


Bottong 


- dirty. 


Birrar • 


' sweat. 


BoU - • 


- to-morrow morn- 


Boy-boy 


- tired. 




ing. 


Bittongan - 


a bellyful. 


Bnngi - 


- midday. 


Bookar 


■ sore, alck. 


Bimi - 


- night, dark. 


Bongalar - 


to fight, or to 


Bearlay 


- to speak or talk 




paint before a 




with. 




fight. 


Barry - 


- hut, house. 


Binderoong - 


- net made of hair 


Bundarar • 


• wallaby. 




or fur worn 


Bimble 


- a grave. 




round the fore- 


Beammar • 


- to bury. 




head. 


Booton 


- net. 


Boots- 


' toamoke. 


Bittar- 


- drink. 


Brenalyer • 


- to throw. 


Bubalo 


- tobacco-pipe. 


Bittar inder 


• you drink. 


Bamby 


- eel. 


Barrayler - 


• going away. 


Bocro - 


- fishing net. 


Batto-tncal - 


' high-water. 


Bumbongar- 


- tokisa. 


BiUo . 


- ating-ray. 


Burri-ee-ler- 


- toaing. 


Boongenaye 


• toahoot. 


Bittrow 


• reeda. 



PORT MAOQUARIE. 



343 



Ko. 186. — Additional Wobds — continued. 



Bale - 


- no. 


Bararbereler 


- the crack of a 


Bayter 


- to spit. 




whip. 


Bittrow 


- necklace made of 


Bingy 


- beeswax. 




reedfl cut into 


Borti - 


- let it be. 




short lengths 


Boorungryban 


- myrtle-tree. 




and strung. 


Bongan 


- cricket. 


Bongon 


- a beetle. 


Burray-gorarar 


- a long way. 


Bullim-b(ui - 


- stripes of skin 


Bongerayler 


- to fight. 




which depended 


Buckar-arkin 


- very saucy. 




from the girdles 


Batto-atto • 


- very wet. 




of the men both 


Boolooboolo 


- dry. 




before and be- 


Bot-toll-o-reelei 


- report of a gun. 




hind; seldom 


Baleambo, bal- 


not dead, living 




worn, except at 


cambo 






oorroborees. 


BiUer- 


- river. 


Brigryban - 


• ironbark-tree. 


Briwinalyer 


• to boU or cook. 


Borri-worrigar i 
Borri mingegar ) 


pregnant. 


Bugee - 
Bunbiergal • 


- jump. 

- sulky. 


Botongaroo- 


• early in the 


Botongan • 


• half-caste. 




morning. 


Burraywill - 


- blanket. 


BJngarro war ? ■ 


• where is my 


Baang- 


• back. 




brother ? 


Battotucal • 


- a flood. 


Bowran, boonan • 


- parrot. 


Bailpandover 


- to come from 


Beerin 


bread. 




Bailpan. 


Bamg- 


back. 


Bottawbootan 


- black snake. 


Bocar - 


' to go inside or 


Balling 


- flying squirrel. 




dive. 


BiUambang- 


- swamp-oak. 


Barwar 


shadow. 


Barpingbang 


- stinging. 


Bockoi 


- short. 


Buckawucker 


- curly hair. 


Berringgar \ 
Bringar / 


sunset. 


Bullii - 


• wattle-tree 
grubs. 


Ban - 


- tree. 


Bucker 


- knee. 


Bondalyer - 


- to break. 


Bunyeller - 


■ to kill. 


Bindy - 


- deep water. 


Bittungan - 


- beUyful 


Bootul 


report of a gun. 


Buckan 


• iron or stone. 


Banbaliung- 


don't talk. 


Boattee 


- a smell. 


Burrieliung 


- don*t sing. 


Booke-booke 


- lazy. 


Bungan 


- grasshopper. 


Bickel 


- backbone. 


Boothoong • 


■ soft, easy. 


Bombay 


- a blow. 


Burrowong • 


- nasty, no good. 


Carr - 


- horse. 


Bitoler 


to bite. 


Cowan-nerrar 


- bullock. 



044 


THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 






No. 186.— Additional Word*— conOiwied. 


Calcrow 


- chin. 


Cnlker 


. talL 


Calliwer 


- to climb. 


Carropoim • 


- kangaroo-rat. 


Caxapan 


- to make nets. 


Gappine 


• honey. 


Cow-winder 


- the other side. 


Gangervan - 


- grapes. 


Gappo-gan • 


- com. 


Cowerang • 


- a comb. 


Cottwoie - 


- one with little 


Cutherwye - 


- leayes. 




finger oif. 


Cooroo 


- kangaroo-akin 


Corain 


• finger and toe 




rug. 




nailfl. 


Cullar, capo 


- sheep. 


Caronemeller 


- to scratch. 


Cambar mokin 


- call the dogs. 


Coonming, coon 


I- a cough or cold. 


Gungalyer - 


- to stop a spear 


uong 






with the shield. 


Gooricki 


- a fern. 


Corrongon * 


- grandmother. 


Carpee 


• to throw. 


Garpeeler carr 


- thrown by a 


Cowering 


• hat 




horse. 


Cntcreller - 


- to break into 


Cottan-bimbing 


- cabbage-tree. 




bits. 


Gopar- 


- arm below elbow. 


Cuttageller- 


- to fall down. 


Coorroong • 


- wrist. 


Cappogan con- 


to pull com. 


Carroongy - 


• jump. 


gayler 




Gurreegen - 


• crack the fingers. 


Cowiebarrego 


- come into the 


Cunggi 


- pillow. 




hut. 


Gayparrerkin 


• a period when 


CoDgayler, cnngar to break. 




women are for- 


Cotto-gang • 


- lame. 




bidden to eat 


Crackor 


' stop. 




kangaroo. 


Copalaa 


• 
- make haste. 


CowiUevitamber 


• Mount Gross. 


Coyel mucker 


- cut firewood. 


Galarar tulcar 


• mouth parched. 


Cando, oowandc 


i • uncle. 


Garrumbang 




Cooler 


- angry. 


Gamban 


' firewood. 


Gubome 


• big. 


Carrumun - ' 




Carambo pata- 


no food. 


Combo 


- ankle. 


limbo 




Cuttang 


- spittle. 


Cumbergor - 


- sunrise. 


Colliprer • 


- net round fore- 


Cookambingal 


- a stranger. 


Gamgon 


head. 
- navel. 


Caparar 


■ boy. 


Crarvrm 


• go over the hill. 


Cookee 


- calabash. 


Gurillay, canny 


^7 

- bring. 


Copang 


- a tree, the leaves 


Gulpeeler - 


- to roost. 




of which are 


Gorambo nuriam 


- I have not heard. 




used to poison 


bo 






fiflh. 


Couyel-borler 


- a common fire at 


Carramar - 


- shade of trees. 




a camp. 



PORT MAOQUABIE. 



345 



No. 186.— Additional WoRDO-'Continued, 



Corrazig beringar 


- no bread. 


Garkeneller 


- nettle. 


Calcrow 


- chin. 


Guttang 


- sand. 


Cootray 


• angry. 


Gonang-worang 


- bashful. 


Conangwerang 


• afraid. 


Gowarrar - 


- sort of fern-tree. 


Coggi - 


■ come here. 


Garrindarr - 


■ light (not heavy). 


Corambste - 


• lies. 


Gumber, cumbay 


- come here. 


CaUaban, cnlyang 


[ woman. 


ler 




Cmmang 


make haste. 


Goolongoung 


- elbow. 


Cnimang gethel- 


quick ! I am 


Denar* gomanner come to dinner. 


gin 


hungry. 


Dungen 


- to shed tears. 


Canunwnmbiller 


fast asleep. 


Doong 


■ smoke. 


Gungarlmayler • 


- a camp in which 


Delambang - 


- a great many. 




all stop together. 


Dowan 


• scrub-bird. 


Condiyang - 


mahogany-tree. 


Dalcome 


- pain. 


Gotemerbang 


box-tree. 


Dungaler - 


to prick. 


Garrambang 


oak-tree. 


Dalemeri - 


- eyelids. 


Cocnmbang 


fig-tree. 


Biggicon 


■ nails of toes and 


Goorar 


turtle. 




hands. 


CarreegaybaDg • 


hardwood. 


Drmgal 


cry. 


Cormmbattang - 


pretend, to lie. 


Drower 


- centipede. 


Curran 


feathers, wings 


Dungarring 


■ right hand. 




of birds. 


Dongaa 


■ iguana. 


Cattageller 


fall down. 


Doorally 


- fight. 


Cnrreepayler 


• to sew. 


Dingayler - 


- moonlight. 


Cooroo cnrree- 


to sew skins to- 


Birring gorarrar 


- long hair. 


payler 


gether. 


Dirring bocoi 


- short hair. 


Gamigo mnnnar - 


to get spears. 


Birring ingalyer • 


- curly hair. 


Garr windarr 


the horses on the 


Birring turrar 


- straight hair. 




wheat. 


Birring wattem 


- light hair. 


Gooyel moonaiig • 


a bad fire. 


Boorroongan 


• whale. 


GooTOopan - 


mist or fog. 


Bilwirrar - 


- grasshopper. 


Gar inda 


you carry. 


Greekar 


- sweet. 


GaleTreeler 


to spill. 


Gillee - 


Ught. 


Golangarban 


beech-tree. 


Gillee mamer 


■ bring a light. 


GallergaUing 


drowned. 


Gonalay 


■ to evacuate. 


Garry-morong 


to cut till blood 


Gonel-gonel 


- lies. 




comes. 


Gtoree - 


- face. 


Gaypar 


wipe. 


Gootong 


■ knee. 


Garm - 


salmon (native). 


Gong - 


• river. 


Goparar 


porpoise. 


Goorarar - 


tall. 



* Denar, aboriginal pronunciation of dinner. 



346 



THB AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



Ko. 188.— ADDmoNAL Wom m cctHmumJ . 



GooDiin 


• fUah. 


Ktndl - 


• lan^ 


Tydney-gftiTcr 


- from Sydney. 


Kindayler - 


- to laugh. 


Tydney-go - 


• to Sydney. 


Kindeynng • 




Go-cnmlMtyler 


• to throw fpeuB. 


Kortey 


- to cati 




- coward. 


Kortey diggioon 


- to cut ane*s nails. 




- a male, from the 




- tooook. 




time he can walk 


Kallender - 


- knife. 




until he enten 


Kaiai- 


- sexual desire. 




the claas, or ta 


Kai^eambo- 


- raw, underdone. 




called Caypar- 


Karkeeler - 


- done, cooked 




rer. 


Kindowen - 


- lies. 


Qreekar 


• aweetb 


Kindowiambo 


you lie. 




- fear. 


inder 






don't yon be 




- kangaroo-rat. 


inder 


frightened. 




- to shake. 


Goropean - 


- frog. 


Kindi-tucal 


- a hearty laugh. 


Qamber mokin 


• call the dogs. 


Ejrri-wong - 


- a magpie. 


Gforree-go 


• toGorree. 


Kinber kallender sharpen the 


Gorry • 


- aa 




knife. 


Qongorgang 


• very : for in- 


JELiUinggam 


• moonlight. 




stance — ootto- 


Karkeeler • 


- a smart. 




gang, very sick; 


Kain - 


. a small sort of 




tacalgong, yery 




ant. 


Inder - 
Inder murri- 
kengen? 
Inder marthoom 


large; mittey- 
gang, very 

- you. 

(are) you mar- 
ried? 

- you (I) love; the 

term used by a 
man when ad- 
dressing a wo- 


Kindilan 

Kulkayler - 

Kackeler 

Kackeambo 

Kaylung 

Konnoo-ung 

Kreeley 

Killang • 


• joyful, merry, 

laughing. 

- wrong. 

- ripe. 

- unripe. 

• a cough or ooM. 
■ carry. 

- armpit 




man. Another 


KarkeneUer 


- nettle. 




term is used by 


Korrikon • 


- toadfish. 




a woman when 


Mottrow - 


- forehead. 




addressing a 


Marthoom - 


- a good fellow. 


lUamor 
Kindr^ 


man. 
• to feel. 
- a term of endear- 


Mickey - lightning. 
Manny, maoomb- paddimellon. 




ment used by a 
female to a 


Mil 

Mamer 


- zace. 

• bring, take. 




female. 


Mingen 


• liver. 



PORT MAOQUABIE. 



847 





No. 180.— Additional Wobds— eon<fniM<2. 


Mollaroo - 


• long ago. 


Mnrrikin wom- 


a bad woman. 


Mingegrbori 


- pregnant. 


bonder 




Merring 


• sharp. 


Merri - 


- go. 


Mmumbang 


- wattle. 


MoUong 


- tide coming in. 


Macka 


- quiok. 


Mittianniller 


- low water. 


Munno 


- looBe. 


Mackoro - 


- mullet. 


Moocorar - 


- rain. 


Mnrrang-wnrrang green. 


Mingey 


- sick. 


Minter-minter 


• tie a knot. 


Marroong - 


- beautifal^ Bonndy 


Mee-bottong 


- dark eyes. 




not decayed. 


Mii marroong 


- a pretty face. 


Marroong morkin a nice little 


Mee wattem 


- light eyes. 


mitgay 


woman. 


Mooloong • 


• to rab the person 


Mittem 


• tree. 




with charcoal 


Mureeler 


- go. 




when in mourn- 


Minnar? 


- what do you Bay? 




ing. 




what IB that? 


Mii wombon 


- ugly face. 


Mondal 


- net. 


Mackang 


- lizard. 


Mallerro 


- Borrow. 


Mnrrikin corang - not married. 


Mioargo? • 


- where are you 


Murrikingen 


• married. 




going? 


Mailcon 


• finger and toe 


Movan 


- wild raspberries. 




nails. 


Manner 


• walk. 


Morlcnn 


• spider. 


Mnllindar • 


- taste. 


Momen 


- blind. 


Mollero 


- Bhed tears. 


Nevalay 


- blow the nose. 


Mongnndre 


- wife. 


Norriambo - 


- (have) not heard. 


Mong - 


• backside. 


Notto norriangan I don*t know. 


Marrong 


- clean. 


Niyerl nackerl look! 


Morroorang 


- wicked. 


narker! 




Mnlloman • 


- the sea. 


Neeer-arkin 


- blind of one eye. 


MonxHwomban 


- deaf. 


o 


•r 


Munder 


- cheek. 


Nnrrangyim 


- think. 


Mooler 


- to Yomit. 


Nnmar 


• feel. 


Moolay 


- dirty. 


Narowerr - 


- sorrow. 


Moondi 


• ashes. 


Nowerr 


- loins. 


Mannoroam 


• cabbage-tree. 


Narrowen - 


- kidney. 


Mnrroi 


- qniet. 


Nurraymayler 


- sick in the 


Morrooee - 


- brains, marrow. 




stomach. 


Myander - 


- in front. 


NuDayer - 


- to vomit. 


Mnrromedayler 


- to snore. 


Nnrrayler - 


- to hear. 


Mary - 


- a hole in the 


Nnmmgar - 


- listen. 




ground, a room. 


Nammgrar 


• drunk. 



348 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 180.— Addxtiokal WoTa»-~eontwued, 



Nappnnganer * - 


young woman. 


Nuckumballung • 


thumb. 


Nimayler - 


to pinch. 


Nuckam mittey - 


little finger. 


Namdo 


who. 


Nuckam - 


- finger. 


Nangray, nunger 


lie down. 


Nameyo 


- take care. 


Narray 


nearly, close to. 


Nameyo tourl- 


- take care (of a) 


Namingar - 


listen. 


tourl 


slip. 


Naming 


name. 


Okellar - • 


• to bay or ex- 


Norang 






change. 


Ningree 


jealous. 


Ooner 


• elbow. 


Nocang 


cow, honey-bee. 


Okear 


give. 


Nacker cowie 


oome (and) see. 


Ohi - - - 


this, 


Newtar 


taste. 


Poneller, ponayler to kill. 


Nuayler 


to kick. 


Perriwhy - 


fish-hook. 


Nnnderovo - 


long since. 


Parperlo 


tobacco-pipe. 


Niangacko - 


name of the lan- 


Parperlo woner ? where (is my) 




guage and coun- 




pipe? 




try round Trial 
Bay. 
yon and I. 


Payraypaller 


to paint the body 


Natave 




with pipe-day. 


Nurrungatteler - 
Ninnung - 


to forget, 
oysters. 


Pickelworang 
Petergang - 


- crooked, 
cockles. 


Norroborarvo 


red. 


Parpinang - 


seaweed. 


^.Y M 


• 


Parrumbal - 


' mushroom. 


Nnnaamg - 
Nimdamg-cotto - 


]aw. 
face-ache. 


Parparakeara 


treacherous. 


Nerro t 


ruddle. 


Ploorcang • 


few. 


1 

Nangong - 


hole through sep- 


Pundur 


cut. 




tum of nose. 


Pongar 


to kill. 


Notto murriken- 


I (am) married. 


Pingy 


' wax. 


gen 




Pambar 


• to talk. 


Narree 


shin. 


Parropolone 


. quail (large sort). 


Notto weeai Par- 


. I will tell Parker 


Parrung 


' limgs. 


kenen 




Perrar mayler • 


• to tremble with 


Notto weeatterri I will not tell 




cold. 


Cangumia 


Cangnmi. 


Piyerban^ - 


- ti-tree. 


Notto Bellowingo 
marray or notto 
marray Below- 


1 I (am) golAg to 
Bellowin. 


Pulkayler - 
Pattoin 


- to push. 

- rat. 


ingo 




Paperlamay 


- blue pigeon. 


Niyee 


rushes. 


Parrimar - 


- to undress. 


Nerromayler 


to scold. 


Poperer 


- day after to-mor- 


Nowakee • 


bellyful. 




row. 



* Probably oompounded of fiappunk = bretuU, and gang = very or large, 
t The Ngooialliun use nor6^nor6 in the same sense. 



POBT MACQUABIE. 



349 



No. 186.^ADDinoyAL Wobd»— con^tnue^f. 



Tew-win 



Torra- 
Talloo 
Tooreller - 
Tirray 
Tippo- . 
Tirrower - 
Tnmong 
Tackrar 
Tiirracotto 

Towibang - 

Tingar 
Tindinbang- 
Terraypin - 
Talmung 
Tnran- 
Tourl-tonrl - 
Tomombang 
Troooie 
Toonegan • 

Timgelar - 

TarrovelleT' 

Toumben - 

Tonbar-tickel 

Tongan 

Tovang 

Talprar 

Tangeli 

Tapparker - 

Tirmng 

Tarvomeller 

Tarpin 

Tarpan 

Tarran 

Tarromaiy - 

Tirmmbibang 



mncos from nose, 
matter from 
wonnd, mag- 
gots, fly-blows. 

thighs. 

heavy. 

to eat too much. 

egg-shells. 

a sheep. 

ribs. 

blunt. 

cold. 

tired (thighs 
sore). 

honeysuckle- 
tree. 

grey hairs. 

grass-tree. 

small quaiL 

strong, hard. 

shells. 

slippery. 

sassafras-tree. 

iguana. 

sinews in tail of 
kangaroo. 

to hide. 

drowned. 

to steal. 

thief. 

creek. 

right hand. 

arm below elbow. 

kilL 

quiet. 

pride. 

to yawn. 

scrub. 

a lie. 

frog. 

rainbow. 

gum-tree. 



Ticking 
Tappy- 
Talprar 
Unnong 
UUoo - 
Urar - 
Umbil- 

Urepayler, urepi 
Uooll, ucore 
Wombon - 
Worotto, worro 
Woner T 
Willing 
Wilker 
Wigt-wigt - 
Willung 
Wuckumbrer 
Woombang - 
Wang arriendo? 

Wang beangar ? 
Wangi nigegur ? 
Warring 
Wooover, woco- 
wun 
Wirrar 
Woterbang - 
Woombin - 
Worimi 



Weambeang 
Warr? 
Wungayler - 
Wigelmar - 
Wattem 
Woorayayler 
Wong-gon-gi-on - 
Wurrung - 
Woporer 
Wizonggurer 
Wurrian, wurrang 



a sore or wound, 
chin, 
arm. 
give, 
forehead, 
clouds, 
drink, 
to steaL 
heart, 
bad, ugly, 
throat, 
where? 
lips. 

shoulder, 
make haste, 
catfish, 
scarring, 
kangaroo skin, 
where (is my) 
sister? 

where father? 
where mother ? 
left hand, 
a lie. 

bandicoot, 
cedar-tree, 
starved. 

language and 
country near 
Maitland. 

whistle. 

where ? 

to corroboree. 

make haste. 

white. 

to talk too much. 

grandmother. 

crooked. 

lagoon. 

to swim. 

valley. 



1 



350 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 
No. 186.— Additiohal Wobpo coi rfi i i iiecl. 



Wnnger 


- aoorroboree. 


Toocore, yooooU • 


• heart 


WackeUer • 


. ahonlder. 


Talpon 


- the bark of a dog, 


Yettiiig - 


. lightning. 


Tarkekr - 


• to paint body 


Tawtong 


• jonmey. 




imL 


TalUyar - 
Terrating - 
Tnngii 
Tetn-yetn 
Tinderee • 


- to dire. 

- shadow. 

- rogue. 

- greedy. 

• eyebrows. 


Tung - 
Tingar 


- New England 
country and 
lugoage. 

• acrab. 


TeUpayler - 


• to bark (as a 


Taymng 


• waterfadL 




dog). 


Tetting • 


• greedy. 


Tindayler • 


- tospUt. 


Tungartilla 


- go on before. 


Taapar 


- toBwim. 


TuUoyen • 


- go behind. 



No. 187.— THE MANNING REYEB. 

Bt Bench of Maoistratss at Winoham. 

Canoes are made of bark, and sometimes shields, and the reader may 
compare the equiyalents of bark, shield, and canoe. 



Kangaroo - 


• womboit. 


Opossum - 


- watoo. 


Tame dog • 


• meni. 


VVUddog ■ 




Emu - 


' mitucit. 


BUickduck* 


krangL 


Wood duck - 




Pelican 




Laughing jackass 


karkoo. 


Native companioi 


1 


White cockatoo 


- terripL 


Crow - 


• warkut 


Swan - 


koolwanuk. 


^ - ■ 


• koopwaL 


Track of a foot 


- yabuk. 


Fish ■ 


- markorow. 


Lobster 


■ yinga. 


Crayfish 




Mosquito 


- koopul. 


Fly - - 


- boorilook. 


Snake 


' batai. 


The Blacks - 


- koori. 


A Blackf ellow 


koori. 


A Black woman - 


- mamkait. 


Nose • 


- nak. 



Hand- 


' muttra. 


2Blacks • 


- boolora koori 


3 Blacks • 




One - 


- wakoolbo. 


Two - 


- boolora, booreit. 


Three- 


- boolora wakooL 


Four - 


- boolorakoo-boo- 




lorakoo. 


Father 


■ bigyaL 


Mother 


niga. 


Sister-Elder 


- ngureit. 


„ Tounger 




Brother-Elder - 


bingaL 


„ Toungei 


' woombana. 


A young man 


boombut. 


An old man 


koonkoon. 


An old woman 


bett 


A baby 


marria. 


A White man • 


keruinbulla. 


Children 


boori, kuUuk. 


Head - - ■ 


waluk. 


Eye - - 


- mikue. 


Ear 


moko. 



THE MANNING RIVER. 



851 



No. 187.— Thb Manniko BxvEBf-continued, 



Month 


- knrrika. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth 


■ tirra. 


Hill . - 


• 


Hair of the head- boorach. 


Wood- 


- wattL 


Beard- 


- yarmt. 


Stone - 


- bakknt. 


Thunder - 


- marloo. 


Camp- 


- moora. 


Grass - 


- mnrmk. 


V7 




Tongne 


- tnUnt. 


Yes - 


- ya, ngoe. 






No - 


- kooriat. 


Stomach - 


- warra. 






Breasts 


- napnk. 


I 


- ngata. 


Thigh 


- ngnrm. 


Yon - 


-beid. 


Foot - 


- tinya. 


Bark - 


• koorak. 


Bone - 


- tirmk. 


Good - - 


- marook. 


Blood- - 


- knngera. 


Bad - 


- yarraki 


Skin - - 


- yoolak. 


Sweet - 


- 


Fat - 


- wamyao. 


Food - - 


- boowartuk. 


Bowels 


- kergo. 


Hungry 


- kappirega. 


Excrement - 


- goonnnk. 


Thirsty 


- tumbuth. 


War-spear - 


- knmai. 


Eat - 


- taki. 


Reed-spear - 
Throwing-fltick 


- mooro. 


Sleep - 


- narboolukoo. 


Shield - 


. kooreel. 


Drink- 


- butooki 


Tomahawk - 


- baibai. 


Walk- - 


- yannau. 


Canoe - 


- kooyank. 


See - 


- narlchL 


Sun - 


- toonan. 


Sit - 


- yallow-akoo. 


Moon - 


- gewak. 


Yesterday - 


- boomi. 


Star - 


- mnriet. 


To-day 


- bungai 


IJght - 


- narraknt. 


To-morrow - 


- koobauki 


Dark - 


- bootoom, bootnk. 


Where are th< 


) wunna koori? 


Cold . - 


- yatoo. 


Bkcks? 




Heat - 


• naooit. 


I don*t know 


- narrai yoongat 


Day - 


- kaiyak. 




ngata. 


Night- - 


- koonbaka. 


Plenty 


• mondai. 


Fire - 


- kooyaL 


Big - - 


• tookal. 


Water 


- bartoo. 


Little - 


- mittoo. 


Smoke 


- beantoo. 


Dead - 


- toothtoo. 


Ground 


- bnrrai. 


By-and-by - 


- kookooka. 


Wind - . 


- wippai, wooroo- 


Come on 


- gowai. 




ma. 


Milk - 


- 


Rain - - 


- yurra. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


- 


Wife . - 


* 



352 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 188.— THE HUNTER MVER. 

THE WOKKARUA TRIBE AND LANGUAGE. 
Bt Robert Mn.f.EB, Esq. 

The Wonnama language is more nearly related to that of 
the Hawkesbnry than to any other; at the same time it has 
many words fonnd in Wiiratheri, and some which were used 
by the Sydney tribe. Mr. Miller, from whom I received my 
information concerning the Wonnama tribe, tells me that 
when he first knew them they occupied the Hunter and all 
its tributaries from within ten miles of Maitland to the 
apex of the Liverpool Ranges, an area which he sets down 
at two thousand square miles. My informant also points 
out that he lived in the Hunter River district for several 
years, having settled there in 1841. At that time, he says 
the tribe numbered about 500 individuals, but it is now 
almost extinct, the result of increased infanticide, de- 
bauchery, diseases introduced by the Whites, exposure to 
rain (which the aborigines avoided in great measure before 
we interfered with their modes of life), bronchitis, and rheu- 
matic fever. Their clothing used to be an opossum-skin 
cloak, and a girdle of spun opossum hair next the skin, and 
their principal ornament a nautilus shell cut into an oval 
shape and suspended from the neck by a string. They also 
anointed the person on gala occasions with a mixture of red 
ochre and fat, and lived in bark ma^-miams like those in use 
in all the southern portions of the continent. Their effects 
were the ordinary spears, wommera, shields, and war-boome- 
rangs, and also the boomerang which returns when thrown, 
which was used partly as a toy and was also thrown into 
flights of ducks and other birds with very good results. The 
boomerang used in fights does not return. They had also 



THE HUNTER RIVEB. 353 

bags made of platted swamp-grass; koolamcm or wooden 
bowls^ two or three feet long, for holding water at the camp; 
tomahawks of hard dark-colored stone, which were first 
chipped and then ground to an edge ; knives made of flint 
for cutting ap meat, and also chips of flint with which they 
skinned animals. For food they got the kangaroo and emu^ 
which they killed with spears and captured with nets, 
besides the other animals and reptiles found in their 
country; as also a variety of roots, one of which was that of 
the water-lily. These they roasted in the usual way, or baked 
in the heaps of cinders and stone (or cinders and lumps of 
clay) usually called ovens. The young of both sexes were 
prohibited firom eating certain sorts of meat. They had also 
at about sixteen years of age to undergo the ceremonies of 
having a tooth knocked out, the septum of the nose pierced, 
and the painful operation of being scarred on the back, 
shoulders, stomach, and occasionally on the legs. At the 
same age the males were made young men with many secret 
ceremonies. Until the advent of the Whites, cannibalism 
also prevailed to the extent of eating portions of a slain 
enemy by way of triumph. 

In their marriages they were strictly exogamous ; men 
obtained their wives in exchange for female relatives ; females 
becoming wives at twelve and mothers at sixteen years of 
age. Polygamy prevailed, and a large number of the men 
were unable to obtain wives owing partly to the paucity of 
female children reared. Infanticide was practised, and is 
ascribed by Mr. Miller to the impossibility of a woman 
carrying more than one young child in her wanderings. 
Men renowned as warriors frequently attacked their inferiors 
in strength and took their wiL ftom them. Widows got 
another husband in the tribe, and children belonged to the 
tribe of the father. 

The Wonnarua had some idea of a Great Spirit, but 
what the idea was my informant does not know. They had, 
too, a custom of daubing their hands and feet with a com- 
pound of fat and red ochre^ and then impressing them on 

VOL. m. z 



S54 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



the sides of caves. The canoes were sheets of bark, cat from 
suitable trees in sach a manner as to give a little elevation 
to the sides and ends. Fish they caaght with nets and 
three-pronged spears. The average height of the men Mr. 
Miller estimates at five feet six inches^ thongh some of them 
were upwards of six feet^ and .the women at five feet. As a 
rule, their hair was long and lank, one or two being early and 
one woolly. The dead were interred in a sitting posture, 
the giave being covered with logs to prevent wild dogs 
getting at the corpse. Their wars were the results of tres- 
passes on their lands by neighbouring tribes (generally by 
the Kamilaroi tribes) and the abduction of females. They 
had a salutation on meeting which was ^^ anigunyaj'* the 
meaning of which is not stated. 

The old men, as usual, used to talk over the affairs of the 
tribe, and generally persuaded its members to adopt their 
views, which Mr. Miller looks on as a sort of government; 
but no authority existed.* In cases of sickness, certain 
impostors in the tribe used to pretend to extract bits of stick 
or stone from the seat of pain with their mouths; for 
rheumatism the skin was scarified; the gums bled for 
toothache, and hot stones applied to relieve various sorts of 
pains. Wounds were plastered with wet clay, and bleeding 
staunched by the application of a sort of spongy bark. 

Besides his translation of my Common Vocabulary, Mr. 
Miller supplies the following words, amongst which will be 
found the names of the four cardinal points: — 

Additional Words. 



Arm - 


• wadtra. 


Calf of the leg 


• woolaoma. 




Forearm 


- mummae. 


Ankle- 


- waingoor. 




Upper arm - 


- klnian. 


Toe - 


. eolo. 


i 


Fingers 


- mntera. 


Toea - 


• berieL 




Knee • 


- waroo. 


Forehead 


- milero. 





* Englishmen generally seem with difficulty to realize the idea of 
a people living entirely without government as onr Blacks do, and not 
nnfrequently dab some intelligent man of a tribe King BiUy or King 
Tommy. 



THE HUNTER RIVEB. 



355 



Additional Wordb— con^tnuecf • 



ESyebrowB 
Man's breast 

Chin - 
Hips • 
Dry bark - 
Dead tree - 
Burnt stump 
Leaf 
Green wattle 

Kangaroo-rat 
Bandicoot - 
Flying squirrel 
Black snake 
Brown snake 
Tortoise 
Eel - 

Pigeon 
Wallaby 
Soldier ant 
Bed ant 

Ignana 
Magpie 
Platypus 
Batcher bird 
Curlew 
Red parrot 
Green parrot 
Swallow 
Jew lizard • 
Woodpecker 
Green ant - 
Wallaroo - 

lightning - 



yenderra. 
yokoU, 
mooralong. 
mnndoo. 
karbalong. 
terrakee. 
kookyal. 
wallangan, 
eele. 
pattigL 

tununbL 

koitonn. 

petnong. 

mutoo-congoan. 

tonibadong. 

kntamong. 

kannung. 

mnrramaa. 
barinbellong. 
torkol, kerraL 
teemong- 
watawan* 
gnerawa, gema. 
goorabul, woing. 
becan. 
merratta. 
booynong. 
wackelara. 
peba. 

billimahnnL 
wirramin. 
bing-gol-gol. 
goonan. 
wallambang, 
wyanna. 
mtdlo. 



Sonth wind- 
Hot wind - 
Cold wind - 
Whirlwind - 
Koolaman or 

wooden water 

bowl 
Honey 
A shadow - 
A bag- 
Raised scars 

skin 
Net - 
A hole 
Rainbow 



- knrrenan. 

- burnuni, 

- tukkera* 

- bolee. 
koka. 



- kerega. 

• gnngooL 

- boaool. 
on weerong, 

mooberra. 
tnrrila. 
dingnng. 
tnmmboly 

wooralegan. 
batan. 



An animal's tail 
Feathers 
Wings 
Bill of bird ■ 
Red - 
Bkck • 
White- 
Green - 
A good many 
Sick - 
Angry - 
Ironbark-tree 
Oak-tree 
Red gum - 
Towards the north kyaubalL 
Towards the sonth bnlgargoba. 
Towards the east baranbali. 
Towards the west wackalangbali. 
Bring water - kaknndia 

murra.* 



ering. 
kilkin, 
karka. 
kapera. 
tackdan. 
barral- 
weerobarral. 
karowara. 
kowal-kowal. 
gerrein-manya. 
memd. 
teraklL 
gooneL 
tarin. 



* See tnmatotion of footer In Common Yocabnbiy. 

Z2 



356 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 188.— THE HUNTER RIVER. 



Kangaroo • 


• womboin,bandar. | 


Hand - 


• mater. 


Opoasnm - 


. Willi. 




2 Blacks - 


. 


Tame dog - 


- merrie. 




3 Blacks - 


. 


WUddog - 


- ukae. 




One - 


-^ munnaan. 


Emu 


- murrin. 




Two - 


- buluarra. 


Black duck 


. 








Wood duck 


^ 




Three- 


- wakkool, nulraw. 


Pelican 


. 




Four • 


- tarn, carroweL 


Laughing jackasa kookaburra. 




Father 


- beeung. 


Native companion 




Mother 


- naae. 


White cockatoo 


- wangolong, 


gaiv 


Sister-Elder 


- marrane. 




ribee. 




„ Younger 


- 


Crow • 


- wagan. 




Brother-Elder 


- binghi. 


3wan - 






„ Younger 


Egg - . 


• kobaan. 




A young man 


. 


Track of a foot 






An old man 


^ 


Fish . - 


- makroo. 




An old woman 


. 


Lobster 










Crayfish - 






A baby - 


- wanni, warray. 


Mosquito - 






A White man 


- 


Fly . 


- boorolong. 




Children - 


^ • 


Snake - 


- currewa. 




Head - 


- gaberong, gaber 


The Blacks 








undea, geren 


A Blackf ellow 


- kurri. 






bandina. 


A Black woman 


I - coolberri, apuL 


Eye - 


- mekong. 


Nose - 


- nockro. 




Ear • 


- pinna. 



THE HUNTER RIVER. 



367 



No. 188.— Thk Huntxb "Birvmb—corUmued, 



Mouth 


- karka. 


Boomerang - 


- barragan, tootoo- 


Teeth 


- nndera. 




kera. 


Hair of the head • woorann. 


Hill - - 


- kooaran. 


Beard 


- 


Wood- - 


- terackli. 


Thunder • 


. murrongali. 


Stone - 


- kumbunding. 


Graas 


- tooka» woio, 




tunong. 




woolo. 


Camp- 


- wattaka, watta- 


Tongae 


- myong. 




kabung. 


Stomach 


- warra. 


Yes - - 


- wattalong, nawa 


Breasts 


- abuk. 




day, mem. 


Thigh - 


- balingora. 


No - - 


- yalJawebung, 


Foot - 


• tinna. 




kae-one. 


Bone - 


- tabaU. 


I - - 


- indua, nuttua. 


Blood- - 


- gooara. 


You - - 


- natrua, nindrua, 


SkiTi - - 


- 




aninua. 


Pat - 


- wommo. 


Bark - - 


- bekeree, koogera. 


Bowels 


- 


Good - 


- murrong. 


Excrement - 


- 


Bad - - 


- yaracke. 


War-spear - 


- dorrane. 


Sweet - 


- 


Reed-spear- 


- 


Food - . 


- 


Wommera or 


werrewy. 


Hungry 


- kuberigo. 


throwing-stiick 




Thirsty 


- 


Shield - 


- murribi, kooreiL 


Eat - 


- takiligo. 


Tomahawk - 


- mundabang. 


Sleep - 


- kungongo. 


Canoe - 


- buba. 


Drink- 


- begennan. 


Snn - 




Walk- . 


- wannin. 


Moon - 


- goondnong. 


See - 


• natan. 


Star - 


- meeka, merri. 


Sit - - 


- woorilla, talla- 


light - 


- lanrae. 




walla. 


Dark - 


- 


Yesterday - 


- 


Cold . - 


- karring, dookra. 


To-day 


m 


Heat - 


- werroo, ewereba. 


To-morrow - 


- 


Day . 


- barraing, burra- 


Where are the 




galia. 


Blacks? 




Night - - 


- tookoi or dookoi. 


I don't know 


- naingiando. 


Fire - 


- watta. 


Plenty 


- kawalL 


Water 


- kalle, kukon. 


Big - - 


■• 


Smoke 


• batta. 


Little - 


- warrae. 


Ground 


- parri, mnirawan. 


Dead - 


- tateba. 


Wind- - 


- booromi, hurra- 


By-and-by - 


- 




maronga. 


Come on - 




Bain - - 


- mergo, banna, 


Milk - - 


- 




wakaden. 


Eaglehawk - 


- kawuL 


God - - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


- boraoir. 


Wife - 


. 



360 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 189.— THE HAWKESBTJRT RIVER AND 

BROKEN BAY. 

Bt J. TUOKSBMAK, ESQ. 

Thb following vocabolaiy was drawn np by Mr. J. Tucker- 
man, and forwarded to me by the Bench of Magistrates at 
Windsor. Some of its words agree with those of tiie Sydney 
and others with those of the Manning River languages. 
There is bnt one word for ye^&rday and UHnarraWj and the 
phrase / dorCt knato is rendered not seen, nukka no donbt 
being derived from tut. 





Additional Words. 




Uncle • 


- kowan. 


Igaana 


- bnngera. 


Aunt • 


- murrikL 


Bear - 


- koolewong 


CoofiiTi 


- nnrria. 


Bandicoot - 


- binben. 


Demon 


- kooyar. 


Hailstones - 


- kooribai 


aonds 


- yoora. 


P<^ . 


- koorebnn. 


Honey 


- koodjung. 


Lightning - 


- moomi. 



No. 189.— HAWKESBURY BIVER AND BROKEN BAY. 

Bt J. TuoKSBMAV, Esq. 

- wollombawn. 

- irmbeL 



- barebare. 

- orina. 

- nullaburra. 



Kangaroo - 

Opossum - 

Tame dog - 

WUd dog - 

Emu - 

Black duck - 

Wood duck- 

Pelican 

Laughing jackass kookundL 

Native companion 

White cockatoo - nooal. 

Crow 

Swan 

Egg 

Track of a foot 

Fish - 

Lobster 

Crayfish 

Mosquito - 

Fly - 

Snake- 

TheBkcks- 

A Blackf ellow 

A Black woman - nukaL 

Nose - - nukurra. 



- wottigan. 
. mooricone. 
• kungiri. 

- moorL 

- marra. 

- wirra. 

- choopin. 

- yulla. 

- butaeen. 

- koori. 

- koori. 



Hand • 
2Blacka 
3 Blacks 
One - 
Two - 
Three- 
Four - 
Father 



- bngeele. 

- booUa koori. 

. burrong koori. 

- workul. 

- booUa. 

• burrong. 

- bea. 

- wyung. 



- nurreen. 



- parping. 



Mother 
Sistei^Elder 

„ Younger 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 

A young man - woongara. 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 



A White man 
Children 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear - 



- narrakL 

- narronyan. 

- kootchlkon. 

- bite-bite. 

- turrongankaL 

- kunibeen. 
. meknng. 

- Innna. 



HAWKBSBURY RIVER AND BROKEN BAY. 



359 



No. 189.-— Hawkesbubt Biveb 



Moath- 


- kurraka. 


Teeth - 


- yerra. 


Hair of the head 


- kewurra. 


Beard - 


• yarring. 


Thunder - 


• wortool. 


Grass - 


- datter. 


Tongue 


- tuUing. 


Stomach 


- ukul. 


Breasts 


- nopping. 


Thigh - 


- durra. 


Foot - 


- genua. 


Bone - 


- dirrel. 


Blood - 


- koomurra. 


Skin • - • 


- bukka. 


Fat - 


- wommo. 


Bowels 


- guanong. 


Excrement • 


- guanong. 


War-spear - 


■ kummi. 


Reed-spear - 


• quarang. 


Throwing-stick 


• woora^wonunera. 


Shield - 


• kooreal. 




mogo. 


Canoe • 


■ nooia. 


Sun - 


. bonnal. 


Moon - 


■ koodang. 


Star • 


- koolang. 


light - 


• burrayang. 


Dark - 


• minni. 


Cold - 


■ tuggera. 


Heat - 


• woonul. 


Day 


- burrea. 


Night - 


• TnJTini, 


Fire - 


• kooyoong. 


Water - 


- bardo. 


Smoke- 


- kutcheL 


Ground 


- bum. 


Wind - 


- wippe. 


Rain - 


- woUong, moora- 




koo. 


God . - 




Ghosts 


- buttons. 



AND Bbokbn Bay— carUinueoL 


Boomerang - 




Hill - 




Wood- 


• wottL 


Stone - 


• kibbar. 


Camp - 


nurra. 


Yes - - 


m. 


No ■ - 


• worripi) worrL 


I - - 


niya. 


You - 


. ninde. 


Bark - 


toomung. 


Good - 




Bad ■ ■ 


- kootear. 


Sweet - 


- kooturra. 


Food - 


- kundoo. 


Hungry 


dullee. 


Thirsty 


• tarrel. 


Eat • - • 


- booda. 


Sleep - 


nangrL 


Drink - 


woodra. 


Walk - 


warre. 


See - - ■ 


• na. 


Sit - . 


• nuUawa. 


Yesterday • 


- purrapeen. 


To-day 


- yakkunda. 


To-morrow - 


- purrapeen. 


Where are the 


wirrikoori? 


Blacks? 




I don't know 


- worrinukka. 


Plenty 


- koora. 


Big - - 


■ kawbawn. 


Little - 


• narrang. 


Dead - 


• tatta. 


By-and-by - 


- nart. 


Come on 


gooi. 


Milk - 




Eaglehawk - 




Wild turkey 




Wife 





BOOK THE SIXTEENTH. 



\ 



BOOK THE SIXTEENTH. 

PREFATORY REMARKS. 

The WiiratAeri language, as it was called by the Lachlan 
Blacks, in whose country I resided for some time, or Wiraduri, 
as the Eevd. W. Ridley spells it in his " Kamlaroiy^ is remark- 
able for the number of tribes by which it is spoken and the 
large area of country throughout which it prevails. Though, 
as the reader will see from this book, there are differences in 
the vocabularies of every tribe, we know that they are not 
so great as to interrupt or even impede conversation, for 
every Black is to some extent a linguist from his infiuicy, 
and on that account less impatient of small differences of 
speech than the average Englishman or Frenchman. 

The word WiircUAeri is derived from mirai, the negative 
adverb, and it is worthy of notice that in almost every tribe 
throughout this series the equivalents of no and the Blacks 
are, though differently spelt by my contributors, in reality 
the same, a state of things which rarely exists in connection 
with tribes occupying so large an extent of country. We 
also find in these dialects da^y dtiggaUy dagga^ &c., common 
equivalents for excrement^ and related terms such as dagun^ 
duggafij and daggoon signifying ground; in &ct in two in- 
stances the two objects are expressed by the same word. In a 
vocabulary drawn up by the Right Reverend Dr. Salvado of 
a language of Western Australia, on the other side of the 
continent, daagn is met with signifying annSy and it seems 
probable that there was a time when there was but one word 
to express the objects excrement^ ground^ and anus. Goonna, 



364 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

goomumgy koonnoL = excrementy bo general in onr langoages, 
also appear in some of the Wiiratheri dialectSy and it is 
likely that the two words tiofftm and koonna exist in all of 
them. In these dialects it will also be fonnd that the 
equivalents of tonfftie and eat are generally related, and 
occasionally that of food. 

But what is most noteworthy about the Wiiratheri tribe 
is, that though they were a people who numbered several 
thousand souls, had a common language, and inhabited a 
country 450 miles in length by 300 in breadth, throughout 
which communication was easy, yet with these advantages 
they never get beyond tribal life which limits cohesion to 
persons nearly related by blood, or made a single step in the 
direction of a national existence. like all other Australians, 
the Wiiratheri tribes had got so far that any one of them 
could by messenger treat collectively with another tribe, but 
had not reached the stage of established authority within 
the tribe. No doubt it is the establishment within the tribe, 
and for home purposes, of some authority other than the 
paternal, which is the first step from tribal to national life, 
and that this perhaps never occurs until agriculture has led 
to stationary settlement. 

Before giving the several translations of my C!onmion 
Vocabulary into Wiiratheri which have have reached me, I 
will proceed with such Additional Words as my correspondents 
have furnished, as follows. In three of these little collections 
we have the equivalents of unclCy aunty and cousiny an im- 
portant &ct which was overlooked when the table found in 
Vol. I., page 141, was drawn up : — 





By the Bjevb. 


J. GUNTHEB. 




Drink 

Present 

Future 


- widgallL 

- widyana. 

- widyalgine. 


Walk 

Present 

Future 


- yanney. 

- yannunoo. 

- yannagun 




See - - 

Present 

Future 


- nguunaL 

- nguna. 

- nsgine. 





PREFATORY REMARKS. 



365 



Mb. C. Rousb 
GiYBB the following names of plaoes and their signifioationB: — 



Ena-wena - 


- Place where the 


Gillendoon 


- A plaoe of cray 




women stop 




fish. 




when separated 


Billa-bulla - 


- The two rivers. 




from the men in 


Gowong 


- The moon. 




times of 5ora or 


Minemoorong 


- Blackfellows* 




war. 




camp. 




Bt thb Bsnoh or Maoistbatbs, Dubbo. 


Lightning - 


- michi. 


Aunt - 


- bnmal. 


Uncle 


- buggamine. 


Cousin 


- mooningaL 


By the Rbvd. J. Balpb, J.P., Booak Rivbs. 


Uncle 


- bugenrung. 


Cousin 


- woonaki. 


Aunt - 


- bunuaL 








By J. Camebon, Esq., Fobbbs, etc. 


Boy 


- boori. 


Forest oak - 


- nying. 


Girl . 


- migi. 


Swamp oak 


- billar. 


Baby (male) 


- boorinjal. 


Pine-tree - 


- kurra. 


„ (female) 


- migijuL 


A scrub 


- beergoo. 


Kangaroo-rat 


- keemung. 


A plain 


- goonigul. 


Paddimellon 


- weerung. 


A creek 


- beela. 


Water-rat - 


- mooeen. 


Road - 


- mooroo. 


Mouse 


- wuthagong. 


Frost - 


- maggar. 


Black snake 


- thoorung. 


A fight 


- boomooloona. 


Brown snake 


- wurulung. 


War - 


- koori. 


Iguana 


- ngooreen. 


Fishing-net 


- kooli. 


Teal - 


- throoyong. 


Flesh - 


-Jeen. 


Magpie 


- karoo. 


Arms - 


- buggur. 


Crane- 


- bara. 


Stand - 


- wurruna. 


Codfish 


- kooroolong. 


Jump - 


- broobeeja. 


Bream 


- koobeer. 


Lay down - 


- wirrija. 


laghtning - 


- meegee. 


Scold- - 


- nuburra. 


Qond 


- urung. 


Shed tears - 


- umbena. 


Box-tree - 


- wooronglong. 


Laugh 


- keentnunna. 


Gum-tree - 


- yarra* 


Never 


- weddaboo. 


The word Boomoolo&na-zz^ 


iight^ is evidently akin to [ 


common word meaninfir strik 


e. From Si] 


r Georere Grev'i 



Travels in Norlhwest Australia^ vol. 2, p. 212, we learn that 
this word is rendered Pooma or Boofna on the Swan River, 
BoomguT at King George's Sound, Poomandi in South Aus- 
tralia, and Bo&nUlliko at Sydney. 



366 



THE AUSTELAUAN RAGE: 





Bt W. H. SunoB, Esq. 




Cnne - 


biirra. 


Box-tree 


bimbiL 


Curlew 


kooreebnn. 


Pine-tree 


kurra. 


Dove — (large) - 


mooragoo. 


Bee (native) 


dthurroongarong. 


„ (small) - 


goobadthoo. 


Honey- 


ngaroo. 


Magpie 


garroo. 


Mirage 


narroowaL 


Pigeon (bronxe- 


yamniur. 


Akifls- 


boodthrabolug- 


wing) 






goo. 


Pigeon (aqnatter] 


dthood-thoo. 


Goward 


gael-gaeL 


Plover • 


baldnmgerL 
djirri-djirrt 


Brave - 


wollunininma]]^ 


Wagtail 


Sorry - 


noonidthong- 


BeUbird 


banbandarloo. 




ninna. 


Frog - 


koolanga. 


Glad - 


gndthangthung- 


Shrimp 


kidjar. 




ninna. 


Poronpine - 


• qnandiallL 


Love - 




liver • 


- gooraloong. 




reree. 


Knee • 


boongong. 


Laugh - 


. ginthinthintha. 


Elbow- 


ngoona. 


Tall . - 


• barrmir. 


Arm - 


- bargoor. 


Short - 


• boomban. 


Shoulder • 


- kunnar. 


Deaf - 


- moogoodtha. 


Bnmp • 


• mog¥roon« 


Dumb- 


' wirriyarra. 


Uncle - 


- buggamgan. 


Blind - 


• mogeen. 


Aunt • 


■ bommall. 


Angry- 


' dthallibinnul. 


Gounin 


• oonaregein. 


Lnaginary animal 


, mirreeulla. 


Daughter - 


. ammoori. 


said to live is 


i 


Lightning • 


• mikkL 


deep waterholes 




Feather 


- boobil. 


Gk> on - 


' enyunnundtha. 


Tail - 


- doondoo. 


W hat do you say f minnu andeyaeh ? 


Snow - 


- koonoomal. 




yukkai I 


A forest 


- birgoo. 


pain 




A plain 


- gooniguL 


Crooked (see Boo- burigan. 


A river 


. murrung. 


merang) 




River oak-tree 


• beUarwL 


Straight (see Spear) dthoolooarree. 



By the Writsb. 
Toodba commonly spelt U(Ma on the Lachlan. 



Native companion pooralga. 

Laughing jackass kokobumu 

Wood, tree - • gi-guL 

Stone - • wollong. 

Crayfish (small inka. 
sort of) 

Small burrowing moondo-bil-bi. 
kangaroo 

Darlinff cockatoo, wi-jdg-a-la. 
or Pfyctolophus 
Leadbeateri 

Squatter pigeon - too-t5ot. 

MaUeebird- - yQ5ng-ai. 



Plain turkey or gOmbuL 
bustard 

Frog - - - ko-ltlng-a. 

Sow-thistle • - t5ol-oo-man. 

A hole in a stone wdllong-mil; 

in which water stone eye. 
collects 

A hole in a tree gigul-mil; i.e. 
in which water wood eye. 
collects, some- 
times to the ex- 
tent perhaps of 
fifty gallons 



•.e., 



PREFATORY REMARKS* 



367 



Whilst giving the few words which the anthor remembers 
of the Wiiratheri language, he thinks it well to mention the 
following fact connected with natural history. The native 
bee was found on the banks of the Lachlan (and at 
least five-and-twenty miles back from that river) as far as 
the npper portion of the Uabba Bun; but if a north and 
south line were drawn through the stockyard of that run^ no 
hives existed to the westward of that line ; in &ct, the bee 
could not be found nearer than two or three miles to the 
eastward of such line. This was often explained to me by 
the Blacks who resided permanently on the station and kept 
us supplied with honey. Why the bees ceased to be found 
at that point — the country on one side of the north and 
south line being exactly similar to that on the other — 
whether they have since spread to the west, or have been 
exterminated by our bees, are questions of interest. 







By Charles Btsne, Esq. 




Son - 


- 


- ooraman. 


Swim - 


- yawinya. 


Daughter* 


• ■ 


• amoor. 


Strike 


- bingictanaloo. 


She* - 


- 


' ama. 


Talk - 


- yallaloo. 


GirlB - 


- 


• miggi. 


When- 


- wigengoo. 


Husband 


- 


• moban. 


Here • 


- ena. 


Bibs - 


a 


• mar. 






Neck - 


. 


- nan. 


Many men - 


. madoo mang. 


Frog - 


m 


• koolunga. 


Many women 


- madoo bulla- 


OpoBsum-cloak • 


- boothong. 




garoo. 


He - 


- 


- myla. 


Come and swim 


• thanganong. 


FaU - 




> bunding. 

By G. R. H. J 


Where? 
3TU0KEY, Esq. 


- taggowa? 


GirlB . 


- 


muUiwan. 


Strike 


• boomalgaree. 


Husband 


m 


• hoban. 


Talk - 


- yalla. 


Ribs - 


- 


• thaura. 


Many men - 


• madomain. 


Neck - 


. 


■ wooro. 


•r 




Frog - 


. 


- kolonga. 


Many women 


- mado buUagara. 


Oposflum-cloak • 


• buthong. 


Come and swim 


- thanuna kooma- 


FaU . 


- 


• bondagee. 




bakee. 


Swim - 


- 


• koombakee. 


Where ? • 


• thagwaf 



• In oonnection with this word see the tFansIation of breoita in Mr. Byrne's renderins^ 
of the Common Vocabulary, a few pages on. 



368 



THB AU8T&ALIAK RACK 



No. 190.— OASTLEREAGH BIVEB, TALBRAGAB. MUDGEK 



Bt THB RCYD. J. GUMTUIB. 



Kangaroo - 


• bondnr. 


Hand • 


• murra. 


Opoisajii 


willeL 


2 Blacks . 




Tame dog • 


• merrL 


8 Blacks 




Wild dog • 




One • 


. ngonbeer. 


Kimi a • • 


> ganmarran. 


Two - 


bulla. 


Black duck • 
Wood duok 




Three - 


- bulla ngunbeer. 


Pelican 




Four • 


• bulla bulla. 


T^ngiifag jaokaM 




Father 


• babin. 


Native oompanloi] 


i 


Mother 


. gunnee, gnnni- 


White cockatoo 


• guarran. 




bong. 


Crow • 


- waggnn. 


Sister-Eider 


. mimmi. 


Swan - 


- doondoo. 


„ Younger ■ 




Egg • - ' 


• gabbuga. 


Brother-Elder - 




Track of a foot 


- dnrm. 


„ Toungei 


' gumbul. 


Fiah - • • 


. dnngur, gabbir. 


A young man 


■ ugal. 


Lobster 


' gidyar. 


An old man 


• derribung. 


Oayfish - 


- inka. 


An old woman • 


• ballagun. 


Mosquito • 
Ply - - 


. mnggin. 
• bnrremul. 


A baby - - 


. ballL 


Snake • 


- yabba. 


A White man 


• gunwan. 


The Blacks • 


• main. 


Children • 


■ burn. 


A Blackf eUow • 




Head - 


• ballang. 


A Black woman • 


. innnr. 


Eye - 


• miL 


Nose - 


- wooroo. 


Ear • - • 


• udda. 



GASTLEREAGH BIVER, TALBRAGAB, MUDGEE. 369 



No. 190.— CAflTLKKKAOH RiVER, 


Month 


- ngnain, ngan. 


Teeth- 


- irrang. 


Hair of the head- 


- uran. 


Eeard • 


- yarran. 


Thunder 


- murruburai. 


Gran - 


- buguin. 


Tongae 


- dallein. 


Stomach 


- ngurmi. 


Breasts 


- ngumorgang. 


Thigh - 


- bngn. 


Foot - 


. dinnung. 


Bone - 


- tubuL 


Blood - 


- gurru. 


Skin - 


• yulin. 


Fat - 


- dnyon. 


Bowels 


■ ngurrui. 


Elzcrement - 


dagu. 


War-spear - 


- doolo. 


Beed-spear- 




Throwing-stick 


- baduwur, bur- 




gun. 


Shield- - 


- marga. 


Tomahawk - 


- burgnin. 


Canoe - 




Snn - 


irrae. 


Moon - 


• giwang. 


Star - 


• girragulang. 


Tiight - 


- ngalum. 


Dark - - • 


• buddang. 


Cold - - - 


• buUudai 


Heat - 


• munur, ugil. 


Day - 


- irrue, irudu. 


Night - - ■ 


• gumuwai. 


Fire - - ■ 


- win. 


Water 


- kaling. 


Smoke 


• gaddaL 


Ground 


• dagnn. 


Wind - - 


girar. 


Rain - 


• milgi, kaling. 


God (Maker) • 


- oai-a-mai. 


Ghosts 


• dullubung. 


VOL. m. 


2 



Talbraoas, Mudoee— contintied. 

Boomerang - 

HiU - - - 

Wood - - - maddun. 

Stone - - - wallnng. 

Camp - - - ngnrang. 

Yes - - - ngawa. 

No - - - wirrai. 

I ... n gni^n^l^ 

You - 

Bark - - - gundai, murdai, 

durang. 

Good - - - murrong. 

Bad . - - murrunubong. 

Sweet- - - ngurru. 

Food - - - wigge. 

Hungry - - girrugul. 
Thirsty 

Eat - - - dulli. 

Sleep - - - yurrai, winya. . 

Drink- - - widjelli. 

Walk - - - yanney. 
See ... ngunnaL 

Sit - - - winga. 

Yesterday - - gumbui. 
To-day 
To-morrow - 

Where are the dagaramain? 
Bbcksr 

I don't know • wurai winanung- 

unua. 

Plenty - - murrawal. 

Big - - - babbir. 

Little - - - bubbai. 

Dead . . - ballun. 

By-and-by - - guayu. 

Come on - - duin yunna. 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk «• 
Wild turkey 
Wife - 
A 



\ 



370 



THE AUSTRAUAN RACE: 



No. 190.— WABEEN. 

GOMFILBD BT C. RoUSB, ESQ., AT THX BBQUSST OV T. A. BbOWNB, EsQ., 

Wabbsn. 



Compare bark and camp in this vooabnlary, and note the tranaUtions of 
Where are the Blacks and / donH know, and the change in the word tugertu 



Kangaroo - 


womboin,bundar. 


Hand - 


- mamu 


Opoosnm • 


Willie. 


2 Blacks - 


- bulla mine. 


Tame dog - 


• meerrie. 


3BlA€ks - 


- bulla wonboy 


wad dog - 


, 




mine. 


Emu - - - 


oorin. 


One - 


- wonboy. 


Black duck 


bunthenbar. 


Two - 


- bulla. 


Wood duck 
Pelican 


gooneroo. 
beraya. 


Three - 


- bulla wonboy. 


Laughing jackasa 


kookaburra. 


Four - 


- bungo. 


Native oompanion brolga. 


Father 


• bnbbeen. 


White cockatoo - 


murine. 


Mother 


• gunnie. 


Crow - - - 


worgan. 


SiRtei^Elder 


■ bone. 


Swan - 


tundoo. 


„ Younger 




Egg - - . 


- koobagar. 


Brother-Elder - 


• kulmine. 


Track of a foot • 


dramble. 


„ Youngei 


' kazgon. 


Fiah - - ■ 


kookabul. 


A young man 


• burn. 


Lobflter 




An old man- 


• derribung. 


Crayfiah - 


inga. 


An old woman 


- bidgah. 


Mosquito 

Fly - • - 


moogin. 
borimill. 


A baby 


• nabba. 


Snake - 


durong. 


A White man ■ 


kubbun, gibrigaL 


The Blacks - 


mine. 


Children - 




A Blackf ellow • 


mine. 


Head- - 


ballong. 


A Black woman • 


ena. 


Eye - 


' mii\\. 


Nose - 


murroo. 


Ear 


outha. 





WAKBEN. 


Oil 




No. 190.— Wabbkn— co»«intt«d. 


Month 


milleen. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


emng. 


HiU - - 




Hair of the head - 


gideong. 


Wood- 


- muthen. 


Beazd- 


yarran. 


Stone - 


- woUong. 


Thunder - 


morrabmrL 


Camp • 


- moorong. 


OnuBs - 


bogin. 


Yes - 


- yarlo. 


Tongue 


dnllan. 


No - 


- wirri. 


Stomach 


borbeen* 


I 


- naddo. 


Breasts 


birrin. 


You - 


- indo. 


Thigh- 


marowl. 


Bark - 


- moorong. 


Foot - 


dinnong. 


Good - 


- murrumbung. 


Bone - 


dubbnl. 


Bad - 


- nunni. 


Blood - 


goin. 


Sweet - 


- murrumbung. 


SWn - 


uline. 


Food - 


• marrie. 


Pat • ■ - 


• wommo. 


Hungry 


- gimgall. 


Bowels 


boorbeen. 


Thirsty 


- yalgo. 


Excrement - 


gonnong, dnggan. 


Eat - 


- duUee. 


War-spear - 


• diUoo. 


Sleep - 


- euree. 


Beed-spear - 


dnreel. 


Drink - 


- werjellie. 


Throving-stick • 


wommara (?). 


Walk- 


- yannergee. 


Shield - 


- mirga. 


See - 


- naddoo. , 


Tomahawk - 


- bnrgoin. 


Sit - 


- welya. 


Canoe- 


- murrin, wargin. 


Yesterday 


- ninnigoorL 


Sun - 


- erie. 


To-day 


- dullan. 


Moon - 
Star - 


- gowong. 

- gerelong. 


To-morrow 


- noorimgle. 


Tiight - 


- ear. 


Where are 


the tugera mine ? 


Dark - 


• mnroong. 


Blacks? 




Cold ■ 


- boUdi. 


I don't kno' 


w - nunna tugeraga. 


Heat - 


- eribung. 


Plenty 


- beerbung. 


Day - 


• drangbnng. 


Big .- 


- murowe. 


Night - 


- mnrongbung. 


Little- 


- boobL 


Fire - 


- wein. 


Dead - 


- baUo. 


Water 


- koUe, kullen. 


By-and-by 


- dullan ereble. 


Smoke 


- knthel. 


Come on 


- kowra. 


Ground 


- duggan. 


Milk - 




Wind- 


- gera. 






Rain - 


- walla. 


Eaglehawk 


- 


God ■ 




Wild turke; 


7 


Ghosts 


- wondong. 


Wife - 


- 



2 AS 



372 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 190.— DUBBO, 
By Bbnoh or Maoistbatbs at Dubbo. 



Kangaroo • 


- bandar. 


Hand - 


• muira. 


OpOBBQin • 


. wilUe. 


S Blacks - 




Tame dog • 
WUd dog - 


- meerie. 


3 Blacks . 




Emu - 


- moorooin. 


One • 


- oonby. 


Black daok- 


• womboinda. 


Two - 


• bulla. 


Wood duck- 


- goonazoo. 


Three- 


- bulla oonby. 


Pelican 


- berar. 


Four - 


- bulla bulla. 


Laughing jackau 


1 kookaburra. 


Father 


- bobbeen. 


Native companioi 


abralgan. 


Mother 


- koonee. 


White cockatoo 


- mooran. 






Crow - 


■ waagan. 


Sistez^Elder 


- boree. 


Swan - 


• thoonthoo. 


>, Younger - 




Egg - 


' koboca. 


Brother-Elder • 


• kulmjne. 


Track of a foot • 


tnrumbal. 


t, Youngei 




Piflh . 


kooyabi. 


A young man 


walloe. 


Lobster 


• 


An old man 


walline oogaL 


Crayfiflh 
Mosquito 


mgar. 
moggin. 


An old woman - 

A V V 


moQgeen. 


Fly - - - 


burremal. 


A baby 


boobi, boon. 


Snake • 


durong. 


A White man • 


gooen. 


The Blacks - 


miQe(midnf). 


Children - 




A Blackfellow - 




Head • 


bnllong. 


A Black woman - 


ennar. 


Eye - - _ 


mill. 


Nose - 


muiTobar. 


Ear • . . 


ooda. 



DUBBO. 



373 



No. 190.— DuBBO— con<f»tt6cf. 



Mouth 


- kuine. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth- 


- eerong. 


Hill . - 


- 


Hair of the head- kidjing. 


Wood- 


- muthum. 


Beard- 


- yarrin. 


Stone - 


- woUong. 


Thunder - 


- murrabnrri. 


Camp - 


- oorong. 


Grass - 


- hoogoin. 


Yes - - 


- owaa. 


Tongue 


- talline. 


No - 


- weeri. 


Stomaoh 


. birrin. 


I - - 


• addu. 


Breasts 


■ namonff* 


Yon - - 


- indo. 


Thigh- 


- boio. 


Bark - - 


- thurrunag. 


Foot - 


- dinnong. 


Good - 


- murrembong. 


Bone - 


• thaban. 


Bad - - 


- 


Blood- - 


- goin. 


Sweet - 


- murrumbar. 


flkin - - 


- uline.. 


Pood - 


- wega, dana. 


Fat - 


- woomo. 


Hungry 


- girrogal. 


Bowels 


- bourbin. 


Thirsty 


- yalgoerung. 


Excrement - 


- tnggar. 


Bat - - 


- 


War-spear - 


- thulo. 


Sleep - 


- eurie. 


Beed-spear- 


- dreel. 


Drink- - 


- weejerra. 


Throwing-stick 


• womar. 


Walk - 


. yannanna. 


Shield- - 


- 


See - 


- nayanya. 


Tomahawk - 


- burgoin. 


Sit - - 


- weeuya. 


Canoe- 


- 






flnn - 


- eerL 


Yesterday - 


- nmngwarra. 


Moon - 


- geewong. 


To-day 


- tharra. 


Star - 


- girralong. 


To-morrow - 


- mooroongaL 


light - 


- mullan. 


Where are the wunaminef 


I>ark - - 


- murroy. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


- bulladi, tuggara. 


I don't know 


- wirri gulburra. 


Heat - 


- kanambang. 


Plenty 


- maddo. 


Day - 


- eera. 


Big - - 


- bamir. 


Night - 


- nurrong. 


Little - 


- boobi. 


Fire - 


- ween. 


Dead - 


- bullo. 


Water 
Bmoke 


- kalleen. 

- kuddal. 


By-and-by - 


• tullan. 






Come on 


- kow-aL 


Ground 


- tagoon. 






Wind- - 


- girrar. 


Milk - 


"■ 


Rain - 


- kalleen. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - - 


- biomar. 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


- wondong. 


Wife - - 


- 



374 



THE AI^TRAUAK RACE 



No. 190.— WELLINGTON. 



Bt H. Kcghtlt, Esq., P.M. 



Kmngiroo 
OpoBBiun 
Tame dog 
Wild dog 
Emi - 
Black dnck 
Wood duck 
Pelican 
Laughingjackaas- 
Native companion 
White cockatoo • 
Crow - 
Swan • 
Effff ... 

Track of a foot - 

Fich - 

Lobster 

Crayfish 

Mosquito - 

Ply - - - 

Snake 

The Blacks - 

A Blackfellow - 

A Black woman • 

Nose - . . 



womboyn. 

Willie. 

merrie. 

ooron. 

boothenba. 

goonaroong. 

wonga wonga. 

kookobnrra. 

bralgan. 

moorie. 

wangan. 

knbboga. 

dinnong 

gooeya. 

gidda. 
mogen. 
bnrrimaL 
durong. 

bowie. 
yenna. 
moorotha. 



Hand - 
2Blacks 
SBlacks . 
One - 

Two - - - 
Three- 
Four - - - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

„ Younger - 
Brother-Elder - 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman • 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear - - 



oonboyie. 

boola. 

boola oonboyie. 

muddo. 

babee. 

koonea. 

mingan. 



kagong. 

waUowie. 

jreebung. 



- naba. 

- yenarka. 

- balong. 

- mail. 

- woodtha. 





welld; 


[GTON. 

:sQTOix— continued 


\ 
t 


• 


No. 190.— Wblu 


■ 


Mouth 


- yerong. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth - 


- 


Hill - 


- 


Hair of the head wooran. 


Wood 


- mathen. 


Beard- 


- yarren. 


Stone - 


• woUong. 


Thunder - 


- moorabrie. 


Camp - 


- moorong. 


Qraas- 


- hoogen. 


Yes - - 


- a-wa. 


Tongae 


- dallan. 


No - - 


• wiiraL 


Stomach 


- boorbye. 


I 


- athoL 


Breasts 


- 


You - 


- indoo. 


Thigh- 


- booeyo. 


Bark - - 


- doorong. 


Foot - 


- dinnong. 


Good - 


- murrumbang. 


Bone - 


- thalbe. 


Bad - - 


- eengel. 


Blood- - 


- goine. 


Sweet - 


- wari-karbeen 


SWn - - 


- nline. 




gingW. 


Pat - 


- wammo. 


Food - - 


- dinnong. 


Bowels 


- goonong. 


Hungry 


- yewarran. 


Etxorement - 


- goona. 


Thirsty 


- galling. 


War-spear - 


- doolo. 


Eat - 


-dally. 


Beed-spear - 


- djreeL 


Sleep - 


- urey. 


Throwing-stiok 


- doora, mothen. 


Drink - 


- woodjalli. 


Shield 


- marga. 


Walk- - 




Tomahawk - 


- bnrgowen. 


See - 


« 


Canoe 




Sit - 


- whiga. 


Son - 


- yerly. 






Moon- 


- ghncong. 


Yesterday - 


- wooroongaL 


Star - 


- gerrelong. 


To-day 


- dallung. 


Light - 


- nalgara. 


To-morrow - 


- wooroongaL 


Dark - - 


- boothong. 


Where are the 


Cold - - 


- ballathaL 


Blaoksr 




Heat - 


- erybong. 


I don't know 


- daggaga. 


Day - 


- 


Plenty 


- murdo. 


Night - - 


- oorong. 


Big . - 


- mooroweL 


Fire - 


- wiin. 


Little - 


- boobye. 


Water 


- galling. 


Dead - 


- baalo. 


Smoke 


. katheL 


By-and-by - 


- 


Ground 


- dagoon. 


Come on - 


- thane, yenna. 


Wind- 


- geerach. 


Milk - - 


- 


Bain - 


- gadle. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


• 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


. 


Wife - 


- 



S76 



376 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE : 



No. 190.— HILL ENB. 



Bt Bench of Maoiskbatbs, Ba.thub8T. 



Kangaroo - 


- wamboin. 


OpoMum - 


- willee. 


Tame dog - 


- miree. 


Wild dog - 


- 


Emu - ' - 


- nooree. 


Black duck - 


- buthanbar. 


Wood duck 


- goonaroo. 


Pelican 


- wirria. 


Laughing jackaas kookoopara. 


Native companion 


White cockatoo 


- moori. 


Crow - 


- wairoo. 


Swan - 


• parama. 


Egg - . 


- kapooka. 


Track of a foot 





Fish - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito - 
Fly - 
Snake - 
TheBlacks- 



- kooia. 

- wangar. 

- komogin. 

- burrumil. 

- turroo. 

- wattaka-allo. 

- makkoo. 



A Blaokf ellow 

A Black woman - moopoon. 

Nose - - - mooroo. 



Hand- 

2 Blacks 

3 Blacks 
One - 
Two - 
Three - 
Four - 



Father 
Mother 
Siste]>-£lder 

,, Younger - 
Brother-Elder - 

I, Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman - 
A baby 
A White man 

Children 
Head - 

Eye - - - 
Ear - - - 



- muzra. 



miko. 

bullagut. 

buUagut miko. 

buUagut-buUa- 
gut. 

paupee. 
koonee, 
kaitee. 



kauka. 

kappara. 

tirreebong. 

mokee. 

burn. 

murre- wangar. 

mill, 
outher. 





HILL 


END. 




ou 




No. 190.— Hill 


Ejn}---e(mtmted. 




Moath 


- nmidle. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


- eeran. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head 


. . ouran. 


Wood- 


mudlthen. 


Beard- 


- yarrie. 


Stone - 


karooL 


Thunder 


- mooroopry. 


Caonp • 




nurru. 


Grass - 


- bngwee. 


Yes 




awa. 


Tongue 


- thallee. 


No 




wim 


Stomach - 


- boorbee. 


I 




nantoo. 


Breasts 


- toomoo. 


You - 




nindoo. 


Thigh- - 


- 


Bark • 




durra. 


Foot - 


. f.hinnjL. 


Good 




yatama. 


Bone - 


- nimbee. 


Bad . 




wim wideroo. 


Blood- - 


- koai. 


Sweet- 




yatamah. 


Skin - - 


• ollee. 


Food 




orattee, tinoorka. 


Fat - 


- 


Hungry 


nattoo, nairrokul. 


Bowels 


- keal. 


Thirsty 




Excrement - 


• tookar. 


Eat - - • 


- attopoodally. 


War-spear - 


- murra. 

• 


Sleep 


. 


■ woorigerry. 


Beed-spear- 
Throwing-stlck 


- wairee. 

- nirru. 


Drink 


. 


- nairooka. 


Shield- 


- mnrka. 


Walk 


- 


• yanna. 




- burgoiee. 


See 


- 


■ naikoo, pirroo. 


Canoe - 


m 


Sit 


- 


• weeta. 


Sun - 


- eree. 


Yesterday - 


• kumpeera. 


Moon - 


- kua. 


To-day 


- tallongo. 


Star - - 


- kirala. 


To-morrow - 


- kuUnareta. 


Ught - 


- nurgan. 


Where are the 


taiga unna mi 


Dark - 


- nou. 


Blacks? 


yanna murrani ? 


Cold - - 


- pallootaL 

m 


I don't know 


- wim. 


Heat - 


' yaukee. 






Day - 


- dranbar. 


Plenty 


- pungoo. 


Night - 


- toagra. 


Big - - 


- poimit. 


Fire - 


- wee. 


Little • 


• popaga. 


Water 


' kallee. 


Dead - 


- pallonee. 


Smoke 


- puttho. 


By-and-by - 


- gumbirra. 


Gronnd 


> tookar. 


Come on 


- dina. 


Wind- 


. girrard. 


Milk - 




Rain - 


- uroo. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - 


- 


Wild turkey 




Ghosts 


- wonda. 


Wife 


m m 





378 



THE AUST&ALIAK RACE: 



No. 19a— BATHUBST. 



Bt F. Folit, Esq. 

Mb. Foley relates that class-marriage existed in the tribes 
about Bathursty and that Ippe^ CumbOy Cubbiy and Murri 
were the names of the classes. In this vocabnlarly may be 
compared the equivalents of Umgmy hungry j and eatj also 
ghost and White man. 



Kangaroo • 

OpoBBiun • 

Tame dog • 

wad dog - 
£mii « - - 

Black duok - 
Wood duok 
PeUoan 

Laaghing jaokaas 
Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - 
Swan - 
Egg . 

Track of a foot 
Fish - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks - 
ABlackfeUow - 
A Black woman - 
Nose - 



murrawaL 

kooragai. 

yukey. 

nguree. 

boothunba. 

gonaro. 

gurotha. 

kookoburra. 

bralga. 

mooroy. 

waugan. 

keeneekin. 

koboka. 

dinna. 

gooeya. 



tirry. 

booramul. 

undaba. 

mi. 

mi. 

weener. 

moorootha. 



Hand - 
2Blaoka - 
SBlacks • 
One - 
Two - 

Three- 
Four • 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

„ Younger - 
Brother-Elder - 
„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman - 
A baby 
A White man 
Children - 
Head - 

Eye - - - 
Ear - * . 



murra. 
booligamL 
booliga mugo mi. 
mugo. 
booliga. 

booliga mugo. 
booliga booliga. 
puppa. 
goonee. 

kugga. 

nubingeri. 

derriba. 

wernnga. 

warro. 

wonda. 

broy-ga. 

boUen. 

mill. 

woodtha. 





BATHUBST. 


o/v 




No. 190.— Bathubst— coniffitied. 




Month 


• willee. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


weera. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head • 




Wood- 


- muthin. 


Beard- 


geer. 


Stone - 


- kowral. 


Thunder 


- mooroomha. 


Camp - 


- ngooroomba. 


Grass - 


■ gooroon. 


Ves - 


- youi. 


Tongae 


■ thnlle. 


No 


- weerL 


Stomach 


- hoorbee. 


I 


• thu. 


Breasts 


- namo. 


You - 


- indoo. 


Thigh - 
Foot - 


- tarra. 
. dinna. 


Bark - 
Good - 


- mungur. 






- murrumban. 


Bone - 








Blood - 


- gooee. 


Bad - 


. warn. 


Skin - - 


- yulin. 


Sweet - 




Fat - 


- wamo. 


Food - 


• wigg^ 


Bowels 




Hungry 


- thuUerte. 


Excrement - 


• goona. 


Thirsty 


- knlleete. 


War-spear - 


- moora 


Eat - 


- thulle. 


Beed-spear - 


- moorabuther. 


Sleep - 


- mooga. 


Throwing-stick 


- beer. 


Drink - 


• narraga. 


Shield - 


- mutha. 


^ »y mm 


m 






Walk - 


- yannme. 


Tomahawk - 


- binjelly. 


See 


• nanee. 


Canoe - 


- kogee. 






Snn - 


- thunee. 


Sit 


- weenga. 


Moon - 


- guer. 


Yesterday - 


- kumberinyanna.* 


Star - 


- girilla. 


To-day 


- talun. 


Light - 


- wanee. 


To-morrow - 


- kumberin. 


Dark - 


- mugee. 


Where are th 


e wontulee mi ? 


Cold - - 


- goonundurra. 


Blacks? 




Heat - 




I don't know 


- weeri thu nanee. t 


Day - 


- talung. 


Plenty 


- baongo. 


Night - 


- tanmgero. 


Big - - 


- bupa. 


Fire - 


- wee. 


little - 


- boothoo. 


Water- 


• kallee. 


Dead • 


- bookago. 


Smoke 


- bombillee. 


By-and-by - 


- taloongery. 


Ground 


- tagoon. 


Come on 


• yanna. 


Wind- 


- boorooma. 


Milk ■ 




Rain - 


- goonda. 


Eaglehawk • 




God ■ 


- biam. 


Wild turkey 




Ghosts 


• woolawoonda. 


Wife - 




• Utei 


rftlbr Uhtnorrow gont. 


t latenl 


ly not/Men. 



380 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 190.— BOQAN RIVER. 



Bt thb Rbvd. J. Baltb, J.P. 



Kangaroo - 
Opoamn • 
Tame dog - 
Wild dog • 
Ema - 
Black dack- 
Wood daok- 
Pelican 

Laughing jaokaas 
Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - - - 
Swan - - - 
Egg . - - 
Track of a foot - 
Piah - 
Lobflter 
Crayfish 
Moeqnito - 
Fly - - - 
Snake - - - 
TheBlacka- 
A Blackf ellow - 
A Black woman - 
Nose - 



• womboL 

- willL 

- merL 

- coring. 

• battranda. 

- goonaroo. 



koooborra. 

bralgan. 

moori. 

wangan. 

doondoo. 

kabuga. 

dina. 

koiya. 

inka. 

mokin. 

boremoL 

toam. 

mien. 

mato. 



- mooroo. 



Hand- 


• murra. 


2 Blacks - 


- 


SBlacks - 


• 


One - 


• 


Two - 


. buUar. 


Three- 


- bullungabL 


Four - 


- 


Father 


• babena. 


Mother 


. gunene. 


Sister-Elder 


- pate. 


„ Younger 


• 


Brother-Elder 


- kaka. 


„ Younger 


A young man 


- bugnragau. 


An old man 


- karawa(?). 


An old woman 


- karawa (?). 


A baby - 


• boobL 


A White man 


- 


Children • 


- boorL 


Head - * 


. bula. 


Eye - 


- meel. 


Ear - 


• outa. 



BOOAN RIVER. 



381 





No. 190.-— BooAN BjVKBf— continued. 




Month 


- mandooL 


Boomerang - 




Teeth- - 


- errung. 


Hill - - 




Hair of the head- peani. 


Wood- 


• mnthnng. 


Beard- 


- yamng. 


Stone - 


• warlong. 


Thunder - 


- mooroobarL 


^t 








Camp - 


. mnming. 


Oraas - 


m 


Yes - - 


■ awa. 


Tongae 


' tailing. 


No - - ■ 


weerL 


Stomach - 


- bnrrabang. 


I ■ . 




Breasts 


- here. 


Yon • 




indoo. 


Thigh- 


- bonan. 


Bark 




• toonmg. 


Foot - 


- temiar. 


Good • 




■ mnrmmban. 


Bone - 


- tabal. 








Blood- - 


- garin. 


Bad . 




yiugiL 


Skin - - 


- milkar. 


Sweet 
Food • 




• weki 


Fat - 


- warmoo. 






Bowels 


. 




• WI^WtTIg 


Excrement - 


- tonga. 


Thirsty 


- kannna. 


WaT'Spear - 


- tooloo. 


Eat - • - 


- tale. 


Beed-spear- 


- 


Sleep - 


• mi. 


Throwing-stick 


• bnragan. 


Drink- 


■ weejali. 


Shield - 


- mooraka. 


Walk- - 


■ yanagare. 


Tomahawk - 


- towane. 


See - - • 


■ nakeri. 


Canoe- 


- mnre. 


Sit - - • 


- weekere. 


Snn - 


- erai. 


Yesterday - 


• kaluane. 


Moon- 


- kewa. 


To-day 


- kalbean. 


Star - 


- kerela. 


To-morrow - 




Light - 


- 


Where are the 


tagaa mien ? 


Dark - 


- 


Blacks? 




Cold - - 


- bullntl 


I don't know 




Heat - 


- knna. 


Plenty 


- mootoo. 


Day - 


. keranba. 


Big - - 


- mootoo. 


Night - - 


- mnring. 


Little- 


• bnbL 


Fire - 


- ween. 


• 




Water 


- kaUe. 


Dead - 


- kalo. 


Smoke 


- kathnl. 


By-and-by - 


- koin. 


Gronnd 


- takoon. 


Come on - 


■ tiftpftr 


Wind- - 


- kerare. 


Milk . - 




Rain - - 


* mnrra. 


Eaglehawk - 




God (Creator) 


- mnka. 


Wild turkey 




Ghosts 


• wonda. 


Wife 


• M 





382 



THE AU3TRALIAK BACK: 



No. 19b.-80UBCES OF BOQAN BIVEB. 



Br Bkitch of MAOianuTis, Oblit. 



KaagMTOO - 


- womboL 


Opomiro 


- Willie. 


Tama dog - 


• mnrria. 


Wild dog - 




Bnii - • 


- noodi. 


Black daok- 


- boothnrd. 


Wood duok- 


- goonaroo 


Pelican 


-bind. 


Laughing jackaaa go-oo-bnm. 


Native companion booralga. 


White cockatoo 


- moorai. 


Crow - 


- waagin. 


Swan - 


• dnndoo. 


B^gg . - 


• kabooga. 


Track of a foot 


- dinong. 


Fiah - - 


- gooia. 


Lobfter 


m 


Crayfiiih - 


- inga. 


Moaqoito - 


. moogin. 


Fly - 


• boorimal. 


Snake - 


- thorong. 


TheBlackB- 


- maing. 


A BlackfeUow 


- 


ABlack wonum 


• aneer. 


Nose - - 


- moorooda. 



Hand- - 


- murra. 


2 Blacks - 


- bulla maing* 


3 Blacks - 


- 


One - 


- muggo. 


Two . - 


• bnllager. 


Three- 


- bulla muggo. 


Foor - 


- bullagerbullager 


Father 


- baa-baa. 


Mother 


. gunnee. 


SiBtez^Elder 


- gaadee. 


„ Younger 


- 


Brother-Elder 


- gaagaa. 


„ Younger 


A young man 


- walwaa. 


An old man 


- dirraba. 


An old woman 


- moogamar. 


A baby - 


- geringa. 


A White man 


- 


Children - 


- booridella. 


Head- 


- balling. 


Eye • 


- mil. 


Ear - - 


- wooda. 



SOURCES OF 60GAN RIVEB. 



383 



No. 190.— SouBCBS OF BooAK BmEa— con/jniied. 

Boomerang - 
HiU . - - 



Mouth 


- gamdaL 


Teeth 


- weera. 


Hair of the head 


I- wooran. 


Beard- • 


- yarring. 


Thunder - 


- moorabrL 


Oraas 


- gooran. 


Tongue 


• daaling. 


Stomach 


-booridi. 


Breasts 


- ngamo. 


Thigh 


- damung. 


Foot - 


- deenuL 


Bone - 




Blood- - 


- goine. 


Skin - - 


- youling. 


Fat - 


- 


Bowels 


- baarm. 


Excrement - 


- dagga. 


War-spear - 


- moora. 


Beed-spear- 


- dethreel. 


Throwing-stick 


• bulga. 


Shield- - 


' murga. 


Tomahawk - 


- waggar. 


Canoe - 


- mamn. 


Sun - 


- dimie. 


Moon- 


- geewa. 


Star - 


- gerrilla. 


Light - 


- nallin. 


Dark- - 


- nou. 


Cold - - 


- goonundi. 


Heat - 


- wee-wee. 


Day - 


- doonagal. 


Night - 


- boorindal. 


Fire - 


- we-ing. 


Water 


- kaUing. 


Smoke 


- bodo. 


Ground 


• dalgan. 


Wind- 


- geerar. 


Rain - 


- nagdora. 


God - - 


- baa baa. 


Ghosts 


- goonidar. 



Wood- 
Stone - 
Camp- 
Yes - 
No - - 
I - - 
You - 
Bark - 
Good - 
Bad - - 
Sweet - 
Food - 
Hungry 
Thirsty 
Eat - 
Sleep - 
Drink- 
Walk - 
See - 
Sit - 
Yesterday - 
To-day 
To-morrow - 
Where are the 
Blacks? 
I don't know 
Plenty 
Big - - 
Little - 
Dead - 
By-and-by - 
Come on 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk - 
Wild tnrisey 
Wife - 



- ma-a-dan. 

- gerroal. 

- mirang. 

- youaL 

- weerai. 

- imingdoo. 
•■ nagdoo. 

- mingar. 

* murrunbar. 

- warrdi. 

- natL 

- dinug. 

- bingina. 

• dalla. 

- mugga-yonda. 
. narruga. 

- yanna. 

- naga. 

- weeda. 

- wamgarril. 



- bongo. 

- binal. 

- boobi. 

- balloni 

- dillin. 



384 



THE AUSTBALIAN RACE: 



No. 190.— CAEOOAR. 



Bt Bkngh or Maoistbatbs, Bathubst. 

In thiB Tooabulary the reader may compare fin and toooci, also hark and 

camp. 



Kangaroo - 
OpoBsnm - 
Tame dog - 
WMdog - - 
Eimu - - - 
Black duck 
Wood duck 
Pelican 

Langhing jackass 
Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - - - 
Swan - - - 
Egg - - - 
Track of a foot - 
Fish - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito - 
Fly - - - 
Snake - - - 
The Blacks - 
A Blackf ellow - 
A Black woman - 
Nose • - - 



womboin. 

Willi 

mirra. 

omiin. 

oonaloo. 

kogabnrra. 

brolgan. 

moorion. 

wargan. 

dundu. 

gobooga. 

mnrru. 

kooia, gooia. 

inga. 
mogan. 

doonion. 

mane. 

mane. 

inner. 

mooroo. 



Hand- 


' murra. 


2 Blacks - 




3 Blacks - 


- 


One - 


- ongbee. 


Two - 


- bulla. 


Three- 


- bulla ongbee. 


Four - 


. bulla bulla. 


Father 


- bubba. 


Mother 


- goonee. 


Sister-Elder 


- borigan. 


„ Younger 


- 


Brother-Elder 


- ngumin. 


1, Younger 


A young man 


- 


An old man 


- jerribong. 


An old woman 


- moogin. 


Ababy - 


m 


A White man 


- 


Children 


- boorion. 


Head - - 


- 


Eye - 


- mill. 


Ear - 


- woodtha. 





CABCOAR. 


i 




No. 190,— CAROOABr-corUinued. 




Month 


" nnn. 


Boomerang • 


- 


Teeth - 


- errian. 


Hill - 


- 


Hair of the head 


[• woorian. 


Wood- 


- ween. 


Beard- • 


- 


Stone - 


- wallung. 


Thunder • 


- bnrri-burri. 


Camp - 


- wooran. 


Graas - 


- ngga. 


Yes - - 


- yalla. 


Tongne 


- oollan. 


No . 


- wiirai. 


Stomach 


- nnbin. 


I 


- uadthu. 


Breasts 


- ammung. 


You - 


- indoo. 


Thigh 


• booia. 


Bark - 


- oorung. 


Foot - 


- ginnong. 


Good - 


- murrumba. 


Bone - 


- thuban. 


Bad . 


- ingee. 


Blood - 


- oomnng. 


Sweet - 


- 


Skin - 


- uUung. 


Food - 


- dungun. 


Fat . 


- wommoo. 


Hungry 


- urung. 


Bowels 


- 


Thirsty 


- weegelly. 


Excrement - 


- thugga. 


Eat - 


- dunung. 


War-spear - 


- dooloo. 


Sleep - 


- yooai. 


Beed-spear - 


- jerril. 


Drink- 


- weegelly. 


Throwing-stick 


• nmuthin. 


Walk - 


- unargin. 


Shield 


- murriga. 


See - 


- argie. 


Tomahawk - 


- dowin. 


Sit ■ 


- weegil. 


Canoe - 


- mnrrin. 


^ w « 




Snn - 


- erin. 


Yesterday - 


• 


Moon- 


- guar. 


To-day 


- 


Star - 


- eeilong. 


To-morrow - 


- 


Light - 


- erin. 


Where are the thugga mane? 


Dark - 


- urra. 


Blacks? 




Cold - - 


- ondung. 


I don't know 


- weedi. 


Heat - 


- oogil. 


Plenty 


- mardu. 


Day - 


- erin. 


Big - - 


- munung. 


Night - - 


- urra. 


Little - 


- bobian. 


Fire - - 


- ween. 


Dead - 


- booloo. 


Water 


- kalli. 






Smoke 


- kudthul. 


By-and-by - 


- yoian. 


Ground 


- oogoon. 


Come on 


- burri. 


Wind 


- unadtha. 


Milk - 


- 


Bain - 


- ullin. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - - 


- 


WUd turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


- geer. 


Wife - - 


- 


VOL. TIL 


2 


B 





385 



386 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 190.--FORBES AND THE LEVELS. 



Bt J. Camkron, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 


- wamboine. 


Hand- 


- 


Opoasom - 


- Willi 


2 Blacks - 


„ 


Tame dog - 
Wild dog - 
Ema - 


- mirrie. 

- ngooreen. 


3 Blacks - 
One - 


- 


Black duck 


- womboolgul. 


Two - 


- 


Wood duck 


- goonaroong. 


Three- 




Pelican 


m 


Four 


- 


Laughing jackass googoohra. 


Father 


m 


Native companion braUgan. 


Mother 


• 


White cockatoo 


- moorein. 


Sister-Elder 


. 


Crow - 
Swan - 
Egg - . 
Track of a foot 
Fish . 


- wagun. 

- thoondoo. 

m 


„ Younger - 
Brother-Elder - 

„ Younger 
Ayoungman - walli 


Lobster 


m 


An old man 


- jeerabung 


Crayfish - 


- 


An old woman 


- mooggun. 


Mosquito - 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks - 


- nuing. 


A baby 

A White man 

Children - 


- gooing. 


A Blackf allow 


- moing. 


Head - 


- bullung. 


A Black woman 


- muth. 


Eye - 


- mill. 


Nose - 


- moorooltha. 


Ear - 


. 



FORBES AND THE LEVELS. 



387 



No. 190. — ^FoBBBS AND THE Levbls— Continued!. 



Month 


- ngiing. 


Teeth - 


• eering. 


Hair of the head* geeyimg. 


Beard- 


- yarreen. 


Thunder - 


- mooroobrL 


Grass - 


- boogeen. 


Tongue 


m 


Stomach 


' boorbin. 


Breasts 


- beergin. 


Thigh- 


- thurnng. 


Poot - 


- jeenung. 


Bone - 


- thnbbnl. 


Blood- - 


- 


SVin - 


- yulnng. 


Fat - 


- 


Bowels 


- 


Excrement • 


- 


War-spear - 


• thooloo. 


Beed-spear- 


- jereel. 


Throwing-stick 


« 


Shield- - 


- marga. 


Tomahawk - 


- thowingjdowing. 


Canoe - 


- 


Snn - 


- ynri. 


Moon - 


- kooiynng. 


Star - 


- girelong. 


Light - 


- 


Dark - - 


- 


Cold - - 


- boolathoonu 


Heat - - 


- 


Day - 


- ynnboggra. 


Night - - 


- ngooroong. 


Fire - - 


- wiin. 


Water 


- knllnng. 


Smoke 


- 


Gronnd 


- thngoon. 


Wind- - 


- mooroolbnrra. 


Bain • 


- nburra. 


God - 


• 


Ghosts 


_ 





Boomerang - 


• burgun. 




Fill - 


- 




Wood- 


- geegul. 




Stone - 


• wallung. 




Camp - 


• ngoorung. 




Yes - 


' ngooa. 




No - 


- widdi or widdai 




I 


- 




You - 


- 




Bark - 


- 




Good - 


- 




Bad - . 


- 




Sweet • 


• 




Food - 


- 




Hungry 


m 




Thirsty 


- 




Eat - 


- 




Sleep - 


- wirrinya. 




Drink- 


- 




Walk- - 


- yanana. 


• 


See - 


- ngana. 




Sit - - 


- 




Yesterday - 


- 




To-day 


- 




To-morrow - 


- 




Where are ' 


the 




Blacks ? 






I don't know 






Plenty 






Big - - 






Little - 






Dead - 






By-and-by - 






Come on 






Milk - 






Eaglehawk - 


• maleyan. 




Wild turkey 


- gumbull. 


Wife - 


- mooban. 


21 


12 





388 



THE AUSTRALIAK RAGE: 



No. 190.-OANIX)BLIN. 

Bt W. H. SunoB, Esq. 

In this vocabulary the reader may compare tongue^ food, and eat; alao 
brecLsU and nUUt, BurgcM s bo<mierang also aignifiee crooked, aa has been 
Been in the Additional Words given by Mr. Snttor. The equivalents of 
thirsty and water are related terms. Families is this neighbourhood have 
totems or yoolo with which they mark trees around the graves of their 
dead and also their opossum-rugs. One of these is the carpet snake. 



Kangaroo - 


- womboin. 


Hand - 


murra. 


Opossum - 


• weelee. 


2 BUu^.kfl - 


- bulla mi-een* 


Tame dog - 


- mirree. 


3 Blacks - 




wad dog - 




One - 


- unbL 


Emu - 


- nffurooin. 


m 




Black duck - 


- boorangwong. 


Two 


. bulla. 


Wood duck- 


- goonarrong. 


Three- 


- bulla unbL 


Pelican 


- birriga. 


Four - 


-bulla bulla. 


Laughing jackass- kookooburra. 


Father 


- bobeen. 


Native companio 


n brolgan. 


Mother 


- goonnee. 


White cockatoo 


- moorein. 


^^ • nv V 


■ 


^1 




Sister-Rlder 


- mmgan. 


Crow - 


- vraagan. 






Swan - 


- dthoonthoo. 


„ Younger 


- 


Egg - . 


- kooboocaw. 


Brother-Elder 


- kulmine. 


Track of a foot 


- mooroo. 


„ Younger kargine 


Fish - - 


- gooya. 


A young man 


- walwye. 


Lobster 


- 


An old man 


- djirrebong. 


Crayfish - 


. inka. 


An old woman 


- dtharboogong. 


Mosqxdto - 
Fly - 


- booreema. 


A baby 


- boobi, boon 


Snake - 


- dthoroong. 


A White man 


- kooeen. 


TheBlack8- 


- mi-een. 


GhUdren - 


. madoobooii. 


A Blackf eUow 


- unbi mi-een. 


Head - - 


- ballong. 


A Black woman 


- eena. 


Eye - 


- mill. 


Nose - 


- moorootha. 


Ear - - 


- woodtha. 





GANDOBLIN. 


389 




No. 190.— Gandobun— «on<Mi«e(i. 


Mouth 


- willing. 


Boomerang- 


• burrgan. 


Teeth - 


- eenmg. 


Fill . 


- djirran. 


Hair of the head- woornng. 


Wood- 


■ geegul. 


Beard 


- yarrain. 


Stone • 




Thnnder - 


• moorooboori. 


Gamp - 


- ngooroong. 


Grass 


- boogween. 


Yes - 


- awa. 


Tongne 


- dthallain. 


No - 


- weerL 


Stomach 


- boorbeen. 


I 


- nadthoo. 


Breasts 


- amoo. 


You - 


- indoo. 


Thigh - - 


- boyou. 


Bark . 


- dthoorung. 


Foot - 


- djinnimg. 


Good - 


- marrumbong. 


Bone • 


- dthabbnl. 


Bad ■ 


• ingeel. 


Blood- 


• qnoin. 


Sweet - 


• adthai. 


flWn . 


- yoolin. 


Food - 


- dthallee. 


Fat - 


- wammoo.* 


Hungry 


- ngooratn. 


Bowels 


- birrien. 


Thirsty 


- kalleentha. 


Excrement - 


- dthngga. 


Eat - 


• dthalleentha. 


War- spear - 


- mell, dtholoo. 


Sleep - 


- eurai. 


Beed-spear- 


- djereel. 


Drink - 


• weejallee. 


Throwing-stick 


• wommera. 


Walk- 




Shield 


- geerin-geerin, 


See - 


- gnaagee. 


■ 


murga. 


Sit ■ 


- boorai. 


Tomahawk - 


- gooroowa, mool- 


Yesterday - 


- dthallung-ingor- 




ooga. 




ein. 


Ganoe- 


. marreen. 


To-day 


• dthallung. 


Sun - 


- eera. 


To-morrow • 


- dthallung ngar- 


Moon - 


- kewong. 




reigiree. 


Star - 


• germlong. 


Where are 


the dthargwa mieen ? 


Light - 


- bondthnre. 


Blacks? 




Dark- 


- ngooroong. 


I don*t kno^ 


V - weeri adjung- 


Cold - - 


- baludthai. 




nein. 


Heat - 


- oogil. 


Plenty 


- maddoo. 


Day - 


- dthallon. 


Big - ■ 


. binnale. 


Night - • 


• ngooroong. 


Little - 


- winnunga. 


Fire - 


- ween. 


Dead - 


- balloongein. 


Water 


- kaleen. 


By-and-by • 


- dthallung book- 


Smoke 


- kadthong. 




ulbirrie. 


Ground 


- dthargwoon. 


Gome on 


- dthanganna. 


Wind- 


- keeraa. 


Milk - 


- amoo. 


Bain - 


- eurong. 


Eaglehawk • 




God • 


- by-am-mee. 


Wild turkej 


7 


Ghosts 


• gooindthar. 


Wife ■ 


■ « 



* ShouUI be spdt iMmunoo.— E. M. C 



390 



THS AU8TRALIAK RAGE: 



No. 190.— WAUEEBa 



Bt J. E. Pbabce, Esq., P.M. 



Kangaroo - 


• womboine. 


Hand - 


- murra. 


Opoisom 


- wiUie. 


2BlackB 


- buUa mingoo. 


Tame dog - 


- mirry. 


3 Blacks 


- buUa kooinebine 


wad dog - 


- 




mingoo. 


Emu - 


. knunowne. 


One • 


- kooinebine. 


Black duck - 


- buthenbang. 


Two - 


• bulla. 


Wood duck - 


. kunmoinnng. 


Three- 


- buUa kooinebine. 


Pelican 


. peneya. 


Four - 


• bulla bulla. 


Laughing jackaaa kookooburry. 


Father 


- babine. 


Native companion buralyang. 


Mother 


- loonea. 


White cockatoo 


- moonine. 






Crow - 


- wargine. 


Sister-Elder 


- boo-ne-gun (?). 


Swan - 


- thunthoo. 


„ Younger 


- 


Egg - 


• kabogie. 


Brother-Elder 


. kulmine. 


Track of a foot 


- yup-pang. 


„ ionnger 


FiBh - 


- gooian. 


A young man 


• bog-gone-gune. 


Lobeter 


- inkka. 


An old man- 


• gune-bang. 


Grayfiah 




An old woman 


- biUa-gune, 


Mosquito • 


- mogin. 


A baby 


- booie. 


Fly 


- boorewal. 


w 

A White man 




Snake - 
The Blacks • 


• thanogie. 
- minffoo. 


Children - 


- poopoe. 


A Blackf ellow 


• mingoo. 


Head - 


- buUang. 


A Black woman 


- yin-na-na. 


Eye - 


- mill. 


Nose - 


- noo-noo. 


Ear - 


- wooda. 



WAUBEBS. 



391 



Mouth • 

Teeth . • - 
Hair of the head - 
Beard- 
Thunder - 
Grass ... 
ToDgae 
Stomach 
Breasts 

Thigh- - - 
Foot - 

Bone - - . 
Blood - - - 
Skin - - - 
Pat - 
Bowels 

WaiHqpear - 

Beed-spear - 

Throwing-stick • 

Shield 

Tomahawk - 

Oanoe- 

Sim - - - 

Moon - - - 

Star - . - 

Light - 

Dark - - - 

Cold - - - 

Heat - 

Day - 

Night - . - 

Fir© - - - 

Water 

Smoke 

Gronnd 

Wind . - - 

Bain - - - 

God - - - 

Ghosts 



No. 190.-- Waljxeb»— eon^ntte({. 

knine. 

yinna. 

woonnna. 

yangnine. 

mooroobony 

bngone. 

thalline, 

boorbin. 

knagmong. 

thanung. 

jinnnng. 

thalpang. 



yoline. 

womme. 

bnllbene. 

thug-ga. 

thnl-loo. 

jereaL 

wammare* 

minegar. 

tliawing. 

yeerie. 

gawong. 

Unalang. 

knnlltmg. 

knamone. 

booloothie. 

willan. 

kalenike. 

kalekoondoo. 

ween. 

Icalhm. 

kodthnL 

thogon. 

thownmu 

nrone. 



Boomerang - 


• 


Hill - - 


- 


Wood- - 


- thnllo thullo. 


Stone - 


- wollong. 


Camp - 


- wurang. 


Yes - - 


- knowan. 


No - - 


- wiry. 


I . - 


- knathn. 


Yon - - 


- knindo. 


Bark - - 


- thnnmg. 


Good - 


- morombang. 


Bad - - 


- noonie. 


Sweet - 


- 


Food" - 


- thnlgiarrL 


Hungry 


• knirane. 


Thirsty 


- 


Eat - 


- thallee. 


Sleep - 


- 


Drink- • 


- weethalle. 


Walk - - 


- yanoogie. 


See - - 


- knagie. 


Sit - - 


• weeagie. 


Yesterday - 


- ning-u-nine. 


To-day 


- thalyeniL 


To-morrow - 


- 


Where are the tpgwannimingoo? 


Blacks? 




I don't know 


- werylie knagie. 


Plenty 


- muttoo. 


Big - - 


. moonoon. 


Little - 


-bobbL 


Dead • - 


- boolo. 


By-and-by - 


- goo-i-yoo. 


Come on - 


- 


Milk - - 


• 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


Wife . . 


• 



392 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 190.— WAOOA WAGOA. 

Bt Hsnbt Batles, Esq., P.M« 

During five-and-forty yean' obaervatioD of the natlTe names of placea, 
I have noticed a tendency to speU with an a aonndii which phonetically 
should have been spelt with an o. In such cases, however, the a used to 
be pronounced o, and so the proper sound was preserved ; but of late years 
such is no longer the case. When I first heard of the place to which this 
vocabulary belongs it was called Wataga Wawga; as often pronounced at 
present it would rhyme with qnagga. 



Kangaroo - 


womboin. 


Hand - 


- marra. 


Opossum - 


Willie. 


2 Blacks - 


- boolamiin. 


Tame dog - 


merrie 


SBlacks 


■ boola oonbi miin. 


Wild dog - 


» 


One - 


- oonbL 


Emu - 


oorooin. 






Black duck • 


poothanbang. 


Two - 


- boola. 


Wood duck- 


koonaaroo. 


Three- 


- boola oonbi. 


Pelican 


koolay karlie. 


Four - 


- boola boola. 


Laughing jackass kokoparra. 


Father 




Native oompamoi 


I pooralgun. 


Mother 


- koon-nee. 


White cockatoo • 


mooran. 


Sister-Elder 


- boregun. 


Crow - 


wagga. 


„ Younger 


. 


Swan - 


' toondoo. 


Brother-Elder 


- ffulbomun. 


Egg . - . 
Track of a foot • 


• kapooka. 
- yabbuck. 


„ Younger 


Fish - . 


. kooeya. 


A young man 


- nurmi. 


Lobster 


dookami 


An old man 


- beejeL 


Crayfish 


• yingar. 


An old woman 


- bullargun. 


Mosquito - 


• kummoon. 


A baby 


• boorL 


Fly - . 


• bookga. 


A White man 


- gohone. 


Snake - 






^^ 


The Blacks- 


• miin. 


Children - 


• matooboori. 


A Blackf ellow • 


oonbi miin. 


Head • 


- bul-lun. 


A Black woman - 


' yeenan. 


Eye - 


- mil. 


Nose - 


- mooroota. 


Ear - 


- woomm. 



WAGGA WAGGA. 



393 





No. 190.— Waooa WAQQA—caiUmu 


ed. 


Month 


yerang. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


nyun. 


Hill - - 




Hair of the head • 




Wood- 


- khegnl. 


Beard- 


' yarra. 


Stone - 


- woUa. 


Thnnder - 


mooroo 








mooroolbri 


Camp • 


- oorong. 


Grass - 


- pooarroo. 


Yes - 


■ nga. 


Tongae 


diillf. 


No - 


- weeri. 


Stomach 


• poorbin. 


I 


- ahtoo. 


Breasts 


tarra. 


Yon . 


- indoo. 


Thigh 


- tarrang. 


Bark - 


- toori 


Foot - 


• geenung. 


Good - 


- mnmimbang. 


Bone - 


tnpptJ. 


Bad - 


■ yingi» yrngiL 


Blood - 


- quoin. 


Sweet 


- ngattee. 


Skin - 


- ulie. 


Food - 


- tungi, tallee. 


Fat 


• wommoo. 


Hungry 


- arran. 


Bowels 


- keeL 






Excrement - 


- tallun. 


Thirsty 


- weedallee. 


War-spear - 


- toolook. 


Eat 


- turn. 


Reed-spear - 


- teereel. 


Sleep - 


- yoori. 


Throwing-stick 


- wammnr. 


Drink- 


- weetallee. 


Shield - 


• gooml-lok. 


Walk ■ 


- yanni 


Tomahawk - 


• towie. 


See 


- nyarga. 


Canoe - 


> murrin. 


Sit 


- waada. 


Snn - 


■ yeri. 


Yesterday - 


- yaandoo. 


Moon - 


- kewung. 


To-day 


- taUahnyeri. 


Star - 


- meemar. 


To-morrow. - 


- orogul. 


Light - 


• nallun. 


Where are tl 


iie tagna miin ? 


Dark - 


booroonda. 


Blacks? 


w 


Cold ■ 


- bulloodi. 






"wr A 




I don't know 


- weeri. 


Heat - 


- yerimoontim. 






Day - 


■ nargun. 


Plenty 


- matool. 


Night - 


■ tamboolba. 


Big - - 


- moorodi. 


Fire - 


- ween. 


Little - 


• boobi. 


Water 


- karlee, karlin. 


Dead - 


- biloon. 


Smoke 


- kartnL 


By-and-by - 


• quloo. 


Ground 


tahgoon. 


Come on 


' tanyinna. 


Wind - 


' towra. 


Milk - 




Bain - 


euro. 


Eaglehawk - 




God • • 




WM turkey 




Ghosts 


' 


WUe . 





894 



THE AU8TRAIJAK BAGB 



No. 190.— TAKKO, URANA, BILLEBONG, AND JEBBILDEBIE. 



Bt Laohlah McLean, Esq. 



Kangaroo • 


womboL 


Hand • 




murra. 


Opoesom • 


willL 


2 Blacks . 




bulla boorL 


Tame dog • 


middi. 


SBlaoks 




bulla imbiboori 


WUddog • 










o 


woorin. 


One - 




moonbi* 


Black dnok • 


wumbolgal. 


Two - 




bulla. 


Wood dnck 


goonaroo. 


Three • 




bulla imbi. 


Pelican 


gooligallL 


Four • 




martoo. 


Langhing jackass 


goo-goo-borra. 


Father 




tnama^ 


Native companion 
White oookatoo • 


L boovanga. 
- korina. 


Mother 




• 

. goont 


Grow - 


• wogra. 


Sister-Elder 


. meengan. 


Swan • 


• toondoo. 


„ Younger • 




Egg • 


> gabbago. 


Brother-Elder • 


galgaL 


Track of a foot 


• mooro. 


„ Younger 




Fish . - . 


guya. 


A young man 


■ eera mooro. 


Lobster 


, 


An old man 


jembang. 


Crayfish 


• mnrrami. 


An old woman - 


durroogang. 


Mosqnito 

ny - - 


. moogin. 
- booriman. 


A baby 


boorL 


•r 

Snake 


• dooroom. 


A White man • 


• gooin. 


The Blacks - 


. mein. 


Children 


■ boorityela. 


A Blackf ellow 


• boorL 


Head - 


. bullang. 


A Black woman 


- bnlagero. 


Eye - 


- mill. 


Nose - 


- moorooda. 


Ear 


• 


- oodfti 



YANKO, UKAKA, BILLEBOKG, JERRILDERIR 395 



No. 190.~Tanko» Usana, Billkboko, and Jebbildxbie— con^intiecl. 


Month 


- mein. 


Boomerang 




Teeth 


- eeran. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head 


I ooran. 


Wood- 


- geegaL 


Beard 


. yarrang. 


Stone - 


• woUa. 


Thnnder - 


- moorobrL 


Gamp- 


- woorang. 


Graas 


- boQgaroo. 


Ves - 


- wa. 


Tongae 


. daUang. 


No - 




Stomach 


- daddo. 






Breasts 


- geen. 


I 


- nadoo. 


Thigh 




You - 


- neendu. 


Foot - 


- jeenang. 


Bark - 


- doorang. 


Bone - 


■ dnbbaL 


Good - 


- murmmbang. 


Blood- 


- goon. 


Bad - 


- nanm. 


Skin - 


- 3nilin. 


Sweet 


- wnttu. 


Fat - 


• womo. 


Food- . 


- dungan. 


BowelB 


kolinga. 


Hungry 


- narran. 




- goonna. 


Thirsty 


. gallinginda. 


War-spear - 


- dooloo. 


Eat • 


• dalli. 


Reed-spear- 


> jeereed. 


Sleep - 




Throwing-stick • 


• wnnunera. 


Drink- 


- widgelli. 


Shield 


■ geenmg, geera. 


Walk- 


- yannagL 




• mobt 


£m 


• 


Ganoe 


' morri. 


See 


- naagL 


Snn - 


• eery. 


Sit 


- weegL 


Moon - 


■ gabbata. 


Yesterday • 


- woonoongulgalla. 


Star - - ■ 


■ meema. 


To-day 


- dallan. 


Light • 


• dumboola. 


To-morrow 


- woorongool. 


Dark- 


' ooroong. 


V\here ar< 


B the daggan mein? 


Cold - 


' bnlloogL 


Blacks? 




Heat - 


- oogin. 


I don't kno 


w - wirra winanga* 


Day - 


> eenba. 


Plenty 


- maddoo. 


Kight 


woonmg. 


Kg - 


- mooring. 


Fire - - . 


ween. 


Little- 


- borbuttya. 


Water 


gnllL 


Dead- 


' bitliTnorf, 


Smoke 


gatta. 


By-and-by ■ 


- goyoo. 


Ground 


dagoo. 


Come on • 


- dandinya. 


Wind 


• dara. 


Milk - 


■ 


Bain - 


• yarong. 


Eaglehawk 


■ • 


God - - . 




Wildturke 


y • 


Ghosts 




Wife - 


* ^ 



396 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE 



No. 190.— DENnjQUIN. 

Bt G. A. OoBDON, Esq., P.M. 

See haby and effg in this vooabalary. 



Kangaroo - 


- womboia. 


OpoflBom - 


willee. 


Tame dog • 


• mirry. 


Wild dog - 




fillllX 


> ginabon. 


Black dnck 


- wombulgal. 


Wood duck 


koonaroo. 


Pelican 


• koolagally. 


Laaghing jackaas 


kookaburra. 


Native companiozi 


L booralgon. 


White cockatoo 


• mooran. 


Grow - 


• waagon. 


Swan - 


- dhundu. 


'Egg • 


- kabooga. 


Track of a foot 


- yabong. 


PiBh . 


- gooya. 


Lobster 


• thugamong. 


Grayfiah 


■ moorogonong. 


MoBqnito 


• mpgin. 


Fly - - • 


boree-mol. 


Snake • 


duru. 


The Blacks - 


moing. 


A Blackf ellow • 


> moing. 


A Black woman * 


yenur. 


Noia - . . 


morooda. 



Hand - 

2 Blacks 

3 Blacks 

One - 
Two - 
Three - 
Pour - 
Father 
Mother 

Sister-Elder 

„ Younger 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Ghildren 
Head • 
Eye • 
Ear 



murra. 
bulla moing. 
buUa ongbee 
moing. 
ongbee. 
bulla, 
bul-la ongbee. 

bulla bulla, 
babeen. 
gonee. 
mingan. 

kaghan. 

wal-looee. 

beedar. 

tharbogang. 

kabooga. 

kaban. 

boon. 

balong. 

nuL 

woda. 





DKNILIQUIN. 









No. IQO.—DENiLiQniN— con^»ue(2. 




Month 


ngang. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth • 


yerong. 


Hill 






Hair of the head - 


wonm. 


Wood- 




geegal. 


Beard- 


yarang. 


Stone • 




wallnng. 


Thnnder • 


moro-bri. 


Camp - 




wallL 


Grass • 


bo-gnng. 


Tes 




nga. 


Tongae 


thalang. 


No 




wen. 


Stomaoh 


borbin. 


1- 




uddu. 


Breasts 


ang-mong. 


Yon 




gneandoo. 


Thigh - 


boyoo. 


Bark 




duran. 


Foot - 


tinnng. 


Good 




marromban. 


Bone - 


' dabol. 


Bad 




yeangiL 


Blood - 


gomnrr. 


Sweet 




naddee. 


akin - 


• ulung. 


Food 




dhangang. 


Fat - • ■ 


• wamo. 


Hungry 


• ngaran. 


Bowels 


■ kalleenga. 


Thirsty 


. kalleenin. 


Excrement - 


■ goonnng. 


Kat - 


• dallee. 


War-spear - 


- dolo. 


Sleep - 


• ure. 


Beed-spear • 




Drink- 


■ weejally. 


Throwing-stick 


- wamnr. 


Walk . 


. yanagee. 


Shield- 


. geran {g hard). 




W *i* 


Tomahawk - 


• thawin. 


See 


. ngagee. 


Canoe - 


- koonadan. 


Sit - 


• weeja. 


Snn - 


- yeree. 


Yesterday - 


> neangorang. 


Moon - 


- ka-bo-da. 


To-day 


■ dalun. 


Star - . - 


. mimma. 


To-morrow • 


- nooronggal. 


light - 


• ngalun. 


Where are the 


thagamoing? 


Dark - 


- bnrroondang. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


• balloody. 


I don't know 


- ne-ag. 


Heat - 


. wogiL 


Plenty 


• madoo. 


Day - 


- eeree. 


Big - 


. monnn. 


Night - 


. bnrrondang. 


Little - 


- bobi. 


Fire - 


- waing. 


Dead - 


- baalo. 


Water 
Smoke 


- kaling. 

- kadaL 


By-and-by - 


- goan. 


Ground 


• dagon. 


Come on 


. thanonya. 


Wind- 


• thawarra. 


Milk - 




Bain - 


- urang. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - 


- bny-a-mee. 


wad turkey 




Ghosts 


- kab-ba. 


Wife 


- 





397 



398 



THB AUSTRALIAK RAGE: 



No. 190.--HOWLONG. 



Bt Ghaslis Btbnb, Esq. 



Kangaroo • 


- wamboyne. 


Hand • 


- mnrra. 


Opooaiim - 


• wiUie. 


2Blaok8 • 


• bolla gowing. 


Tame dog • 


- merrie* 


3 RlackH ^ 


• bnllaoonbee 


WUddog - 






gowing. 


Bmn - 


' moomng. 


One ' 


• oonbee. 


Black dnok • 


- poothenba. 


Two ■ 


. bulla. 


Wood duck 


■ goonaroo. 


Three • 


. buUa oonbee. 


Pelioan 


• golegala. 






Laughing jaokaai 


1 googoobnrra. 


Four - 


bulla bulla. 


Native oompanioD 


L bralgan. 


Father 


- mamoo, 


White cookatoo • 


> warriema. 


Mother 


- gunnee. 


Crow • 


■ warroo. 


Siater-Elder 


■ mingong. 


Swan - 


- thnndoo. 


„ Yonnger • 




Egg • • • 


- kobogong. 


Brother-Elder • 


- kajong. 


Track of a foot 




„ Vonngei 




Fiflh • 


■ gooi-ya. 


Ayonngman 


- wallie. 


Lobster 
Crayfish • 
Mosquito - 


■ mooragonong. 


An old man 


■ jerribong. 


• mogin. 


An old woman • 


■ terboga. 


Fly - 




A baby 


' kaboga. 


Snake- 


doorong. 


A White man • 


gooin. 


The Blacka 


main. 


Children - 




A Black! ellow - 


gowing. 


Head - 




A Black woman • 


baragooroo. 


Eye - 


- mill. 


Non - • 


■ marrooda. 


Ear • - 


■ woodtha. 





HOWLONG. 

• 




dm 




No. 190.^HowLONG — continued. 


• 


Month 


nayn. 


Boomerang • 




Teeth - 


yeran. 


Hill - 






Hair of the head- 


nmn. 


Wood- 




googal. 


Beard- - - 


yaring. 


Stone • 




wallong, gibber. 


Thnnder • 


marroobara. 


Camp - 




moorong. 


Grass - 


bognna. 


Yes - 




minawa. 


Tongne 




No • 




weeraL 


Stomach 


- boorigin. 


I . 




athn. 


Breasts 


among. 


You ■ 




indoo. 


Thigh - 


• boogoL . 


Bark • 




thoorong. 


Foot - 


. ginnong. 


Good ' 




murrambong. 


Bone - 


- jabnl. 


Bad 






Blood - 


• gooma. 


Sweet- 






Skin - - • 


• oolang. 


Food 




- thalloo. 


Fat - - • 


• wammoo. 


Hnngry 


• arran. 


Bowels 


. koUing-gong. 


Thutity 




Excrement • 


- goonoo. 


Eat • 


» a ■ 


thalla. 


War-spear - 


- oola. 


Sleep • 




■ werrigoo. 


Beed-spear • 


- jereeL 


Drink 


• • a 


• bolUng. 


Throwing-stick • 


• wama. 


Walk 


- 


- yannagoo. 


Shield 
Tomahawk • 
Ganoe 
Snn - 
Moon • 
Star - 
Tiight - 
Dark - 
CJold . - 


- mnrga. 

• towing. 

- marring. 

- yeara. 

- goowong. 

* miTfTTn^t 
■ nallan. 

- broonong. 

- bolludera. 


See 
Sit 

Yester 
To-daj 
To-moi 
Where 
Black 

I don't 


* * 

day - 

r 

rrow - 

are the 
s? 
, know 


- nagoo. 
• wegoo. 

tallan. 

- manmgQ. 


Heat - 


- koninna. 


Plenty 


- madoo. 


Day - 




Big - - 


• moonoon. 


Night- . 


- moorong. 


Little- 


• boobegal. 


Fire - 
Water 
Smoke 
Ground 


■ wiin. 

- boodong. 

• boombillie. 

- thagoon. 


Dead - 
By-and-by - 
Gome on • 


- baloona. 

■ thanyanagoo. 


Wind- 


- thowarroo. 


Milk - 




Rain - 


. nrong. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - . 




WUd turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife 


■ • 


• ennar. 



400 



THE AUSTEUHJAN RACE: 



No. 190.--ALBnBY. 



Bt G. R. H. Stucuet, Esq. 



Though this vocabalary has much in common with preceding onee, it 

differs from them in the equivalent of no. 



Kangaroo - 


- womboin. 


Hand- 


- manra. 


Opossum - 


wooley. 


2Blacks • 




Tame dog • 


miri. 


SBhickB 




WUddog - 




One - 


- wallween. 


Emu ~ 


moorein. 






Black duck 


boothongbong. 


Two - - 


• bulla. 


Wood duck 


goonara. 


Three 


- bullawon. 


Pelican 


■ goolagerie. 


Pour - 


. bnlla-bullA. 


Laughing jaokasi 


B kookaburra. 


Father 


- mama. 


Native compamo 


ubooralging. 


Mother 


• goone. 


White cockatoo • 


' waima. 




o 


Crow- 


■ waggan. 


Sister-Elder 


- mingam. 


Swan - 


thundoo. 


„ Younger 


- baraging. 


Egg - - . 


- kobbako. 


Brother-Elder 


- kagong. 


Track of a foot 




„ Vounger gullbooman. 


Fish ■ 




A young man 


- naramong. 


Lobster 




An old man 


- jerebong. 


Crayfish 




An old woman 


- kaambatha. 


Mosquito - 
Ply • 


■ moloola. 


A baby 

A White man 


- boon. 
. koen. 


Snake 


■ gona. 






The Blacks 


- main. 


Children 




A Blackfellow 


iabba. 


Head- 


- balong. 


A Black woman 


- bullagera. 


Eye - 


■ mill. 


Nose - 


- moorootha. 


Ear - 


- woodtha. 





ALBUKV. 


4 




No. 190. — ^Albubt — continued. 




Mouth 


• erong. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


- erong. 


Hill - 




Hair of the he 


Eld- oum. 


Wood- 


- geegil. 


Beard 


- yarang. 


Stone - 


- wallan. 


Thnnder - 


- mooruban. 


Gamp 


- moorong. 


Graas- 


• mugong. 


Yes - 


- yama or yarlo. 


Tongae 




No - 


- woodL 


Stomach 


- gidan. 


I 




Breasts 


- yamong. 


You - 




Thigh 


- tharong. 


Bark - 


- thorong. 


Foot - 


- thenong. 


Good - 


- murrabong. 


Bone - 


- thaubal. 


Bad - 


- ingle. 


Blood- - 


- gowong. 


Sweet- 




Rkin - 


- youlong. 


Food - 


- thunong. 


Fat - 


- wombo. 


Hungry 


. narang. 


Bowels 


- borellin. 


Thirsty 




fixcrement - 


- goonong. 


Eat - 


> thulgaru. 


War-spear - 


- thula. 


Sleep - 


- werigee. 


Beed-spear- 


gereel. 


Drink 


- wegalie. 


Throwing-stic] 


k . 


Walk - 


- yanagee. 


Shield 


- geringarin. 


See - 


- nogaree. 


Tomahawk • 


- thouwing. 


Sit - 


- weegee. 


Canoe 


• marin. 


Yesterday - 




Sun - 


- erie. 


To-day 


- thalan. 


Moon- 


• kewong. 


To-morrow - 


- owantha. 


Star - 


- mema. 






Light - 


- nargong. 


Where are th 


le 


Dark - 


- ourong. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 




I don't know 




Heat - 


- moononera. 


Plenty 




Day - 


- gerambong. 


Big - - 




Night- - 


- ourong. 


Little - 




Fir© - 


- wein. 


Dead - 




Water 


- kullen. 






Smoke 


- kuthaL 


By-and-by - 




Ground 


- thugong. 


Come on - 




Wind 


- thoura. 


Milk - 




Bain • 


* urong. 


Eaglehawk- 




God - 




WUd turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife - 


- hobanblara. 


VOL. lU. 


2 








401 



BOOK THE SEVENTEENTH. 



202 



BOOK THE SEVENTEENTH. 

PREFATORY REMARKS. 

Fob mnch of the information contained in this book I am 
indebted, as will be seen, to the late Bevd. William Ridley, 
who was fortnnate in meeting with a half-caste woman, an 
Englishman, and a Blackfellow, whose acquaintance with the 
languages of the sonth-eastem extremity of the continent 
enabled him to preserve a few scraps of information which 
most otherwise have passed away entirely unrecorded. Nor 
have these gleanings been without their use, for, as the reader 
will see further on, they have enabled us to determine the 
point at which the occupation of Australia by its aboriginal 
race became complete. 

If, however, it is unfortunate in some respects that Mr. 
Bidley^s records of the languages in this portion of the con- 
tinent are in one or two instances — ^that of Twofold Bay 
particularly — so scanty, we are happy in obtaining from Mr. 
Bulmer and Mr. du Ye a sufficiently full account of the 
Moneroo language. Still it must not be overlooked, that 
long prior to this work being commenced our civilization 
had brought together, and into famUiar intercourse in this 
portion of the continent, tribes which had previously lived in 
a state of chronic hostility, and that their languages have, 
as the result, become very much fused. Hence the time has 
passed when a vocabulary of any of these languages free from 
foreign words could be obtained. 

In the short lists of phrases which follow several of Mr. 
Ridley's vocabularies, a knowledge of some of the root-words 
of our languages has enabled me to see that the translations 
made by that writer are seldom literal, and in some few cases 
to give exact renderings. 



406 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 191.— PORT JACKSON, OR SYDNEY HARBOUR. 

From thje Works of Captain John Huntkr, R.K., and 

LUSUTENANT-COLONEL COLLDTS. 

Afteb Captain Cook's stay at the Endeavour River, the 
next real acquaintance of Europeans with the Blacks of 
Australia took place at Sydney Harbour in 1788. Concern- 
ing the manners and language of the several associated 
tribes which dwelt in that locality, numerous details have 
been recorded by Hunter in 1793, by Collins in 1804, and by 
other early writers. Those tiamed accompanied the expedi- 
tion which planted our first settlement in New Holland, as 
the continent was then called. From their accounts, we 
learn that the tribes in the neighbourhood of Sydney Harbour 
agreed essentiaUy in manners with the other tribes in that 
portion of the continent, of which the reader has already 
seen many descriptions. Thus we find them piercing the 
septum of the nose, amputating a portion of one of the 
fingers of the left hand of the females, scarring the body, 
knocking out teeth, and so on. They wore no clothes, and 
Collins describes the women as blushing at their nakedness 
when in presence of White men. What is most singular is 
that this author should have witnessed the rites which 
accompany the knocking out of teeth; one of the secret 
ceremonies which only one or two White men have succeeded 
in gaining admission to during the eighty years which have 
elapsed since his time. Of these ceremonies Collins' work 
contains many plates. 

Within about fourteen months after the formation of onr 
settlement at Sydney, small-pox broke out in the tribes 
which dwelt around the harbour, and nearly exterminated 
them. 



PORT JACKSON, OR SYDNEY HARBOUR. 



407 



The following Additional 
Captain Hunter's Journal : — 



Words are extracted from 



To stay 


- aUocy. 


„ ask for any 


- annegar. 


thing 




Distant 


- arrowan. 


Buried 


- bourbillie remul. 


AbeUyful - 


- barong-boruch, 




canno. 


A grave 


- bomar. 


A cloud 


- bourra. 


TokisB 


- boon-abbiey, 




boonya. 


Finger 


- berrille. 


Rihfl - - 


- bibbe. 


^rhe heart - 


- boot-boot. 


„ cheek - 


- birra. 


Flood tide - 


- baragoola. 


The red kangaroo bangaray. 


To fling 


- boraya. 


A louse 


- moona,burradoo. 


Woman's apron 


- barin. 


With young 


- binny. 


To singe the beard bunyadil. 


off 





To bum 
„ call 
Broken 
A fishing-line 
The neck 

A gut - 

Black cockatoo 
The sea 
To sneeze - 
Here - 
To spit 
,, prick 
A son - 
To sweat 
SmaU-pox - 
Rotten 
The knee - 



cannadinga. 
cama. 

cot-ban-jow. 
carra-duin. 

cadlwar, coUi- 
ang. 
carramah. 

caraU. 

caragarang. 

dere-nignan. 

die. 

dooragya. 

dooralang. 

dooroow. 

erooka. 

gall-gall. 

godieby. 

gorrook. 



The arm 
Feathers - 
A hut - - 

A female child 
Ornamental scars 

on the body 
Reed necklace - 
To tickle - 

„ snore 

„ leap 
A rock 
To steal - 
Sand - 
lightning - 
An ant 
The navel - 
Tears - - - 
The biU of a burd 
To take hold 
The liver - 
A net - 
The forehead 

„ elbow 

„ throat 
To laugh 
The shotdder 
To weep 

,, sneeze 

„ yawn 

,, swim 
Where 
The lips 
chin 
eyebrow 
„ Ups 
To whistle 
Red • 
White 
Bhick- 
Green 



>> 



)) 



gading. 

gwomeU. 

gonyi. 

gooring. 

gongara. 

gwe^rang. 

gitte-gittim. 

gorooda. 

ilga. 

kibba. 

karama. 

murong. 

manga. 

mong. 

manaro. 

megaL 

moono. 

maur. 

naga. 

narramee. 

nulla. 

oona. 

parrangle. 

pillia. 

tarong. 

tonga. 

terenang. 

talanga. 

wadby. 

war^, wa. 

willin. 

waUo. 

wanaree. 

weelang. 

worgye. 

morjal. 

taboa. 

nand. 

boolga. 



1 



408 



THE AUSTRAUAN RAGE: 



No. 191.— PORT JACKSON, OR A PART OF SYDNEY HARBOUR. 



Bt Captain John Hunter. 



Kangaroo • 


- patagarang. 


Hand 


- tamira. 


OpoBSum - 




2Black8 




Tame dog - 


tingo. 


3 Blacka 




WUddog 


waregal. 
■ maraciy, mar-ry- 


One - 






ang. 


Two - 




Black duck • 




Three- 




Wood duck • 




Foup • 




Pelican 








^k ^^AA^^WBA 




Father 


• be-anga. 


Laughing jackaaa 






o 


Native companion 


Mother 


. wy-anga. 


White cockatoo • 


■ ga-ra-way. 


Sister Elder 




Crow - 


• wagan. 


„ Younger 




Swan - 




Brother-Elder • 




Egg . . . 


ca-ban. 


„ Youngei 


r 


Track of afoot 








Fiflh - . 


' ma-gra. 


A young man 




Lobster 




An old man 




Crayfiflh 




„ old woman 




Mosquito * 


■ doo-ra. 


A baby 




Fly - - 


- my-ang-a. 


A W hite man 




Snake • 


• can. 


Children • 




The Blacka • 


- eo-ra. 






A Blackf eUow 


muUa. 


Head - 


• caberra. 


A Black woman • 


din. 


Eye • 


• w*ii 


Nose - 


- nogur. 


Ear - • • 


gorai 



PORT JACKSON, OR SYDNEY HARBOUR. 



409 



No. 191.— Port Jackson, ob a Pabt of Sydney Hakboub— con^nu6d. 


Mouth 


• kalga. 


Boomerang- 




Teeth - 


- dara. 


Hill - - 




Hair of the head • 


diwarra. 


Wood 




Beard - 




Stone - 




Thunder - 


- morungle. 


Gamp - 




Grass - 


■ dooroy. 


Yes - - 




Tongue 


tailing. 


No - - 




Stomach 

Breasts 

Thigh- 


■ barrong. 
nabanq. 


I 

You - - ■ 


gnia. 


Foot - 


- menoe. 


Bark - 




Bone - 


- diera. 


Good - 


- beal, bidgeree. 


Blood - 


- ba-na-rang. 


Bad - - 


• w6r6. 


Skin ■ 


■ baggy. 


Sweet - 




Pat 




Food . 




Bowels 




Hungry 


- yu-ru-gurra. 


Excrement • 




Thirsty 




War-spear - 




Eat - - • 




Beed-spear - 




Sleep - 


- nan-ga-ra. 


Throwing'Stick 

^^V • 4 4 


■ womar. 


Drink - 


■ wee-de. 


Shield - 


■ a-ra-goon, e-li- 










Walk - 


yen. 




mang. 




w 




■ mogo. 


See - 




Canoe - 


- nowey. 


Sit - - 


' gnal-loa. 


Sun - 


■ ooing. 


Yesterday - 


boorana. 


Moon - 


• yannadah. 


To-day 




Star - 


• birrang. 


To-morrow - 


- bur-ra-n^, parry 


light • 






buga. 


Dark • 




Where are the 




Cold - 


- ta-ga-ra. 


Blacks? 




Heat - 




I don*t know 


• man-ye-ro. 


Day - 


• camurra. 


Plenty 




Night - 


■ gnoowing. 


Big - - 




Fire - 


- gwee-ang. 


Little - 


narrong. 


Water 


- bado. 


Dead - 


- boe. 


Smoke 


• cud-yaL 


By-and-by - 




Ground 


- pe-mall. 


Come on 


- cow-ee. 


Wind - 


■ gwarra. 


Milk - 


■ murtin. 


Bain - 


• panna. 


Eaglehawk - 




God . - 




WUd turkey 




Ghosts 


■ boye, mawn. 


Wife . 





410 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 191.— PORT JACKSON, OR A PART OF SYDNEY HARBOUR. 

Bt LlEUTKNAMT-GOLONBL COLLHTS. 



Kangaroo • 




Hand - 


- tam-mir-ra. 


Opoflflum 




2 Blacks - 


„ 


Tame dog - 


din-go. 


3 Blacks - 


„ 


VVUddog ■ 

V9 


wor-re-gaL 


One - 


- WOffUl. 


Emn - 


ma-ray-ong. 




o 


Black duck - 


yoo-rong-i. 


Two - 


- yoo-blow-re» boo 


Wood duck 






la. 


Pelican 


<sar-r&ng-a-bo- 


Three- 


- brew-y. 




murray. 


Pour - 


- 


Laughing jackaas 


go-gaji-ne-gine. 


Father 


. be-an-na. 


Native companion 


Mother 


- wy-an-na. 


White cockatoo - 


gare-a-way. 


Sister-Elder 


- ma-mun-na. 


Crow • 


wau-gan. 






Swan - 


mul-go. 


„ Younger 


- 


Egg - - - 


ca-bahn. 


Brother-Elder 


- ba-bnn-na. 


Track of a foot - 




„ Younger 


Fiflh - - - 




A young man 


- 


Lobster 




An old man 


M 


CrayfiBh 




„ old woman 


• 


Mosquito ■ 




A baby 


. 


Fly - - - 


mi-a-nong. 


A White man 


^ 


Snake - 


cahn. 






The Blacks - 


eo-ra. 


Children 


• go-roong. 


A Blackf ellow - 


mul-U. 


Head - 


- ca-ber-ra. 


A Black woman - 


din. 


Eye - 


- mi. 


Nose - - 


no-gro. 


Ear - 


- go-ray. 



PORT JACKSON, OR SYDNEY HARBOUR. 



411 



No. 191.- 
Mouth 

Teeth 

Hair of the head 

Beard- 

Thnnder 

Grass - 

Tongue 

Stomach 

Breasts 

Thigh- 

Foot - 

Bone - 

Blood 

Skin - 

Fat - 

Bowels 

Excrement - 

War-spear - 

Reed-spear - 

Throwing-stick 

Shield 

Tomahawk - 

CSanoe- 

Son 

Moon 

Star 

Light 

Dark 

Cold 

Heat 

Day 

Night 

Fire 

Water 

Smoke 

Ground 

Wind - 
Rain - 
God - 
Ghosts 



-POBT jACXaON, OB 

• kar-gft. 

- dara. 

- de-war-ra. 

- yar-rin. 

- tal-lang. 

- bar-rong. 

- nabung. 

- ma-no-e. 



bog-gay. 



ca-my. 

womera. 
e-lee-mong, ar- 
ra-gong. 
mogo. 
nowey, 
coing. 
yennadah. 
birrong. 



- tagora. 

- yooroo-gS. 

- carmarroo. 

• gnoowing. 

- gweyong. 

- b&do. 

- cadje^. 

- permuL 

m 

' panna, wftllan. 

• mahn. 



A Pabt 07 Stdmet 

Boomerang - 
Hill - - - 
Wood- 
Stone - 
Camp - 

Yes - - 

No - - - 
I - . 

You - - - 
Bark - 
Good 

Bad - - - 
Sweet - 
Pood - 
Hungry 
Thirsty 
Eat - 
Sleep 
Drink- 
Walk - 
See - 
Sit - 
Yesterday 
To-day 
To-morrow 
Where are the 
Blacks? 
I don't know 
Plenty 
Big - - 
Little - 
Dead - 
By-and-by 
Come on 
Milk • 
Eaglehawk 
Wild turkey 
Wife . 



Habboub. 



mo rem me. 
bealL 
gnia. 
gnee-ne. 

bood-jer-re. 
wee-re. 



yu-roo. 

patty, 
nanga. 

yen. 
gna. 

barilne. 
yagoona. 
parry boogoo. 



mur-ray. 
gnar-rang. 



cow-e. 
mooroobin. 



mau-gohn. 



412 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

The langaages and cofltoms of the long extinct tribes of 
Sydney Harbour (originally known as Port Jackson) bear 
several marks of eastern descent. Thus ^lee^mong or 
helimanj the equivalent of shieldj is met with fS&r away in 
North^stern AustraUa, and the custom of amputating a 
finger of the female's^ or a portion of a finger, prevails in 
Southern Queensland as it used to do on the shores of 
Sydney Harbour. 



BOTANY BAY. 



413 



No. 192.— BOTANY BAY. 



Bt the Bevd. William Ridley. 



The following short vocabnlary of the Tnmwiil langnage is 
taken from Mr. Eidley's Kamilaroi. In his notice prefixed 
to it, Mr. Ridley states that Turuwnl was spoken both at 
Botany Bay and Port Jackson. The several vocabnlaries of 
the Port Jackson (or Sydney Harbour) tribe, however, make 
it clear that there were two languages, and that Turuwnl was 
confined to Botany Bay. From Lieutenant-Colonel Collins' 
Account of New SoiUh Wales j published in 1804, we learn 
that the name of the Botany Bay tribe was Gweagal. In 
studying the aboriginal phrases preserved by Mr. Ridley, 
who obtained them from a half-caste of those parts, it is clear 
that their translations are free and not literal. For instance, 
in the rendering oiNgandagoo booroo = I see a kangaroo^ we 
know from a consideration of the other phrases that the 
equivalent of see is not present, whilst we know that the 
indefinite article a does not exist in any Australian tongue. 
There is also reason to believe that bring and take are often 
expressed by variations of the same root-word. The follow- 
ing will exemplify these statements: — 



Ridley. 


Tarawul. 


Literal rendering. 


There he ia - 
He kiUed a snake 
Take the dog away 
Bring it here again 


Ngo, ngo, nga nguUai - 
Banm& moonda - 
Ngaine^tna mirigung - 
Ngaingttto^ nga miri- 
gnng 


There, there, I see. 
(He) struck snake. 
Take away dog. 
Bring (or take) hert I 
dog. 



414 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 192.— BOTANY BAY. 



Bt the Revd. William Bidlbt. 



Kangaroo - 


buiral, booroo. 


Hand - 


■ murramul. 


Opoflflum 


- koorooera. 


2Blacka 




Tame dog - 


mirigung. 


3 Blacks • 




WUddog . 


joogoong. 


One - 




Kinii 








Blaok duck- 


- koondyerL 


Two - 




Wood duck- 




Three- 




Pelican 




Four ■ 




Langhing jackaai 


1 


Father 


babuna, babunna 


Native companioi 


1 


Mother 


■ ngubung. 


White oockatoo • 
Grow • 


■ mebitha, war- 


Sister-Elder 


midjun, mitjun. 




nnng. 


„ Younger 




Swan - 




Brother-Elder ■ 




Egg - 




„ Youngei 




Track of a foot 




A young man 




Fish • 
Lobster 




An old man 


• bangung. 


Crayfiah 




An old woman 


- moolda. 


Moeqnito • 




A baby 




Fly 




A White man 




Snake - 


- moonda. 


Children 


- chajnng. 


The BlaokB - 


• tdhalla. 


Head - 


- kabura. 


A Blackf ellow 








A Black woman 




Eye - 


• me. 


Nose - 


• noogoolbnndi. 


Ear 







BOTANY BAY. 


4 




No. 192.— BoTAmr Bay— continued. 




Mouth 


- kommL 


Boomerang • 




Teeth- 




Hill - 




Hair of the head 




Wood- 




Beard- 




Stone • 




Thunder - 




Gamp (hut) - 


- koonje. 


Grass - 


bumboor. 


Yes - 




Tongae 


- tullung. 


No - 


- meira. 


Stomach 




I - . 


nga. 


Breasts 




You - 




Thigh - 




Bark - 




Foot - 


- dnnna. 


Good - 


kuller. 


Bone - 


« 


Bad - . 


■ wirra. 


Blood - 




Sweet • 




Skin - 




Food - 


■ dunmingung. 


Fat - - 




Hungry 




Bowels 




Thirsty 




Bzcrement - 




Eat - - • 




War-spear - 




Sleep • 




Beed-spear • 




Drink- 




Throwing-stick - 




Walk - 




Shield - 




See - 


- ngullaL 


Tomahawk • 




Sit - - . 




Canoe- 


- yemera. 

• • 


Yesterday - 




Smi - 


• wim. 






Moon - 




To-day 




Star - 




To-morrow - 




light - 




Where are the 




Dark - 




Blacks? 




Cold - 




I don't know 




Heat • 




Plenty 




Day - 




Big - - 


kaiun. 


Night . 


■ purra. 


Little - 


murruwulung. 


Fire - 


- we. 


Dead - 




Water 


• batoo. 


By-and-by - 




Smoke 


• kurunggerij. 


Come on 




Ground 


- moorung. 


Milk - 




Wind - 


- koomgooma. 






Bain - 


- bunna. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - - 




Wild turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife - 





415 



416 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

Upon this scanty yocabnlaiy of Botany Bay but few 
remarks can be made. Most of its words differ firom those 
of Port Jackson, which is rather surprising, seeing the short 
distance it is between the two places. The reader may 
compare the equivalents of sun and^r^. 



WOLLONGONO, ILLAWARBA, AND SHOALHAVENf. 417 



No. 193.— WOLLONGONG, ILLAWARRA, AND 

SHOALHAVEN. 

Bt the Rbvd. William Bidlet. 

Thb following words are extracted from Ridley's Katnilarai. 
The name of the language, we leam, is Wodi-wodi, and its 
negative adverb is naiyung; but it is to be noticed that the 
negative at the Hunter Itiver is warri^ at Albuiy woodi^ and 
at Swan Hill rvottiy and it is probable that there was a time 
when Toodi prevailed in the same sense from Wollongong to 
Jervis Bay. 

The equivalent of God Mr. Ridley derives from mrir =^ 
skj/y which is one of the words in that sense given by the 
same writer in the Turrumbul language, spoken on the 
Brisbane River. The reader may compare the renderings 
camp and bark. A htU was often spoken of as a campj and 
hiUs were atmost always made of bark in the southern 
portion of the continent, and hence the two objects were 
expressed by one word. In some of our languages a man 
will talk of his tree or his roood^ meaning his spear; a form 
of speech which has something of the grand as well as of 
the rude about it 



vol. m. *i> 



418 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 103.— WOLLONGONG, ILLAWAKRA, AND SHOALHAVEN. 



Bt the Revo. William Ridlit. 



SLangaroo - 


booroo. 


Hand 


. mnxnumur. 


Opottmm 


kooraora. 


2 Rlankn - 


. 


Tame dog - 


mimgong. 


3 BlackB - 


^ 


wad dog - 




One - 


- mittuDff • 


Emu 


■ birribain. 




D 






Two - 


- boolar. 


Black dnck 








Wood duck 




Three- 




Pelican 


. kurungaba. 


Four - 


- boolar boolar. 


Jjaughing jaokaai 


1 kookara. 


Father 


- 


Native compaoioi 


1 gooradawak. 


Mother 


- 


White cockatoo • 


• yambai-imba. 


Sister-Elder 


, 


Crow - 




„ Younger 


• 


Swan - 




Brother-Elder 


. 


Egg - 
Track of a foot 




„ Younger 


¥iMh ' 


- dun. 


A young man 


- yoomng, 


LobBter 






banggung^ 


Crayfiah 


. 


An old man 


* beungguiL 


Mooquito - 


. 


An old woman 


- 


Fly - 


. 


A baby 




Snake 


. 


A White man 


- jirunggalnng. 


The BlackB - 


- 


Children 


- kudjagung. 


A Blackf eUow 


m 


Head - - 


. woUar. 


A Black woman 


• 


Eye - 


- mobura, mer. 


Nose - 


* nooffoor. 


Ear « 


- koori. 



WOLLONGONG, ILLAWAEBA, AND SHOALHAVEN. 419 



No. 193. — ^WoLLONooNo, Illawab&a, and Shoalhayen— eoR^tntie^. 



Mouth 


. kommi 


Teeth - 


■ irra. 


Hair of the head • 


• jirra. 


Beard- 


■ 


Thunder - 


p 


Grass • 




Tongue 


• tttllun. 


Stomach 




Breasts 




Thigh 


' tnrra. 


Foot - 


- dunna. 


Bone - 




Blood - 




Skin - 




Pat . - 




Bowels 




Bxcrement - 




War-spear - 


• maiagung. 


Beed-spear - 




Throwing-stick 




Shield- - 








Ganoe- 


■ yanaoera, 




mudyeri. 


Son - 


■ bukiirung. 


Moon - 


• tedjung. 


Star • - . 


• jinjinnurung. 


Light - 




Dark . 




Cold - - ■ 


maiing. 


Heat - 


• bukuring. 


Day . - . 




Night - 




Fire - . . 


■ kanbi. 


Water 


ngaityung. 


Smoke 


. kumnggurij. 


Ground 


. murung. 


Wind - 




Rain - 


■ yewi. 


God - - ■ 


mirirul. 


Ghosts 


gooun. 





Boomerang - 






Hill - 


• 




Wood- 


m 




Stone • 


m 




Camp - 


- kundi, ngurra. 




Yes - - 


- nge. 


« 


No . - 


- naiynng. 




I - . 


- ngaiagung. 




You - - 






Bark - - 


- kunida. 




Good - - 


- nukkoong. 




Bad - - 


- hnllin. 




Sweet 


- 




Food - 


- 




Hungry 


- 




Thirsty 


- 




Eat - 


- 




Sleep - 


- 




Drink - 


• 




Walk- 


- 




See - 


- 




Sit - 


- 




Yesterday - 


• 




To-day 


- 




To-morrow - 


- 




Where are 


the 




Blacks? 






I don't know 


- 




Plenty 


- 




Big - - 


- kaiyung. 




Little - 


. murruwailung 




Dead - 


- bulyar 




By-and-by - 


- 




Come on 


- 




Milk - 


- 




Eaglehawk - 


- 




Wild turkey 


- 




Wife - 


• - 


2] 


[>2 





420 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 194.— FROM JERVIS BAY TO MOUNT 

DROMEDARY. 



Bt Mb. Righabd Dawbit. 

Fob tliiB yocabnlary I am indebted, throngh Mr. Stewart 
Caswell^ P.M. at Moraya, to Mr. Richard Dawsej. The 
tribes of whose langnage a specimen is attached divide 
themselves into two classes, viz., Piindri or tree^UmberSj 
and K(Uhoongal or fishermen. It is, I am informed, a 
tradition of theirs that the earth was once destroyed, some 
say by water and others by fire, and was subsequently re- 
peopled from the moon. They humourously call policeman 
tchingar — etour-fi^h^ as they say both seize and detain. 
These tribes still retain a few of their old customs, for they 
scar the person and knock out teeth. Every remarkable 
hill, waterhole, and rock, says Mr. Dawsey, has its native 
name. It will be noticed that mn^ lights heatj day^ and 
tchday are all translated by the word rwwa^ and probably 
correctly so. 





No. 194.— ADDmoKAL Words. 




Scrub - 


• kubbee, burrar. 


Roart- 


- koonjal. 


River - 


• nadju. 


Goup- 


- kuUowa. 


Bread - 


. tungi (see Food). 


Come down 


. nirini. 


Hut - 


• koongL 


Run - 


- woUiar. 


Finger 


- minna. 


Jump - 


- worraga. 


Calf of leg • 


- iabooda. 


Cry - 


- noongoo. 


My head 


- kabomanga. 


Qub - 


- koodgeroo. 


Kill - 


- biUyagooin. 


Bandicoot • 


- gooragoor. 


Call - 


• karrooga. 


Mullet 


• worre^Ua, 


Inquire 


- ytfboo. 


Bream 


- bnrra. 



FROM JEBVIS BAY TO MOUNT DROMEDARY. 



421 



No. 194.— ApDxnoKAL WoBJ>a— continued. 



Crab - 


thooriL 


Paddimellon 


• potalemon. 


Crane - 


kaloo. 


Mnsk duck - 


- nunneloo. 


Black cockatoo ■ 


ngerral. 


Spider 


- marara. 


Ring-tailed opoe- 


boogoorL 


Wattle-tree 


- boarr. 


snin 




Porpoise 


- towerL 


Maggot 


• mnndooga. 


Seal - 


- eeraguUa, 


Bk)w-fly 


mooroon. 


Gull - 


- mara. 


AboU 


• mundarlo. 


Shark- - 


- woolemboora. 


Black snake 


moontha. 


Oyster 


• bithunga. 


Brown ,) 


mooroomba. 


Clonds 


• moongooroo. 


Carpet „ 


wagoor. 


Wombat - 


- bunkata. 


Bark yesBel for 


wondia. 


Boy - - 


• kaboogabal. 


carTjing water 




Girl - 


- yandabaL 


Wooden y eesel f oi 


> bnngalli 


Sweetheart - 


. tunnamung (eat 


carrying water 






breasts). 


East wind - 


browa. 


I am eating- 


- tunnaga. 


North-east wind - 


bnllya. 


Grandmother 


- baoonga. 


South wind- 




Strong 


. matong. 


West „ - 


goorooma. 


Cripple 


- kookiwon. 


Spotted gam-tree 


derani. 


Deaf - 


- nerragum. 


BCahogany - 


• mnthawan. 


Lyrebird 


- chakola. 


Fern • 


mnnga. 


Sea • 


■ burra-burra. 


Fern-tree - 


iunbagnn. 


A rough sea 


- kuth-thoo. 


Lizard 


bongaoo. 


Platypus 


- yarrenbooL 


Sting-ray - 


babba. 


Red ochre - 


- koobnr. 



422 



THE AU8TBAIIAN RACE: 



Na 1M,.FB0M JERVIS BAY TO MOUNT DROMEDARY. 



Kangaroo 
Opoflaum 
Tame dog 
Wild dog 
Eiinii • 
Black duck 
Wood duck 
Pelican 

Laughing jackaas 
Native companion 
White oockatoo 
Crow • 
Swan - 

Egg • 
Track of a foot 



Fish • 
Loheter 
Crayfish 
Mosquito 
Fly ■ 
Snake - 
The BUickfl 
A Blackfellow 
A Black woman 
Nose - 



hooroo. 

koongera. 

mirriga. 

muiria. 

wombarra. 

yerrinbooL 

kurringooba. 

kookoo. 

gooerrL 

ngowal. 

wagoora. 

koorawarri, 

koonyoo. 
koamo. 
moorooda, burd- 

yoo. 
ma, mena, 

birrooa. 

neelooga. 

myrmga. 

kurri. 

kimbnnya. 

uin. 

wangan. 

nogooroo. 



Hand - 
2BIaoks 
3 Blacks 
One - 

Two - 
Three- 
Pour - 
Father 



Mother 
Sister-Elder 

i> Younger 
Brother-Elder 

M Younger 
A young mny ^ 

An old man- 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head • 
Eye • 
Ear - 



mmma. 



mittondaL 

mooodaoora. 

dooroogai. 

barbatha, bal- 
ing, 
meunda, mane, 
mamung. 

tatha. 
myinga. 

warn. 

warran. 

moomaga. 

warran. 

kabomo. 

mubbura. 

koori. 



FROM JERVIS BAY TO MOUNT DROMEDARY. 



423 



No. 194. — Fbom Jesyib Bat to Moukt Dbomedaby— con^tted. 



Moath 
Teeth - 

Hair of the head 
Beard- 
Thunder - 
Gran - 
Tongue 
Stomach 
Breasta 
Thigh 
Foot 
Bone 
Blood 
Skin 
Fat 
Bowels 
Excrement - 
War-spear - 
Reed-spear - 
Throwing-stick 
Shield - 
Tomahawk • 
Canoe 
Sun 
Moon 
Star 
Light 
Dark 
Cold 
Heat 
Day 
Night 
File 
Water 
Smoke 
Ground 
Wind - 
Bain - 
God - 
Ghosts 



Willi. 

era, nganayoo. 

jaour. 

yarran, yani. 

maybL 

wuddaL 

nimming. 

binjL 

numminya. 

boonda. 

tinna. 

boyoo. 

dgeralli. 

wardoo. 

buon. 

koonnoo. 

koonnoo. 

birruya. 

birryoola. 

wommera. 

bimbia, murka. 

mundooba. 

kurridja. 

nowa. 

dowera. 

tingee. 

nowa. 

i-il-wa. 

goo-yoodoo. 

bukkeran, nowa. 

nowa. 

i-il-wa. 

kanL 

nadju. 

tooroor. 

ilurgar, bukkan. 

gooroo-ooma. 

bunna. 



Boomerang 

Hill 

Wood 

Stone 

Camp 

Yes 

No 

I 

You 

Bark 

Good 

Bad 

Sweet 

Food (vegetable) 

„ (meat) 
Hungry 
Thirsty 
Eat - 
Sleep 
Drink 
Walk 
See 
Sit 

Yesterday 
To-day 
To-morrow 
Where are the 
Blacks? 
I don't know 



Plenty 
Big - 
little- 
Dead - 
By-and-by 
Come on 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk 
Wild turkey 
Wife - 



warrangan. 

boombal. 

boora, moora. 

doogan. 

ngi. 

tukkayil. 

iaga. 

inde, indiga. 

oolaga. 

jummaga. 

kannia. 

jummaga. 

tungL 

narroouL 

ithul. 

oondago. 

nomgooga. 

oondaga. 

yannooga. 

nagunL 

ma-i-ga. 

boguia. 

nowa. 

braguia. 

wanagauin? 

nginbagaor 
tukkyil. 
bukkan. 
birraga. 
koobya. 
worraL 
kawai. 
yowL 



424 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 



No. 195.^nBANBETAN. 

Bt TBI POUGE MAGUrnUTB AT THE ABOVS TOWH, 

Who infarmfl me that only one penon of thia tribe, an old woman, remaina. 



Kangaroo - 

Opoaaom - 

Tame dog - 

Wild dog - 

TCmn . 

Black duok 
Wood duck 
Pelican 
Langhing j 
Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Grow 

Swan - - - 
Egg - - - 
Track of a foot - 
Fish - - - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito - 
Fly - - - 
Snake - - . 
TheBlacks- 
A Blaokf ellow - 
A Black woman - 
Nose - - - 



pmidar. 
widgen. 
merrigon. 

arang. 
boojangbnng. 

gradack. 
googoobnrra. 



wagon. 

gonynck. 

gabbong. 

mnnjuwa. 

mnllang. 



- mnrragolong. 



jigegong. 
mnrring. 

ballong. 



Hand - 
2 Blacks - 
SBlacks 
One - 
Two - 
Three- 
Four - 
Father 

Mother 
Sister-Elder 

yy Younger 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 

An old woman - 
A baby 

A White man - 

Children - 

Head - 

Eye - . - 

Ear . . • 



mnnna. 



midjemban. 
boUan. 



- boboDg. 
-ija. 

- guUung. 

- gooung. 

wurrumbull. 
jerrabung. 

bullane. 
wunja. 
gubba. * 

guddagong. 
goondaL 

binningaring. 





QUEANBEYAN. 




^Z 




No. 196.— -QuxAMiUETAH— eon^tift^. 




Month 




Boomerang - 




Teeth • 


weera. 


Hill . 






Hair of the head- 


yaiang. 


Wood 






Beard- 


• earing, yaring. 


Stone 




' wullung. 


Thunder - 


• mirrabee. 


Gamp ■ 




• wallane. 


Graas - 


narruck. 


Tes 




• awang. 


Tongue 


. dalling. 


No 




• wungung. 


Stomach 


dowong. 


I- 




■ indegee. 


Breasts 


ummingyang. 


You 




> imeba. 


Thigh- 


- munjawong. 


Bark 




■ dunarung. 


Foot - 




Good 




• dunga. 


Bone - 










Blood - • 


goorooba. 


Bad • 




nanyngalong. 


Skin - 


^ 


Sweet 




• murrumbung. 


Fat - - • 




Food - 


. dunnong. 


Bowels 


goonong. 


Hungry 


• aranda. 


Excrement - 


goonong. 


Thirsty 


■ yungimeba. 


War-spear - 




Eat 




abaUy. 


Reed-spear - 




Sleep 




- umbaree. 


Throwing-stick • 




Drink 




• admy. 


Shield 


■ towrang. 


Walk 




- yarrabajay. 




• umhagong. 


See 




• goolang. 


Canoe • 

Sun - - - 


• mumng. 
. mumite. 


Sit 




• alagee. 


Moon - 




Yesterday - 




Star - 


• jingee. 


To-day 




light - 


- burra. 


To-morrow - 


- urongal. 


Dark - 




Where are the 


wnUo mnrring? 


Cold . - 


■ guxrada. 


Blacks? 




Heat • 


• murrumbung. 


I don't know 


■ wunnagnng. 


Day - . 




Plent?y 




Night • 


• dia. 


Big - 


• yabung. 


Fire • 


• wudda. 


Little - 


- gobang. 


Water 


ijong. 


Dead - 


- berraging. 


Smoke 




By-and-by - 




Ground 


- dowra. 


Come on 


■ goolL 


Wind- 


• gooroolcma. 


Milk - 




Bain • 


- urong. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - 




Wild turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife 


■ • ■ 





426 



THE AUSTRALIAN BAGS: 



No. 190.— YAS8. 

Bt thb Bbnoh of MAQiaraATts at that Placb. 
Also a Fbw Wobds iboh Oiobox Bbowkk, Esq. 



Kangaroo 
OpoMom 
Tame dog 
wad dog 
Eiina - 
Black duck 
Wood duck 
Pelican 
Laughing jackaaa 
Nativeoompanion 
White cookatpo 
Grow • 
Swan - 
Egg • 

Track of a foot 
FiBh - 
Lobster 
Grayfiflh 
MoBqnito 
Fly 
Snake - 
The Blacks 
A Blackf ellow 
A Black woman 
Nose - 



bnrroo. 

Willi 

mirragong. 

bennebang. 
boothonba. 
goonangrL 

kookaburra. 

goorine. 

wagara. 

waigan. 

doondoo. 

goobagong. 

yoweL 

guir. 

mangaba. 

mooroonong. 

mudjering. 

boreman. 

mnkka. 

myning. 

wnmmbllL 

bnllong. 

moorangee. 



Hand- 
2BlackB 
SBlacks 
One - 

Two ■ 
Three- 
Four - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

9, Younger 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear 



mooianlang. 



mittong. 

boolla. 
booUa mittong. 

moonmonthur. 

magong. 

thargong. 

mooroombyn. 

ngarrang. 

nannong. 

wybong. 

gangang. 

goodtha, boobaL 

gubba. 

guddagong. 

migel^. 

bnngenerra. 



YASS. 



427 



No, 106.— Ya8&— con^tMd. 



Month 


• thamberree. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth 


yeera. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head- 


yarragODg. 


Wood- 


- noola. 


Beard- 


yarrang. 


Stone - 


• wollmig. 


Thnnder - 


- mooroobey. 


Camp - 


■ noora. 


GraBs - 


• ngalook. 


Yes - 


- nea. 


Tongne 


. thnllong. 


No - - 


. oonthewa. 


Stomach 


- binjey, ugga. 


I - - 


- ngoolangi. 


Breasts 


nononng. 


You - - - 


- goolanga. 


Thigh- 


darra. 


Bark • 


• doorong. 


Foot - 




Good - 


mnrrmnbong. 


Bone - 


. jennang. 


Bad - 


- narregalong. 


Blood- 


• JN«y- 


Sweet 




Skin - 


• gairing. 


Food - - 




Fat - - 


■ booraL 


Hnngry 


- nnmuL 


Bowels 


■ noobee. 


Thirsty 


■ marjoong. 




' goonong. 


Eat • 


• ngaraiL 


War-spear • 


• jewing. 


Sleep - 


- googong. 


Beed-spear - 


• jereel. 


Drink- 


- narging. 


Throwing-stlck • 




Walk - 


- yarraba. 


Shield - 


• minga. 


See - 


• naangi 


Tomahawk • 


- thowing. 


Sit • 


• nnlli. 


Canoe • 


- mnrreng. 






Snn - - ■ 


' wynen, weenyoo. 


Yesterday - 


• barrandi. 


Moon - 


• gerrong. 


To-day 


• youngoo. 


Star - 


- jenna. 


To-morrow • 


- barrandL 


Light • 


• narragan. 


Where are the 


ooronamyning? 


Daric - 


■ burrabi. 


Blacks? 




Cold - - ■ 


knrrett. 


I don't know 


■ moonalthwa. 


Heat • 


■ wynen. 


Plenty 


- jamma. 


Day - 


• booroowal. 


Kg - - 


• moonoon. 


Night . • 


. bnrrabL 


little - 


• boobi. 


Fire - 


. gnnbey. 


Dead - 


■ kowe. 


Water 
Smoke 


. narjimg. 
• knddalth. 


By-and-by - 


■ koomnn. 


Ground 


• thoora, doorla. 


Come on 


- gooUi. 


Wind- 


• bandoo. 


Milk - - 


■ 


Bain • 


• enrong. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - 




WUd turkey 




Ghosts 


• boronaga. 


Wife - . 





428 THE AUSTRALIAN BAGS: 

I am informed that a few indiYidnalB of the Yarr— or, as 
we call it, Yass — ^tribe, still sorvive. The reader will notice 
that there is but one word for yesterday and UHnorraw. 
Almost the same thing occurs in Nos. 191 and 194. In view 
of the statements made by some writers on the subjects of 
Australian marriages and terms of relationship, the following 
Additional Words are important, viz., goomn = tmele and 
aurU; peringing = ecusin. 



MONEBOO. 429 



No. 197.— MONEROO. 

Bt Chiblbs du Vb, Esq., and John Bulmxb, Esq. 

Of the dialects spoken in the Moneroo or Mantra district, 
several vocabnlaries have reached me, only two of which I 
have thought it necessary to insert. The one compiled many 
years back by Mr. John Shotsky, of the Botanical Society 
of Bavaria, which has often appeared in print, is before me; 
but it is evidently incorrect in many particulars, and hence 
is not inserted. Those placed before the reader were col- 
lected, the first by Mr. Charles da Y6, a gentleman long 
resident in Gippsland, and the other by Mr. John Bolmer, 
manager of one of the Government Aboriginal Stations in 
that country, who has many qualifications for the under- 
taking, and has bestowed great pains on his paper. The 
language, this gentleman informs me, is called Ngarago, 
and it will be seen that it has many words found but little 
altered in the dialects of Queanbeyan, Moruya, and Omeo. 
Whether this was always so, or is the result of the mixture 
of tribes, consequent on our occupation, it is now impossible 
to determine. 



\ 



430 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 197.— MONEBOO. 
Bt Chablbs du Vi, Esq. 



Eaagaioo - 






Hand- . 


- manga. 


Opoanun 




' wa^en. 


2 Blacks - 




Tame dog • 




. mittagang. 


SBlacks • 




WUddog 
Emu - 




• Uri-birL 


One - 


• mittoog. 


BlAokdack- 




• poodoombamg. 


Two - . . 


• boolariar. 


Wood dude 




- goonarook. 


Three- 




PelioMi 






Four - 




Lauj^iing jaokaas 


Father 


bobahn. 


Native oompamon gooyoor. 
White cookatoo • n^touL 


Mother 


■ mitcbong. 


Crow - 


- warcolin. 


Sistei^Elder 




Swan - 




„ Younger • 


• onUan. 


Bgg ■ 




Brother-Elder • 


' jydchong. 


Traok of afoot 


- mooritche. 


„ Toungei 




Fish - 


> moolaan. 


A 




Lobster 




A young man 


. munguynng. 




An old man- 


- jirrybnng. 


Crayfish - 
Mosquito - 
Fly - 


- barrinjook. 
. moolookmar. 


An old woman - 
A baby • • 




Snake - 


- jijucung. 


A White man • 


• moomoogan. 


The Blacks - 




Children < 




ABlaokfeUow 


- myang. 


Head • 


• kadagong. 


A Black woman 


• ballam. 


Bye - 


• mobbara. 


Nose - 


m 


- nor. 


Ear - - • 


• binneyarree. 





MONEKOO. 


4^5 




No. 197.— MoMXBOO— cofKJnued. 




Month 


- dha, moordingee. 


Boomerang - 


- warmngen. 


Teeth- 


- yayra. 


Hill - 


- 


Hair of the head- eSrong. 


Wood- - 


- baar. 


Beard- - 


• 


Stone - 


- goorobung. 


Thunder • 


- 


Gamp - 


- wallaan. 


Grass - 


- nolhook. 


Yes - - 


- 


Tongae 


• 


No - - 


- moko. 


Stomaoh 


- 


I- - - 


- ngimba. 


Breasts 


- 


You - - 


- jrindigee. 


Thigh- 


- tharal. 


Bark - - 


- 


Foot - 


. genno. 


Good - - 


- murrembarang. 


Bone - 


- 


Bad - - 


- moko (?). 


Blood - 


- 


Sweet - 


- 


SUn - 


- 


Food - . 


- 


Eat - 


- 




- 


Bowels 


* 


Thirsty 


- 


Excrement - 


- 


Eat - 


- 


War-spear - 




Sleep - 


• 


Reed-spear - 


- gerambardee. 


Drink - 


. 


Throwing-stick 
Shield ' - 


- armmeL 


Walk- - 


- yarrabye. 


Tomahawk - 




See - - 


- 


Canoe- 


• 

- marring. 


Sit - 


- 


Snn - 


- monnntche. 


Yesterday - 


- 


Moon - 


- cnbartong. 


To-day 


w 


Star - 


- ieenkee. 


To-morrow • 


m 


light - 


- mnrdeditch. 


Where are the 


Dark - 


- dthag. 


Blacks? 




Cold - - 


- cnrret. 


I don't know 




Heat - - 
Day - 


- weenya, 

- brayeo. 


Plent?y 




Night - 


- 


Big - - 


- yhubung. 


Fire - 


- gannby. 


Little - 




Water 


- ngiijong. 


Dead- 




Smoke 


- dhoomdook. 


By-and-by - 




Ground 


- towra. 


Gome on 




Wind- 


• goonoookomar. 


Milk - - 




Bain - 


- yuroug. 


Eaglehawk - 


- meerong. 


God - 


■• 


wad turkey 




Ghosts 


. 


Wife - 








482 



THE AUSTBAUAN BACB: 



No. m.— MONEBOO. 



Bt John Bulmkb, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 


• bandara. 


Hand • 


• mairanga. 


Oposium 


- wajan. 


2 Blacks . 


- blala marrin 


Tame dog - 


• meirigang. 


SBlacks - 


- wajala boor mar 


WUddog . 


• meraiL 


• 


rin. 




■ ngooroon. 


One • 


• boor. 


Black duck - 


• boothan-baan. 


MP« 








Two - 




Wood dock 


• koonaroo. 






Pelican 




Three- 


• blala- boor. 


Laughing jaokaai 


1 


Four - 


• wajala-wajala. 


Native oompanioi 


ikroobanben. 


Father 


papang. 


White cockatoo 




Mother 


• najan. 


Crow • 


wagoolan. 


Sister-Elder 




Swan • 


koonyak. 


„ Younger • 


kalian. 


Egg 


kabango. 


Brother-Elder • 


- dejan. 


Track of a foot • 


> jennnm. 


„ Younger 


kookong. 


FiHh - 


• manjar. 


A young man 




Lobster 


notknn. 


An old man 


■ jembaang. 


Crayfish • 


barranjerk. 


An old woman ■ 


kowandit. 


Mosquito - 


• nilakmon. 


A % % 




nn 




A baby 


• waen. 


fly • ■ 


ngago. 


w 




Snake 


- tetohogang. 


A White man 


- mumogang. 


The Blacks • 


marrin. 


Children 


waenmerang. 


A Blackf eUow • 


■ marrin. 


Head 


• kuttegang. 


A Black woman • 


ballan. 


Eye - 


- kindthuno. 


Nose . - 


■ noor. 


Ear - • 


' jenna-nana. 





MONEROO. 


43S 




No. 197.— MoNSBOO--oon^nued. 




Mouth 


- yerra, nana. 


Boomerang - 


- warranin. 


Teeth - 


• mundtho, nana. 


Hill - 


- boolo. 


Hair of the head 


i- yerrang. 


Wood- 


- ngalu, murru. 


Beard- 
Thunder • 
Grass - 
Tongae 
Stomach 
Breasts 


- yerran. 

- merbil. 

- nallook. 

- thalline. 

- yugerin. 
• banannu. 


Stone - 
Camp - 
Yes . . 
No - . 
I - . 


- koorogang. 

- baanja. 

- yayoo. 
• murro. 


Thigh- 


- darra. 


You - 


- nindega. 


Foot - 


- yenote. 


Bark - 


- thorrang. 


Bone • 


- kakak. 


Good - 


- mowdang. 


Blood- - 


- kooroban. 


Bad - - 


- mado, jamogang. 


Skin - - 


- watnana. 


Sweet - 


- yellagine. 


Fat - 
Bowels 
Excrement - 
War-spear - 
Beed-spear- 
Throwing-stick 
Shield 
Tomahawk - 


- bewan. 

- thowang. 

- gnanang. 

- yarraka 

- jerwang. 

- berriiui, baar. 

- ngmal. 

- ngmalagan. 


Food - 
Hungry 
Thirsty 
Eat - 
Sleep - 
Drink- 
Walk- - 


- merra. 

- chuta. 

- thai-i. 

- kappuga. 

- ngo-ye-a. 
• yerrabe. 


Canoe - 


- mamat. 


See - 


- nai 


Sun - 


- warrangnr. 


Sit - 


- ngalaga. 


Moon - 


- jingaL 


Yesterday • 


- beanuboor. 


Star - 


- wagang. 


To-day 


. myaro. 


Light - 


- thaik. 


To-morrow - 


- ngoongang. 


Dark - - 

* 


- katata. 


Where are the ngandoo marrin ? 


Cold - - 


- thurmn. 


Bkcks! 




Heat - 


- booreo. 


I don't know 


- ngandagnn. 


Day - 


- thaik. 


Plenty 


- yapang. 


Night - - 


- watha. 


Big - - 


- mineba. 


Fire - 


- ngagung. 


LiUle - 


- koobeang. 


Water 


- maniak. 


Dead - 


- birragan. 


Smoke 


- thairra. 


By-and-by - 


- balloot. 


Ground 


- widdin. 


Come on 


- kajoo. 


Wind- 


- yerrung. 


Milk - - 


. mimin. 


Bain - 


- karrit. 


Eaglehawk - 


- mirrung. 


God - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- karook. 


Ghosts 


- birribang. 


Wife - 


- maan. 


VOL. III. 


2 


E 





434 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE. 



No. 198.— TWOFOLD BAT. 

Bt the late Rxvd. William Bidlxt. 

The following few words are extracted firom Ridley's Kami- 
aroi, a work of which the author has many times availed 
himself. As the Twofold Bay country was the locality at 
which the descendants of the Sydney tribes which followed 
the coast to the southward and those which, taking an inland 
course, reached the Yarra, Gippsland, Omeo, and the southern 
confines of the Twofold Bay country met, it is to regretted 
that the vocabulary preserved is so scanty. The only words 
it contains which serve for comparison are the following: — 



I ... ngaiadha. 

Thou (yon) - • indiga. 



Father - babS. 

Mother - minga. 



Mamunff is given as a proper name for a stater in a 
&mily, but in the Sydney language we have mamunay and in 
that spoken from Jervis Bay to Mount Dromedary we have 
the same word mamuny meaning sister. Hence I have no 
doubt that Mr. Ridley was in error when he took the 
word down as a proper name. This is strong evidence of the 
tribe being of Sydney descent; otherwise the first three of 
the four words given above are too common in root through- 
out Australia to help us to any conclusion on the subject. 
"We know, however, that the Twofold Bay Blacks themselves 
were always in alliance with those about Mount Dromedary 
and to the northward of that point, and at war with the 
Qippsland and Snowy River tribes ; a state of things which 
we always find existing at points at which portions of the 
race loi^ separated have again come into contact. 



BOOK THE EIGHTEENTH. 



2 E2 



BOOK THE EIGHTEENTH, 



PEEFATOBT BEMARES. 



The tribes treated of in this book belong almost entirely 
to Victoria. They occupy the south-western extremity of 
the Eastern Division of the continent, and their languages 
may easily be traced as far north as the Maclntyre River. 
The close connection of these tongues admits of no doubt^ 
as also their difference from the Lower Murray and Lake 
Alexandrina form of speech, with which they come in con- 
tact at Lacepede Bay. The following table will instance 
both of these fitcts : — 



BngH<ph, 


HnmyLakea 


Mount Ckunbier. 


TatiAm. 


Swan Hm. 


Kangaroo • 


Wangami - 


Kooraa- 


Mindyun 


Koorengi. 


Emu - 


PinyaH - 


Kower - 


Kowir - 


Kurwing. 


Pelican 


Nori - 


Parangal 


Waroopool - 


Purtanal. 


Laughing 


Kukukki - 


Kooartang 


Kooungal 


Koongo. 


jackaas 










Swan - 


Kungari 


Koonowoor - 


Koonooer 


Konawar. 


Father 


Nanghai 


Marme - 


Maame - 


Mamoo. 


Head - 


Knrle 


Boop - 


Boorp - 


Poibo. 


Eye - 


PHH - 


Mir - 


Mir . 


Mimoo. 


Ear 


Plombe 


Wrung - 


Wirambool • 


Wirmpoolo. 


Hair - 


Kuri - 


Ngurlaboop- 


Ngarapoorp - 


Nguragnoo. 


Beard- 


Menake 


Ngnrlangeme 


Ngainye 


Ngenengroo. 


Fire - 


Kene - 


Wumap 


Wanyep 


Wumaway. 


Smoke 


Mnldi, kare 


Booloing 


Borring- 


Boorangni. 


Bark - 


Yorle- 


Moondart 


Mitch - 


Mickoo. 


Sleep - 


Muwe 


Kooma - 


Eombian 


Komba. 


Walk . 


Ngoppun • 


Van - 




Yanna. 


To-day 


Hikkai 
nungge 


Keto - 


Eaiejung 


KeeU. 


Gome on 


Yelellai - 


Kooki - - 

• 


Yannag 


Kaki, yanna. 



438 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



For the most part the names of the tribes in this sonth- 
westem extremity of the Eastern Division are the negative 
adverbs of their several langnageS; and we see that as a fresh 
tribe came by secession into existence it often invented for itself 
a new negative adverb. It also frequently altered its equiv- 
alent for the Blacks. In the Tyntynder, Piangil, Eulkyne, 
and Tatiarra dialects we find kaalk, kulko, or other similar 
words meaning bane or tvood, or both of them. We also 
meet with kalluk and kalk on the Upper Glenelg as wood^ 
and the same word occasionally as f^r north as the heads of 
the Mitchell and Walsh Rivers signifying war-^ear. In a 
general way, however, it is wood d^nA Jire that we find 
related. 

The partial differences found in some of the vocabularies 
in this book are in accordance with the fact, which I have 
several times observed myself, that a section of a tribe, 
or even a family, will occasionally develop some variety of 
speech. As an instance, we find the words of the first of 
the two Tatiarra vocabularies ending with great frequency 
with the sound ik or eky which is almost absent from the 
other. 

The following phrases, belonging to one of the Laichi- 
laichi families, were kindly forwarded to me by Mr. McLeod, 
who I understand speaks the language. The variation in the 
use of the negative adverb will be noticed: — 

Here (is some) • kimnia. 
Presently I wiU tartemnnUy 



Where (are the) winga wortongi? 

BlackB? 
(I have) not seen laohong 

(them) nnrongan. 

Where (are all the) winga 

women T moroignee ? 

(They are) fiBhing yoo-ong-illa. 
One woman (is at) gea-abbi neyaw 

Bumbang Bombang. 

Two women (are boralgi neyaw 

at) Kulkyne Kulkyne. 

(I am) hungry • krenambun. 
Give (me some) wookey bnmimo. 

food 



eatopoBsnm tchowa welang. 

Emn good (Ema ia karwingi delgL 

the beet) 
Where (are you) winga yangnowa? 

going? 
I wiU go (too) • yeta yoowannur. 

(I am very) tired mikkgun. 
( WeU ! go to) sleep koomba ullL 

you 
Where (is) my winga yann 

husband ? lieuki ? 



SWAN HILL AND TYNTYNDER. 439 



(Yon) will 866 him y6nga nnlli 
presently tartem. 

I see two women yetti nyen 

boolagi lieu. 

Where (is my) winga kooyoni ? 
war-spear ? 

(I have) not seen lacha ninon. 
(it) 



Give me one - wakey nong 

kaiup. 
(Do) not talk • lacha yama. 
WhenwillTommy winga winyari- 
oome back ? gen Tommy ? 

When go you ? - winga yang 

nooa? 



From this it will be seen that winga means both where 
and when^ a fonn of speech which is found in the Bangerang 
languages, and probably in others. 



No. 199.— SWAN HILL AND TYNTYNDER. 

Bt John Bevesidge, Esq. 

The following information concerning the language of the 
tribe which dwelt in the neighbourhood of Swan Hill and 
T^tynder, but few individuals of which now remain, was 
kindly supplied by Mr. John Beveridge, who speaks it with 
some fluency. Few of my correspondents have taken so 
much trouble with the vocabularies they have forwarded to 
me. The name of the tribe is Wotti^wotti* a reduplication 
of the negative adverb of their language. A very good and 
full account of this tribe has been published by the late Mr. 
Peter Beveridge, a brother of my correspondent, who lived 
many years amongst them, in which, however, the careful 
reader will notice a few inaccuracies. The following is one 
of them. At page 53 it is stated that nome is not the equiv- 
alent of sun in the Wotti-wotti language, whilst at pages 
43, 45, and 56 we find sun translated by that term. The 
same writer in his rendering of aboriginal words uses y, at 
others ie^ and at others i to express the sound of the Italian 
2. In other cases I notice y has the sound which it bears in 
the English word my; as, for instance, in lyoor = woman, 
which I should write laioor. 

* Mr. Peter Beveridge in his pamphlet speUs it Watty-watty. 



440 



THE AUSTRALIAN &ACE: 



No. 199.~Additional Words akd PHBAflas. 

Walk - • yan*, yarwa. 

Tell - - lata, kaya. 

Give • - wogna, woga, 

wook, woorda. 
Hear • - derbima. 

Steal - • bechin, becha. 

Fight • • - waragnera. 
Bum • - pathama, ngan- 

gia. 
Go away - - werawia. 
Arrive • bema, beniin, 

wata. 
Bird - - (no general name). 

Plover - - mingerai. 
Spurwing plover perrit-perrit. 



Bronzewing 

pigeon 
Crested pigeon 
Nest (camp) 
Tail - 
Wing - 
Bill - 
Sky - 
Qoud - 
Sand - 
Waterhole 
Ashes - 
Grave • 
Gum • 
Tired (lit., sore 

flesh) 
Alive - 
Long - 
Short - 



tnppy. 

- kolflmbilbob. 

- lamoo, lingi. 

- pirko. 

- tnrtow. 

- woorogno. 

- terrili 

- moomgi. 

- kooraki. 

- yallum 

- berrigni. 

• thumboo. 

- mi, 

warapynki. 

• boorinyer. 

- tuergini. 

- toolentha, too- 

logni. 



Greek - 


- loortowie, loorto- 




kal, bemiwnr. 


Platypus • 


• mardL 


Husband - 


- lielu. 


Body - 


- (no term). 


Back . 


- wurtoo. 


Beaid- - 


. ngeninthnn. 


MoQstache • 




Bib - 


. leningL 


Heart - 




Kidney 


- wertinn. 


Chest - 


. thungo. 


Lips . 


• woortogna 


Elbow 


- ngonyooro. 


PUin - 


- vprurky. 


Tree • 


- kulky. 


Leaf - 


- kerenthu. 


Flower 


- beechon-beechon. 


Yam - 


- thabor. 


Mud - 


- bUby. 


Mussel 


• warmum (large), 




nunkir (small). 


Lagoon 


- gunbakoor. 


Here - 


• kima. 


There - 


- ngala. 



My (own) mother yannaio baabai. 
His (own) mother ngookaio baabin. 
Your (own) mother ngineo baabin. 
My (own) father yannaio maamai. 
His (own) father ngookaio maa- 



Your (own) father ngineo maamai. 



Who is that Blackfellow; i.e., What Blackfellow that? 
Winyerangi woortongi ngata ? 

I don't know. 
Winta. 

I cannot see him; i.e., Not I see. 
Wotti yetti ngakin. 



SWAN HILL AND TYNTYNDBR. 441 

No. 199. — ^Additional Wosds and Phsasbb— con^tnitec?. 

(Do) you aee that woman ? 
Nginna ngakin ngata laioor ? 

I saw her yesterday; t.6., Yesterday I saw. 
Karalko yetti ngyn. 

She (is) pretty. 
Noonthi kongin-kongin. 

Ugly is that old woman. 
Ngomloiwil ngata kuloor. 

By-and-by many Blacks will arrive. 
Darti koko woortongi bimin. 

I see them now; i.6., Here I see. 
Eima yetti ngakin. 

Where? 
Wintala? 

(A) good way off (on the) plain. 
Kilothukkil wnrkido. 

(Do) you see that person ? 
Nginma ngakin noonthalla ? 

Long ago he back mine speared. 
Jeleka noonthi wurtoo yanden boin. 

To-morrow I will kill (him). 
Munmunerbo yetti tukkin. 

I see (an) emu, or emus. 
Yette ngyn kurwing. 

(Be) quiet. 
Kapo. 

(He is a) long way ofif. 
KUothukkU. 

Silence! 
Koorgni! 

By-and-by I (will) spear (him). 
Darti yetti boin. 

He is coming to water; t.«., Here comes water-drink. 
Kaki yannin kertenarda. 

No, he won't come to water; t.e.. Not he come water. 
Wotti ngoonthi yanna kertenarda. 

I believe fat that one. 

Yetti ngurangna pipaloo noonthL 

No, (all) bones. 
Wotti, kulkali. 



^2 THE AUSTRALIAN RAGB: 

No. 199.— ABDinoirAL Wordb akd Phbases— oonfimied. 

Now 1*11 spear him; %.e.. Here I spear. 
Kima yanda boin. 

There (he is) dead. 
Thoak delbin. 

He is fat; t.«., Plenty fat. 
Koko pipaloo. 

Gome on I make (a) fire. 
Goway! pnthama wumaway. 

(There is) no wood. 
Wotti wumaway.* 

Well ! carry that one, there, trees. 
Yeri toorta noonthi keo kolki. 

Hungry I. 
Berinyetti. 

Hasten, eat. 
Kakkai, jakkla. 

By-and-by I (will) eat. 
Barti yettl jakkla. 

Where (are the) Blacks ? 
Wintala woortongi ? 

I don't know; literally, where. 
Winta. 

Nonsense speak you. 
Ngurgnongnabbe nginma. 

There, I saw (them at) Ulupna. 
Keo, yetti ngyn Ulupna. 

How many? 
Anaboo? 

Many. 
Koko. 

What (do they) eat? 
Nalli jackla ? 

Emu, fruit, and flour. 

Kurwing, cherenthu ngna, beechon-beechon. 

What women (are) there? 
Wingeregnilaioorkeo? 

Many. 
Koko. 

Has Tommy got a wife yet? t.e., How many Tommy got wife? 
Anaboo Tommy magna murtamoo? 



* This word means both^ andySmpood. 



SWAN HILL AND TYNTYNDER. 443 

No. 199.^Ai>DinoNAL Words and "PsRAssa—contifmed, 

Yea! 

£a! 

Which Blacks gave her to him ? t.6., Which Blacks gave that one? 

Nalli woortongi woen noonthi? 

Which girl did he get? t.e., Which girl he? 

Nalli moorignoor noonthi? 

He only p^ot an old womaQ; i.e., No 1 <nd woman. 

Wotti! kuloor. 

When (will the) Blacks here come ? 

Natte woortongi kaki yanna? 

(Li) three days. 

Pola ky-np ngeringnerinum. 

Where is your wife ? 

Wintala nginio laioor? 

To-morrow coming. 

Munmunderbo bemin. 

Have yon seen my wife? t.e., How much you seen my woman? 

Anaboo nginna ngaken yanio laioor ? 

Yes. 

Ea. 

Where? 

Winta? 

TherCj on the plain. 

Keo wurkerda. 

Wliat (is) she doing? 

Nanga noonthi wara ? 

Where you went this day? (I)went(tothe) 

Winta or winthanga nginma yaen keeli ngengni? Yaen 

mallee. What (did) you want there? I wanted 

boorongarda. Nalli nginma yukka nua? yanda yukkin 

lowan's eggs. Aye, aye, how many (did) you get ? 

lowan mikko. Nga, nga, anabon nginma ngurmin? 

Plenty. Not you brought many here, because I 
Koko. Wotti nginma mangna kirtawil kaki, yeri yanda 

threw away many. Why you threw away addled 
winia maranda. Nukka nginma winia wertawil 

eggs? I like that kind. By-and-by I will get 

mikko? Yetti gera enganabo. Darti yanda ngurmin 

others, and I not throw away addled eggs; I 

yooia, nga yetti wotti winia wertawil mikko; yetti 

will give (them) to you. 
wongna nginma. 



444 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



In addition to the foregoing phrases and short dialof^es, 
Mr. Beveridge sent me many others which I have not thoaght 
it necessary to insert. Though they show well the rude form 
of conversation prevalent in our tribes, the ethnologist will 
notice, amongst other things, that the verbs as given are 
wanting in the inflexions common to all Australian tongaes. 
As an instance, the present, fature, and imperative of the 
verb eat are all translated Jo^/a. 



No. 199,— SWAN BILL AND TYNTYNDER. 



By John Bevebibge, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 
OpoBBnm 
Tame dog - 
Wild dog - 
Emu • 
Black duck - 
Wood dack - 
Pelican 
Laughing jackaas 
Native companion 
Wliite cockatoo 
Crow - 
Swan • 
Egg - 

Track of a foot 
Fish - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks 
A Blackf eUow 
A Black woman 
Nose - 



koorfingi. 

weeltSngL 

wir&Qgen. 

kOrwing kfbrwL 

t5lem. 

ngOmi 

pdrtagnaL 

koongo. 

k55rtani. 

kSrenyi. 

wongi. 

kdnawar. 

mirkoo. 

toorake. 

mtmchL 

chipeL 

yapi. 

moSntchi. 

pSrtL 

kftni. 

wootcha. 

woort5ngi. 

leyoor. 

leintoo. 



Hand - 

2 Blacks 

3 Blacks 



mumagna. 
pola wootcha. 
pola ky up 
wSotcha. 



One - 


- kyup or yoori. 


Two - 


- pola. 


Three- 


- dola kyup. 


Four - 


- pdla-pdla. 


Father 


- mSmoo. 


Mother 


- baboo. 


Sister-Elder 


. m§noo. 


„ Younger 


- 


Brother-Elder 


- wSwoo. 


„ Younger 


A young man 


• kolkroon. 


An old man 


- ngurambin. 


An old woman 


kuloor. 


A baby 


- popo. 


A White man 


• ngurtangL 


Children 


- pinko. 


Head • 


- poibo. 


Eye - 


• mimoo. 


Ear 


• winnpoolo. 



445 



No. 199.— Swan Hill and TrNmn)E&— con^ued. 


Mouth 


- wor5gna. 


Boomerang - 


- worn. 


Teeth- 


- liannoo. 


Hill or head 


- poibo, poorpo. 


Hair of the head 


- ngnragnoopoiho. 




banyole. 


Beaid - 


- ngenengroo. 


Wood - 


• kulki, wumaway 


Thmider - 


• munder. 


Stone - 


- mukkL 


Gnun - 


■ woolngL 


Gamp • 


lingL 


Tongue 


chellingnoo. 


Xes - - 


- eaoreyer. 


Stomach 


- wotohowoo. 


No - - 


- wottL 


Breasts 


- koimbo. 


1- 


- yettL 


Thigh . 


- kero. 


You - 




Foot - 


. chinangoo. 


Bark • 


- michoo. 


Bone - 


• kulko. 


Good - 


- telko. 


Blood • 


• koorko. 


Bad - 


- waikidoo. 


Skin - 


- michoo. 


Sweet - 


- kooli, lerpL 


Fat - 


- pipaloo. 


Food - 


- bemimoo. 


Bowels 


- gonangroo. 


Hungry 


- beea. 


Excrement - 


- gonangroo. 


Thirsty 


- konamia. 


War-spear - 


- bamar. 


Eat - 


• jakkla. 


Beed-spear • 


- tharami. 


Sleep - 


- komba. 


Throwing-stick 


- kerL 


Drink- 


- kopla. 


Shield ■ 


• kerami 


Walk - - 


- yanna. 


Tomahawk - 


■ pertL 


See - 


- ngaekla. 


Canoe • 


■ unkooi 


Sit - 


- ngennga. 


Snn - - . 


- nowi. 


Yesterday - 


- karalko. 


Moon - 


mertein, mitian. 


To-day 


- keelL 


Star . 


toortL 


To-morrow - 


. munmunerbo. 


Light - 


ngaenngi. 


Where are 


the winthsegno 


Dark - 


wooka, booirangi. 


Blacks? 


woortongi. 


Cold - 


boilinga, yebra. 


I don't know 


- wotte yetti 


Heat - 


kurtL 




derbinuu 


Day - 


ngaengL 


Plenty 


- koko. 


Night - - . 


wooka-boorangi. 


Big - - 


- karaway. 


Fire 


wumaway. 


Little - 


- panoo. 


Water- 


- kerlinL 


Dead - • 


- delbin. 


Smoke- 


boto, boorangni. 


By and-by - 


- darti. 


Ground 


• thungi. 


Come on 


- kaki! yanna! 


Wind - 


■ weelangL 


Milk - 


- koombo, koimbo. 


Rain - 


■ meertL 


Eaglehawk - 


- werpiL 


God . . - 




wad turkey 


• 


Ghosts- 


- ngurtangi. 


Wife - - 


- murtamoo. 



446 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 200.— ABOUT FIFTY MILES SOUTHERLY FROM SWAN 

HILL. 

By thk WRirxB. 

ThiB Iftngnage, whioh is called Mirdiragoort, is evidently related to tlie 

Wotti-wotti dialect 



Kangaroo - 


kora. 


Opoflsum • 


wills. 


Tame dog - 


werangen 


WUddog ■ 




Emu - 


kowir. 


Black dnck 




Wood dnck 




Pelican 




Laughing jackam 


1 


Native companioi 


Q 


White cockatoo • 


kurtuga. 


Crow • 


wa. 


Swan - 




Egg - 




Track of a foot 




Finh - 




Lobster 




Grayfiiih 




Mosquito • 




Fly - 




Snake 




The Blacks ' 


- wirtoo. 


A Blackf ellow 




A Black woman 


- laioor. 


Nose - 


• kagna. 



Hand- 


mimung. 


2 Blacks - 




3 Blacks - 




One - 


kaiup. 


Two - 


pooleL 


Three 


poolel kaip. 


Four - 


poolel pe poolel. 


Father 


manak. 


Mother 


baapek. 


Sistei^Elder 


- kotooe. 


„ Younger 




Brother-Elder 


• kotek. 


„ Youngei 


• 


A young man 




An old man 




An old woman 




A baby 


- popok, baingoor. 


A White man 




Children - 




Head- 


- Poolpe 


Eye - 


• mer. 


Ear • 


• wirmboola. 



FIFTY MILES SOUTHERLY FROM SWAN HILL. 



447 



No. 200.— About 

Month- 
Teeth - 

Hair of the head • 
Beard- 
Thunder 
Grass - 
Tongne 
Stomach 
Breasts 
Thigh- 
Foot - 
Bone • 
Blood- 
Skin - 
Fat - 
Bowek 
Excrement 
War-spear 
Reed-spear 
Throwing-stick 
Shield or back 
Tomahawk - 
Canoe - 
Sun - 
Moon - 
Star - 
Light - 
Dark - 
Cold - 
Heat - 
Day - 
Night - 
Fire - 
Water- 
Smoke 
Ground 
Wind- 
Rain - 
God - 
Ghosts 



FlFTT MiLBS SOXTTHEBLT FBOH SwAN KlUr—COntmued. 


garp' 


Boomerang - 


- 


Uya. 


Hill - 


- 




Wood- 


- 




Stone • 


- 


mnndor. 


Camp - 


- 


boait. 


Yes - 


- 




No - - 


« 




I- 


- 




You - 


- 




Bark - 


- 


dchinna. 


Good - 


- 




Bad - 


- 




Sweet - 


- 




Food - 






Hungry 






Thirsty 




koodna. 


Eat - 


- djekelinga. 


■ 


Sleep - 






Drink- 


- gopark. 




Walk - 


• 




See - 




partek. 


Sit - 






Yesterday - 






To-day 




toord. 


To-morrow - 






Where are 


the 




Blacks? 






I don't know 






Plenty 






Big ■ - 






Little - 




wimnp. 


Dead - 




kartin. 


By-and-by - 






Come on 




tiha. 


Milk - 




mirtnk. 


Eaglehawk • 






wad turkey 






Wife - 





1 



448 



THE AUBTBAUAN RACE: 



No. 201.-PIANGIL. 



Bt Thomas Macret>ie, Esq. 



Kjuigaroo - 


- korangi. 


Opoaram - 


. bendindL 


Tame dog - 


- kaU. 


WUddog - 


m 


Emu - 


' barrimalL 


Blaokdnok- 


- tholomL 


Wooddnok 


- man. 


Pelioan 


- nenankari. 


Laughing jackaas koorL 


Native oompanion turkanyi 


White oookatoo 


- jaranyi 


Oow - 


- willachalL 


Swan - 


- donabogL 


Egg - 


■ maiki. 


Track of a foot 


- yaanyi 


Finh - - 


- wirrumjali. 


Lobster 


- chiboli. 


Crayfish 


- yappi. 


Mosquito - 


- mungL 


Fly - 


- pichi. 


Snake 


- kami. 


The Blacks 


- woonyi. 


A Blackf ellow 


- woonyi. 


A Black woman 


- laioorki. 


Nose - - 


• djaindo. 



Hand- 


- monanying 


2BUcks . 


- bolaja woonyi. 


3 Blacks - 


- bolaja yetua 




woonyL 


One - 


- yetua. 


Two - 


- bolaja. 


Three- 


- bolaja yetua. 


Four - 


- bolaja bolaja. 


Father 


- marmi. 


Mother 


- komoo. 


Sister-Elder 


- mekana. 


„ Younger 


- 


Brother-Elder 


- mia. 


„ Younger 


A young man 


- kulkooL 


An old man 


- bukulkL 


An old woman 




A baby 


" baenyL 


A White man 


. kuthobL 


Children - 


- bobi. 


Head - 


- boebo. 


Eye - 


- maingo. 


Ear - 


- cholamdoo. 





PIANGIL. 


M 




No. 201.— PiANGiL-^eofUtfitfei. 




Month 


• wooroogoo. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth- 


- narrookoo. 


Hill . 




Hair of the head 


- naboebo. 


Wood- 


kniki. 


Beaid 


- nyamygo. 


Stone - 


■ matchi. 


Thunder - 


- mundari. 


f^ 


1 •• 






Camp - 


laiinyea. 


Oraas • 


- wooloogi. 


Yes - - • 


ea. 


Tongue 


- talayin. 


^^ 


£ J B 


Stomach 


- bellanyin. 


No - • • 


> wattaL 


Breasts 


- tandioo. 


I - - - 


• nulgi. 


Thigh 


- boyarbin. 


You - 


• nundi. 


Foot - 


- jennanyim. 


Bark • 


■ toolambi. 


Bone - 


- kalko. 


Good - 


- bai-ai-oo. 


Blood- • 


- koorkioo. 


Bad - - 


- wykatanyee. 


Skin • 


- loopko. 


Sweet - 


- bango. 


Fat - 


- kalbendioo. 


Food - 


• tarochi. 


Bowels 


- papgoonamyin. 


Hunizry 


. darbun. 


Excrement - 


- kooanyin. 


^7 w 




War-spear • 
BeedHBpear- 


- kalkarangoyono. 
• banyoondi. 


Thirsty 

Eat - 


■ gonamoo. 
- jikanal. 


Throwing-stick • 




Sleep - 


• koomba. 


Shield- 


- murkangL 


Drink- 


- koopung. 


Tomahawk - 


- taiinya, 


Walk - 


- yangaL 


Canoe- 


- yungobi. 


See - - • 


• nykan. 


Sun - 


, naianyi 


Sit - 


• naiango. 


Moon - 


- tarongia. 


Yesterday - 


■ kalko. 


Star - 


- toorti. 


To-day 


. jalinaika. 


Light - 


- waiogi. 


To-morrow - 


• biioo. 


Dark - 


- booroongi. 


Where are the 


winta-woonyi? 


Cold - 


- bulloinknrrori. 


Blacks? 




Heat - 


- pingoon. 


I don't know 


- winda. 


Day - 


- nainye. 


Plenty 


. kopeko. 


Night - 


- boorongL 


Big - 


- gurraway. 


Fire - 


- woonobL 


Little - 


. bfvitft^- 


Water 


- tainyi. 


Dead - 


- dalbexn. 


Smoke 


- boti. 


By-and-by - 


- bawa. 


Ground 


- dunyi. 


Come on - 


- kagai. 


Wind- 


• woolanyi. 


Milk - - 




Rain - 


- maitcheri. 


Eaglehawk - 




God . 




Wild turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife - 




YOL^ IIL 


2 


P 





450 



THE AUSTBAIIAN RACE: 



No. 201.— PIANOIL. 



Bt the Wbitxb. 



Kangaroo 
Oposram 
Tame dog 
WUd dog 
Emu • 
Black dack 
Wood dnok 
Pelican 
Laughing jackaas 
Native companion 
White cockatoo 
Crow - 
Swan - 
Egg - 

Track of a foot 
Fish - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks 
A Blackfellow 
A Black ^oman 
Nose • 



korangi. 

paangendi. 

kalU. 

buraimallL 

tolomi. 

naarL 

nanangore. 

korL 

torkanyi. 

kerangl. 

walechin. 

thanabootch. 

neki. 

chinanya. 

baanda. 

yabbechi. 

mnngi. 

beti. 



woani. 
woanL 
laiorki. 
changi. 



Hand - 

2 Blacks 

3 Blacks - 

One - 
Two • 
Three. 
Four - 

Father 

Mother 

Sister-Elder 

„ Yoonger • 
Brother-Elder - 

„ Tonnger 
A yoong man 
An old man 
An old woman - 
A baby 
A White man 
Children - 
Head - - - 
Eye - - . 
Bar - - - 



nmnanL 

polaigilla woani. 
polaigilla yaitna 

woani. 
yaitna. 
polaigilla. 
polaigilla yaitna. 
polaigill-poUai- 

gilL 

maamoo. 
konoo. 



waawoo. 

paitoo. 

pokkonL 

tillibillechi 

pobL 

kotolL 

marandobangL 

poibi. 

maingL 

toolandi 



PIANGIL. 



451 



No. 201.-- 



Mouth 


- woroni. 


Teeth - 


- ngarochi. 


Hair of the head - ngua-poibL 


Beard - 


- ninini. 


Thunder - 


- mundari. 


Grass - 


- woobigi. 


Tongae 


- chelengi. 


Stomach 


- beleni 


Breasts 


- koimbL 


Thigh - 


- kaingi. 


Foot - 


- chinnaan. 


Bone - 


- bembo. 


Blood - - 


- karko. 


Skin - - 


- looko. 


Fat - 


- kalbindo. 


Bowels 


- beto. 


Excreme9t - 


- koonanga. 


Waivspear - 


- kooiooni. 


Beed-spear- 


- panondi. 


Throwing-€tiok 


• chaieki 


Shield- - 


- markandgi. 


Tomahawk - 


- thaieni. 


Canoe - 


- yangoibi. 


Sun - 


- ngaiingi. 


Moon - 


- tooroongoi. 


Star - 


- tooti. 


light - 


- waingo. 


Dark - 


- borongi. 


Cold - - 


- poloinga. 


Heat - 


- nunga. 


Day - 


- tift-iingi, 


Night - 


- borongi 


Fire . - 


- wunabL 


Water 


- teem. 


Smoke 


- pooti. 


Ground 


- thanni. 


Wind - . 


• willain. 


Rain - - 


- maicheri. 


God - - 


- 


Ghosts 


• 



FiANQTL— continued. 

Boomerang- 
Hill •- - 
Wood- 
Stone- 
Camp - 
Yes - - 
No - - . 
I . - - 
You - - - 
Bark - 
Good - 

Bad - - • 
Sweet - 
Food - 
Hungry 
Thirsty 

Eat - - - 
Sleep - 
Drink- 
Walk - 
See - - 
Sit - - - 
Yesterday • 
To-day 
To-morrow - 
Where are the 
Blacks? 
I don't know 
Plenty 

Big - - - 
Little - 
Dead - 
By-and-by - 
Come on - - 
Milk - - 
Eaglehawk - 
Wild turkey 
Wife - 

ZVZ 



- baali, kaalki 

- kandogi. 

- laingL 

- iia. 

- waati. 

- nitte. 
• ninte. 

- laikoti. 

- baioo. 

- chilka. 

- bsdoo. 

- wilberoo. 

- tabun. 

- konema. 

- thowun. 

- koombian. 

- kopan. 

- yanna. 

- natchi. 
. ngaiingun. 

- kalko. 

- naiki. 

- tai-ai-oo. 
wuntha woani? 

winda. 

niarandoo. 

karawe. 

baiedain. 

telbL 

bawa. 

kagai. 



452 



THB AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 202.— BUBCBANG» ON THE MURRAY RIVER. 

Bt F. Gobnst, Esq. 



The ziame of the tribe i» Laitchi-laitchL 



Kmngaroo • 


■ goyangL 


Opoflsum 


■ wolangL 


Tame dog • 


. kollL 


wad dog . 




Emu " 


- karwingL 


Blaokdnck- 


• toolomL 


Wood duck 


* naline. 


Pelican 


• purtangiL 


Laughing jaokaBS 


gongong. 


Native companioi 


igotami. 


White cockatoo • 


• kowa. 


Crow - 


• wong. 


Swan - 


- goonowong 


Egg - - . 


• meg. 


Track of a foot • 




Fiflh - . - 




Lobeter 




Crayfish 


- ringwong. 


Mosquito - 


. moonine. 


Fly - - • 




Snake - 


. VyiTlf, 


The Blacks • 


- woortongi. 


A Blackf ellow • 




A Black woman . 


. lioo. 


Noee - - 


- geangL 



Hand- 


• munnagL 


2 Blacks - 


- 


3 Blacks - 


- 


One - 


- geyabL 


Two - 


- boolagL 


Three- 


- boolagi geyabL 


Four - 


- boolagi-boolagt 


Father 




Mother 


-papaL 


Sirter-Elder 


- chage. 


„ Younger 


- 


Brother-Elder 


- moondoondi. 


„ Younger bambL 


A young man 


- tininnr. 


An old man 


- mowmL 


An old woman 


- bowbL 


A baby - 


- boobop. 


A White man 


- 


Children - 


- 


Head - - 


-popL 


Eye - 


• mingL 


Ear - - 


- wunbola. 



BUMBANG, ON THE MURRAY RIVER. 



453 



No. 202.- 

Moath 

Teeth - 

Hair of the head- 

Beard- 

Thnnder - 

Grass - 

Tongue 

Stomach 



Thigh- 
Foot - 
Bone - 
Blood - 
Skin - 
Fat - 
Bowels 
Excrement - 
War-spear - 
Reed-spear - 
Throwing-stick 
Shield 
Tomahawk • 
Ganoe- 
Sun - - 
Moon - 
Star - 
light - 
Dark - 

Cold - 
Heat - 
Day - 
Night - 
Fire - 
Water 
Smoke 
Ground 
Wind- 
Rain - 
God - 
Ghosts 



-Bttmbano, on thb 


MuBBAT RiYSB— cont»nt(«{. 


menna. 


Boomerang • 


m 


liang. 


Hill - - 


- 


narapopi. 


Wood- 


- kulgL 


narringee. 


Stone- 


- mukkL 




Gamp - 


- lang 


boadgi. 


Yes . . 


- nia. 


yamL 
kutabi. 


No - . 


- laitchi. 


I- - . 


- yatti, yanga. 


tandi. 


Yon - - 


- 


jennagL 


Bark - 


- mori. 


bimbi 


Good - 


- delgi. 


gookL 


Bad - - 


- 


metcha. 


Sweet - 


- 


pibola. 


Food - 


- jakkalub. 


kumangi. 


Hungry 


- krenambun. 


galingi. 


Thirsty 


. 


kooiooni. 

mooli 

kurigL 


Eat - 


- boolagegelup 


Sleep - 


- kompaup. 


geyami. 


Drink 


- goobilup. 


patigi. 


Walk- - 


- yannow. 


longoL 


See - - 


- yettang. 


nowingi. 


Sit - 


- nienga. 


miteyan. 


Yesterday - 


- 


toorti. 


Today 


- dartigima. . 


beber. 


To-morrow - 


- mordar. 


koUi. 


Where are i 


the 


mangi. 


BUcks? 




kute. 


I don't know 


. 


nowingi. 


Plenty 


m 


paungL 


Big . - 


- wittab. 


woomabbL 


Little - 


- bamikum. 


kartini. 


Dead - 


- waekin. 


burringi. 


By-and-by - 


- 


gangi. 


Come on 


- yennaga 


wilangi 


Milk - . 


m 


mangi. 


Eaglehawk - 


• 




Wild turkey 


- 




Wife . - 


. 



454 



THE AUSTRAUAK RACE 



No. 203.--KULKYNB. 





Bt the 


Wmter. 




Kangaroo - 


- koaing. 


Hand - 


- mimongL 


Opossum 


- willang. 


2 Blacks 


- polaidjiwortongL 


Tame dog - 


- kaaU. 


3 Blacks . 


- polaidji kiap 


Wild dog - 


- 




wortongi. 


Emu - 


- karawingi. 


One - 


- kiap. 


Black duck - 


- tolomi. 


Two - . 


- polaidjii 


Wood duck- 
Pelican 


- ngalain. 

- boolunsal* 


Three- 


* • 
• polaidji kiap. 


Laughing jackass kongo. 


Four - 


- polaidji a polaidji 


Native companion kotomi. 


Father 


- mamai. 


White cockatoo 


- kawa. 


Mother 


. papai. 


Crow - 


. waangi. 


Sister-Elder 


- chache. 


Swan - 


- koo-no-wang. 


„ Younger 


- 


Egg . - 


- mikke. 


Brother-Elder 


- waawe. 


Track of a foot 


- chinnano. 


„ Younger 


Fish - 


- bimdi. 


A young man 


- balarje. 


Lobster 


•> 


An old man 


- ngarambin. 


Crayfish - 


- wolona. 


An old woman 


^7 

- kalao. 


Mosquito - 


- moaing-moaing. 


A 1. 1- 




Fly - 


- beted. 


A baby 


-popop. 


Snake- 


- kaanyL 


A White man 


- ngatang. 


The Blacks - 


- wortongi. 


Children - 


• paimbango. 


A Blackf ellow 


• wortongi. 


Head - 


-popai. 


A Black woman laiyoo. 


Eye - 


• mingL 


Nose . . 


. jenjL 


Ear 


• wimboli. 



KULKYNE. 



455 





No. 203.— KuLKTNS— eontinuecf. 




Mouth 


gappe. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


liangi. 


Hill - - . 




Hair of the head- 


pope. 


Wood- 




wumambie, kaalk 


Beard- 


ngaragi. 


Stone • 






Thunder - 


murnda. 








Grass - 


> boaidji. 


Gamp • 
Yes 




' laangL 

• • 


Tongue 


challinge. 




• ai-ai. 


Stomach 


> wiohobL 


No 




laitche. 


Breasts 


kombL 


I 




• yatte. 


Thigh- 


> barabo. 


You 




. n|;inna. 


Foot - 


chinnongi 


Bark 




> ngori. 


Bone - 


kaalk. 


Good 




• talge. 


Blood - - - 


kok. 


Bad 




- chelSgan. 


Skin - - - 


mitche. 


Sweet 




■ talge. 


Fat - - . 


• kaanjo. 


Food 




- bimimi. 


Bowels 


' warrongi. 


Hungry 


• kanamban. 


Excrement • 


komongL 


Thirsty 


- konbunan. 


War-spear - 
Reed-spear - 


wirtyulgaione. 
ohaame. 


Eat - • 


- chekilian. 


Throwing-stick • 


kairki. 


Sleep - 


- komban. 


Shield 


keami. 


Drink . 


■ kopelian. 


Tomahawk • 


battegi. 


Walk- 


■ yawan. 


Canoe - 


longwe. 


See - 


- ngawan. 


Sun - - - 


ngwingi. 


Sit - 


- ngewan. 


Moon • 


mittean. 


Yesterday - 


- chilalog. 


Star - - - 


toorti. 


To-day 


- taitigin. 


light - 


■ wai-inge. 


To-morrow - 


- mordur. 


Dark - 


• bondji. 


Where are the 


windje wortongi? 


Ck)ld - 


mendji. 


Blacks? 




Heat - 


kattai, walpam- 


I don't know 


- windja. 


*v^ 


unda. 

• • 


Plenty 


- ketawi. 


Day - 


' ngarwingi. 


Big - 


- wirtoor. 


Night . 


alogobondji. 


Little - 


- barmgam. 


Fire - - . 


wimabi. 


■V^ M 


w 






Dead - 


- wegan. 


Water 


kaatini. 




^7 


Smoke 


- poringi. 


By-and-by - 


• kalwa, chilaloga. 


Ground 


• janji. 


Come on 


- yennaga. 


Wind - 


willangi. 


Milk - - 




Rain - 


• naanji. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - - 




Wild turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife 


. 





456 



THB AUSTRALIAN RACB: 



No. 204.— THE TATIARRA COUNTRY. 

Bt WmiAM Hatvsb, Esq. 

There are still in the Tatiarra conntry remiiaiits of the 
seyeral associated tribes whose numbers in the aggr^ate are 
thought to have reached fiye hondred. In speech they 
differed somewhat, as will be seen by the two vocabnlaries 
given. It is singular that, in both of them, there is but one 
word for hungry and dead. 



Na 204.— THE TATLABRA OOUNTRY. 



Kangaroo - 




Hand - 


- manyarek. 


Opoisom • 


• wiUa. 


2 Blacks 


• polatch woychi- 


Tamedog - 


• kaL 




birik. 


Wild dog . 


■ wilkra. 


3 Blacks - 


• 




• kowir. 


One • 


• kyap. ' 


Black duck - 


• narri. 


Two • 


- polatch. 


Wood duck - 


■ tarriwnt. 


Three- 


- polatch po kyap. 


Pelican 




Four - 


- polatch po 


Laughing jackass 


koorungaL 




polatch. 


Katiye companioi 


1 koortchin. 


Father 


. miamik. 


White oockatoo • 


• chinap. 


Mother 


- piapik. 


Grow - 


- wa. 


Sistei^Elder 


- chiachek. 


Swan - 


. koonooer. 


,, Younger 


- kotundek. 


Egg 


- murrek. 


Brother-Elder 


• wiawek. 


Track of a foot • 
Fish - 


• paring. 


„ Younger gotek. 


Lobster 




A young man 


• kolkroon. 


Crayfish 
Mosquito - 




A" old man 


- narrambin. 


• knrrek-kurrek. 


An old woman 


" narramgooka 


Fly . 


• bachick. 


Ababy • 


- windek-windek. 


Snake • 


• koronwiL 


A White man 


r 


The Blacks - 


• woychibirik. 


Children 


• poopoop. 


A Blackfellow 


- woychibirik. 


Head - 


• poorpek. 


A Black woman • 


• lyrook. 


Eye 


- murrinyek. 


Nose - 


-kanyik. 


Ear - - 


• woormbilek. 



THE TATIARRA COUNTRY. 



457 



No. 204. — Thb Tatiabba Country — continued. 



Month 


- 


- chaipek. 


Teeth - 


- 


- leor. 


Hair of the head • narranyek. 


Beard- 


- 


- nanyingek. 


Thnnder 


- 


- mTimda. 


Qraas - 


- 


- powatch. 


Tongue 


- 


. challinck. 


Stomach 


- 


- billinyek. 


BreastB 


m 


- koombek. 


Thigh- 


m 


- kairitek. 


Foot - 


- 


- chiniek. 


Bone - 


- 


- kalkek. 


Blood- 


m 


- korrekek. 


RVm - 


- 


- miitchek. 


Fat - 


- 


- papooL 


Bowels 


- 


- pochek. 


Excrement 





- koonna. 


War-spear 


- 


- koioon. 


Beed-speai 


^ 


- 


Throwing-i 


itick 


- karrek. 


Shield 


- 


- potwiL 


Tomahawk 


.- 


- patchek. 


Canoe - 


m 


- 


8nn - 


- 


- neowt 


Moon - 


- 


- miitchnn. 


Star - 


- 


- trot. 


Light - 


- 


- waling. 


Dark - 


- 


- porrong. 


Cold - 


- 


- moortangi. 


Heat - 


- 


- walpen. 


Day - 


- 


- neowi. 


Night - 


- 


- pommg-pommg. 


Fire - 


- 


- wanyep. 


Water 


- 


- katchin. 


Smoke 


- 


- porring. 


Ground 


- 


- jarr. 


Wind- 


m 


- willa. 


Bain - 


- 


- mainng. 


God - 


- 


- 


Ghosts 


- 


- narkook. 



Boomerang - 


- karum-karum. 


ffill - 


- porpook. 


Wood- 


- wooling. 


Stone - 


- kotchep. 


Camp - 


- laar. 


Yes • 


- nia. 


No . - 


- wawrek. 


I - . 


- yerrowik. 


You . 


- yerrowin. 


Bark - 


- mitch. 


Good - 


- daelk. 


Bad . 


- yatchin. 


Sweet - 


m 


Food . . 


' panyim. 


Hungry 


- wikin. 


Thirsty 


- walpen. 


Eat - - 


- chekalun. 


Sleep - 


- dorran. 


Drink - 


- kopan. 


Walk- - 


- yannuk. 


See - - 


- naiangun. 


Sit - 


- niowun. 


Yesterday - 


- chalgar. 


To-day 


- yingmona. 


To-morrow - 


- paerpaerk. 


Where are the 


) windiatch. 


Blacks? 




I don't know 


- barwingi. 


Plenty 


- ketohawil. 


Big - - 


- koerung. 


Little - 


- paer. 


Dead - 


- wikin. 


By-and-by - 


- marlok. 


Come On 


- yannaka. 


Milk - - 


- koorun. 


Eaglehawk - 


- wirepQ. 


WUd turkey 


- narrow. 


Wife - 


- matohimek. 



458 



THB AUSTRAUAK RAGE: 



No. 204.— THE TATIARRA COUNTRY. 





Bt the 


Wbitxb. 




Kangaroo - 


- mindja. 


Hand • . 


> manym. 


Opoasum - 


- wille. 


2 Blacks > 


* polaitch baang. 


Tame dog • 


• kaaL 


3 Blacks . 


- polaitch pe kainp 


Wild dog - 

Emu • m 

Black duck - 


■ kowir. 
• ngare. 


One - 


baang. 
- kaiup. 


Wood duck 


- bea-pe-up. 


Two - 


- polaitch. 


Pelican 


• waroopooL 


Three - 


• polaitch pe kaiup. 


Laughing jackaw 


1 krong-krong. 


Four - 


- polaitch polaitch. 


Native oompanioz 


k nawl-ko^ng. 


Father 


- maame. 


White cockatoo 


■ gij^yap* 


Mother 


- baab. 


Crow - 


• war. 


Sister-Elder 


. chache. 


Swan - 


koonawar. 


,t Younger 




Egg 


• mirk. 


Brother-Elder • 


- waawe. 


Track of a foot - 


- paring. 


„ Younger 




Fuih - •- 
Lobster 




A young man 


- namborongworo. 




An old man 


- ngarambe. 


Crayfish - 
Mosquito • 


• yapitch. 

• kraig-kruk. 


An old woman • 


. ngarambango. 


Fly - - . 


batchik. 


A baby 


wiirendetch 


Snake - 


kommul. 


A White man 


- wainman. 


The BUcks - 


baang. 


Children 




A Blackfellow • 


• baang. 


Head - 


■ boorp. 


A Black woman • 


baiambangoo. 


Eye - 


• mir. 


Nose - - - 


kaar. 


Ear - 


wirambool. 



THE TATIAKRA CX)UNTRY. 



459 





No. 204.— The Tatiabba Couktrt— ca 


ntinued. 


Mouth 


- 


- chalalk. 


Boomerang- 


- 


Teeth- 


- 


- lii& 


Rill - - 


- 


Hair of the head- ngarapoorp. 


Wood- 


- welling. 


Beard- 


- 


- ngainye. 


Stone - 


- laa. 


Thunder 


m 


- muj^dar. 


Camp- 


- iray. 


Grass 


- 


- boaitoh. 


Yes - - 


- nge. 


Tongae 


- 


- challe. 


No - - 


- allanya. 


Stomach 


- 


- charoen. 


I- - - 


- chormek. 


Breasts 


- 


. chang. 


You - 


- choramin. 


Thigh - 
Foot - 


• 


- kra. 

- chinna. 


Bark - - 


- tokur. 


Bone - 


« 


- kaalk. 


Good - - 


- tealk 


Blood - 


. 


- kork. 


Bad - - 




Bkin - 


- 


- tallang. 


Sweet - 


- tealk. 


Fat - 


- 


- perpooL 


Food - 


- baiuyim, 


Bowels 


- 


-bille. 


Hungry 


- wiikan. 


Excrement 


- 


- koonna. 


Thirsty 


- brangunyan. 


War-spear 


•• 


• koioon. 


Eat - 


- chekellea. 


Beed-spear 


- 


- jeran. 


Sleep - 


- kombian. 


Throwing-stick 




Drink - 


' kopan. 


Shield 


- 


- malkar. 


Walk - 


. yanna. 


Tomahawk 


- 


- bai-e-jik 


See - 


- nyawan. 


Canoe - 


- 


- yongoe. 


d» j_ 




Sun • 


„ 


- irangool. 


Sit 


- ngeima. 


Moon - 


. 


- yem. 


Yesterday - 


- chalegi. 


Star - 


« 


- toort. 


To-day 


- kaiejung. 


Light - 


tm 


- yaap. 


To-morrow - 


- beurbe. 


Dark - 


- 


- boroin. 


Where are 


the winjabaang? 


Cold - 


- 


- monmot. 


Blacks? 




Heat - 


- 


- kaije. 


I don't know 


- windjabaaka. 


Day - 


- 


- yerungoori. 


Plenty 


- kidjowil. 


Night - 


- 


- boroin. 


Big . - - 


- korong. 


Fire - 


- 


- wi. 


Little - 


- baan. 


Water 


- 


- kaiejin. 


Dead - 


- wiikin. 


Smoke 


- 


- borring. 


By-and-by - 


- kaiejong. 


Ground 


- 


- ja. 


Come on 


- yannag. 


Wind- 


- 


- warwort. 


Milk - - 


- 


Rain - 


- 


- miring. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


- 


- 


WUd turkey 


■ 


Ghosts 


• 


. 


Wife - - 


■ 



460 THE AUSTRALIAK RACK: 



No. 205.— MOUNT GAMBIER. 

Bt D. Stewabt, Esq. 

The following information concerning the Mount Glambier 
Blacks, and vocabulary of the language of the Booandik 
tribe, were forwarded to me by Mr. D. Stewart. 

The Mount Gambier Blacks, I learn from my informant, 
are divided into several tribes, which, in conversation, were 
readily distinguishable by certain words, phrases, and accents 
peculiar to each. Some, for instance, used the sound of the 
letter / in words from which others omitted it, as koolevj 
kooer »» an effff; and malangey maange = wife. Others used or 
omitted k in certain words, as wookine^ n)ooine= elbow; and 
Tmkaj n>ena^=^ strike. In terms of relationship the suffix -ine 
is equivalent to wy, as marm^^faiher^ marmine^^mf father; 
ngate^^ mother y ngatine^^my mother. Marmine wan is the 
equivalent of my father's brother if he exercises occasionally 
the right of husband over the speaker's mother, but he is 
addressed as waitine if he does not exercise such right. A 
woman addresses her grand-daughter as mootngoon when a 
child, and as ngurpine when grown up. Mr. Stewart, who is 
an excellent authority, is not aware that any distinction in 
terms is made when speaking of or to the children of a man's 
brother and those of his sister. The same terms of relation- 
ship are applied to both. 

As the Mount (Gambier Blacks have no expression for 
numbers above 4, except the teTms paroojig and karli-^-mamfj 
they fix the date of a future meeting in this way. The 
spokesman places the index finger of his right hand on his 
head, then in succession on his neck, shoulder, elbow, wrist, 
thumb, and fingers of one or both hands if necessary, dis- 
tinguishing each of these portions of the body with a different 
word, each word representing a day, and arranging at which 
of them the meeting shall take place. The same custom I 



MOUNT GAMBEER. 461 

have noticed in my Recollections of Squatting as in use in 
the Bangerang tribes. 

These Blacks, Mr. Stewart writes, are divided into two 
classes, which, from their disposition to quarrel, he is almost 
disposed to call factions. They are called Kumite and 
Krokeey and when applied to the females Kumitegor and 
Krokeegor respectively. A Kumite can only marry a Kro- 
keegoTj and a Krokee a Kumitegor. An infringement of 
this law is held in aborrence as incestuous. Mothers-in-law 
and sons-in-law studiously avoid each other. A father-in- 
law converses with his son-in-law in a low tone of voice, and 
in a phraseology differing somewhat from the ordinary one. 

The Kumite and Krokee classes are each divided into five 
sub-classes, under which are ranked certain objects which 
they call tooman =^sh^ or wingo =^ friend, AU things in 
nature belong to one or the other of these ten sub-classes. 
For instance, under Kumite we have — 

1st. Boort ma = the crow, to which belong rain, thunder, 

lightning, haU, clouds, &c. 
2nd. Boort moola = the fish-hawk, to which class belong 

smoke, honeysuckle, trees, &c. 
3rd. Boort parpangal= the pelican, to which belong the 

blackwood-tree, fire, frost, dog, &c. 
4th. Boort wilier = the black cockatoo, to which belong 

the stars, moon, &c. 
5th. Boort karato = 9k non-venemous snake, to which 
belong eels, seals, the stringybark-tree, &c. 
The Krokee classes are — 

1st. Boort wereo= the ti-tree, under which are the 

black duck, wallaby, opossum, crayfish, &c. 
2nd. Boort laa = the turkey, to which belong the tolit 

or small kangaroo, quail, certain edible roots, &c. 
3rd. Boort karual = the white crestless cockatoo, to 
which belong the kangaroo, the sheoak-tree, the 
smnmer season, &c. 
The particulars of the 4th and 5th Krokee boorts have 
escaped from Mr. Stewart's memory. 



I 



462 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



These boorts have nothing to do with marriage, 8o that a 
Kumite may marry a Krokeegor of whatever sab-dass she 
may be; but to food they do refer, as it is only when dis- 
tressed by want and hanger that a person will eat any of 
the animals or roots which belong to his hocrt. When 
hanger compels them to eat of their teaman or mngo^ they 
express their sorrow by touching their breasts as a sign of 
relationship. 

Mr. Taplin relates in his Ndrrtnyeri, p. 47, that two 
of that tribe established themselves at Mount Gambier, but 
language shows that the locality was peopled by offshoots of 
the Eastern tribes. 

Mr. Stewart gives the following Additional Words and 
Phrases : — 



MnUet . - - - 


- kokber. 


Lightning ... 


minan-mnm. 


Trees .... 


- poena. 


Red gum-trees 


- tartpeena. 


Temporary camp 


- nurom. 


Winter camp 


- karodoor. 


My father - i . 


- marmine. 


Your father - 


- marmoon. 


His or her father 




The father of us two 


- marmabo. 


The father of you two - 


- marmong. 


The father of those two - 


- nungpalerat marmong. 


Our father (plural) - 


- marmano. 


Your father (plural) 


- marmorong. 


Fathers of us two - 


- marmbolalo. 


Fathers of you two - 


- marmbolalong. 


Fathers of those two 


- nung calat marmbolong 


I am going 


• yananga. 


We two are going - 


- yanangal. 


We are going - - - 


• yanange. 


I went - - - - 




We two went - 


• yaanalo. 


We went- 


- yaane. 



MOUNT GAMBIEE. 



463 



Additional VfoKDS— continued. 



I went a loDg time ago • 


■ yapa. 


We two went a long time ago - 


yapalo. 


We went a long time ago 


■ yape. 


I will go 


yowyeunga. 


We two will go - - • 


yowyeallo. 


We will go - • - ■ 


■ yowyeunge. 


Where are you going ? - 


• na ngin yan ? 


I am going for firewood • 


- wumapo nga yan 


Did you go ? - 


- na ngin yaan ? 


Go (or walk) fast 


- yanba yanka. 


My wife - . - - 


- malangine. 


Your wife - . - . 


- malangon. 


Hia wife - - - - 


- malanoong. 


My two wives - 


- malaboline. 


My wives (over two) 


- malanganune. 



464 



THB AU8TRALKAN RACE: 



No. 200.— MOUNT QAMBIER. 



Kangaroo 

Opoisom 

Tame dog 

Wild dog 

Emu ' 

Blaok duck 

Wood duck 

Pelican 

Laughing 

Native companion 

White cockatoo 

C5row - 

Swan • 

Egg 

Track of a foot 

Fiah - 

Loheter 

Crayfish 

Mosquito • 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks - 
A Blackf ellow 
A Black woman 
Nose - 



kooraa (male). 

kooramo. 

kal or karL 

kar nachum. 

kower. 

dnmer. 

pnmer. • 

parangal. 

kooartang. 

wondL 

mar. 



koonowoor. 

kooler. 

tenanoong. 

keler. 

konkro. 

kecho. 

uluL 

koorang. 

drooaL 

drooaL 

kinenle. 

kow. 



Hand • 
2Blacks 
3 Blacks 

One - 
Two - 
Three- 
Four - 
Father 
Mother 
Sistex^Elder 

„ Younger 
Brother-Elder 

,, Younger 
A young man 

An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 
Eye -^ 



boUte drooaL 
wpow-wong 
drooaL 
wondo. 
boUte. 
wroW'Wong. 
kurtor, kurtbano. 
marm. 
ngate. 
date, 
nereer. 
wazgale. 
dote, 
babater, wawar- 

koatparek. 

wi-at-a-wer. 

koonam. 

koomamir. 

koongapumim. 

boop. 

mir. 

wrung. 



MOUNT GAMBIEB. 



465 



No. 206.— Mount QAMBSER—coniimud 



Moath 


^ ■ 


. lo. 


Boomerang 


- ketnm-ketum. 


Teeth - 


> tunga. 


Hill 




- boopik. 


Hair of the head- 


. ngar la boop. 


Wood 




• wumep. 


Beard- - • 


• ngurlangeme. 


Stone 




- murL 


Thunder - 


• mumdaL 


Gamp • 




- ngoorla nurom. 


Graaa - 


- bootho. 


Yes 




■ nga. 


Tongue 


- tale. 


No . 




- ngin. 


Stomach 


- boole. 


I 




- ngatho. 


Breasts 


-pap. 


You . 




• ngooro. 


Thigh- 


> prum. 


Bark • 




- moondart. 


Foot - 


- tena. 


Good • 




- murtong. 


Bone - 


- baa-aa. 


Bad 




. wrang. 


Blood - - • 




Sweet- 




• ngooit. 


iSkin - 


' moor. 


Food (yegeti 


kble)- booang. 


Fat - • ■ 


mumt. 


„ (flesh) - 


• toomanu 


Bowels 


• koonna. 


Hungry 






• koonna. 


Thirsty 


- koornoon. 


War-spear - 


' kooen. 


Eat - 


- dira. 


Reed-spear • 


• (none). 


Sleep 




. kooma, wilitch. 


Throwing-stick 


- koombine. 


Drink- 




- tata. 


Shield 


- malgar. 


Walk 




• yan. 




• peragor. 


See - 




• na-a. 


Ganoe • 




• wola. 


Sit • 




- inga. 


Bun • 




- karo. 


Yesterday • 


- woordooing. 


Moon • 




- toongoom. 


To-day 


> keto. 


Star 




- boongil. 


To-motTOw ■ 


- kalepa. 


light • 

Bark 

Gold 

Heat 

Day 

Night- 


• 


- karo. 

- mola. 

• moortona. 

- woat. 

• karo. 

• mola. 


Where are 
Blacks? 
I don*t knoii 

Plenty 
Big - - 
Little - 


the na drooal? 

seen). 

• parung, karli. 

• woorong. 

• mooroke. 


Fire - -♦ 




Dead - - 


- nooana; be-e a = 


Water 


■ pare. 




stinking. 


Smoke 


' booloing. 


By-and-by • 


- keto. 


Ground 


- mrade. 


Gome on - 


. kooki. 


Wind- 


• nerecha. 


Milk - . 


- papumboop. 


Bain - 


- kawine. 


Eaglehawk 


- ngere. 


God - - - 


(no name). 


Wild turko; 


f - laa. 


Ghosts 


■ woor. 


Wife - 


. inftlfr, 


vo 


u m. 


2 


G 







BOOK THE NINETEENTH. 



BOOK THE NINETEENTH. 



PBEFATOBY REMARKS. 



This book containg specimens of the languages of the western 
portion of Victoria. The teaching of its vocabularies is that 
the aborigines of this part of the colony are related to those 
of the Murray Eiver, in the vicinity of Swan Hill. The 
first vocabulary inserted, No. 206, belongs to the tribes which 
dwell, or dwelt, on and about Morton Plains, in connection 
with which I have collected the following few Additional 
Words: — 



Swim • 


- yawa. 


The Mnrray River mil-le. 


Blow^fly 


- barperik. 


CodfiHh 


- bajal. 


Manna 


- lenrp. 


Plain - 


- ^'ark. 


Scrub - 


- peenoorfcigal. 


SandhiU 


- poorpook. 



lightning - 
Opoflsum-mg 
Be gone ! 
Give me a drink 
Half -grown emn 



wiUebook. 
willejookjook. 
yannage! 
baitn makin. 
wartipnngmook. 



I see two Blacks - nge noon poolet 

koole. 

The areas of country which are, or were, occupied singly 
by the Victorian tribes are in many cases so small that it is 
impossible to lay them down on the map, hence I have 
grouped a number of vocabularies in No. 207, under the 
designation of The Langita^es of Western Victoria^ in order 
to show their position. The aboriginal population of Victoria, 
a country rich in aboriginal food, was, I am of opinion, greater 
per square mile than was to be found in any other area of the 
continent of equal extent; not, it is important to notice, that 
a tribe numbered more members, but that there were more 
tribes. Perhaps an average Victorian tribe contained about 
200 persons. I am of opinion that the tribes in Australia, 
when undivided into marriage classes, did not often exceed 
that number. 



470 



THE AUSTRAUAK RACE: 



The languages of which specimens are given in this book 
the Blacks themselves hold to be distinct, and each of them 
has a separate name, bat the reader will notice the differences 
are minor ones — those of dialect. At the same time these 
differences are numerous and sometimes confined to very small 
tribes, if not indeed in some instances to one or two families. 
They often display themselves in terminations, roots remain- 
ing unchanged or nearly so. This may be instanced in the 
two renderings I have received of the Hopkins Biver lan- 
guages^ as follows: 



BlAok duck 


- thoorboornng 


- toorpnmk. 


Pelican 


- kirkpirap 




Hand - 


• mnrrang - 




Stomach 


- togong - 


• tookonk. 


BreastB 


- nabnng - 


- ngupponk. 


Thunder 


• mumdal - 


- mimdonk. 


Sleep • 


- yoo-anan 


. youmonk. 


Head - 


- pimaning 


- peem. 


Eye - 


- mimaming 


• minmk. 


Ear • • - 


' winuaming 


- wirrunk. 


Teeth • 


- tinganaming - 





Other differences also exist. In the Lake Hindmarsh 
vocabulary, for instance, we find the sound of ch very pre- 
valent, and in that of Lake Wallace ek or ak commonly the 
terminal sound of words expressive of the parts of the human 
body. In the twelve vocabularies which this book contains 
we have five distinct terms for the Blacks; six for nOy whilst 
there are but two really distinct words fory^^. 

Proper names seem to be decUned in all of our languages. 
I asked the intelligent young Black from whom I obtained 
the vocabulary from the Glenelg, above Woodford, whether 
he knew the Aboriginal Station on the Yarra. His reply was 
^' Eorrendrook," the name of the station. Then he said laugh- 
ing, Yaanaen Korrendroogo = Imll go to Korrendrook. 

I have always thought the Blacks of Victoria somewhat 
in advance of their northern relatives; for though many of 
their customs are the same, they are more decent generally; 
do not go naked, and abstain, as a rule, from giving their 



PREFATORY REMARKS. 471 

daughters in marriage until they approach the age of 
puberty. We see also in this book a few advances in 
language. For instance, we generally have a distinct word 
for 3, and occasionally for 4, in place of the compound 
terms which the reader has so often met with. Also when 
4 is expressed by the equivalent of two twOy an equivalent 
for and is found between them, which, if I remember rightly, 
never occurs in the North. These little advances of the 
Victorian Blacks I attribute to the more favorable conditions 
of climate and food amidst which they have long existed. 

In Western Victoria dwelt the tribes of which Mr. James 
Dawson has left a record in his Australian Aborigines^ a 
work in which are found many interesting details of 
manners and language, and a few statements which I have 
called in question in Vol. I., chapter 3. 



472 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 



No. 206.— MORTON PLAINS. 



Bt THl WbITIB. 



The langoAge, of which what foUowi ifl a spedmeii, is called Bn^ikiit. 
It mfty be compared with Mirdiragoort and Tatiarra. With the Utter it 
almoat agrees in its negative adverb. 



Kangaroo • 
Opoesum 
Tame dog - 
Wild dog - 
Bmu - 
Black dnck - 
Wood dock • 
' Pelican 
Laughing jackaas 
Native companion 
White cockatoo 
Crow - 
Swan - 
Egg - 

Track of a foot 
Fish • 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito - 
Fly • 
Snake 

The Blacks • 
A Blackfellow 
A Black woman 
Nose • 



kore. 
wille. 

yawir. 



karQpki 



mirk. 



kommil. 

koole. 

koole. 

paibagoo. 

ka. 



Hand - 


• mumoo. 


2Blaoks - 


- poolet koole. 


SBlacks - 


• poolet pe kaiup 




koole. 


One - 


- kai-up. 


Two - 


- poolet. 


Three - 


- poolet pe kaiup. 


Four - 


- poolet poolet. 


Father 


-* minim ■ 


Mother 


- bai^. 


Sister-Elder 


- kotnk. 


„ Younger 


- 


Brother-Elder . 


m 


„ Young4 


9T 


A young man 


- 


An old man 


- 


An old woman 


- 


A baby 


- p5-pdp. 


A White man 


- 


Children - 


- 


Head - - 


- booip. 


Eye - 


- mir. 


Ear - 


- wirbool. 



MORaX)K PLAINS. 



473 







No. 206.— MoBTON ThAm^'-isontintted, 


Mouth 


- 


' kom. 


Boomerang 




Teeth - 


- 


- lia. 


Hill . 


• kowa. 


Hair of the head - 


Wood 






Beard- 


- 


- 


Stone - 






Thunder 


- 


- mumdal. 


Camp • 






Grass - 


m 


- boet. 


Yes 




- ngai-e. 


Tongue 


« 


- 


No . 




- ngallanya. 


Stomach 


- 


- 


I 




- nge. 


Breasts 


- 


- 


You ■ 






Thigh - 


- 


- 


Bark • 






Foot - 


- 


- dchinna. 


Good 






Bone - 


- 


- 


Bad 






Blood - 


- 


- 


Sweet- 






Skin - 


- 


- 


Food 






Fat 


- 


- 


Hungry 




Bowels 


- 


- 


Thirsty 


• konmun. 


Excrement 


m 


- koonna. 


Eat 


- checkalinarchin. 


War-spear 


- 


- koioon. 


Sleep - 


- kobe. 


Beed-spear 


- 


- jark. 


Drink- 


- baitchek. 


Throwing-Btick 
Shield 
Tomahawk - 
Canoe - 
Sun - 
Moon - 
Star - 
Light - 
Dark - 


• 

- malkar. 

- parik. 

- ngawi. 

- yen. 

- toort. 


Walk - 
See - 
Sit - 
Yesterday 
To-day 

* 

To-morrow 

Where are 
Blacks ? 


• yaanna. 

- noon. 

- parpo. 
the 


Cold - 


m 


- 


I don*t knoti 


r 


Heat - 


- 


- 


Plenty 




Day - 


- 


- malinawin. 


Big . . 


- porin. 


Night - 


- 


- pooroin. 


Little • 


- warchipoongup. 


Fire - 

Water 

Smoke 




- wi. 

- karlin. 
■ bort. 


Dead - 
By-and-by ■ 
Come on 
Milk - . 
Eaglehawk 


. dredaiin. 


Ground 
Wind - 
Rain - 




- dja. 




God . 




- 


wad turkey 




Ghosts 




• 


Wife ■ 


m 


- naragorook. 



' 



474 



THE AU9TRALIAK RACE: 



No. 207a.~LAKE HDTDMABSH, UPPER REGIONS STATION, 

AND LOWER WDOCERA. 



Kaiigmo • 
OpoMiim 
Tune dog • 
Wild dog - - 
Emu - * « 
Black daok • 
Wood daok- 
Palioftii 

Tiftnghing jackMS 
Native oompanion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow • - - 
Swan • 

Egg - - . 
Track of a foot • 
Fiih - - • 

Lobfter 

Crayfish 
Moaquito • 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks 
A Blaokf ellow 
A Black woman 
Nose - 



nuinjnn. 
wille. 



Bt tbb Wbitib. 

Hand - 

2B]acks 

3Blacka 



kowir. 

ngari. 

waalmng. 

patchinga. 

kroongkroong. 

kotchnn. 

chinnap; 



koo-noo-war. 
mirk. 

paring bo chinna 
(no general 
name). 

wolonok. 

graigkrik. 

pittik. 

kommil. 

wootcha. 

wootcha. 

laiarook. 



One 
Two - 
Three • 
Foot • 

Father 

Mother 

Sister-Elder 

„ Toanger 
Brother-Elder 

„ Toanger 
A young man 
An old man- 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 
Eye 
Bar 



monya. 

poUetchwootdua. 

poEetch pa kainp 
wootcha. 



poUetch. 

poUetchpakaiap. 
poUetch pa pol- 
letch. 



paab. 
ehach. 



kolkoom. 
nganunbe. 
kallagallagoork. 
pobop. 

wiimditch. 
boorp. 
mir. 
wirmbooL 



LAKE HINBMABSH, UPPER BEGIOKS STATION. 476 



Ko. 207a. — ^Lakb Hindmabsh, Uppkb Rjboions Station, and Lower 

Wtmmera— ■con^tntted. 



Month 


• charp. 


Boomerang - 


m 


Teeth- 


• Ua. 


ffiU . 


. 


Hairof thehead 


• ngarampoorp. 


Wood- 


- wnnjrup, kaalk. 


Beard- 


- nganyi. 


Stone - 


- kootchup. 


Thunder • 


• mnmdar. 


Camp - 


- ira. 


Grass • 


- boaitch. 


Yes - - 


-ng. 


Tongue 


- challe. 


No . ■ 


- worrekaia. 


Stomach 


• billL 


I - - 


- aan. 


Breasts 


chang. 


Yon - 


. chormin. 


Thigh - 


. kra. 


Bark - . 


- dookoor. 


Foot - 


. chinna. 


Good - 


- taalk. 


Bone - 


■ kaalk. 


Bad - - 


- yaatchung. 


Blood. 


• kork. 


Sweet- 


- taalk. 


Skin . 


- mitch. 


Food - 


- paanyimbai 


Fat - - 


• barpool. 




yowir. 


Bowels 


• koonabarong. 


Hungry 


- wiika. 


Exorement- 


- koonna. 


Thirsty 


- brangoonya. 


War-spear - 


kooioon. 


Eat - 


. chakkella. 


Beed-spear- 


• chaark. 


Sleep • 


- toira. 


Throwing-stick • 
Shield 


. kaarik. 
• botwel. 


Drink 
Walk 


- kopilla. 

- yanga. 


Tomahawk - 


• batchik. 


See . 


- neikella. 


• 

Ganoe- 


- yoongooip. 


Sit ■ 


- ngenga. 


Snn - - . 


- ngowi 


Yesterday - 


- challige. 


Moon - 


• mittean. 


To-day 


- ingoome. 


Star - 


• toort. 


To-morrow - 


- beruppa. 


Light - 


• yaap. 


Where are the 


> - windga wootoha 


Dark - 


• mnlparoin. 


Blacks? 


bailaiarook? 


Cold - - ■ 


■ motmot. 


I don*t know 


- nge. 


Heat - 


• walpa. 


Plenty 


- kitchowl. 


Day - .- 


- ngowi. 


Big - . 


- korong. 


Night- 


• poroin. 


Little - 


- baan. 


Fire - ■ 


- wanynp. 


Dead - 


- wiikin. 


Water 
Smoke 


- kaatyin. 
• boring. 


By-and-by - 


- maloknea. 


Qroond 


• ja. 


Come on • 


- yannaga. 


Wind - 


' willa. 


Milk - 


- 


Bain • 


mitohak. 


Eaglehawk - 


* 


God - 




Wild turkey 


• 


Ghosts 




Wife - - 


• 



\ 



476 



¥HS AOSTRALIAN BAGS: 



Ko. 207B.-LAKE WALLACE AND KEIGHBOURHOOD. 



Bt the Wbitbb. 



Kangaroo - 


- kore. 


Hand - 


- manyanek. 


OpoflBom - 


- wille. 


2Blaok8 - 


- pollaioh baang. 


Tame dog - 


-kaal. 


SBlacks - 


- pollaich pa kainp 


WUddog - 


- 




baang. 


ICinii • 


- kowir. 


One - 


• kaiup. 


Black dnok- 


- ngurri. 


Two - 


- pollaich. 


Wood duck- 


- bichangro. 


Three- 


- pollaich pa kaiup 


Pelioan 


- doong. 


Four - 


- pollaich pa 


Laughing jackai 


IS krong-krong. 




pollaich. 


Native companion koiyoon. 


Father 


- muTffif 


White cockatoo 


- kaiyekker. 


Mother 


-papL 


Crow - 


• waa. 


Sister-Elder 


- chaohL 


Swan - 


- koonowar. 


yy Younger 


. 


B;gg - - 


. mirk. 


Brother-Elder 


- wawi. 


Track of a foot 


. chinnayook. 


II Younger 


Fish - 


- yeyook. 


A young man 


- jawillL 


Lobster - 


- 


An old man 


. ngamnd. 


GrayfUi - 


- yapitch. 


An old woman 


- wegaregat. 


Mosquito - 


- krekrek. 


A baby 


-popop. 


Fly - 
Snake - 


• 

- kommil. 


A White man 




TheBlack8- 


- baang. 


Children - 


- 


A Blaokf eUow 


- baang. 


Head - - 


• propak* 


A Black woman 


- painbangoork. 


Eye - 


- mimik. 


Nose - • 


• kaangek. 


Ear - 


- wirmboolek. 



No. 207b.- 


-Laks Wallace akd NsiOHBonBHOOD— eon(tn«ed. 


Month 


■ kanek. 


Boomerang • 




Teeth - 


> liangek. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head- 


ngamgek. 


Wood 




- wi. 


Beard- - 


- nganiek. 


Stone 




. - u. 


Thunder - 


• mumdar. 


Camp 




- lerum. 


Grass - 


• boaitch. 


Yes 




- nge. 


Tongue 


• ohalingek. 


No . 






Stomach 


ballingek. 


I 






Breasts 


- kroombook. 


You 






Thigh - 




Bark 




- mitchook. 


Foot ' 


■ » « 


- Ghinnaaek. 


Good 






Bone - 


B « fl 


kaalk. 


Bad . 






Blood 


* • ■ 


korkek. 


Sweet- 






Rkin 


a « fl 


miohek. 


Food - 






Fat - . . 
Bowels 
Exorement • 
War-spear • 
Beed-spear - 
Throwing-stick • 
Shield - 


barpoolek. 

koonna. 
• deer, 
ohirark. 
kraiik. 


Hungry 
Thirsty 
Eat - 
Sleep - 
Drink- 
Walk - 




Tomahawk - 


bayik. 


See 




Canoe • 


yungooit. 


Sit - 




Sun - 


yumgai. 


yesterday • 




Moon • 


■ yum. 


To-day 




Star - 


- toort. 


To-morrow • 




light - 
Dark - 
Cold - 
Heat - 
Day - 
Night - 
Fire - 


wi 


Where are 
Blacks? 
I don't knoDi 
Plenty 
Big - 
Little - 


the windjabaang? 
r - windja. 


Water 


• kayin. 


Dead - 




Smoke 


• pori. 


By-and-by ■ 




Ground 


- cha. 


Come on 


- watajem. 


Wmd - 


• wardwart. 


Milk - 




Bain - 


- meren. 


Eaglehawk 




God • - 




Wild turke] 


f 


Ghosts 


■ 




Wife 


. 


m • 



477 



478 



THE AUBTRAIJAK RACE: 



No. 2(y7a— UPPER OLENELG AKD WANNON. 





Bt thb 


Wbitib. 




The reader will notioe the eqaiyalents of hwigry 


•addead. 


Kangaroo • 


• korain. 


Hand - 


• marrang. 


OpoflBom • 


. kooramook. 


2 Blacks . 


• poUdtch koloin. 


Tame dog • 


■ yoopaitch. 


3 Blacks • 


. palini koloin. 


WUddog - 




One - 


- kaii^^ 


Ema • 


. kapumg. 


Two - 


• polaitch. 


BUokdack- 


. krein. 


Three • 


palinL 


Wood duck - 
Pelican 


> pimerL 


Four - 


■ polaitch pa 


Laughing jackasi 


1 tarakook. 


Father 


polaitch. 
pipai 


Native oompanioi 


ikorerook. 




White cockatoo 


- korokeitch. 


Mother 


• nerang. 


Crow - 


■ waaung. 


Sister-Elder 


- kakak. 


Swan • 


■ koonoowara. 


1, Younger • 


koquiara. 


Egg ■ • 


• kole. 


Brother-Elder < 


> kokon. 


Track of a foot • 


. dinnong. 


,f Younger 


wardaL 


FiBh - . 


• kooiyang. 


A young man 


' kokngun. 


Lobster 




An old man 


polbipollep. 


Crayfish 
Mosquito - 
Fly - - 


• maraija. 

- kUtook. 

- woroL 


An old woman • 
A baby 


• polpolnerang. 
popop. 


Snake 


• kooriang. 


A White man 




The Blacks - 


- koloin. 


Children 


• tooquai 


A Bhickfellow 


- koloin. 


Head - 


• kolan. 


A Black woman • 


• nerangoork. 


Eye - 


mimg. 


Nose - 


• kapoong. 


Ear 


wiizm. 



UPPER OLENELG AND WANKON. 



479 



No. 207a~UppiB QuunsLo and Wannon-— continued. 


Mouth- 


• ngoolang. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


- tangang. 


Hill - - 




Hair of the head 


• nalang. 


Wood- - . 

• 


wiin. 


Beard • 


• narraing. 


Stone - 


■ morrai. 


Thunder 


- mundaL 


Camp - 


■ woom. 


Grass • 


• botong. 


Yes - - . 


- ko. 


Tongue 


tallain. 


No . 


• brangat. 


Stomach 


. poll-o-in. 


I . - . 


• naitch. 


Breasts 


• nappan. 


You - - 


- paalekmo. 


Thigh - 


• prin. 


Bark - 


• toronff. 


Foot - 
Bone • 


• thinnong. 

• bakkain. 


Good - 


• noetohong. 


Blood- • • 


kerkoom. 


Bad • 




Skin - 


• mityonin. 


Sweet • 


- noetchong. 


Fat - - . 


• bapool. 


Food - 


- baambaL 


Bowels 


- korong-werek. 


Himgry 


- kalpemo. 


Excrement - 


- komong. 


Thirsty 


- koomtnangan. 


War-spear - 


- koioon. 


Eat • • . 


takk. 


Beed-spear • 


• tarark. 


Sleep • 


• yowatt. 


Throwing-stiok • 


- narong. 


Drink- 


datt. 


Shield - 


• malkara. 


WaJk • 

See - - . 




Tomahawk - 


> palpakoort. 


■ naako. 


Canoe- 


torong. 






Sun - 


- terremg. 


Sit - - . 


• yinyalt. 


Moon - 


■ teunget. 


Yesterday - 


. ngokat. 


Star - 


poongel. 


To-day 


• karoomba. 


light - 


kaUat. 


To-morrow - 


> toongatta. 


Dark • 


- torioin. 


Where are the 


windakoloin? 


Cold - 


motmot. 


Blacks? 




Heat - 


■ lg*lAin, 


I don't know 


■ windadaba. 


Day - 


• tecremg- 


Plenty 


mam. 




merring. 


Big - - . 


• maartong. 


l«ght - 


boroin. 


Little - 


koordoowi. 


Fire - 
Water- 


' wiin. 
' boretoh* 


Dead - 


kalpemera. 


Smoke 


• to-ong. 


By-and-by - 


kalo. 


Ground 


• mirring. 


Come on 


wotte. 


Wind - 


• naretchak. 


Milk - 




Bain - 


- kappain. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - - . 




Wild turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife - - . 





480 



THE AUBTRAIIAK RAGE: 



No. 2a7D.~THE GLENELG, ABOVE WOODFORD. 





Bt thb 


Wbitib. 




Kangaroo - 


- kori. 


Hand • 


• munya. 


Opoosnm - 


. Willi 


2BlaokB 


- pooleteh koolL 


Tame dog - 


- kal. 


3 Blacks - 


- pooleteh pe kaiap 


WUddog . 






kooU. 


tCfUfi • • 


- kowir. 


One • 




Black duok • 


- ngari. 


Two - 


- pooleteh. 


Wooddaok- 


• pirpir. 


Three- 


• pooleteh pe 


Pelican 


- batynnal. 




kaiap. 


Laughing jackan 


1 krorkror. 


Four - 


- pooleteh pe poo- 


Native companioi 


a kortyan. 




leteh. 


White cockatoo 


- chinyap. 


Father 


- marmL 


Crow - 


• waa. 


Mother 


- P»»P- 


Swan - 


• koonoowara. 


Sistei^Elder 


- chagL 


Egg - - . 


- mirk. 


», Younger 


- 


Track of a foot • 


• parib. 


Brother-Elder 


- kote. 


Fiah . . . 


(no general name) 


„ Younger 


Lobster 




A young man 


kolkar. 


GrayfUi • 


kapich. 


An old man 


. ngaram-ngaram. 


Moaquito • 


krirkrirk. 


An old woman • 


- kolkolagok. 


Fly - - - 


bitchik. 


A baby 


winwindaitch. 


Snake - 


koomowill. 


A White man • 


• koomamir. 


The Blacks • 


baang. 


Children • 


gitchwarL 


A Blackf ellow - 


kooli 


Head . 


proorp. 


A Black woman - 


bainwango. 


Eye - 


mir. 


Noee - 


kaa. 


Bar - . . 


wirmbool. 



THE GLENELG, ABOVE WOODFORD. 



481 



No. 207i>.— The Glenblg, above Woodford— eon(inu6c2. 



Month 


• koom. 


Boomerang 




Teeth 


- leya. 


Hill - - . 




Hair of the hei 


id ngurra. 


Wood 


- kaalk. 


Beard 


• moonoochir. 


Stone - 


• k. 


Thunder - 


- mizdarip. 


Camp- 


• lerra. 


Graaa 


• boait. 










Yes - 


. nge. 


Tongue 
Stomach 


- challi. 

- kanjrangoork. 


No . ■ 
I - - 


• ngalanya. 


Breasts 


- chain. 


• waan. 


Thigh 


- karrL 


Yon - 


- waanyen. 


Foot - 


- chinna. 


Bark - 


- mitchook. 


Bone - 


- kaalk. 


Good- 


talka. 


Blood- 


- koork. 


Bad . 


- yiatchung. 


Skin - 


- meech. 


Sweet 




Fat - 


- papooL 


Food • 


• 


Bowels 




Hungry 




Excrement - 


- koonna. 


Thirsty - 




War-spear ■ 


- deer. 


Eat - 


- chakol. 


Beed-spear 

Throwing-stic) 

Shield 


■ djirrak. 
c - karrik. 
- malkar. 


Sleep - 
Drink 


- ngorakol. 
■ kopalal. 


Tomahawk 


• baachik. 


Walk 


- yannano. 


Canoe 




See - - 


- ngawan. 


Sun - 


- ngawik. 


Sit - - 


ngenyak. 


Moon- 


■ yem. 


Yesterday • 


' chalekio. 


Star - 


- toort. 


To-day 


• katchong. 


Light - 




To-morrow- 


parbio. 


Dark- 


- tek-tek. 


Where are the 


windja baang ? 


Cold - 


- mot-mot. 


Bhicks? 




Heat - 


• Ilk. 


I don't know 


- windja imba. 


Day - 


. kadlak. 


Plenty 




Night 


- poroin. 


Big - - ■ 


yawer. 


Fire - 


- wi. 


Little 


baan. 


Water 


- katyin. 


Dead- 


kiikil. 


Smoke 


- perri, pnrri. 


By-and-by - 


kartchon. 


Ground 


• cha. 


Come on - 


warte. 


Wind 


- ward. 


Milk - 




Bam • 


- woUa. 


Eaglehawk 




God • 


- ngarambe. 


Wild turkey 




Ghosts 


- oonyim. 


Wife - 




VOL. m. 


2 


H 





482 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



No. 207k.— WOODFORD. 





Bt thb 


Writer. 




Kangaroo • 


-kori. 


Hand- 


- murra. 


OpoflSQin - 


- kooramoo. 


2 Blacks - 


- boaittrooaL 


Tame dog - 


- kaL 


3 Blacks - 


- waawong trooaL 


WUddog - 


m 








One - 


- waando. 


Hjfttn ■• — 


' kraba. 






Black duck 


- buma. 


Two - 


- booait. 


Wood dnck 


. pinyangoor. 


Three- 


- waawong. 


Pelican 


m 


Four - 


- booait ba booait 


Laughing jackass koadda. 


Father 




Native companion poortmadda. 
White cockatoo - mra. 


Mother 


- ngaan. 


Crow - 


- waa. 


Sister-Elder 


- nimur. 


Swan - 


- merangum. 


„ Younger 


• 


Egg - . 


- kooir. 


Brothei^Elder 


• wurrakukkL 


Track of a foot 


• tinna. 


„ Younger 


Fish - 


- (no general name) 


A young man 


- marangaL 


Lobster 


- 


An old man 


• ng!^wim»ngapiin _ 


Crayfish - 


- murangir. 


An old woman 


• wraambo. 


Mosquito - 


- kipa. 






Fly - 


•* torado. 


A baby 


- koabuming. 


Snake - 


- koorang. 


A White man 


- 


The Blacks - 


- trooal. 


Children - 


- parang. 


A Blackf ellow 


- trooal. 


Head • 


. popaing. 


A Black woman 


- puUe-pulle. 


Eye • 


- mumgaing. 


Nose - - 


- kaboo. 


Bar • 


- wra. 





WOODFORD. 


42 




No. 207b.— WooDFOED— continued. 




Month 


- loaing. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth - 


- tunangain. 


Hill - - 


- 


Hair of the head- ngnrla. 


Wood- 


- wumaam. 


Beard- 


- nnrlauming. 


Stone - 


- murde. 


Thunder - 


- mumdal. 


Camp- 


- ngoorla. 


Grass - 


- botho. 


Yes - - 


- ngo. 


Tongue 


- thage. 


No - 


- wUp. 


Stomach - 


- booi. 


I - - 


- ngaddo. 


Breasts 


- murdain. 


You - - 


- ngoro. 


Thigh 


- kaiib. 


Bark - 


- longlong. 


Foot - 


- tinna. 


Good - 


- ngebo. 


Bone - 


- bL 


Bad - - 


- wraang. 


Blood- - 


- kummar. 


Sweet - 


- wurlan-wurlan 


Skin - - 


- moom. 


Food - 


• boongan. 


Fat - 


- mumbooi. 


Hungry 


- nroanna. 


Bowels 
Excrement - 


- balkwim. 

- koonna. 


Thirsty - . 
Eat - 


- koomoonen. 

- thai-e-wir. 


War-spear - 
Beed-spear 
Throwing-stick 
Shield 
Tomahawk - 
Canoe - 
Sun - 


- goaan. 

- kooimban. 

- malgar. 

- pimbagoor. 

- wow-wo. 

- karo. 


Sleep - 
Drink - 
Walk- 
See - 
Sit - - 
Yesterday - 


- loomai. 

- thathia. 

- yawia. 

- ngawiaboorat. 

- ngwia. 

- woowardoo. 


Moon - 


- boortbooi. 


To-day 


- kirdoo. 


Star - 


- taman-taman. 


To-morrow - 


- koogabar. 


light - 


- yaap. 


Where are the ngatrooalT 


Dark - 


- moul. 


BlacksT 




Cold - - 


• mon-mon. 


I don't know 


- wiip. 


Heat - 
Day - 

Night- 
Fire - - 
Water 
Smoke 
Ground 
Wind- - 
Rain - - 


- murtguaal. 

- karo. 

- moor. 

- wumaam. 

- ban. 

- poloign. 

- mrat. 

- neraiga. 

- kabain. 


Plenty 
Big - - 
Little - 
Dead - 
By-and-by - 
Come on 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk - 


- kar-lai-i. 

- worong. 

- morogin. 

- nroanar. 

- kerdo. 

- kakai. 


God - - 


• 


Wild turkey 


* 


Ghosts 


m 

2 ] 


Wife - 

92 


• 



484 



TBE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 207F.— DARTMOOR. 





Bt thb 


Wmtkr. 




Kangaroo - 


• kore. 


Hand - 


munuL 


Opossum 


- kooramoo. 


2 Blacks ■ 


poaitch troo-a-aL 


Tame dog - 


• kaal. 


3 Blacks 


■ wrawoon troo-a- 


WUddog - 


- pumer. 




aL 


Emu - 


- kowwa. 


One • 


• waando. 


Black duck - 


- buma. 


Two - 


■ poaitch. 


Wood duck- 




Three- 


wrawoon. 


Pelican - kurtperap. 
Laughing jackass koaddang. 
Native companion 


Four - 
Father 


• poaitch pa 

poaitch. 

• mami. 


White cockatoo 


- meran. 






Crow • 


- waa. 


Mother 

• 


ngatL 


Swan - 


• koonoowarra. 


Siste]>-Elder 


- toti. 


Egg - 


• koa. 


„ Younger - 


nueyur. 


Track of a foot 


- poptina. 


Brother-Elder • 


wragL 


Fish . 


• (no general name) 


„ Younger- 


- nere. 


Lobster 


• 


A young man 


- morongal. 


Crayfish 


- monagur. 


An old man 


• kartparL 


Mosquito 


• 


An old woman • 


kartpariur. 


Fly - 


- yooangooal. 


A baby 


. kongaparim. 


Snake • 


- krurwang. 


A White man 




The Blacks - 


- troo-a-al. 


Children 




A Blackf ellow 


- troo-a-al. 


Head - 


pop. 


A Black woman 


• kainganyo. 


Eye - 


mir. 


Nose - 


- kow-o. 


Ear - - - 


waar. 



DARTMOOR. 
No. 207r. — DixntooR—eotUiiMed. 



485 



Month 


- 


■ lo. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth- 


- 


- tanga. 


Hill - - 


• 


Hair of the head - ngurla. 


Wood- 


- wumap. 


Beard- 


• 


- ngorlangome. 


Stone - 


- marre. 


Thnnder 


- 


- mnmdal. 


Camp- 


- ngoorla. 


Grass - 


- 


- botha. 


Yes - - 


- ngo. 


ToDgne 


- 


- thowe. 


No . . 


- winana. 


Stomach 


- 


- pooi 


I - - 


- ngado. 


Breasts 


- 


-poap. 


You - . 


- ngoro. 


Thigh- 


m 


- brani. 


Bark - 


- moomdart. 


Foot - 


- 


- thinna. 


Good - 


- moitpong. 


Bone - 


- 


- pe-e. 


Bad - - 


- waanff. 


Blood- 


^ 


- InLmmfir. 




^? 


^w • 




• 


Sweet - 


• warlan-warlan. 


Skin - 


- 


- moom. 






Fat - 


„ 


- mumbooi. 


Food - 


- poogang. 


Bowels 


. 


_ 


Hungry 


- ngooroonga. 


Excrement 


. 


- koonna. 


Thirsty 


- koomemang. 


War-spear 


- 


- kooun. 


Eat - 


- trewia. 


Beed-spear 


- 


- pongor. 


Sleep - 


- loomia. 


Throwing-stick 


- kombain. 


Drink- 


- thathea. 


Shield - 


m 


• malkar. 


Walk- - 


- yowea. 


Tomahawk 


- 


- pirpowerkoort. 


See - 


- ngawia. 


Canoe - 


- 


- 


Sit - - 


- newia. 


Snn - 


• 


- karo. 


Yesterday - 


- woordoo. 


Moon • 




- thonwoon, poort- 
booi. 


To-day 
To-morrow - 


- kerdo. 

- keap. 


Star - 


. 


- tamman-tamman. 




Light - 


• 


- karomum. 


Where are 


the naa troo-Sral? 


Dark - 


. 


- mol. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


. 


- mot-mdt. 


I don't know 


- winana wangon 


Heat - 


- 


• waam. 


Plenty 


- karlaiitch. 


Day - 


- 


- karomum. 


Big . - 


- worong. 


Night - 


- 


- moL 


Little - 


- moroki. 


Fire - 


- 


- wnmap. 


Dead - 


- neron. 


Water 
Smoke 


m 


- parri. 

- purloin. 


By-and-by • 


- kerdo. 


Ground 


« 


- mirat. 


Come on 


- kakai. 


Wind- 


. 


- noredja. 


Milk . 


- 


Rain - 


. 


- kowain. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


- 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


* 


m 


Wife - - 


- 



486 



THE AUBTRAUAH BACB 



No. 207o.— HAMILTON. 





Bt thx 


WsiraB. 




KaDgiroo - 


kore. 


Hand - 


- mnnya. 


Opossum - 


wille. 


2 Blacks - 


- poolsitch koole. 


Tame dog - 


welkar. 


3 Blacks • 


- kartoro koole. 


Wild dog - 




/One - 


- IrMpamAn. 


Emu - - - 


kowi. 


Two - - 


" pollaitch. 


Blaok duck 


ogare. 


Three- 


- kartoro. 


Wood duck 




Four - 


- poUaitcha 


Pelican 

Laughing jackass 


batehalang. 
kom-kom. 


Father 


pollaitch. 
- mami. 


Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - 


L kotchun. 
ngaiook. 
wa. 


Mother 
Sister-Elder 


-pape. 
- ohache* 


Swan - 


koonoowar. 


„ Younger 


- kotek. 


Egg • - . 


mirk. 


Brother-Elder 


- wawe. 


Track of a foot - 


paring. 


„ Younger kotte. 


Fish - - - 
Lobster - 
Crayfish - 
Mosquito • 
Fly - - ■ 
Snake - 
The Blacks - 


choolem. 

yappitch. 
kirk-kirk. 

koommil. 
koole. 


A young man 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children • 


- kolkroon. 

* ngarsm-ngaram 

- kogowitch. 

- popop. 

. pokalik. 


A Blackfellow • 


koole. 


Head - - 


-porp. 


A Blaok woman - 




Eye - 


• mer. 


Nose - - 


kaa. 


Ear - 


- wirmbooL 





HAMILTON. 


48' 




No. 207o.^Hamilion— con^«e(2. 




Month 


- ngyang. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth- 


- lia. 


Hill - - 


. 


Hair of the head - Dgara. 


Wood- - 


- wi 


Beard- 


- nganye. 


Stone - 


- la. 


Thunder - 


- mnmdar. 


Camp - 


- laar. 


Grass • 


- poaitch. 


Ves - - 


- ko. 


Tongne 


- challe. 


^*T 




Stomach 


- wanya. 


No - - 


• nge-nge. 


Breasts 


• korm. 


I 


- winnak. 


Thigh 


- karip. 


Yon - - 


. winnin. 


Foot - 


- chinna. 


Bark - - 


- nganak. 


Bone - 


- kaalk. 


Good - 


- talkok. 


Blood - 


- koork. 


Bad - 


- yatchan. 


Skin - 


- metch. 


Sweet - 


- piorwetch. 


Fat - 


- papool. 


Food - - 


- poongboorgoon. 


Bowels - 


- poonart, 

A 


Hungry 


- poonboorgoonin. 




poonyart. 


Thirsty 


- kongin. 


Excrement - 


- koonnang. 


Eat - 


- chakkin. 


War-spear - 
Reed-spear - 


- parmoor. 

- chaark. 


Sleep - 


- koombin. 


Throwing-stick 


- kark. 


Drink- 


- ngoopin. 


Shield 


- malkar. 


Walk - 


- wurwin. 


Tomahawk - 


- toktagarm. 


See - 


- ngakin. 


Canoe - 


- yaongalo. 


Sit - 


- wunarpin. 


Sun - 


- nowi. 


Yesterday - 


- chalegoo. 


Moon - 


- wartiptanyo. 


To-day 


- yingomoo. 


Star - - 


- chagenowi. 


To-morrow - 


- barpobark. 


Ught • 


- nowioha. 


Where e^ the windjakooli? 


Dark - 


- poroin. 


Blacks 7 




Cold - - 


- mot-mot. 


I don't know 


- windja jamok. 


Heat - 


- kurtai. 






Day - 


• chanowi. 


Plenty 


• parok. 




• 


Big - 


- murtok. 


Night - 


- porom. 


w 




Fire - 


- wi. 


Little - 


- wudibok. 


Water 


- koatchen. 


Dead - 


- wikin. 


Smoke 


•• poorin. 


By-and-by - 


- noondjar. 


Ground 


- cha. 


Come on 


- pimigar. 


Wind- 


- ngoomdook 


Milk - 


- 


Bain - - 


- woUa. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


- 


wad tnrkey 


- 


Ghosts 


. 


Wife - 


. 



488 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 207H.— MOUNT BOUSE; NATIVE NAME KOOLOOJL 

By THX WsiraB. 

In this Unguage the eqniyalent of Jive is kaiap mtnijfa, literally ome 

hand. 



Kangaroo - 


• korai 


Hand - 


• mimya. 


Opoflsam 


- kooramook. 


2 Blacks - 


- pollaich koolL 


Tame dog - 


. kaaL 


3 Blacks - 




WUddog - 






kooU. 


ESmu • 


• kowering. 


One - 


. kaiap. 


Blaok duck - 


• ngerrL 


Two - 


- pollaich. 


Wood duck 


- biabiap. 


Three- 


- kartoor. 


Pelican • paiangal. 
lAUghing jackass krookroong. 


Four - 


- poUaicha pol- 
laidL. 


Native companion kooioon. 


Father 


a iwa^^a a m 

" mamL 


White cockatoo 
Crow - 


- chmyap. 

- waa. 


Mother 


- paapL 


Swan - 


- koonoowar. 


Sister>Elder 


- chachi. 


Egg - - 


- merk. 


„ Younger 


- kootrook. 


Track of a foot 


- chinanyook. 


Brother-Elder 


- waawe. 


Fish - - 


• (no general 


„ Younger kootte. 




name). 


A young man 


- koolkoon. 


Lobster 


- 


An old man 


- ngaram-ngaram. 


Crayfish 


- 


An old woman 


. ngaram-ngaram- 


Mosquito - 


- lirrL 




gook. 


Fly - 


- piik. 


A baby 


- po-p6p. 


Snake - 


- koorwil. 


A White man 


- ngamaiketch. 


The Blacks - 


- 


Children 


* popopkille. 


A Blackf ellow 


- kooU. 


Head - 


- poorp. 


A Black woman 


. koolikoork. 


Eye - 


- mir. 


Nose - - 


- kaa. 


Ear 


- wirmbooL 



MOUNT ROUSE. 



489 





No. 207h.— MouMT BouBE— con^tied. 




Mouth 


- ngeing. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


- lia. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head 


- ngarra. 


Wood- 




wi. 


Beard- 
Thunder - 
Grass - 
Tongne 
Stomach 
Breasts 
Thigh - 
Foot ■ 


- ngurra. 

- moondar. 

- karewan. 
• challe. 

. billi, 

- koroom. 

- karilyooak. 
. chinna. 


Stone • 

Gamp • 

Ves 

No - 

I 

You 

Bark 




laa. 

laar. 

ko. 

nge-nge. 
. winnin. 

winnak. 
■ nyunyak. 


Bone - 


- kaalk. 


Good 




telkok. 


Blood - 


• koork. 


Bad 




■ yeyang. 


Skin . 


- miitch. 


Sweet 




• cheroaitoh. 


Fat 
Bowels 
Excrement - 
War-spear - 


. pepool. 

• we wepoo koonna. 

- koonna. 

• kooioon. 

- cherark. 

• kertch. 

- malkar. 

- purpooreroop. 

• yowargalook. 


Food 
Hungr 
Thirst] 
Eat 


7 ' 
f 

m • 


- paronkekoom. 
• nyeng. 

■ banyangen. 

- chakkelowanff. 


Reed-spear • 
Throwing-stick 
Shield - 
Tomahawk - 
Canoe- 


Sleep - 
Drink- 
Walk - 
See 


- koombamoon. 
> openan. 

- yanyangoo. 

- ngakin. 


Run - 


- ngowi. 


Sit - 


- ngangano. 


Moon - 


- waiiptumyoo. 


Yesterday - 


- chalegko. 


Star - 




To-day 


. ngarga. 


Light - 


- ngowiitcha. 


To-morrow • 


' perpurperk 


Dark - 


- boroin. 


Where are the 


windjakooli? 


Ck)ld - 


- mot-mot. 


Blacks? 




Heat • 


• koorkark. 


I don't know 


- windjajamok. 


Day - 


• gaanyanwe. 


Plenty 


- parok. 


Night . 


- boroin. 


Big - - 


- mirtook. 


Fire • 


- wi. 


LitUe - 


• waiipook. 


Water - 


- kaiyen. 


Dead - 


- wikin. 


Smoke 


- pirren. 


By-and-by - 


- windjal. 


Ground 


- chaa. 


Gome on 


- kaka. 


Wind- 


- ngoomdook. 


Milk - 




Bain • 


- woUa. 


Eaglehawk - 




God • 




Wild turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife 


* • 





} 



490 



THB AOStftAliAK RACE: 



No, 207l— PORTLAND, LAKE OONDAH, AND EUBIERALLA. 



Bt THB WSITKB. 



Kangaroo • 
OpoMom • 
Tame dog • 
wad dog - 
Emu - 
Black duck • 
Wood duck 
Pelican 
Laughing jackaas 
Native companion 
White cockatoo 
Crow - 
Swan - 
Egg - 

Track of a foot 
Fiah - 
Lobster 
Crayfish • - 
Mosquito 
Fly 
Snake 

The Blacks • 
A Blackfellow 
A Black woman 
Nose - 



korain. 

kooramook. 

kaaL 

kappin. 

moi. 

bremeL 

karppirak. 

konet. 

korork. 

nguook. 

waang. 

koonoowara. 

mik. 

yo-i-yong. 

(no general name) 

yarrun. 

marwengel. 

wooral. 

koorang. 

marra. 

marra. 

tanambool. 

kapoong. 



Hand • 
2Blacka 
3 Blacks 
One - 
Two - 
Three - 
Four - 

Father 

Mother 

Sister-Elder 

„ Younger 
Brother-Elder 

tf Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 

Children 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear 



mnrrung. 

pollaidja 

poUimia 

kaiappa. 

pollaidja. 

pollimia. 

pollaidja-pol- 
Uidja. 
pipai 

nerang. 

kakai 

kokaiar. 

wiirdaL 

poorpep. 

winwinmamu 

poorbipoorbip 

poortnerang. 

popop. 

ngamaigitch. 

tokoakai 
pim. 

ming. 
wing. 



PORTLAND, LAKE OONDAH, AND EUMERALLA. 4dl 



No. 207l— 1 


?OB,TLAND, LaKB CoN 

- ngoolang. 


DAH, AND EUMEKALLA — GOtUintLRd. 


Moath 


Boomerang - 


. 


Teeth 


- tanang. 


Hill - 


- 


Hair of the head - narat. 


Wood- 


- wiin. 


Beard- 


- ngarrang. 


Stone- 


• murrai. 


Thunder - 


- mnmdal. 


Camp • 


- worn. 


Grass - 


• botong. 


Ves • 


- ko. 


Tongae 




No . - 


- baangat. 


Stomaoh 


- tokong. 


I 


- nattook. 


Breasts 


- nappang. 


You - - 


- ootook. 


Thigh- - 


- woonikarrip. 


Bark - - 


- moroitch. 


Foot - 


- yook. 


Good - 


- oitchoong. 


Bone - 


- bakkain. 


Bad - 


. namindjar. 


Blood- - 


- kerik. 


Sweet - 


- poo-oor-witch. 


Skin - - 


- mitch. 


Food - 


- gerang. 


Fat - 


• bapool. 


Hungry 


- kalpinohook. 


Bowels 


• tokoonya. 


Thirsty 


- koomanum. 


Excrement - 


. koonna. 


Eat - 


- takekooia. 


War^spear - 


- ko-i-oon. 


Sleep - 


- yoowoppan. 


Beed-spear- 


- nyirrin. 


Drink - 


- tatookaia. 


Throwing-stick 
Shield 


• ngaroong. 
- malkar. 


Walk- - 


- poorpe. 


Tomahawk • 


. karkin. 


See - 


- ngakaL 


Canoe - 


- tholong. 


Sit - 


- kooppe. 


Snn - 


- nnnung. 


Yesterday - 


- naangat. 


Moon - 


- moorkin. 


To-day 


- kanalpa. 


Star - 


- menkeL 


To-morrow • 


- toongattL 


Light - 




Where are the 


winda marraf 


Dark - 


- por-o-in. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


- ngoomdook. 


I don*t know 


- baangat. 


Heat - 


- kaloin. 


Plenty 


- portoon. 


Day - 


- ronannng. 


Big - - 


- leengiL 


Night - - 


- poroin. 


Little 


- tookoonanya. 


Fire - 


- wiin. 


Dead - 


• kalprinna. 


Water 


- paraitch. 


By-and-by - 


- kallo. 


Smoke 


- to-ong. 


•r m 




^^ ^ 


« • 


Come on 


- kowe. 


Ground 


-. muring. 






Wind- - 


- ngoomdook. 


Milk - 


• 


Bain - 


- mai-ang* 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


. 


Wife - 


. 



492 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 207j.— HOPKINS RIVER. 





Bt thx 


Wbiteb. 




Kangaroo • 


koraL 


Hand - 


- muirang. 


Opoflstun • 


koramook. 


2 Blacks 


■ polija maar. 


Tame dog - 


kaaL 


3 Blacks - 


- politimea maar 


WUd dog . 






A 


9 


• knprunk, barai- 


One • 


■ kiappa. 




mal. 


Two - 


- polija. 


BUok daok - 


thoorboomng. 


Three- 


■ politmea. 


Wood duck - 


■ ngaook. 


Four - 


- kirtpan. 


Pelican 


■ kirkpirap. 


Father 


pipai 


Laughing jackass konet. 
Native compamon koron. 


Mother 


- nerangai. 


White cockatoo - 


> ngaiook. 


Sister-Elder 


■ korokai, kakaL 


Crow - 


waak. 


„ Younger ■ 


• koklarra. 


Swan - 


koonoowar. 


Brother-Elder • 


• wardai, koko. 


£gg • 


mirk. 


„ Youngei 


r waidiarra. 


Track of a foot • 




A 


m 


Fish . . - 


^9 

inja. 


A young man 


• ngommarr. 


Lobster 


yaram. 


An old man 


- naram-naram. 


Crayfish ■ 


wuja. 


An old woman • 


kogoitch. 


Mosquito • 


kirkirk. 


A baby 


p6-p6p. 


Fly - - - 


minik, woorill 


A White man 


ngamagitch. 


Snake - 


korang. 


Children • 


choechoe. 


The Blacks - 


maara. 






A Blackfellow • 


maar. 


Head - 


pimaning. 


A Black woman - 




Eye - - . 


mimaming. 


Nose - 


kalxftig. 


Ear - - • 





HOPKINS RIVER. 



493 



No. 207j.^Hopkins Bxvmtf-omUntted. 



Month 


- woronaming. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth 


- tinganaming. 


Hill - 


- 


Hair of the head- nairananing. 


Wood- - 


- wiin, wumgooit. 


Beard- 




Stone - 


- murrai. 


Thunder - 


. mnmdal. 


Camp- 


- worn. 


Grass - 


- karewan. 


Ves - - 


-ko. 


Tongne 


- thallang. 


No 


- ngin-ngin or ngi* 


Stomach - 


- togong. 




ngL 


Breasts 


- nabong. 


I 


- ngatook. 


Thigh- 


- karip, pirn. 


You - 


- ngindook. 


Foot - 


- thinnang. 


Bark - 


- torong. 


Bone - 




Good - 


- ooitohoong. 


Blood- 


- koreanin. 


Bad - 


- kalprano. 


Skin - 


- thoramanin. 


Sweet- 


- pirooitch, ooit- 


Fat - 


• pipoolaning. 




choong. 


Bowels 


- koonnanin. 


Food - 


- tooloort. 


ESxcrement - 


. koonna. 


Hungry 


- bartoobaring 


War-spear - 


- tooloowam. 




ngoolanga. 


Reed-spear - 


- nerin, tark. 


Thirsty 


- kootnanabaretch 


Throwing-stick 


- ngarong. 


Eat - 


- thakeanan. 


Shield 


- malk. 


Sleep - 


- yooanan. 




- pirtpirtkoort. 


Drink - 


- tattakooia. 


Ganoe- 


- torong. 


Walk- 


- yananan. 


Snn - 


- tirrang. 


See - 


- naawake. 


Moon - 


- konardo. 


Sit - 


- ingake. 


Star - 


- wutchook. 


Yesterday - 


- ngagatto. 




• • vn ^^^^im^^m ^^ ^^B V 


To-day 


- makkadeba. 


light - 
Dark - 


- yaap. 

- koorooalook, pn- 


IF 

To-morrow - 


- mallangeba. 




• 


Where are the windamaara? 




rom. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


- pallapetch. 


I don't know 


. baangato or 


Heat - 


• kalloin. 




winda. 


Day - 


- ngallokatterin. 


Plenty 


- woomt baneran. 


Night - - 


- puroin. 


Big - - 


- megarong. 


Fire - 


- wiin. 


Little - 


- koomoominin. 


Water 


- baretch. 


Dead - 


- kalgeran. 


Smoke 


- to-ong. 


By-and-by - 


- kallo. 


Ground 


- mering. 


Gome on - 


- kakawattake. 


Wind- 


- ngoondook. 


Milk - 


- 


Rain - - 


- maiyang. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - • 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


. 


Wife - 


- 



494 



THB AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 207k.— HOPKINS RIVER. 



Bt W. Qoodall, Esq., Hakaosb of Abobioinal Statiok, Fbaxunohaii. 



Kangaroo 
Opoaram 
Tame dog 
WUd dog 
Emu • 
Black dack 
Wood dack 
Pelioan 
Laaghing jackaas 
Native companion 
White cockatoo 
Crow - 
Swan - 



kooroo. 

kooramook. 

karl. 

knpronk. 

toorpomk. 

ngarwook. 

knrtpnmk. 

koonet. 

koonm. 



Track of a foot 

Fiah • 

Lobster 

Crayfish 

Mosquito 

Fly • 

Snake 

The Blacks - 

A Blackf ellow 

A Black woman 

Nose - 



koonoowam. 

mirk. 

timmong. 

yoori. 

weechong. 

jronri. 

kemk-kerak. 

wooril. 

goorang. 

mar. 

mar. 

tanamball. 

karpoong. 



Hand • 
2 Blacks 
SBlacks 
One - 
Two - 
Three - 
Foor - 
Father 
Mother 
Sistex^Elder 

„ Toonger 
Brother-Elder 

I, Younger 
A young man 
An old man 

An old woman 

A baby 

A White man 

Children 

Head • 

Eye • 

Ear 



mnrrunk. 

pulija mar. 

pulemeir 

kyupa. 

pulija. 

pnlemir. 

knrtpun. 

peept 

nuraagt 

kokL 

wuxdi 

nguitmar. 
ngnllong-ngul- 
long. 

kookooweitch. 
poopoop. 
nnmerdeitch. 
tooki-tooki 
peem. 
mirunk. 
wirrunk. 



EOPEINa BIVEB. 



495 





No. 207k.~Hopkins River— con^n««(2. 


Mouth 


- ngullong. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


■ tungunk. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head 


■ narutum. 


Wood - 


- wumgooit. 


Beard- 


■ ngumne. 


Stone - 


■ murrie. 


Thunder - 


- mimdunk. 


Camp • 


' wormp. 


Gnus - 


- puttong. 


Yes - - 


ko. 


Tongue 


- tulline. 


No - - • 


■ ngee-ngee. 


Stomach 


- tookonk. 


I 


nuttook. 


Breasts 


- nguppunk. 


You - 


ngootook. 


Thigh - 


pirm. 


Bark - 




Foot - 


■ timmong. 


Good - 


- michong. 


Bone - 


- puckine. 


Bad - 


kuUin. 


Blood- 


- kerreek. 


Sweet • 


- nuitchong. 


Skin - 


■ moom. 


Food - 


tuUuirt. 


Fat - - - 


puUoot. 


Hungry 


purtook, pungun, 


Bowels 


pulloin. 




ullonga. 


£iXGTement • 


- koonong. 


Thirsty 


- purtook pungun 


War-spear - 


tullom. 




pureitch. 


Reed-spear • 


tark. 


Eat - - 


' turkuk. 


Throwing-stick 


- ngurroin. 


Sleep - 


- youmunk. 


Shield- 


■ marlk. 


Drink - 


■ tutturk. 


Tomahawk - 


- purtpurtcut. 


Walk- 


> yannake. 


Canoe- 


• toorong. 


See - 


• tuteunnook. 


Sun - 


■ tirrum. 


Sit - - 


■ koopunung. 


Moon - 


- pirriue yannin. 


Yesterday - 


. ngamkurt. 


Star - 

• 


wutohook. 


To-day 


- munkcuttee, 


Flight - 


• tirrong. 


To-morrow - 


- mullebar. 


Dark - 


- purroin. 


Where are th< 


) wundamar? 


Cold - 


pullup-peitoh. 


Blacks? 




Heat - 


■ kuUoin. 


I don't know 


wuuda. 


Day - 


• woorome-termg. 


Plenty 


parronk parronk. 


Night - 


■ koorowuUock. 


Big - - 


■ meharo. 


Fire - - . 


weein. 


Little - 


kumong. 


Water 


purretch. 


Dead - 


• kalpirran. 


Smoke 


■ toong. 


By-and-by - 


■ kuloo. 


Ground 


■ mining. 


Come on 


■ kaka. 


Wind - 


- ngumdook. 


Milk - 




Bain - 


• myyung. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - . . 




Wild turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife - 





BOOK THE TWENTIETH. 



VOL. m. 2 1 



BOOK THE TWENTIETH. 

PREFATORY REMARKS. 

Thb Yocabnlaries grouped together in this book are specimens 
of the languages in use from the Moolamiin to the Moorabooh 
They are evidentlj nearly related, as well amongst them- 
selves as to those treated of in the preceding book. 

It may be noticed that the Loddon Biver where it ap- 
proaches the Mnrraj (Miller as the Blacks in that neighbonr- 
hood call the latter) and a portion of country near Merton, 
or perhaps a creek, are both called Woppoon by the Blacks. 

In the Moolamiin language we have cherimboork = uncle^ 
and kofvrinuk = aunt; and in the Mount Emu language 
dai-Or^aTiindap = uncley alok = aunt^ and wrapek = cousin* 

The mode of replying to the question, Where are the 
Blacks? by adverb where used interrogatively, when the 
person questioned does not know, so frequently met with 
in the Eastern Division of the continent, occurs several times 
in this book. 

It has constantly been noticed by the writer that any 
remarkable variation of a wide-spread word is rarely confined 
to one locality, but that it is generally to be found in some 
other, perhaps a thousand miles away. As an instance, we 
find the word kocnna or goanna = excrement (perhaps the 
most generally prevalent term in our languages) appearing 
as quan in Western Australia and as quank in the Gunbower 
(properly Kanbowro) vocabulary. 

In our languages generally there is but one term to 
express foot and the track of a foot^ but in those dealt with 
in this book two distinct words are used. In several of the 
vocabularies, the equivalent of children is evidently a plural 

* Attention is drawn to these words in this and other places beoanse 
practicaUy it has been asserted that none such exist in onr langoages. On 
the subject see Vol I., page 140» of this work. 

212 



500 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



fonn of the eqaivalent of baby or ehildj whilst they aure 
often met with elsewhere as distinct tenns. In the Kerang 
vocabnlary we find kaalk standing for bone and wood; in 
other cases we know the same word is nsed for spoor; also 
that kaalky kalky or kulka means bone in one language and 
spear in another ; also that wood and^re are often expressed 
by the one word, which is not kaalk. Probably, should a 
close examination of these words ever be made, it will be 
found that there are in all of oor languages two terms for 
woody one identical with or closely related to Jire and the 
other to bone and spear. 



No. 206a.— MOULKEIN. 
Bt thi Bench of MAOianr&ATBfl at that Plagb. 



Kangaroo • 


konra. 


Opoosmn 


weala. 


Tame dog - 


werangcn. 


WUddog - 




Rtnn • 


- kower. 


Black dack • 


- nowera. 


Wood duck 


■ gonnok. 


Pelican 


nenangar. 


Laaghing jackaai 


1 kerrong-kerrong. 


Native companioi 


i kudthoo. 


White cockatoo 


. ginup. 


Crow - 


> wa. 


Swan • 


> koonawar. 


Egg . 


• mirkook. 


Track of a foot 


. perring. 


Fiah - 


• pongill. 


Lobster 




Crayfish 


Up-Up-tiU. 


Moaquito 


- lerrigon. 


Fly - - 


• bedik. 


Snake - 


• koormiwill. 


The Blacks • 


■ bang. 


A BlackfeUow 


- kooli 


A Black woman 


• layrook. 


Nose - 


' karmuk. 



Hand * 
2 Blacks - 
a Blacks - 
One - 
Two - 
Three- 
Four - - - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

„ Tonnger - 
Brother-Elder - 

,, Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman - 
A baby 

A White man - 
Children - 
Head - - - 
Eye - 
Ear 



poolet de bang. 

kaiap. 

poolet. 

poolet kai-ap. 

poolet poolet. 

marmook. 

qungerook. 

chargook. 

quanthanook. 

wakook. 

koolkoon. 

jerribung. 

woringoork. 

pobena. 

noother. 

pambango. 

mooranguk. 

minook. 

weremboolok. 





MOULMEIN. 


OUl 




No. 20SA,—MoTJiMEin—c<mUnued. 




Mouth 


- oharjook. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth- 


- liannk. 


Hill - • 


- 


Hair of the head- nerannk. 


Wood- 


- bial. 


Beard 


- ngininnk. 


Stone - 


- la. 


Thunder - 


- monder. 


Camp - 


- lurr. 


Graoe- 


- boaitoh. 


Yes - - 


- nowe. 


Tongae 


• 

- challingak. 


No - - 


- womba. 


Stomach 


- wongebok. 


I - - 


- niak. 


Breasts 
Thigh 
Foot - 
Bone - 
Blood - 
Skin - - 


• chanegnk. 

- brajnk. 

- chinanuk. 
-kalkook. 

- koorkook. 

- talonkook. 


You - 
Bark - 
Good - 
Bad - - 
Sweet - 


- niam. 

- mooachup. 

- dalkook. 

- yatamutchuk. 

- urtcha, witcha. 


Fat - 


- .]babalook. 


Food - 


- punam. 


Bowels 


. chinginook. 


Hungry 


- wikanda. 


Excrement - 


- koonanook. 


Thirsty 


- peringonyonda. 


War-spear - 


- koioone. 


Eat - 


- chukalanda. 


Beed-spear- 
Throwing-stick 
Shield- - 

Canoe - 
Snn - 


- ohftrSm, 

- perband. 

- knllerweL 
• teer. 

- yongwitch. 

- nowa. 


Sleep - 
Drink- - 
Walk- 
See - 
Sit - 


- koombanda. 

- koopalanda. 

- yarrawonda. 

- nowanda. 

- naimuk. 


Moon - 


- wongwel. 


Yesterday - 


- kaUekellikt. 


Star - 


- toort. 


To-day 


- killewitch. 


light - 


- wying. 


To-morrow - 


- berbooL 


Dark - - 
Cold - 


- poroong. 

- bonbondolong. 


Where are the wingalook bang? 
Blacks? 


Heat - 
Day - 
Night- 
Fire - 
Water 
Smoke 
Gromid 


- wiamnk. 

- pearp. 

- poroong. 

- wnnap. 

- kathon. 

- poort. 

- chak. 


I don't know 
Plenty 
Big - - 
Little - 
Dead • 
By-and-by - 


- winga? 

- parook. 

• koommbit. 

- murduk. 

- wathinging. 
-killamin. 


Wind- 


- memig. 


Come on 


- kooraman. 


Bain - 


- mithak. 


Milk - 


- 


God - - 


- 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


Ghosts 


- tallewidoobak, 


Wild turkey 


- 




nuther. 


Wife - . 


« 



502 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 206b.— LAKE BOGA. 

Bt MouinnBD-cx)NSTABLB Lbonabd Fawobit, Local Guabdian of 

Abobioinis at Swan Hill. 



Kangaroo 
Opoflsom 
Tame dog 
Wild dog 
Emu • 
Blaok duck 
Wood duck 
Pelioan 
Laughing jackass 
Native companion 
White cockatoo 
Crow - 
Swan - 
Egg - 

Track of a foot 
Fish - 
Lobster 
Crayfish ■ 
Mosquito - 
Fly 

Snake • 
The Blacks - 
A Blackf ellow 
A Black woman 
Nose - 



kora, 
willa, 
werangen. 

kowir. 

nini. 

nunnuk. 

ninnankora. 

quong-quong. 

kooteen. 

katakur. 

owar. 

quinowar. 

mi-urk. 



parring. 
piangil. 

lippekil. 

lawi. 

pittik. 

quemmil. 

bang. 

kooli. 

winyin. 

kamook. 



Hand - 

2 Blacks 

3 Blacks 
One - 
Two - 
Three - 

Four - 



mananyook. 



Father 

Mother 

Sister^Elder 

„ Younger 
Brother-Elder 

,, Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear 



kaiup. 
pooletya. 
pooletya kaiup. 

pooletya-poolet- 

mamok. 
parbuk. 
tartuk. 

- wa-wi. 

kulkera. 

narambin. 

winyingarrok. 

puppok. 

ni-tung-L 

painbago. 

porp. 

mir. 

wirumbooL 





IiAKR 


BOGA. 




W6 




No. 208b.— Lakb Booa— coiKffiua;. 




Month 


- itchekamp. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth- 


- lia. 


Hill - - - 




Hair of 


the head- naraporp. 


Wood- 




kaalk. 


Beard- 


- nanyenook. 


Stone • 




- poat. 


Thnndi 


IT • mnmda. 


Camp • 




larr. 


GraoB - 


• poat. 


Yes 




yeya. 


Tongae 


) • tallinyook. 


No - 




womba. 


Stomac 


h - witchibook. 


I 




woUanyerk. 


Breastfl 


• tangook. 


Yon . 






Thigh- 


• kamook. 


Bark 




xnichnk. 


Foot - 


- chinanyook. 


Good 




telkook. 


Bone • 


- kallkook. 








Blood • 


- knrrabook. 


Bad 




yattandook. 


Skin 


• mitrak. 


Sweet 




• witta-witta. 


Fat 


- papalook. 


Food - 


• yoowirra. 


Bowek 


- porpgonayook. 


Hungry 


■ wiknn. 


Xbccren 


lent • - qninayook. 


Thirsty 


- pnrrongonyon. 


War-sp 


lear • - qnira. 


Eat 






Beed-8] 


pear • - tcharrok. 


Sleep 




• koombang. 


Throwi 


ng-8tiok • piorpin. 


Drink 




■ koopon. 


Shield - 


- mullknra. 


Walk 




. yanner. 


Tomahi 


»wk - - tirr. 


See 




• nia-nia. 


Canoe • 


- soingoot. 


Sit 




■ ninnk. 


Snn • 


- nowi. 






Moon • 


• miteyan. 


Yesterday - 


kallik-kallik. 


Star - 


- toort. 


To-day 


kampaginga. 


Light • 


• win. 


To-morrow • 


• perrapo. 


Dark • 


- porroin. 


Where are the 


windyallo kooli ? 


Cold 


. merindooma. 


Blacks? 




Heat 


• • - kartL 


I don't know 


• windy a? 


Day 


- now-yi 


Plenty 


• kittowel. 


Night- 


- porroin. 


Big - . 


■ korangandook. 


Fire 


• wonnnp. 


Little - 


■ wittiyook. 


Water 


- kartin. 




w 






Dead • 




Smoke 


- port. 






Qrounc 


I • cha. 


By-and-by - 


• kamboor. 


Wind- 


• merring. 


Come on 


- kakai. 


Bam 


• mittok. 


Milk - 




Ood 


- mammonggorak. 


Eaglehawk • 




Ohosts 


- namook, chal- 


Wild turkey 






liwitnp. 


Wife 


• • 





504 



THE AUSTBAUAN RACK: 



MOOBEKBAT AND THE LOWER LODDON. 




Btthb Wbitxb. 




Kangaroo - 


• kore. 


Hand- 




Opoesum - 


wille. 


2 Blacks - 


• poletkoolL 


Tame dog - 
wad dog ■ 


. werangen. 


3 Blacks - 


> poletkai-up kooli 


** 

Emu - 


• kowir. 


One - - 


■ kai-up. 


Black duck - 


ngari. 


Two - 


- pdlet. 


Wood duok - 


> ngunnk. 


Three- 


- poletkai-ap. 


Pelican 


• ninnngoor. 


Four • 


• poletpolet 


Laughing jackaai 


1 kom-kom. 


Father 




Native companioi 


i kotun. 


Mother 


• pabe. 


White cockatoo 


- chinop. 






Grow • 


* 

' wa. 


Sister-Elder 


- chache. 


Swan - 


■ koonoowar. 


„ Younger • 


kotooe. 


Egg- - . 


- mirk. 


Brother^Elder * 


• waawe. 


Track of a foot • 


• paring. 


„ Toungei 


•kotL 


Fiah - • 




A young man 


• kolkroon. 


Loheter 




An old man 


• ngarambe. 


Crayfish 


' yapitch. 


An old woman 


• wonyinakork. 


Mosquito 


- leroo. 

• 1 M Vl 


A baby - 


- paingoo. 


Fly - - 
Snake 


- pit-tik. 
• kommil. 


A White man 




The Blacks - 


- baang. 


Children 


- painbangoo. 


A Blackf ellow - 


- kooli 


Head • - 


- pirpook. 


A Black woman • 


- leoork. 


Eye . - 


- mimook. 


Nose - - 


- kaa. 


Ear 


• wirmboolook. 



505 



No. 208O. 


— ^The Neighbourhood of Laxb BoQAr-^contmued. 


Month 


- taarbook. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth 


• lea. 


Hill - - 


- 


Hair of the head 


I- ngara. 


Wood- 


- wunnup. 


Beard- 


- nganni. 


Stone - 


- laa. 


Thunder - 


- mumdar. 


Gamp- 


- larr. 


QnuBs - 


- boait. 


Yes - 


- i-ya. 


Tongae 


- challe. 


No - - 


. weumba. 


Stomach - 


- wudjup. 


I - - 


- woloonyek. 


Breasts 


- koorm. 


You - 


- woonyin. 


Thigh 


• kar. 


Bark - 


- toolem. 


Foot - 


- ohinna. 


Good - 


- talkook. 


Bone - 


- kaalkook. 


Bad - 


- yattang. 


Blood- 


• koork. 


Sweet - 


- wittea. 


Hkin - 


• michook. 


Food (flesh) 


- yowir. 


Fat - 


- papoolook. 


99 (v^etable 


1 • paanim. 


Bowels 


- toorekoonna. 


• Hungry 


- wika. 


Excrement - 


- koonna. 


Thirsty - 


- barungoonya. 


War-spear - 


- koo-1-oon. 


Bat - 


- tukkali. 


Reed-spear- 
Throwing-stlck 
Shield - 


- jaraam. 

- karik. 

- malkar. 


Sleep - 
Drink- 


- koomba. 

- koopa. 


Tomahawk - 


- tir. 


Walk - 


- yanna. 


Canoe - 


- yoonkooit. 


See - 


- naikala. 


Sun • 


- nowir. 


Sit - 


- naianga. 


Moon - 


- mittean. 


Yesterday - 


. challik-challik. 


Star - 


- toort. 


To-day 


- kamba. 


light - 


- waing. 


To-morrow - 


- perrapoo. 


Dark - 


- poroin. 


Where are the 


) windjolakooli? 


Ck)ld - 


• boonboondola. 


Blacks? 




Heat- 


- woonwoondola. 


I don't know 


- windjaf 


Day - 


- nowir. 


Plenty 


- kittowil. 


Night- - 


- poroin. 


Big - - 


• korandook. 


Fire - - 


- wunnup. 


Little - 


• wootiook. 


Water 


' - kaatin. 


Dead - 


- wegun. 


Smoke 


- poort. 


By-and-by - 


• kambum. 


Ground 


- cha. 


Come on - 


- kakai. 


Wmd- - 


• merin. 


Milk - 


- 


Run - 


- mittak. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


Ood - - 


• 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


. 


Wife - - 


- 



506 



THB AUSTBAUAK BACK 



No. 206d.-^GONN station, MURRAY RIVER. 



Bt John MoCabtht, Esq. 



Kangaroo - 


- koora. 


Hand - 




OpoMnun 


• willa. 


2B]aoks - 


- pelligekooli 


Tame dog - 


• werangnn. 


SBlaoks - 


- peUigekaip 


WUddog • 


m 




koolL 


Emu - 


• kowir. 


One - 


• karp. 


Black duck- 


- nerre. 




* 


Wood duck - 


• nonnuk. 


Two - 


- pellige. 


Pelican 


- niinnngoor. 


Three- 


- pellige karp. 


Laughing jackass koorong-koorong. 


Four - 


- pellige-pellige 


Native companion kuthon. 


Father 


- mame. 


Widte cockatoo 


- jinup. 


Mother 


- quingoni. 


Crow - 


- waga. 


Sister-Elder 


- charche. 


Swan • 


- koonawar. 




- 


Egg 


- merkook. 


Brother-Elder 


- wool. 


Track of a foot 


- perring. 


„ Younger 


Fish - 


- jowwill. 


A young man 


- kolkon. 


Lobster 


- 


An old man 


- cherribong. 


Crayfish - 
Mosquito * 


. Up-Up-kill. 
• leroo. 


An old woman 


^7 

- winimgoor. 


a 

Fly - 


- pitchi. 


A baby 


- poban. 


Snake- 


- koniwil. 


A White man 


- 


The Blacks - 


- bang. 


Children - 


- pimbango. 


A Blackf ellow 


- kooU. 


Head - 


- moranoo. 


A Black woman 


- leuxook. 


Eye - 


" mernno. 


Nose - - 


- kamook. 


Ear - - 


- wimbolo. 



GONN STATION, MURBAT RIVER. 



607 



No. 206d.— GoNN Station, 

Mouth - • worronook. 

Teeth- - - liamook. 
Hair of the head- naranaok. 

Beard- - noninook. 

Thunder • mondar. 

Graas - • poowotoh. 

Tongue - ohallenook. 

Stomach - - widjibiabo. 

Breasts - - chongo. 

Thigh - - kamook. 

Foot - - - ohinonook. 

Bone - - maderook. 

Blood - . - kooroko. 

Skin • • - witohook. 

Fat - - pappolo. 

Bowels - - koonooquanwik. 

Excrement - - koonni. 

War-spear - - koo-o-in. 

Reed-spear- - charSm. 

Throwing-stick - korrik. 

Shield - - mulkar. 

Tomahawk- - deerr. 

Canoe- - - yoonguch. 

Sun - - - nowi. 

Moon - - - wyngwil. 

Star - - toort. 

light- - parap. 

Dark - - parong. 

Gold - > - bonbondabong. 

Heat . - - namgar. 

Day - - - nowi. 

Night- - - porL 

Fire . - - wonnnp. 

Water - kuthin. 
Smoke - • poartL 

Ground - - jar. 

Wind - - - merring. 

Rain - - - mittok. 

God - - - 
Ghosts 



MuBBAT BiPnsar— continued. 

Boomerang - 
Hill - - - 
Wood- - - kumbowL 
Stone ... larr. 
Gamp ... larrer. 
Yes ... nongi. 
No - - - yambk 
I - - - yandong. 
Ton . - - ninan. 
Bark ... tolang. 
Good ... dalko. 
Bad ... yathanuntook. 
Sweet- - - wotayar. 
Food ... poonioom. 
Hungry - - wolkunder. 
Thirsty - - punkunnooder. 
Eat ... chukelander. 
Sleep ... qombander. 
Drink - . . kobbalander. 
Walk ... jarwander. 
See ... narkalander. 
Sit - - - narwonter. 
Yesterday - - jellik-jellik. 
To-day - • kilarwit. 
To-morrow- - berrpoo. 
Where are the wingella kooli?. 
BhMks? 
I don*t know - wingari ? 
Plenty - - barrok. 
Big - - - quormbim. 
Little ... mertook. 
Dead . - . mertingin. 
By-and-by - - kaliman. 
Come on - - quam. 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk - 
Wild turkey 
Wife - 



508 



THE AUBTRAUAN BAGB : 



No. 208s.— OUN60WER STATION. 
Bt Mnass. Mickib asd Sandt. 



Kangaroo 

Opoesam 

Tame dog 

WUd dog 
Elmn . 

Black duck 
Wood duck 
Pelioazi 
Laughing jackau 
Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - 
Swan • 
£2gg 

Track of afoot 
FiBh ■ 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito 
Fly . 
Snake - 
The Blacks < 
A Biaokf ellow 
A Black woman 
Nose • 



koora. 
wiUa. 
werangen. 

kowri. 

noorL 

kooroonoo. 

nirunga. 

kooran-kooran. 

kootan. 

kinnap. 

wa. 

gunnaworra. 

muxguk. 

paring. 

wirringil. 

yampit. 

liroo. 

bithuk. 

koomwiL 

parooquiU. 

kooli 

laurk. 

kaannk. 



Hand • 
2 Blacks 
8 Blacks 
One - 
Two . 
Three - 
Four - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

99 Younger - 
Brother-Elder - 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman • 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 
Eye . 
Ear 



maanuk. 



pledgoo. 

pledgookaap. 

pledgoo pledgoo. 

wpftTni 

papi 

koota. 

tatL 



koolquom. 
wingin. 
wingingurk. 
poopan. 

pian-pisn-koo. 
mooranuk. 
miizinik. 
wirmoolook. 





GUNBOWRR 




No. 208e.— GUNBOWKB 


Mouth 


- tharbuk. 


Teeth - 


- lianuk. 


Hair of the head- narranok. 


Beard 


- narrinuk (?). 


Thunder 


- moorandara. 


Graas - 


► yi-ing. 


Tongue 


- tallinuk. 


Stomach 


• beelinuk. 


Breasts 


- koorumbuk. 


Thigh 


- kaarohuk. 


Foot - 


- chinnanuk. 


Bone - 


- maarderuk. 


Blood - 


■ korrookuk. 


Rkin - 


. mithuk. 


Fat - 


- babulook. 


Bowels 


• babquank. 


Excrement - 


. quank. 


War-spear - 


> kigum. 


Beed-spear - 


- garr&m. 


Throwing-stiok - karik. 


Shield 


- malga. 


Tomahawk - 


- taree. 


Canoe 


. yungooit. 


Sun - 


- nowee. 


Moon - 


- wianguil. 


Star - 


- toort 


light - 


. wiring. 


Dark - 


- poorooin. 


Cold - . 


- poonpoondelang. 


Heat • 


- 


Day - 


- kaathenbootong. 


Night ■ - 


- kaaralkmin. 


Fire - 


- waanap. 


Water 


- kathin. 


Smoke 


- 


Ground 


-ja. 


Wind- 


. mirrin. 


Rain • 


- midthok. 


Ood - - 


- 


Ghosts 


- 



STATION. 609 

Station — continued. 

Boomerang - 

HiU - . - 

Wood - beeyal. 

Stone - - - la. 

Camp . - . larrh. 

Yes - - - ungwee. 

No - - - kaarraba. 

I - - - naaik. 

You - - - neen. 

Bark - 

Good . • . talguk. 

Bad - - - tnilika. 

Sweet- - • talguk. 

Food - pyoninu 

Hungry - - wigonda. 

Thirsty - parifagoonya. 

Eat - - kailon. 

Sleep . - . quamba. 

Drink- - - qubillon. 

Walk- - yanga. 

See . . - naagundad. 

Sit - - 

Yesterday - - thallik-thallik. 

To-day " - - killowit. 

To-morrow- - parragoor. 

Where are the thala parooquili ? 

BUioks? 

I don't know - barrabba. 

Plenty - - parook. 

Big . - - kooroombit. 
Little- - - mirdook. 

Dead - - - waathin. 

By-and-by - - killomin. 
Come on - 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk - 
Wild turkey 

Wife - 



510 



THE AOTTRAIiTAy RACE 



No. 208s.— MOUKT HOPE— PANYOOL DIALBCT. 





Bt the 


Weitkb. 




Kangaroo - 


- koora. 


Hand - 


. 


OpOMnm - 


- wille. 


2BlackB - 


. 


Tame dog - 


- 


SBlacks - 


. 


VVUddog • 


- 


One - 


- kai-ap-men. 


Bmu - 
Black duck 


- kowor. 


Two - 


- polliger. 


Woodduok 


. 


Three - 


- polliger kaiap. 


Pelican 


„ 


Four - 


- polliger polliger. 


Laughing jackass 


Father 


- 


Native companion kut-tho(m. 


Mother 


•• 


WMte cockatoo 


- ohinap. 


Sistei^Elder 


- chachip. 


Crow . 


- wa. 


„ Tonnger 


M 


Swan - 


- 


Brother-Elder 


- wawo. 


Egg - 


- mirgook* 


„ Tonnger 


Track of a foot 


- 


A young man 




Piah - 


* 


An old man 


- woonwiL 


Lobster 


„ 










An old woman 




Grasrfish - 


- 


A V V 




Mosquito - 


. 


A baby 


- pooper. 


Ply - 


. 


A White man 


• moanyit. 


Snake 


- koorwe. 


Children - 


- papingook. 


The Blacks - 


- pQang. 


Head - 


- mooranyooL 


A Blackfellow 


- 


Eye - 


- mimnyooky mir> 


A Black woman 


- leyoorook. 




nook. 


Nose - - 


- kanyook. 


Ear - - 


- 





M0U14T 


HOPK. 


OJ 


No. 208v.— Mount Hope— Pantool DiALisoir— eon^ffiued. 


Month 


- champook. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth- 


- lianyook. 


HUl - 


- 


Hair of the head 


- ngaranyook. 


Wood- - 


- 


Beard- - 


m 


Stone - 


- 


Thnnder - 


• mondarp. 


Gamp- 


- 


Graoe - 


- ye-in. 


Yes - - 


- ngoe. 


Tongne 


• 


No - 


- purrerbook. 


Stomach 


- 


I - - 


- ngen. 


Breasts 


- 


You - - 


- 


Thigh - 


• 


Bark - 


- 


Foot - 


- ohinanyook. 


Good - 


- 


Bone - 


- 


Bad - 


- yettheminook. 


Blood - 


- 


Sweet - 


- 


Skin - 


* 


Food - 


- 


Fat . 


- 


Hungry 


- 


Bowels 


• 


Thirsty 


- 


Excrement - 


- popan. 


Eat - 


- 


War-spear - 


- ko-i-oon. 


Sleep - 


- 


Beed-spear - 


- 


Drink- 


- 


Throwing-stick 


• 


Walk - 


. 


Shield 
Tomahawk - 
Canoe - 
Snn - 
Moon - 
Star - 
light • 
Dark- 


- tiir. 

- yoongut. 


See - 
Sit - - 
Yesterday - 
To-day 
To-morrow - 
Where are 
Blacks? 


- kelowit. 
the 


Cold - - 


- 


I don't know 


- 


Heat - 


* 


Plenty 


• 


Day - 


- 


Big - - 


- 


Night . - 


m 


Little - 


- 


Fire - 
Water 
Smoke 
Onmnd 
Wmd- - 
Bain - 
God - 


- wonap. 

- mithap. 


Dead - 
By-and-by - 
Come on - 
Milk - - 
Eaglehawk - 
Wild turkey 


- koamit. 

« 


Ghosts 


. 


Wde - 


. 



512 



TBS AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 208o.— KERANG, LODDON RIVER. 



Bt thi Wbitib. 



Kangaroo • 
OpoMnun • 
Tame dog • 
Wild dog - 
Emu • 
Black dnok 
Wood daok 
Pelican 

Laughing jackau 
Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Grow - - - 
Swan - 
Egg - 

Track of a foot - 
Fish - - - 
Lobster 
Grayfiah 
Moequito 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks 
A Biaokf ellow • 
A Black woman - 
Nose • - - 



waamha. 

wille. 

werangon. 

kowir. 

ngunuk. 

nenuigoor. 

korong-korong. 

koton. 

chinnap. 

waar. 

koonoowarra. 

mirk. 

paring. 

wainjal. 

yaapitch. 

leri. 

pittik. 

kommiL 

kooli. 

baang. 

lal'Oork. 

kaa. 



Hand - 


. munna. 


2 Blacks - 


• pollaich baang. 


3 Blacks • 


- poUaich kaiup 




baang. 


One - 


• kunp. 


Two - 


- pollaich. 


Three- 


• poUaich kaiup. 


Four - 




Father 


• maamin. 


Mother 


- baabin. 


Sister-Rider 


- chach. 


„ Younger 


• 


Brother-Elder 


• waawin. 


„ Younger kootminyin. 


A young man 


- kolkoom. 


An old man 


- Dgoonyim. 


An old woman 


- ngoonyimgoork. 


A baby 


• pop. 


A White man 


. mongandif 


Ghildren - 


- embengoo. 


Head - - 


. morengin, por- 




pin. 


Eye - 


. miming. 


Ear • 


- wixmbooL 



KERAKO, LODDON RIVER. 



513 



No. 


208o.— Kkbano, Loddon BiYSBr— con^nued. 


Mouth 


kaar. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth - 


lia. 


Hill . 


m 


Hair of the head- 


• ngara. 


Wood- 


- kaalk. 


Beard- 


- ng^nni. 


Stone - 


- laar, kotup. 


Thunder - 


• mundar. 


Gamp - 


- ngar. 


OrasB - 


• boaitch, ying. 


Yea - 


- onge. 


Tongue 


- ohalle. 


No - - 


- waamba. 


Stomach 


• wiitohoop. 


I - - 


. ngaitch. 


Breasts 


• chaang. 


You - 


- ngen. 


Thigh - - . 




Bark - - 


- tolem. 


Foot - 


• chinna. 


Good - 


- talkook. 


Bone • 


kaalk. 


Bad - 


- yatanandook. 


Blood- 


• koork. 


Sweet - 


• witche-witche, 


Skin 


. mitch. 




talkook. 


Fat • - • 


' bapooL 


Food (fleeh) 


- yowir. 


Bowek 


• paapkoona. 


, , (vegetable) • paanim. 


Excrement • 


koonna. 


Hungry 


- wiga. 


WazHspear - 


• koo-i-oom. 


Thirsty 


- bangoonya. 


Beed-Bpear • 


■ oherram-cheram. 


Eat - 


- chakelang. 


Throwing-Btiok • 


- kaarik. 


Sleep • 


- komba. 


Shield 


malkar, kallawil. 


Drink - 


- koppa. 


Tomahawk - 


• ter. 


Walk - 


- yan-ga. 


Canoe 


- yoongooitoh. 


See - 


- nai-an-ga. 


Snn - - - 


■ nowi 


Sit 


- nienga. 


Moon - 


• waingmil. 


Yesterday - 


- jeUi-jellik. 


Star - - • 


- toort. 


Today 


- kelanowik. 


light - 


• waing. 


To-morrow - 


- barpoa 


Dark - 


- boroin. 


Where are the 


windjatokooli? 


Ck)ld - 


. mirmjuma. 


Blacks? 




Heat - 


- wonmoondillong. 


I don't know 


- windja? 


Day - 


• nowi. 


Plenty 


- baarook. 


Night - 


- boroin. 


Big - - 


• korombit. 


Pure - 


• wunnap. 


Little - 


. mirtook. 


Water 


- kattin. 


Dead - 


- wiikin. 


Smoke 


• boort. 


By-and-by - 


- bataga. 


Ground 


j»- 


Gome on 


. nooga yannuk. 


Wind - - ■ 


• merring. 


Milk - - 


- 


Bain - 


• mittuk. 


Eaglehawk • 


- 


God - ■ . 




WUd turkey 


- 


GhofltB 




Wife . - 


• 


VOL. in. 


2 


K 





514 



THB AU9TRALIAK RA£Z 



No. 206H.— NATTI-TALLOOK AND STUART-MILL. 



Bt thx WBirxB. 



Kmagaroo - 
OpoMoin - 
Tame dog - 
Wild dog - 
Emii • • - 
Black dnck - 
Wood dnck • 
Pelican 

Laughing jackaae 
Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - - - 
Swan - - - 
Egg - - - 
Track of a foot - 
Fiah - 
Loheter 
Crayfish 
MoBqnito - 
Fly - - - 
Snake 

The Blacks- 
A Blackfellow • 
A Black woman - 
Nose - - - 



kora. 
wille. 

yowir. 
ngare. 
piap-piap. 

koark. 

noorkqoang. 

chinyap. 



koonoowar. 
mirk, 
bakook. 
wiirap. 

yapit. 

lirre. 

biityik. 

koommiL 

koole. 

koole. 

paibebook. 



Hand- 
2Black8 - - 
SBlacka - 
One - 
Two - 
Three- 
Four - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

„ Younger - 
Brother-Elder - 

,t Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman - 
A baby 
A White man 
Children - 
Head - 

Eye - . - 
Ear - - - 



- munym. 



klH». 

poolet. 

poolet pe kiap. 

poolet poolet. 

mamook. 

babook. 

chachook. 

wawook. 

tingatook. 

ngarbe. 

winnungoork. 

p9-p0p. 

wamakit. 

poorp. 

mir. 
wirmbooL 



NATTI-TALLOOK Ain> STUART-MILL 



515 



No. 208H. 


— Natti-Tallook Ain> SruABT-MiLir- eon^nuet^. 


Month 


wooro. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


lia. 


.HiU - 




Hair of the head - 


ngamook. 


Wood- 


- wi. 


Beard- 


ngagne. 


Stone • 


- laa. 


Thunder ' 


mnmdar. 


Camp - 


- lar. 


GraoB • 


boait. 


^tir 








Yes - 


- ye-ye. 


Tongue 
Stomach 


tchalle. 
pilinyook. 


No - 
I 


- nge-nge. 
. wokok. 


Breasts 


karbok. 


Jb 


Tv \^mm^^m^9 


Thigh - 


kaar. 


You • 


• waan. 


Foot - 


chinna. 


Bark - 




Bone - 


kalkok. 


Good • 




Blood - 


korook. 


Bad - 




akin • 


mitchook. 


Sweet - 


» • 


Pat - - . 


> papoolok. 


Food - 




Bowels 




Hungry 




Excrement - 


- koonna. 


Thirsty 




War-spear - 


• kooioon. 


Eat • 




Beed-spear - 


- chark. 


Sleep - 
Drink- 


• 


Throwing-stick 


• kaarik. 




Shield - 


- malkar. 


Walk ■ 




* r 1 Bii^^^^Jfc 


AAAW&SbWIb • 




Tomahawk - 


- partik. 


See - 




Canoe • 


■ yoo-gooip. 


Sit - 




Sun - 
Moon - 


- ngawe. 
• yel. 


Yesterday 




Star - 


• 
- toort. 


To-day 




V • 4 a 


m 


To-morrow 




Tight - 


' paanp. 






Dark - 


- boroin. 


Where are 


the windja kooli ? 


Cold - 


- mootelong. 


Blacks? 




Heat - 


- woorokal. 


I don't knoi 


w • windja? 


Day - 


- paarip. 


Plenty 




Night - 


- boroin. 


Big ■ 


- martook. 


Fire - 


- wi. 


Little - 




Water 


- katchin. 


Dead - 




Smoke 


- boort. 


By-and-by 




Ground 


- cha. 


Come on 




Wind- 


- nud-a. 


Milk - 




Kain • 


• wolla. 


Eaglehawk 


- 


God - 




WUd torke 


y - 


Ghosts 


2 


Wife . 

K2 


" " 



516 



THB AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 2081.— MOUNT EMU. 



Bt Sib Samusl Wilson. 



Kangaroo • 


- koraa. 


Hand > 




OposBtim 


• wille. 


2 Blacks - 




Tame dog - 


• kaaL 


SBlacks 




WUddog - 




One - 


- kyap. 


Emu • 


• yowarr. 


Two - 


- boolait 


Black dnck • 


- maree. 






Wood duck • 


- bearp-bearp. 


Three - 


- boolait boo kyap. 


Pelican 


- patyangal. 


Four - 


- boolait boo boo- 


Laughing jackau 


kowark. 


^PV a ■ 


lait 


Native companioi 


igutun. 


Father 


- mamay. 


White cockatoo 


• katyakar. 


Mother 


-papay. 


Crow - 


• waa. 


Sister-Elder 


- tyatgay. 


Swan - 


■ goonoowarra. 


„ Younger 


- 


Egg 


• mirk. 


Brother-Elder 


- noway. 


Track of a foot 


• baray. 


„ Younger 


Fiah - 
Lobster 




A young man 


. tringit te koolay. 






An old man 


- mategooly. 


Crayfish 
Mosquito 


yaparte. 
• layray. 


An old woman 


- matebangerago. 


Fly - - ■ 


• mooroo. 


A baby 


- poopoop. 


Snake - 


• kummil. 


A White man 


- amaikeek. 


The Blacks- . 


koolay. 


Children - 


- poopoop. 


A Blackfellow 


• koolay. 


Head - 


- poorop. 


A Black woman 


. byang, byango. 


Eye - 


- myrr. 


Nose • 




Ear - 


- wirmbooL 





MOUNT 


EMU. 




No. 208i.— MouN 


Emu — continued. 


Month 


wooroo. 


Boomerang • 


Teeth - 


leea. 


Hill - 


Hair of the head - 


ngarra. 


Wood- 


Beard- 


ngayay. 


Stone - 


Thnnder - 




Camp - 


Graas - 




Yes - - - 


Tongue 




No - - - 


Stomach 




I - - 


Breasts 




You - 


Thigh - 




Bark - 


Foot - 




Good - 


Bone - 




Bad - - 


Blood - 




Sweet - 


Skin - 




Food - 


Fat - - 




Hungry 


Bowels 




Thirsty 


Excrement - 




Eat - - - 


War-spear - 




Sleep - 


Beed-spear - 




Drink- 


Throwing-stick 




Walk- 


Shield- 




See - 


Tomahawk - 
Canoe- 
Snn - 
Moon - 
Star - 
Tiight - 
Dark - 


■ 


Sit - - - 
Yesterday - 
To-day 
To-morrow - 
Where are the 
Blacks? 


Cold - 




I don't know 


Heat - 




Plenty 


Day - 




Big - - - 


Night • 




little - 


Fire - 




Dead - 


Water 
Smoke 
Ground 
Wind- 
Bain • 
God - 


- boodndyalL 


By-and-by - 
Come on 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk - 

Wild turkey 


Ghosts 


• karaL 


Wife . 



617 



518 



THS AUSTRALIAN EAGB: 



No. 206J.— MOORABOOL-JIBBEBIN LANGUAGE. 



* 


Bt THS 


WRim. 




Kangaroo - 


• koim. 


Hand - 


- mimuk. 


OpoMom - 


• woUeit. 


2B]acka 


- polagikooli 


Tiuiiedog - 


. kaL 


3 Blacka 


. pdlagi koinmet ta 


Wild dog • 






kooli. 




• kowir. 


One - 


. koinmet. 


Black dnck - 


- tolouL 






Wood dnck 




Two • 


polagL 


Pelican 


- birdnngaL 


Three> 


• polagi koinmet. 


Laughing jackaas 


kowaruk. 


Four • 


■ polagi polagL 


Native companion 


L porenget. 


Father 


. bitjung. 


White cockatoo • 


> kinnap. 


Mother 


• ngardung. 


Crow • 


• wa. 


Siater-Elder 


- wooranark. 


Swan • 


• koonoowaira. 


„ Younger 




Egg . 


kie. 


Brother-Elder • 


• waartoong. 


Track of a foot • 




„ Toungei 


' waangut. 


Fiah - . . 


koein. 


A young man 


• goolgun. 


Lobeter 




An old man 


• pidjarong,nedok. 


Crayfiah 


■ tchoriong. 




An old woman - 


- mudocoork. 


MoBqnito • 
Fly - 


ngaioong. 
. chogot. 


A baby 


^* 


Snake - 


koommiL 


A White man 


• ngammaigL 


The Blacka - 


• boorogn. 


Children - 




A Blackfellow 


• kooU. 


Head • 


• moork. 


A Black woman 


• baiargook. 


Eye - 


mir. 


Noae • 


- kaanatok. 


Ear • • • 


> wimgatuk. 



• 


MOORABOOL. 


Dl« 


No. 208j.— MoosABOOL— JiBBiERiN Lanouaok— cofitinued. 


Mouth 


- wooro. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth 


- leanatnk. 


Hill - - 


- 


Uair of the head 


- ngarmooretuk. 


Wood 


- wiin. 


Beard 


- 


Stone - 


- laark. 


Thunder - 


- mnndara. 


Camp - 


- karong. 


Grass - 


- paraark. 


Yes - - 


- e-or-ge. 


Tongue 


- galanatnk. 


No - - 


- noolam. 


Stomach 


- gtongatuk. 


I - - 


- 


Breasts 


- baab. 


You - 


- 


Thigh - - 


- karingatuk. 


Bark - 


- moorat. 


Foot - 


. chinnongatok. 


Good - 


- koonibenyook. 


Bone - 


- 


Bad - - 


- noolam (?). 


Blood - 


- 


Sweet - 


- 


Skin - 


- mityatuk. 


Food - 


- 


Pat - 


- maamboolatnk. 


Hmigry 






a^iav^^l^PMS^ a^ ^^ ^^ ^iviw ^^^f^t^ m 




Bowels 


- 


Thirsty 


- 


Excrement - 


- 


Eat - - 


- koodjalla. 


War-spear - 


- kaarp. 


Sleep - 


- kombangat. 


Beed-spear - 


- jaark. 


Drink - 


- ngobiith. 


Throwing-stick 


- daar, murreone. 


Walk- - 


- yannoik. 


Shield 


- malga. 


See - 


, 


Tomahawk - 


- kalbalerak. 


Sit - 


^ 


Canoe - 


- korong, yaoot 

9 


Yesterday - 


- taleo. 


Sun - 
Moon - 


. mermg. 
- yert. 


To-day 


- 


Star - 


- toortberang. 


To-morrow - 


- 


light - 


- yeramb. 


Where are the 


Dark - - 


- moorgal. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


- motoongating. 


I don't know 


- 


Heat - 


- kongat. 


Plenty 


- dedarbiL 


Day - 


- yeramb. 


Big . - 


- 


Night 


' moorgal. 


Little - 


- 


Fire - 


- wiin. 


Dead - 


- dedangatoo. 


Water 


- ngobik. 


By-and-by - 


- 


Smoke 


- bolt. 


Come on 


- yanna, worrewa, 


Qronnd 


- jaar. 




ko-ko. 


Wind- - 


- kntgirt. 


Milk - - 


- 


Rain - 


m 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - - 


- 


WUd turkey 


• 


Ohosts 


- 


Wife . - 


- 



BOOK THE TWENTY-FIRST. 



BOOK THE TWENTY-FmST. 

PREFATORY REMARKS. 

Thb langnage of which specimens of four dialects are given 
in this book was spoken by twelve or fourteen tribes. Its 
vocabularies have many words which agree with those in 
the last book. With the Ngooraialum tribe (language 
No. 209a) I was well acquainted when a young man, and 
knew something of their language. Concerning the country 
occupied by the tribes dwelt on in this book, I have received 
the following information from Albert A. 0. Le Souef, Esq., 
who had, in the early days of the colony, excellent oppor- 
tunities of being well informed on the subject. He says: — 

" Starting from the first available country on the Upper 
Goulbum, as far down as the present Tea or Doogalook, and 
taking the Miller's Creek country (where the Plenty Kiver 
tribe came in), the Bootherboolok had their habitations, and 
numbered, I should think, some one hundred souls. Then 
down the river to the Old Crossing Place (now Tabilk) came 
the Natrakboolok Blacks, occupying both banks of the river. 
This tribe would also, I am of opinion, number one hundred 
persons, old and young. All the country from the Dividing 
Bange, where Heathcote now is, and Pyalong, belonged to 
the Nerboolok, one of their principal haunts being the curious 
little hill near Bradford, known as the Sugarloaf. This 
tribe, I think, must have numbered folly two hundred souls. 
From the Old Crossing Place, on the Goulbum, down to 
about the present Toolamba, was owned by the Ngooraialum; 
below Toolamba the strong and numerous Bangerang tribe 
owned the river, as you are aware, to its junction with the 



524 THE AUSTBALIAN RACE: 

Morray. The Ngoondalam stood rather in dread of the 
Bangerang, and never, I think, felt very comfortable if 
camped much below what is now Mnrchison. On the nortli 
of the river they went back to the Seven Creeks and the 
present Violet Town, where they met the Upper Broken 
Blver and Ovens Blacks. On the south they owned the 
country which at present constitutes Whroo and Bushworth, 
and met the Pimpandoor on the Wongulta and Colbinabbin 
Plains. The Ngooraialum, Bootherboolok, Natrakboolok, 
•and Nerboolok were very much mixed up by intermar- 
riages, and often fought together against the Bangeraug 
and Pimpandoor. I think the Ngooraialum mustered two 
hundred souls, old and young, and that the total number of 
the four tribes would be six hundred. My information 
about the location of the tribes I obtained from an intelligent 
Natrakboolok, Ned Narrabin by name ; the numbers I have 
given are from my own observation, but I had considerable 
opportunities of judging, ^and I don't think I am far wrong. 
I may say that I think the estimate of the entire population 
given in Brough Smyth's work very much below the actual 
number. The four tribes I have spoken of formed a sort of 
petty nation ; they spoke the same language, and, as I have 
said, fought side by side, though separated into distinct 
tribes, each owning its own territory." 

It is now about thirty-four years since I last heard Ngoo- 
raialum spoken, and the following Additional Words and 
Phrases are all I can call to mind: — 

Stringybark-tree .... irip. 

Gum-tree beaL 

Box-tree birtpool. 

Yam ...... mo-i-yool, bamm. 

Yam-stick ..... wolo-ain. 

Mamia laap. 

Raddle or red ochre - noro-noro. 

As damper, or bush bread, was baked in the ashes, in the 
same way that the Blacks converted a certain sort of red clay 
in to ruddle, the Ngooraialum called damper noro^ and 



PBEFATORT REMARKS. 



525 



inthage noro mitta Cowel (give bread Mr. Cnrr) was at one 
time a very common sound in my ears. 

Indian com ..... narangat. 

Blanket yallan@birong- 

Plain waark. 

Blacks ontside of thoee known to bnkkeen. 

the tribe 
Creek ...... yellamL 

Names of Csrbks in the Countbt of the Ngoobaialuh. 



Eaglehawk Creek 
Dog Creek 
Opoflsum Creek 
Crayfish Creek 

9 



ySllami PSSngil. 
ySllami Erangen. 
yellami Wollert. 
yellami BoongSngooloom. 
yellami goloro. 



Ring-tailed opossum - P^g^ 

Lyrebird boollnm-booUam. 

A sort of duck .... koonSbbiL 

Ibis ...... paipSdjerook. 

Women --..-- baadjerboolok. 

Yellam, bark of a tree and also camp, seems to have 
been changed into illum^ to express the people who dwelt in 
any land. Thus we have Waaringnlnm, to denote the people 
who dwelt lower down on the Goulbum, which the Ngoo- 
raialnm called Waaring; Wongatpaiillnm, the tribe which 
dwelt at Wongaty a part of the Moira; Tidneillom, men who 
come from Sydney, and probably NgooaiiUum, people of 
Ngoorai, contracted into Ngooraialnm. 

Opossum-mg th&thowooL 

Anus moom. 

Talk - thomnge. 

Boys kolinoro. 

Girls booboonark. 

Husband koliin. 

Give me a fire-stick (or fire) - inthaje wiin. 

(I have) no fire .... aiabuntukka wiin. 

Thin nelamjnk. 

To evacuate konyoobok. 

None ai-i-a. 

Sick jerraming. 

Look there ..... naangano. 



526 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE; 

LfOtiugo • yume. 

Make haate onde. 

Where (is my) wife? - indakorriii budjor ? 
(I) don*t know indimga. 



Darling, or dear 

To-morrow I will go 

Fetch water 

(I'm) dry- 

Reach (me my) tomahawk 

To-morrow I'll fight 



- oonyanmik. 

• yeramboi 

- waamdnk baam. 

• konboothinaL 

- konak kangik. 

• yeramboi chipcherangan. 



To-morrow I will go to Colbinabbin- yeramboikamambathin 

Kolbinabbin. 

There are plenty of yama there - woorthoondok moinl chondo. 

To-morrow I hunt emu - - yeramboi pooringdaring 

baraimal. 

Be off tool ! w towak janni ! 

NaMBS of PlAOSS in THB NkIOHBOURHOOD op CoLBINABBnt. 

WoUinjo. 

Ariogobaming. 

ToonailMu 

Ullombubil. 

Boobamdoo (Mount Scobie). 

Nammerong. 

Yibberithoop. 

Kor&gorag (now called Crag-crag). 

POramburt (now called Burramboot). 

Paboinboolok (Lake Ck>oper). 

(}ob6rip. 

Gargarro. 

Eraigin. 

Yallook (The Campaepe). 

Pumiwong. 

Beul. 

Woranga. 

Korop. 

Taimnring (now called Tbnmering). 

WongOlta (called One-halter Plain). 

Chirazabel. 

Baangyoobyne. 

Tdmdaim. 

Konela (called Cornelia Creek). 



PREFATORY REMARKS. 527 

Nambs ov Men. 
Kol5pka, 
Wftwgroot. 
Berrin-berrin, or Bpnr-winged plover. 

Nambs of Womien. 
Poormfining. 
Kfirwitha. 
TapSming. 
TOrtool. 
OrgenSngarook. 

The dialect of the tribe (now extinct for some forty years) 
on whose country stands the city of Melbourne was early 
collected by the late Daniel Bnnce^ and in 1856 published 
under the title of Language of the Aborigines of the CoUmy 
of Victoria, Mr. Bunco, who eventually became manager of 
the public gardens at Geelong, worked about Melbourne in 
the forties^ for my father amongst others^ as a gardener. 
Though we owe it to his eflforts that any record of the Mel- 
bourne language is extant, it is necessary to say that he was 
quite uncultivated as regards languages ; that his vocabulary 
is evidently replete with errors, and can only be depended on 
when the most simple words are concerned. As the title of 
his little work shows, Mr. Bunco was under the impression 
that all the Victorian tribes spoke the same language. 

As regards the river which flows through the country 
which used to be occupied by the tribe under consideration, 
its name was not Tarra-Tarra, but Bay-ray-rung, as I have 
been informed by Blacks resident at Coranderrk, whose 
&thers dwelt on its banks. The name Yarra-Tarra was re- 
ported by Mr. Wedge, a surveyor, who came upon it with a 
strange Black from Geelong. The latter probably when he 
saw it exclaimed yanna / yanna I or it flows ! it flows I and 
that this exclamation, imperfectly noted, was accepted as the 
name of the river. 

The Melbourne Blacks used to throw the boomerang with 
greater skill than any others I have witnessed. In their 
hands it was a wonderful toy. 



528 



THB AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 209A.-8ETMOnR TO MUBOHISON, PART OF GOULBTIBN 
RIVER» WHROO. ETC.— NQOORAIALUH LANGUAGE. 



Bt tee WRimu 



Kangaroo - 
Opoflsom - 
Tame dog - 
Wadd<^ - 
Emu 

Black dack 
Wood dnck 
Pelican 

Laughing jackass 
Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - 
Swan - 



maribn. 
wGllert. 
yetingen. 

baraimal. 

tolom. 

packmoom. 



krork. 

kaan. 

wong. 

k53noowarra. 

dirandiL 



Track of a foot 
Fish . 
Lobster 

Crayfish 
Mosquito - 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks 
A Blackf ellow 
A Black woman 
Nose - 



boonggangoo- 
loom. 

kogok. 

m59noloom. 

kdloonoon. 

koliinb59lok. 

koliin. 

bfiadjnr. 

kaag. 



Hand- 

2Blacks 



8 Blacks - 

One - 
Two - 
Three- 
Four - 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

„ Younger 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 
Young men- 
An old man 
An old woman - 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear - 



- mimoiig, 

- poUbel koliin- 

b651ok. 

- polabel koptoon 
koliinboolok. 

- kop, koptnn. 

- polabel. 

- polabel kop. 

- polabel-polabeL 

- m&nmoomong. 

- b&wain. 

- paanbin. 

- bumUmbi. 

yen-yen-boolok. 

thaingola. 

wurkoork. 

pobop. 

ngamftigi. 



- kowong. 

- merin. 

- wirn* 



SEYMOUR TO MURCHISON, ETC. 



629 



No. 209a.— Setmoub to Mttbchison, Pabt of Goulbttbn RiyER, Whboo, 

Etc. — NoooRAiALUM Lakquaoe — amtinued. 



Mouth 


- wo5rro. 


Boomerang - 


IT V « V WV^^^MF ■ 


Teeth 


- laan. 


Hill - - 


- pannoL 


Hair of the head - kownng. 


Wood - - 


- kaalk. 


Beard 


- 


Stone - 


- mSegin, batto- 


Thunder - 


- ngondabiL 




batto. 


Grass 


- boaL 


Camp - 


- yellam. 


Tongue 


- tchSllang. 


Yes - - 


- ai-e. 


Stomach 


- barbagon. 


No - - 


- thago. 


Breasts 


- hiring, brim-brim 


I - - 


- waan. 


Thigh - 


- during. 


You - - 


- waar. 


Foot - 


- chinnong. 


Bark - 


- yellam. 


Bone - 


- kalgo. 


Good - 


- pondap. 


Blood- . 


- kork. 


Bad . 


- mattabe. 


Skin - 


- marok. 


Sweet - 


_ 


Fat - 


- marmbool. 


Food - 


. 


Bowels 


- koomong. 


Hungry 


- niribro5in. 


Excrement - 


• koomong. 


Thirsty 


- bekSonian. 


War-spear - 


- ko-i-oou. 


Eat - 


- thange. 


Reed-spear - 


- djerar. 


Sleep - 


- kumambooman. 


Throwing-stick 


- karek, marewnn. 


Drink- 


- ngoban. 


Shield - 


- girab. 


Walk - - 


- y&nnonan. 


Tomahawk • 


- kSragik. 


See - - 


- nganoonan. 


Canoe - 


- korom. 


Sit - 


- allftmbanan. 


Sun - 


- ngammai. 

• 


Yesterday - 


- jrulungoi. 


Moon - 


- miman.i 






Star - 


- toort. 


To-day 


- karemin. 


Light - 


k&remin. 


To-morrow - 


- yeramboi. 


Dark - 


- boroin, mo5lok- 


Where are the indakorin koliin 




moSlok. 


Blacks? 


boolok? 


Cold - - 


• motoon. 


I don*t know 


- indanga. 


Heat - 


narawing, ngam- 

• 


Plenty 


- woorthoondok. 




mai. 


Big - - 


• woortaboo. 


Day • 


- karemin. 




Night - 


- boroin. 


Little - 


- wikork. 


Fire - 


- wiin. 


Dead - 


- wimdabil. 


Water 


- baam, w5lloon. 


By-and-by - 


- mallemalto. 


Smoke 


• boort. 


Come on - 


- ngondS. 


Ground 


• biik, pik. 


Milk - 




Wind - 
Rain - 


- gorin. 

- ygul. 


Eaglehawk - 


- poongil. 


God - 


- 


Wnd turkey 


- birrail. 


Ghosts 


- 


Wife - 


- baadjur. 


VOL. III. 


2 


L 





530 



IT 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE 



No. 209b.— HEALESVILLE, UPPER TARRA— OORONGIR 

LANGUAGE. 





6t thb 


Wbitbb. 




Kangaroo - 


- koim. 


Hand • 


- mimoDAa 


Opossum 


- woUert. 


2 Blacks . 


^ 


Tame dog - 


- werangun. 


3 Blacks . 


• 


VVUddog . 


m 


One • 


- kaambo. 


Emu - 


* baraimaL 






Black duck - 


- tolom. 


Two - 


- benjero. 


Wood duck- 


- bebeup. 


Three- 


- benjero kaambo 


Pelican 


- waajil. 


Four - 


- benjero on 


Laughing jackass tororo. 




benjero. 


Native companion krork. 


Father 




White cockatoo 


- ngaiook. 


Mother 


- paapa. 


Crow 


- waan. 


Sister-Elder 




Swan 


- koonoowara. 


,) Younger 


* 


Egg 


• dirandin. 


Brother-Elder 


% ■ 


Track of a foot 


- baareng. 


»9 Younger 


Pish - 


. 


A 


% 


Lobster 
Crayfish 


- boongangooloom. 

m 


A young man 
An old man 


- jeje. 

- wigabbiL 


Mosquito - 


' kogok. 


An old woman 


- moondegork. 


Fly - 


- kurumburra. 


A baby - 


- pobop. 


Snake - 


- koommil. 


A White man 


* ngammaiffi. 


The Blacks - 


- koliinboolok. 


Children - 


- 


A Blackfellow 


- kolin. 


Head - 


- kowong. 


A Black woman 


- baidjarook. 


Eye - 


• mim. 


Nose - 


- kaaong. 


Ear - 


- wim. 



531 



No. 209b.— HEALESVn<LK, 


Uppxr Yakka— Oobokgir 




L^youAGS — continued. 




Month - 


' woorro. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


- leum. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head 


- yarre-kowong. 


Wood- 


kaal. 


Beard - 


• yarre-umdok. 


Stone - 


• laan. 


Thunder 


■ ngondabbiL 


Camp - 


• wiUam. 


Grass - 


boat 


Yes . - 


. yi-yL 


Tongue 


- tohiUong. 


No . - 


- yootha. 


Stomach 


boet. 


I 




Breasts 


. birring. 


You - 


• marambina. 


Thigh - 


djereng. 


Bark - 


■ wlllam. 


Foot - 


chinnomr. 






Bone • 


nil lung- 


Good - 


■ pondap. 


Blood - 


■ kork. 


Bad . 


• nullam. 


akin - 


• paap. 


Sweet - 




Fat - - 


• marmbooL 


Food - 




Bowels 


. koonna. 


Hungry 


nerebrooin. 


Excrement - 


' goon. 


Thirsty 




War-spear - 


- koioon. 


Eat - • 


- thanjip. 


Beed-spear - 


• jerrar. 


Sleep - 


■ yimmoonan. 


Throwing-stick 


- kareg. 


Drink • 


- mooean. 


Shield • 


• jiram. 


Walk - 


. yannanan. 


Tomahawk • 


• moring. 


See - - • 


• nganganan. 


Canoe - 


■ kor5m. 






^^i^pa*^^^^ 




Sit - - • 


allambanan. 


Sun - 
Moon - 


ngiwen. 
. miman. 


Yesterday - 


- yellungoit. 


Star - - • 


• toort. 


To-day 


- yellunbo. 


Light - 


> yellembo. 


To-morrow - 


- yeramboL 


Dark - 


- boroin. 


Where are the 


indakoliinbolokl 


Cold - . . 


■ monmoot. 


Blacks? 




Heat - 


• woloon. 


T don't know 


- indunga. 


Day - 


• yellembo. 


Plenty 


- woorthoonda 


Night - 


- boroin. 


Big - 




Fire - - 


• wiin. 


Little - 


• waigo. 


Water- 


• baam. 


Dead - 


> wigaL 


Smoke - 


- boort. 


By-and-by - 


- mollogo. 


Ground 


- biik. 


Come on 


- warewe. 


Wind . - 




Milk - 




Rain - 


• pummubil. 


Eaglehawk - 




God . 




Wild turkey 




Ghosts 


2] 


Wife 

L2 





r:ir7 



75Z ATyraJLLLlS 



Ko. attc— LOWEB TABRA. 



Fkom DAJfJEL Briers Tocabtlast. 



KangMTjo ' 
OpOMQin 
T»ni« dog • 
WiMdrig ' 
Kma . • • 
BUck dock ' 
Wood dock - 
Pelican 

I^anghing jackiiM 
Native companion 
White cockatoo • 
Crow • 
Hwan • 

Kkk • 

Track of a foot 
Kiih • 
LolMitor 
Crayflah 
Mom^uito 
Kly . 
Hiiako • 
Tiio Hlaoka 
A lUaokfollow 
A lUaok woman - 
Noio - 



toolome. 



nayook. 
waang. 
koonwarra. 
dimndirrL 

touit. 

tooiyung. 

bir-ma-bnck. 

ooommiL 

cooleenth. 

cooleenth. 

baggorook. 

oongatha. 



2BhckB 

SBUcks 

One . . - 

Two . 

Tkree - - - 

Foot - 

Father 

Mother 

Sister-Elder 

„ Younger - 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man- 
An old woman - 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 

Eye - - - 
Ear - - - 



benjeroo. 
benjeroo tot 

cambooi. 
benjeroo vtw 

benjeroo. 
mannoonth. 
parblne. 
moUokin. 

wnnthnlong. 



booboop. 

allambee. 

oothanong. 

cowong. 

myrringatha. 

kidnongatha. 



LOWER YAfiRA. 



833 





No. 209o.— Lower Yarra— coniiis 


vue4. 


Mouth 


- worongatha. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


- leongatha. 


Hill - 


• morack. 


Hair of the head- yarragong-atha. 


Wood- 


- kalk. 


Beard- 


- yarragondock. 


Stone - 




Thunder - 


- drumbullabuU. 


Camp - 


- mierum, willam. 


Grass - 


- poath. 


Yes - 


- um urn* 


Tongue 


- 


No 


- nuther. 


Stomach 


- thoronee, bel- 


I 

You - 




Breasts 


ling'atha. 
- brimbrimgatha. 


- mirambeena. 


Thigh - 


- thirrongatha. 


Bark - 




Foot - 


- geenongatha. 


Good - 


- monomeeth. 


Bone - 
Blood - 


- n'yeelang. 

- gooroomuL 


Bad - 

Sweet - 


- n'yellan. 


Skin - 


- tatbee. 


Food - 


- jindaming, 


Fat - 


- mirmbul. 




thangoith. 


Bowels 


- bindirk. 


Hungry 


- nerriburdin. 


Excrement - 


- conong. 


Thirsty 




War-spear - 


• neerim. 


Eat - 


- thangarth. 


Reed-spear - 


* 


Sleep - 


- umina. 


Throwing-stick 


- 


Drink- - 


- noobuck. 


Shield - 


M 


Walk- 


. yannathan. 


Tomahawk - 


• galbiling n'gar- 


See - 


. mirambiak 




rook. 




nangooth. 


Canoe - 


- korong. 


Sit - 


- allambee. 


Sun - 


- noweenth. 


*V7 . m 




Moon - 
Star - 
Light - 


- miniyan. 

- tutbyrum. 

- noweenth, dur- 


Yesterday - 
To-day 
To-morrow - 


.. yellingbo. 

- booyboorooing. 


^^ 


ran-durran. 


Where are 1 


bhe 


Dark - 


- booroonth. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


- cabbin. 


I don't know 




Heat - 


- 


Plenty 


- buUarto. 


Day - 


- 


Big - - 


- bullarto. 


Night 


• booronthooith. 


Little - 


- wyeeboo. 


Fire - 


- weenth. 


Dead - 


- murmbui(?). 


Water 
Smoke 


- baanth. 


By-and-by - 




Ground 


- beek. 


Come on 




Wind- 


- mommoot. 


Milk - 


- brim-brim. 


Bain - 


- baanth mellaba. 


Eaglehawk - 


- winjeel. 


God • 


- buUarto mar- 


Wild turkey 






mlngatha. 


Wife - 


- ooolenyee bag- 


Ghosts 


m 




garook. 



534 



THS AreTRAlJAH RACX 



No. 201h>.— MOBDITALLOOK. 



Bt thx WBim. 



Kangaroo - 


• koioL 


OpOtlHIll 


willert. 


Tune dog - 


werangon. 


Wild dog • 




fiSma - 


- haniimal. 


BUok dnok - 


• tolom. 


Wood dnok 


lekolabeL 


Pelican 


wagiL 


Laughing jaokan 


1 tharowerag. 


Native oompanion 


t korrok. 


White cockatoo • 


ngaayok. 


Crow - 


• waang. 


Swan - 


koonoowar. 


E^ • 


• dirandeL 


Track of a foot • 


bareng. 


Fiih . - ■ 


• wiraap. 


Lobster 


• toing. 


Crayfish 




Mosquito • 


- kokak. 


Fly - . . 


kawn, kaaragak. 


Snake • 


■ kaan. 


The Blacks 


- koliinbolak. 


A Blaokfellow 


koliin. 


A Black woman • 


' badjer. 


Nose • 


- kaang. 



Hand - 
2BlackB 
SBlaoks - 

One - 
Two - 
Three- 
Four • 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

„ Younger 
Brother-Elder 

tt Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children 
Head - 
Bye - 
Ear 



nnraong. 
pdabel 

polabel koptoon 
koliin. 
kop, koptoon. 
polabeL 
polabel kop. 
polabel-pol&beL 



paba. 
ladtha. 

jajait. 

yenyin. 

wegobeL 

moomdigork. 

pobop. 

ngamaigi. 

pobop. 

kowong. 

mem. 

unring. 



MORDIYALLOOK. 



535 





No. 209d.— MoRDiYALLOOK—oon^tnuecf. 


Month 


- worong. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth 


- liang. 


Hill - 




EEair of the hea4i 


yare kowong. 


Wood- 


• kaalk. 


Beard 


- yarengondnk. 


Stone - 


- lum. 


Thunder - 


- momdabeL 


Camp- 


- wollum. 


Qnifls- 


- boait. 


Yes - 


• ngai-e. 


Tongne 


• djellan. 


No - 


• thaog, indunga. 


Stomach 


- maarp. 


I 


- boordop. 


BieastB 


• brim-brim. 


Yon - 


- ngulum. 


Thigh 


- jaam. 


Bark - 


• willum. 


Foot - 


- chinnong. 


Good . 


- monamiit. 


Bone - 


- ngem. 


Bad - 


- mattabe, pallim. 


Blood- 


- kammool. 


Sweet 




Skin - 


- daap. 


Food - 




Fat - 


. maarmbool. 


Hungry 


- ngerebrooin. 


Bowels 


■ koomong. 


Thirsty - 


- konboonoon, 


Bzcretnent - 


- koomong. 


■f 


9 

koondebain. 


WaiHBpear - 


- ko-i-oon. 


Eat - 




Reed-spear- 


- djerar. 


Sleep - 


- kamambooin. 


Wommera • 


■ karek. 


* 








Drink- 


- thamok. 


Shield 


■ kiarm. 










Walk - 


- yannag. 


Tomahawk- 


kalb&lenark. 




• o 






See - 


- nganak. 


Canoe 


• korong. 




o 


Snn - 


■ nffammai. 


Sit - 


- ngalambe. 


Moon • 


■ memian. 


Yesterday - 


- yeloongoil. 


Star - 


- toortbaim. 


To-day 


- yeloombok. 


Light - 


■ iram. 


To-morrow 


- yeramboi. 


Dark- 


- pooroin. 


Where are the 


windakorim ko 


Cold . - 


• taambnlk. 


Blacks? 


liinolok ? 


Heat - 


■ ngoiin. 


I don't know 


• indunga. 


Day - 




Plenty 


- woortondok. 


Night 


• pooroin. 


Big . - 


- woortha. 


Fire - 


- wiin. 


Little- 


- wiben. 


Water 


baam. 


Dead - 


wiirgai. 


Smoke 


boort. 


By-and-by - 


- mooloko. 


Ground 


- bilk. 


Come on - 


- warrewi. 


Wind 


• mornmot. 


Milk - 


- 


Run • 


- pnmabel. 


Eaglehawk- 


1 


God - - 


• 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 




Wife - 





BOOK THE TWENTY-SECOND. 



BOOK THE TWENTY-SECOND. 

PREFATORY REMARKS. 

GippsLAND is the south-eastern portion of the colony of 
Victoria. Prior to the coming of the Whites, this district 
was a remarkably isolated one. Small-pox, which overran the 
rest of the colony, never reached its tribes, and, setting aside 
an occasional war-pariy which made a flying attack on some 
tribe on the Tarra (and, I believe, on the Strathbogie Ranges), 
and then retreated, and pretty frequent meetings on the 
Snowy River with what are called the Bidwell and Moneroo 
Blacks, the Gippsland tribes had no outside relations. Of 
these tribes, Mr. A. W. Howitt, F.G.S., has given a very 
interesting account in a work entitled Kamilarai and Kumaiy 
which, however, dififers in some important particulars from 
what has been communicated to me 'on the subject by Mr. 
John Bulmer, who has been many years in charge of one of 
the Government B.eserves on which a portion of the Gippsland 
Blacks are domiciled. As I think Mr. Bulmer an excellent 
authority, I shall lay before the reader the statements which 
I have received from him. 

Mr. Howitt, in the work just referred to, sets down the 
Gippsland tribes as five in number, but it seems probable 
that there were more, as I have received from Mr. Bulmer 
the vocabulary of a tribe which dwelt at Omeo. This 
vocabulary differs from that of the Brabrolung tribe, whilst 
Omeo has been included by Mr. Howitt in their country. 
The names of the tribes given by Mr. Howitt, which no 
doubt are correct as far as they go, are, commencing from 



540 THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 

the sonth-west of Gippslandy the Bratanolong, the Braiako- 
lung, the Brabrolung (or Brad-ow-oo-loong, as I have beard 
a Blackfellow pronounce the word), the Tatungolongy and the 
Kroatungolung. Looking at them collectively, it is imr 
portant to notice that three out of their five names commenoe 
with the word Bra — man — and all terminate in lung {loong?\ 
circumstances which, joined to the affinity of their langoages, 
leave no donbt that these tribes, which, as we learn, so often 
fought and so often made friends, were closely related by 
blood, and, in feict, one descended from the other. 

Immediately to the east of the Kroatungolung, itself the 
most easterly of the Gippsland tribes, we have one named 
Birtowallf or scrub people, and Mr. Bulmer remarks that the 
Kroatungolung, in whose country is the Snowy River, fia- 
ternize with the Brabrolung; and the Birtowall, or as they are 
commonly called Bidwell or Bidwelli Blacks, with the tribes of 
Moneroo, to whose speech their own is akin. Examining into 
this subject I find, in fact, that from the Snowy Biver west- 
erly to the limits of Gippsland the several languages are 
closely related amongst themselves, and allied to those of 
Central Victoria, and through them to Wiiratheri and Kamil- 
aroi; on the other hand, passing over the Birtowall lang-uage, 
said to be related to that of Moneroo, but of which I have 
not been able to obtain a specimen, we find the languages 
between Cape Howe and Sydney Cove diffiering from those of 
Gippsland, and strongly connected amongst themselves, in 
proof of which the following tables are given: — 



PREFATORY REMARKS. 



541 



9 






6 



8. 
^ I 
a' g 

I 8 

II 

n 



1^ 
s s 

S '-3 
•S 2 



SB 






I 



9 

a 



* 



i 



6 



O 



a 
o 

94 



> 

s 

o 



B 
o 



I 



."S 



I 




O S 



I 



1 I 

<3 a 






& 



I I 



111 

^ tl iz; 



I 




M Sz; g 



I ^1 






o 



'3 • 8 ' 



^ 



li 






1 i 

iz; S S 






- 1 1 i 1 1 

^ M ^ M A ^ 




I I I I I 



tS 






&P 



M 



•fib 



fl4 |H 



II II 



8 



I I I 



d 
PQ 



^ 



i 






I I I 



44 






I I 



I 



to 



3 



ik 



M 



II 



►5 ■♦^ ,* 
^ CO ^ 



> I 



'3 



542 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGB: 



Table showing affinitiei betireen the Bnbrolmig Luignage and 

Wiiratheri Dialects. 



En^lah. 


GipiMkiid. 


WlintlMri. 


nMsevliereDialeetis 
■lokai. 


Oposscun 


Wodthan - 


Willee - - 


Upper Osstlereagfa. 


Dog • 




Merrigang 


Merree 


tf 


Smu • 




Miowera - 


Oaring 


19 


Snake 




Toorung - 


Doomng - 


>> 


Stone - 




Wallnng - 


Warlnng • 


BpganBiver. 


Breasts 




Beng 


Bere- 


f> 


Fat - 




Wamewan 


Wamoo - 


If 


Yoa - 




Nindo - 


Indoo 


»9 


Bad • 




Dinden 


Yinga . 


It 


Hungry 




Mreman - 


Marang 


II 


Skin - 




Yone 


Ynlin 


Maoqnarie River. 


Tomahawk 




Gwean 


Bergnin • 


II 


Moon- 




Wane 


Qewang 


1* 


Dark- 




Bookang • 


Bnddong • 


II 


Bain- 




WiUang • 


Kaling - 


•1 


Testerday • 




Warran - 


Uningwarra 


Dnbbo. 


Stone - 




Wallnng - 


Wallung • 


Bathnrst. 



As the result of the facts set out, supported as they are 
by the evidence of language, I arrive at the Mowing condn- 
sions, viz.. That Gippsland began to be peopled at its western 
extremity by Wiiratheri-descended Blacks from the valley of 
the Tarra ; that the first comers into this district continued 
to increase, and spread themselves in every direction, in 
which they were not prevented from so doing by mountains 
or dense scrubs, until they came in contact, in the neighbour- 
hood of Cape Howe, with tribes which had reached that 
locality by following the coast line from Sydney Harbour; 
and finally that, on the meeting of these Yarra and Sydney 
descended tribes, the occupation of this continent by the 
aboriffinal race became complete at this point* It is to be 
borne in mind that Gippsland is all but surrounded by 
scrubs and mountains, which are nearly impenetrable, and 



PREFATORY REMARKS. 543 

that it was this circmnstance which cat off communication 
between the Blacks of that district and those of the Yarra 
valley, and restricted their outside relations to the Birtowall 
and Moneroo tribes. What time it took for the first comers 
to spread themselves throaghont Gippsland there is nothing 
to show, except that it was safficiently long to allow of the 
growth of several languages, and of their descendants 
increasing to as many as 1,500 souls. What time has 
elapsed since the occupation of Australia by the Blacks 
became complete is another question, to which no reply can 
be given, except that no fact has come to light which would 
lead to the suspicion that the occurrence has been of recent 
date. Indeed, were it not for the deductions to be drawn 
from the languages and customs of the continent as a whole j 
it would be impossible to predicate that the tribes on the 
north coast have existed from a more ancient date than 
those of Gippsland, and yet there is probably a difference 
of several hundred years between the epochs at which the 
two coasts were first peopled. 

The last of the vocabularies which appears in this book, 
No. 213, has no connection with those of Gippsland. It 
belongs to an isolated tribe on the Upper Murray, of which 
but three members were left when I received it, and is 
inserted here for convenience' sake. A second rendering of 
this vocabulary, which I received from the late G. R. H. 
Stuckey, I have not thought necessary to insert. 



No. 210.— GIPPSLAND. 

A GOOD deal of difficulty has been experienced with the 
vocabularies of Gippsland, for the remnants of the tribes 
which spoke them, having now dwelt together for twenty or 
thirty years, their languages have become much mixed. 
Originally, there were probably six or seven distinct lan- 
guages in this district— of one of these, that spoken by 



544 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

the Brabrolong or Brad-ow-oo-loong tribe, four renderings 
are given; and of Omeo and the Snowy River, one each. 

The following account of the Brabrolnng tribe is com- 
piled from notes kindly forwarded by Mr. John Bulmer, 
who, as already stated, has lived amongst them for many 
years, in charge of the Lake 1^ ers Aboriginal Reserve. 

The country of this tribe is between the rivers Mitchell 
and Tambo and the lakes into which they fdl. When the 
Whites first entered Gippsland, in 1841, Mr. Bulmer thinks 
the native population may have amounted to 1,000 souls, 
amongst whom were noticed many men and women who 
seem to have reached the age of seventy or eighty years. 
In 1862, when my informant began his residence in the dis- 
trict, the number had dwindled to 150, of whom 80 are now 
(1882) all that remain. The decrease is attributed to the 
causes so often mentioned in these pages. Like the other 
tribes of Victoria, those of Gippsland were clad in opossum- 
skin rugs. The girls wore a fringe of opossum-fur strings 
round the waist, called kiung; as did also the men, on state 
occasions, one made of strips of the skin of the kangaroo or 
some other animal. Their ornaments were necklaces made 
of small reeds, cut into short lengths; a netted band round 
the forehead; and a bone through the septum of the nose. 
On occasions of rejoicing, they smeared their bodies with a 
compound of red ochre and grease; and, when in mourning, 
with pipe-clay. They manufactured fishing-nets and bags 
out of grass, and also from the fibre of stringybark. Their 
tomahawks were of hard stone, brought to an edge by first 
chipping and afterwards by rubbing with sandstone; their 
spears were tipped, sometimes with sharp flakes of flint, 
fastened on with the gum of the grass-tree, and at others 
with barbs cut out of the solid wood. They had also several 
kinds of clubs, one called kallak (i.e.y wood) ; and two sorts 
of shields, one used in combats with clubs, and the other 
when fighting with spears. They had also boomerangs and 
wommeras. 



GIPPSLAND. 545 

The principal articles of food in Gippsland were kanga- 
roo, wallaby, native-bear, opossum, and fish ; they had also 
yams and several other sorts of vegetables, and it is a 
singular circumstance that ovens are not found in Gipps- 
land. Eestrictions in connection with certain articles of 
food, regulated by age and sex, existed as elsewhere, though 
of course a change of production led to variations in 
detail. Of small-pox, the marks of which were so common 
in the rest of Victoria up to 1845, no traces ever existed in 
Gippsland, as I have been informed by many persons besides 
Mr. Bulmer, who also remarks that the Blacks of that 
district have no name for the disease in their language. 

Cannibalism was avowedly practised by these tribes, to 
the extent of eating portions of the skin and the hands of 
an enemy when slain. Instances of this have been noticed 
more than once by White men. Mr. Bulmer remarks the 
very general characteristic, that the Gippsland Black did not 
consider the person who met him in fair fight as a real 
enemy, but only the individual who practised magic against 
him; "he," as they said, "would seize me by the throat, 
and lay a net for my feet." Of the remains of such as these 
they would eat. 

The Gippsland Blacks objected strongly to let any one 
outside the tribe know their names, lest their enemies, learn- 
ing them, should make them vehicles of incantation, and so 
charm their lives away. As children were not thought to 
have enemies, they used to speak of a man as " the father, 
uncle, or cousin of so-and-so," naming a chUd ; but on all 
occasions abstained from mentioning the name of a grown- 
up person. Now-a-days, this superstition has given way, and 
Mr. Bulmer has been able to give me the following names of 
some of the Blacks at Lake Tyers Reserve: — Males: Bungil 
Noorut, wombat hunter ; Dango-willin ; Bungil Tambun, 
fish hunter; Bungil Barlijan, platypus hunter; Karemba- 
kyne; Karloba, crane; Bumberat, the name of a place; 
Wallung, stone; Bundalwaal, stinging-spear; Torrikaat; 

VOL. HI. 2 M 



546 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

Bengnan; Telmri, shark. Females: Tawali; Boolgen; 
Labit; Tarlkang. 

Mr. Bulmer thinks that the Gippsland tribes used to have 
class-names in connection with their marriage system, bnt 
that since our arrival they have been forgotten. Men used to 
marry women of other tribes, if nnable to obtain as wives in 
their own, women unrelated to them. On this sabject they were 
very particular, even third cousins being within the prohibited 
degrees of relationship. Polygamy was practised, and a man 
had a right to the widow of his brother. If he did not care 
to have her, or the deceased had left no brother, his relations 
disposed of her as they thought fit. There is reason to 
believe that custom sanctioned a single man cohabiting 
occasionally with his brother's wife; and also a married man 
with his wife's sister. A man spoke of his sister-in-law as 
puppar-foorccUy which means another wife: and when a wife 
died, her sister not anfrequently took her place. Girls were 
often married at thirteen years of age, and their mothers 
preferred their marrying out of the tribe, on account of the 
custom which required mothers-in-law and sons-in-law never 
to speak to each other, or almost be seen by each other, 
which was excessively inconvenient in daily life. Wives 
were generally obtained in exchange for sisters or cousins. 
Occasionally, however, a youth got a girl to elope with him. 
The pair were certain to be overtaken in a day or two at 
latest, when the girl received some wholesome correction, 
and the man a sound thrashing and some wounds. As the 
result of several elopements and several thrashings, it not 
unfrequently happened that the constancy of the youthful 
pair overcame the customs of the tribe, and the marriage was 
ratified. Children belonged to the tribe of the father. The 
tribes of Gippsland are fast dying out, principally from con- 
sumption, diseases of the liver, and other ailments common 
amongst them. 

In these tribes, the septum of the nose is pierced, and 
the skin scarred on the back, shoulders, and stomach, in 



GEPPSLAND. 547 

both sexes; no teeth are knocked ont^ and circumcision is 
unknown. 

The Gippsland tribes^ as far as can be ascertained^ had 
no knowledge of God, and certainly no worship or religious 
belief of any kind. As usual, they practised sorcery, with a 
view to taking the lives of their enemies. The mode of pro- 
ceeding was to obtain possession of something which had 
belonged to the person whose death was desired, such as 
some of his hair, or excrement, or food; or to touch him with 
an egg-shaped piece of stone which was called bulk^ and was 
thought to be possessed of magic powers. At other times, 
they would charm by means of the maktAar (real name of the 
person); or several of them, retiring to some lonely spot, 
and drawing on the ground a rude likeness of the victim, 
would sit around it and devote him to destruction with 
cabalistic ceremonies. Such was their dread of proceedings 
of this sort, that, not unfrequently, men and women who 
learnt that they had been made the subjects of incantations, 
quickly pined away and died of fright. 

The Creator of all that has life on the earth they believe 
to have been a gigantic Blackfellow, who lived in Gippsland 
many centuries ago, and dwells amongst the stars. Indeed 
many of the stars are named after some of their people 
long since dead. Venus, for instance, is called Bungil 
Noanit^ or wombat-hunter, and, as we have seen, an indi- 
vidual of the tribe bears the same name at the present 
day. They have also the tradition of a deluge, of which 
Mr. Bulmer gives the following particulars. Ages ago 
there was no water in what are now the lakes, rivers, and 
seas known to the Eumai (a name which seems to have 
included all the tribes of Gippsland), for an immense frog 
had swallowed up the whole of it. This state of things, it 
appears, was a source of great discomfort to the animals 
generally, and especially to the fishes, so they held a consul- 
tation on the subject, and came to the conclusion that the 
only remedy was to make the frog laugh, and that if this 
could be accomplished there would soon be plenty of water. 

2H2 



548 THB AUSTRAUAH RACEz 

To give effect to tliis idea, every animal presented himself 
before the frog in the most Indicrons postores he oonld 
assume, and went through his fonniest antics. For a time, 
however, they were onsuccessfal, until the eel stood upon the 
tip of his taO, which so tickled the overgrown firog that he 
literally burst with laughing, and the water poured from him 
in sach vast streams that there was presently a deluge, and 
all the Blacks would have been drowned, had not one of 
them, Loon by name, made a large canoe, in which he saved 
a great many. Why at the present day they call White 
men Loon, I cannot say. However, alas! for the ingratitade 
of human nature, those whom Loon had saved refused to 
give him a wife, in consequence of which he pipe-clayed 
himself in the orthodox fashion, and conmienced hostilities 
forthwith. In this undertaking, however, he seems to have 
been worsted; at all events, all that is positively known is 
that he was transformed into a pelican, and it is owing to 
the pipe-clay that this bird has always been so white about 
the head and breast. Fire, according to the traditions of 
the Gippsland people, was originally obtained ages ago by 
their ancestors from Bimba-mrit (the fire-tailed finch) in a 
very curious way, and I remember having heard from the 
Bangerang people in my youth a host of traditions, of which 
I can no longer recall the particulars, but which were quite 
similar in character (possibly in detail) to those related by 
Mr. Bulmer as existing in Gippsland. 

The Gippsland Blacks had canoes of bark, the smooth side 
of the bark being outside, which, as far as I am aware, is an 
exceptional arrangement. The ends of the canoe were secured 
with string. They obtained kangaroo and emu by surround- 
ing and spearing them. Fish was procured with nets, spears, 
and also with hooks made of bone, an implement which I 
have not noticed in use in any other Victorian tribe. They 
made rongh drawings of animals with charcoal on sheets of 
bark, and probably on rocks and in caverns. 

Li all Australian tribes we find the corroboree, and those 
of Gippsland were no exception to the rule. They likewise 



GIPPSLAND. 



549 



made their striplings into joting men at from sixteen to 
eighteen years of age, and buried their dead sometimes in 
tronks of trees and at others in the ground, the mourners, 
whilst the interment was in progress, beating their heads 
with their stone tomahawks until the blood flowed. Wars 
were generally undertaken to revenge murders, deaths 
brought about by sorcery, and the abduction of women. 
Fights were carried on in the usual way with spears, boome- 
rangs, and clubs. Disputes within the tribe were often 
settled with the club, and still more frequently, as Mr. Buhner 
remarks, " with much talking and much lying." No form of 
government existed. Message-sticks were not in use. Men 
saluted each other when they met after an absence by placing 
their hands on each others shoulders. 

The Gippsland tribes spoke of the few outside tribes of 
whose existence they knew as Brc^erak, from Bra = men, 
Vkudjerra =z/ear. 

The four attached renderings of the Brabrolung vocabu- 
lary differ somewhat, owing to the cause already mentioned. 
The following Additional Words were kindly supplied by 
Mr. Bulmer: — 



Son - - ■ 


■ leeth. 


Leaf ■ 


- jerrang. 


Daughter - 


■ turtbaggan. 


Branch 


- bimdanga kal 


Arm - 


bimdang. 




lak. 


Elbow 


• jeUnng. 


Pipe-clay 


- marloo. 


Thnmb 


yakan bret 


String - 


- ngarang. 




(mother of the 


Creek- 


- kaewat. 




hand). 


Plain - 


- bawaran. 


Heart - 


- bappak. 


Sand - 


- wathart. 


Liver - 


- wolowalak. 


Tail of animal 


- wrek. 


Great toe 


yakan jaan 


Meat - 


- jaak. 




(mother of the 


Lightning - 


. mlangbit. 




foot). 


Bald head - 


- barrat poork. 


Toe - - ■ 


- kimba yarrak. 


Angry - 


- yarrak. 


Face 


• mree. 


Stupid 


- narangan. 


Knee - 


■ bun. 


Die - 


- melkea. 


Heel - 


■ blanjaan. 


Fight - 


- pandean. 


Anns - 


■ ngrang, dam. 


Give - 


- yooa. 


Urine - 


- wiraak. 


Spit - 


- thupanwert. 


Feather 


• wirtwirt. 


FaU - 


- plakanwert. 


Qoud - 


• nort. 


Whistle 


- whirtbran. 



550 





AoDmovAL WoEDS— eofKintfed. 




Blake - . 


' naratba. 


Plea • 


. nin; said not to 


Ron - 


. windan. 




have been 


Excrete 






known before 
the artival of 


Speak - 


• ihii«A.^l^a.ng- 




the Whiter 


Vomit- 


' kramerook. 


Prog - 


• tirtelak. 


Cut - 


- batgea. 


Yam-stlok • 


. kanning. 


Laugh 


- krambalwert 


String 


. ngarang. 


Jump • 


- kimdan. 


Louse - 


- nin. 


Sing . 


- witebalan. 


Bed . 


krookirk (see 


Strike. 


- pandan. 




Blood). 


Swim . 


* wiragwan. 


White. 


- tabartaba. 


Cry . 


. nung. 


Black. 


• nimba, nimbaL 


Scratch 


- wirta. 


Qreen > 


- (no word exists). 


Thin - 


• terangan. 


Blind - 


• toorlomree. 


Laey - 


• yardile. 


Deaf - 


• narangan wring. 


When. 


• nara. 


Shadow 


- ngowk. 


Here • 


- dthitha. 


Liar - • • 


jatebolak. 


Gk> away (go you 


) yanimba. 


Bedoohre • 


. ninl, 




No. 210..— g: 


• 

[PPSLAND. 






By John B 


ULKiK, Esq. 




Kangaroo - 


jirrah. 


Hand. 


bret 


Opoflfum ' 


wadhaa. 


2 Blacks . 




Tame dog • 


baan. 


3Black8 - 




WUddog - - 


ngooran, merri- 




hatha kootook. 




gang. 


One - 


kootopan. 


Emu - • • 


miowera. 


Two - - . 


booloman. 


Black duck 


wrang. 


Three 


booloman hatha 


Wood duck 


jellangoong. 




kotook. 


Pelican 


booran. 


Pour - 


booloman baiha 


Laughing jaokasi 


1 wokook. 




boolung. 


Native companioi 


ikooragan. 


Pather 


moongan. 


White cockatoo - 


braak. 


Mother 


%^ 


Crow - 


wagara. 


Sister-Elder 


bowang. 


Swan - 


gidL 


„ Younger - 


lundnk. 


Egg 


booyang. 


Brother-Elder • 


bramun. 


Track of a foot • 


wanick. 


ff Younger 


tnnang. 


Fiah - 


kine. 


A young man - 


brawitban. 


Lobster 


waat. 


An old man 


boordine. 


Crayfish • 


waat. 


An old woman - 




Mosquito ' 


newan. 


A baby 


leth. 


Ply - • - 
Snake 


naroon. 
toomng. 


A White man - 


lorn or loon. 


The Blacks 


kani. 


Children 


womba leth. 


ABlaokfellow • 


brakani. 


Head- 


poork. 


A Black woman . 


woorcat 


Eye . 


uaL 


Nose ■ 


koong. 


Ear - . > 


wring. 





GIPPSLAND. 


551 




No. 210.— GiPPSLAKB— cofi^anued. 




Month 


- gaat. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


- nemdack. 


Hill - 


- kragnark. 


Hair of the head- Urt. 


Wood- - 


- kallaok. 


Beard 


- yaanlirt. 


Stone • 


- wallung. 


Thunder - 


• quarran. 


Camp - 


- bang. 


Graas 


- ban. 


Yes - 


- nga. 


Tongae 


- jellao. 


No - - 


- ngalko. 


Stomach 


• booloon. 


I 


- ngio. 


Breasts 


- beng. 


You - . 


- nindo. 


Thigh - 


- jerran. 


Bark • 


- yone da kaUack 


Foot . 


- jane. 




(skin of a tree). 


Bone - 


- bring. 


Good - 


- lane. 


Blood- 


- kamdobara. 


Bad . 


- din-din. 


Skin • 


- yone. 


Sweet - 


- naroon. 


Fat - 


- wamewan. 


Food . 


- napan. 


Bowels 


- tirlk. 


Hungry 


- mreman. 


Excrement - 


- gwanang. 


Thirsty 


- taraban tooloot. 


War-spear - 


- waaL 


Eat - 




Beed-spear- 


- kowat. 


Sleep - 


- balmdan. 


Throwing-stiok 


- kaning. 


Drink - 


• glookban. 


Shield 


- bamerook. 


Walk- 


- yangan. 


Tomahawk - 


- gwian. 


See - 


- takan. 


Canoe - 


■ gre. 


Sit - - 


- neanwert. 


Snn - 


- woorin. 


Yesterday - 


- waran. 


Moon - 


- wane. 


To-day 


- jilli. 


Star - 


- braeL 


To-morrow - 


- broondo. 


Light- 


- yart. 


Where are the 


woonmanda 


Dark - 


• bookang. 


Blacks? 


kani? 


Cold - - 


- merbuck. 


I don't know 


- ngee or ngalla 


Heat - 


- quaragwan. 


* 


ngat bowome. 


Day - 


• broon. 


Plenty 


- yail. 


Night - 


- bookang. 


Big ■ . 


- quarrail. 


Fire - 


- towera. 


LitUe - 


• tarUt. 


Water 


- yam. 


Dead • 


- tirligan. 


Smoke 


- thone. 


By-and-by - 


- nowando. 


Ground 


- wrack. 


Come on 


- nowan. 


Wind- 


- krowera. 


Milk - 


- baak. 


Bain - - 


- willang. 


Eaglehawk • 


- quamameroo. 


God . 


- 


Wild turkey 




Ghosts 


• mraat. 


Wife - 


• woorcat. 



1 



552 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



No. 210.— GIPPSLAND. 





Bt thk 


Writkb. 




Kangaroo - 


girriL 


Hand • 


bret. 


Opossum 


waitnn,koongoFa. 


2 Blacks - 


. tanoward 


Tame dog • 


■ baain. 






WUddog - 


- mirigang. 


3 Blacks 


• poolanain da 


Emu - 


- maioor, grewL 




gunnaL 


Black duck • 


- wirrung. 


One - 


- ngoonabin. 


Wood duck 


■ naidit. 


Two - 


• tanoward. 


Pelican 


- boorun. 


Three - 


> tanowara ta 


Laughing jackass bumdigan. 




ngooruk. 


Native oompanioi 


i karloo* 


Four - 


- tanoward tan- 




turtkurawun. 




oward. 


White cockatoo 


• braek. 


Father 


- moongan. 


Crow - 


- klard, waageri. 


Mother 


• yakkun. 


Swan - 


• kooindrook. 


Sister-Klder 


■ bowung. 


Egg ■ 


- booiang. 


„ Younger ■ 


- lunduk. 


Track of a foot 


- wannik. 


Brother-Elder 


■ bramun. 


Fish . 


- (nogeneralname) 


„ Younger 


tundung. 


Lobster 


• dimdung- 


A young man 


geraieL 




dimduk. 


An old man 


■ boordain, warn 


Crayfish 


- the same. 






Mosquito 


- neuwan. 


An old woman • 


ganna. 
ngoondigallok. 


F*y • - 
Snake 


- bi-an. 
■ toorong. 


A baby 


- taloogroong. 


The Blacks - 


- wrukut 


A White man 


■ looun. 




gilgunnai. 


Children 


groong. 


A Blackfellow - 


gunnai. 


Head • 


- brook, ngenan. 


A Black woman - 


wrukut. 


Eye - 


- mri, meeragoot. 


Nose - 


goong. 


Ear . - 


- wring. 



GIPPSLAND. 



S53 



Mouth 


- kaatch. 


Teeth- 


- ngumduk. 


Hair of the head 


- lirt. 


Beard- 


• yeen. 


Thunder - 


- koorang. 


Graas - 


- bun. 


Tongue 


- gelling. 


Stomach 


- buUun. 


Breasts 


• baauk. 


Thigh - 


- gerraug. 


Foot - 


- jaen. 


Bone - 


bring. 


Blood - 


- nunik. 


akin .- - 


- yoo-un. 


Fat - 


- gowomi. 


Bowels 


- gr^ook. 


Excrement - 


- gwanung. 


War-spear - 


- boren. 


Beed-spear - 


• waal. 


Throwing-stick 


- marrewun. 


Shield 


- bamrook, dum- 




mun. 


Tomahawk • 


- gooiun. 


Canoe 


• yuro. 


Run - 


• woorrin. 


Moon - 


- nyurrun. 


Star - 


- bi-il. 


Tiight - 


■ daibinturuk. 


Bark - 


- laUt. 


Cold ■ 


- mraerpuk. 


Heat - 


- quaragwm. 


Day - 


■ wurrin. 


Night - 


- butkoBluk. 


Fire • 


• dower. 


Water 


- kailtung. 


Smoke 


• noBpur, naipur. 


Ground 


• wruk. 


Wmd - 


• grower. 


Rain - 


■ willung. 


God . - 


- (no word). 


Ghosts 


• mrait, yootgang. 



No. 210.-^iFFaLAND— con^tied. 

Boomerang - 

Hill 

Wood 

Stone 

Camp 

Yes 

No 

I 

You 

Bark 

Good 

Bad 

Sweet 

Food 

Hungry 

Thirsty 
Eat - 

Sleep - 
Drink - 
Walk - 
See 
Sit 

Yesterday 
To-day 
To-morrow 
Where are the 
Blacks? 
I don't know 

Plenty 
Big - 
Little - 
Dead - 
By-and-by 
Come on 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk 
Wild turkey 
Wife - 



- wangin. 
grangurk. 
dower, 
walloong. 
bung, 
ngi 

ngalkoo. 
ngaioo. 
indoo. 
nunduk. 
langmln. 
tenbin. 
nirroong. 
dooit or dwitt. 
mremin, ganu- 

kin. 
gwan. 
dumbin w tum- 

bin. 
bemdin. 
krooitpin. 
yannin. 
dein. 

bunengin. 
ngendower. 
jillaioo. 
brindoo. 
woodun da gun- 

nai? 
woodaigi or 

ngalkoo. 
yeilmin. 
quarallmin. 
turliklin. 
turdigin. 
nowindja. 
koo-e-a. 

mwaranga-barga. 
kumugmuroon. 
woomgiL 
maint 



554 



THE AUSTRAUAK RACB 



No. 210.-GIPP8LAND. 



By thx Bxvd. F. A. Haoinauee. 



We have seen th»t Paroo is the name of a river and the equivalent of 
Jish , to Tambo in thia language means Jish and is also the name of one of 
the riven. 



Kangaroo - 


- koorang. 


Hand - 


- manya. 


Opoesiim - 


- karramook. 


2 Blacks - 


- booletgamy. 


Tame dog - 


- haan. 


3 Blacks - 


- boolet-pa kit^ 


WUddog . 






gamy. 


Emu - 


- myory. 


One - 


- kiap. 


Black duck - 


- woorang. 


Two 


- boolet 


Wood duck- 


- woorangy. 


Three- 


- boolet ba kiap. 


Pelican 


- boorang. 


Four - 


- boolet ba boolet 


Laughing jackass- wookwook. 




ye. 


Native companion kooracan. 


Father 


- moongan, ma- 


White oockatoo 


- braak. 




men. 


Crow - 


- wong. 


Mother 


- yackan, baben. 


Swan - 


- 


Sister-Elder 


- bowang. 


KiTflr • » 


- booyoong. 


„ Younger 


- menein. 


Track of a foot 


- worn. 


Brother-Elder 


- wawin. 


FUh - 


• tambo. 


„ Younger 


Lobster 


- kipU. 


A young man 


• brawit. 


Crayfish - 


- yappy. 


An old man 


- boordnie. 


Mosquito - 


. naroon. 


An old woman 


- boordine woor- 


Fly - 


- kerramongera. 




cat. 


Snake - 


- koran, gooroot- 


A baby - 


- boboop. 




mill. 


A White man 


. mamdell. 


TheBlacks- 


- gamy. 


Children 


- wambar-laath. 


A Blaokf ellow 


- gamy. 


Head - - 


- propoop. 


A Black woman 


- wooroat. 


Eye - 


- toorooming. 


Nose - ' - 


- kapung. 

• 


Ear - - 


- wooring. 





GlPPRTiAND. 




Q 




No. 210.— GiPPHLANi>-^c(m^tn«e({. 




Month 


> wooloong. 


Boomerang - 




Teeth - 


nemdack. 


Hill - 




Hair of the head- 


• narat. 


Wood. 




■ tower. 


Beard- 


- narangyan. 


Stone • 




- waloon. 


Thunder - 
GrasB • 


■ willingnoong. 
- ban. 


Gamp ■ 
Yes 




■ bang. 

• 


Tongae 


• gellong. 




• ngai. 


Stomach 


• werrick. 


No 




- naatpan. 


Breasts 


- mooL 


I 




■ yetty. 


Thigh - 


kamp. 


You ■ 




• yeraUy. 


Foot - 


tinang. 


Bark 




■ moorook. 


Bone - 


yarlaak. 


Good • 




■ laen. 


Blood - 


kamdobara. 


Bad • 




denban. 


Skin - 


yooen. 


Sweet- 




■ laenan. 


Fat - - - 


temgatta. 


Food ■ 


- 


kuwat. 


Bowels 


noongwanaog. 


Hungry 


• wecking. 


Excrement - 


• goonny. 


Thirty 


■ oonanim. 


War-spear • 


- wal. 


Eat - - • 


■ tampack. 


Reed-spear - 
Throwing-stick 
Shield - 


. toorooknaroong. 
- naroong. 
■ bammerook. 


Sleep - 
Drink - 


- dora. 
• klurkpan. 


Tomahawk - 


kallaok. 


Walk . 


. yangan. 


Ganoe - 


■ gree. 


See - 


- tackan. 


Sun - 


wooreen. 


Sit - - 


• kopeck. 


Moon - 


- wane. 


Yesterday - 


■ nintower. 


Star - 


brael. 


To-day 


- ngawan. 


light - 


■ werrook. 


To-morrow - 


- roockoo. 


Dark - 


pooroon, bat- 


Where are the 


winy a gamy? 




gala. 


Bhicks? 




Cold • 


merbook. 


I don't know 


• waga galatin 


Heat • 


quarra-quarrack. 




nyak. 


Day - 


■ woorin. 


Plenty 


■ yaail. 


Night - 


• bookan. 


Big - . 




Rre - 


towera. 


Little - 


- tarlitban. 


Water 


■ katnng. 


Dead - 


- turtigan. 


Smoke 


tong. 


By-and-by • 


> nowantook. 


Groimd 


woork. 


Come on 


■ goir. 


Wind - 


- kookowert. 


Milk - 




Bain - 


. myoong. 


Eaglehawk - 




God - - 




WUd turkey 




Ghosts 




Wife 


• 





555 



55« 



THE AUSTRALUH BACB 



No. 2ia— GIPFSLAND. 



Br Aatbid W. Howitt, Ebq.» P.M., Sale. 



Kftogiroo * 


- baoot, djeerah. 


Hand - 


• brett, narmng^ 


Opoflfam • 






nun. 


Tame dog - 


- bam. 


2 Blacks - 


. bullung knxni. 


Wild dog - 










3Blacka - 




Enm ' 


- myowr, crowee. 






Black duck 


- oowreng, nnr- 




nibattagoot-tok 




dnrt. 


One - 


- goottnp. 


Wood duck 


- nark, jeelnng- 


Two - . 


- bttllum. 




eetie. 


Three- 


bttllum-^m-batta- 


Pelican 


- poonm, wodjiL 


1 


goot-tok. 


Laughing jackau ooarg. 


1 « 
Four 


- bullum-an-batta- 


Native companion gooreeknn. 




bnllnm 


White cockatoo 


- brayak, ngullok- 


^pw - ■ 






goonmg. 


Father 


- munjan. 


Crow . 


- narrooknl, eu- 


Mother 


- yackan. 




mummnrat. 


Sister-Elder 


- bowung. 


Swan - 


- giddifbabbiytmg. 


„ Younger 


- lunduk. 


Egg - 


- booyung. 


Brother-Elder 




Track of a foot 


- wannik. 


„ Youngc 


it bramung. 


Fish . - 


-billy. 


A young man 


- browit. 


Lobster 


- 


An old man 


. boldine. 


Crayfiah • 


- greeor. 


An old woman 


^ 


Moaqoito - 
Fly - 


- neerwun. 

- beeung. 


A baby - 


- tally-leet 


Snake* 


> thumng, gale- 


A White man 


- loan, cullungurk 




lung. 


Children - 


- leet. 


TheBlaokB. 


- kumi. 


Head - 


• poork. 


A Blaokfellow 


- kumi. 


Eye - 


- mree. 


A Black woman 


> woorkut. 


Ear - 


- ooeng, bunnun- 


Noae - 


- ooong. 




gurry. 





GIPPSLAND. 


00 




No. 210— OiPPSLANi>— confintiec2. 




Mouth 


■ gart. 


Boomerang- 


- 


Teeth 


- nunduk. 


Hill - - 


_ 


Hair of the head - leet. 
Beard - - . yane. 
Thunder - - gwamin, toom- 


Wood- 
Stone - 


- gallagut. 

- wallung. 




boyee. 


Camp - 


- bung. 


Grass - 


- bun, neartbun. 


Yes - 


- gna. 


Tongue 


- tellung. 


No - - 


- gnart-bun. 


Stomach 


- mindnk. 


I 


« 


Breasts 


- bark. 


- gmu. 


Thigh - 


- bum. 


You - 


- gnendu. 


Foot - 


- djeen. 


Bark - 


- ewn. 


Bone - 


- bring. 


Good - 


- laen. 


Blood- . 


- grook, kumdoo- 
burra. 


Bad - - 


- dindin, denbun 


Skin - - 


- ewn. 


Sweet - 


- laen. 


Fat - 


- wuma-woony. 


Food - - 


- 




tchewanny. 


Hungry 


- mrammaleg. 


Bowels 


- craook. 


Thirsty 


. 


Excrement - 


- gwanimg. 


Eat - 




War-spear - 


- booring. turrum- 






butty. 


Sleep - 


- baindu. 


Reed-spear - 


- warL 


Drink- - 


- tamy. 


Throwing-stick 
Shield 


- murrywun. 

- bammarook, 


Walk - 


- yangun. 




birrcumba. 


See - 


- tarkatta. 


Tomahawk - 


- boondooba. 


Sit - - 


- neeni. 


Canoe - 


- gree. 


Yesterday - 


- pookung. 


Sun - 
Moon - 


- wooreen. 

- naming. 


To-day 


- djiUeye. 


Star - 


- breel. 


To-morrow - 


- broondoo. 


Light - 


- wooreen. 


Where are the woolkadutta 


Dark - 


- butgulluk. 


Blacks? 


kumi? 


Cold - - 
Heat - 


- mabruck. 


I don't know 


- nee. 


Day - 


- wooreen. 


Plenty 


- yale. 


Kight - 
Fire . - 


- butgulluk, bo- 

kung. 

- towra, goombal- 


Big - - 

Little - 


- gatty. 

- tally. 




lung. 


Dead - 


- turdy-gattoo. 


Water 


- yam, gattung. 


By-and-by - 


- meerindoo. 


Smoke 


- bowndung, toon. 


Come on 


- now-wunty. 


Ground 


- wurk. 


Milk - 


. 


Wind- - 
Rain - 


- willung. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - - 




Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


. 


Wife - 


- 



558 



THE AUBTBAUAN RACE 



No. 211.-OME0. 



By John Bulmxr, Esq. 



KAnguroo - 
Opoflfam • 
Tame dog • 
WUd dog 
Emu • 
Black duck 
Wood dnck 
Pelican 
Laughing jackass 
Native companion 
White cockatoo - 
Crow • 
Swan • 
Egg 

Track of a foot 
Fish . 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito 
Fly - 
Snake- 
TheBlaoks- 
A Blackf ellow 
A Black woman 
Nose - 



joatba. 

wadthan. 

worregaL 

ngurmn. 

tooloma. 

ngapalanga. 

(none). 

kookunyal. 

koorook. 

gidano. 

yukumbrack. 

koonyaok. 

kabango. 

biaL 

manja. 

thangambooloa. 

baranjak. 

moneya. 

miansan. 

titchogan. 

yune. 

yune. 

kowambo. 



Hand- 

2Blacks 

SBlacks 

One - 
Two - 
Three- 
Four - 



warkolala yune. 
waricolala bore 
yune. 
bore. 

warkolala. 
warkolala bore, 
warkolala- 
kolala. 



Father 


- papang. 


Mother 


- najan. 


Sister-Elder 




„ Younger 


- 


Brother-Elder 


- dejan. 


„ Younger 


A young man 


- warambaL 


An old man 


* jirrabang. 


An old woman 


- kowandlL 


A baby 


- nanmg. 


A White man 


- moomogung 


Children - 


- wenyeran. 


Head • 


- kuttagang. 


Eye - 


• kundolo. 


Ear - 


- janya. 



OMEO. 



559 



No. 211. — OuEO—conUnued, 



Mouth 


mundo. 


Boomerang • 




Teeth - 


yera. 


Hill - - 




Hair of the head - 


karung-karung. 


Wood- 


- baar. 


Beard • 


yerang. 


Stone • 




- dinga. 


Thunder 


merbi 








Grass - 


boon. 


Camp - 




- baanya. 


Tonffue 


thalan. 


Yes - 




- yayoo. 


Stomach 




No ■ 




• karanga. 


Brieasts 


booyack. 


I 




- nadtha. 


Thigh 


naryalan. 


You - 




- nginda. 


Foot - 


jinnang. 


Bark 




- worogang. 


Bone - 


kakaquo. 


Good • 




- koingowa. 


Blood - 


kooroba. 


Bad • 




- kiaro. 


Skin - - - 


wotquang. 


Sweet 


- yalagang. 


Fat - - - 


kamboa. 


Food - 


- thangang. 


Bowels 


kunanqua. 


Hungry 


- meria. 


Excrement - 


nangwa. 


Thirsty 


- jutoia. 


War-spear - 


jerambity. 


Eat • 


- thianang. 


Beed-spear - 
Throwing-stick • 


yarka. 
kallin. 


Sleep 


■ 


- miamial (?). 


Shield • 


■ ngamaL 


Drink 


- 




Tomahawk - 


- ngamba. 


Walk 


- 


- nana. 


Canoe • 


• worbang. 


See 


- 




Sun 


• noweyo. 


Sit ' 


- kako. 


Moon - 


• kabatang. 


Yesterday 


- kakoura. 


Star - 


- jewang. 


To-day 




Light - 


- mamat. 


To-morrow 


- kambejeri. 


Dark - 


■ kambijo. 


Where are 


the walo yune ? 


Cold - 


- karritt. 


Bkcks? 




Heat • 


- jUmin. 


I don't kno^ 


w - nari-narimiga. 


Day - 


- yamathango. 


Plenty 


- qooranaka. 


Night - 


- kambijo. 


Big - 


- thorkee. 


Fire - 


- watha. 


Little - 


- maragalang. 


Water 


- miamial. 


Dead - 


- toortbamban. 


Smoke 


- maniak. 


By-and-by 


- balowa. 


Ground 


- thia. 


Come on 


- kakow. 


Wind- 


• koorokmang. 


Milk - 




Rain • 


• japmanutn. 


Eaglehawk 




God - 




Wild turke; 


f 


Ghosts 




Wife 


* 


• " 



560 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE 



No. 212.-SN0WY RIVER. 



Br John Bulmeb, Esq. 



Kangaroo 
Opoasum 
Tame dog 
WUddog 
Emn - 
Black dnck 
Wood dnck 
Pelican 

Laughing jackass 
Native companion 
White cockatoo 
Crow - 
Swan - 
Egg - 

Track of a foot 
Fish - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito 
Fly 

Snake • 
The Blacks 
A Blackf ellow 
A Black woman 
Nose - 



jirra. 
wachan. 

ngooran. 

miowera. 

wreng. 

nembalagang. 

booran. 

kookokarrak. 

balwin. 

brak. 

woggara. 

gidL 

booyang. 

ngooka janda. 

kine. 

krangalang. 

tirdick. 

ngaroon. 

thoorung. 

kani. 

kani. 

woorcat. 

koong. 



Hand - 

2 Blacks - 

SBUcks 

One • 
Two - 
Three - 

Four - 

Father 

Mother 

Sister-Elder 

„ Younger 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children • 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear 



faret. 

boolong kanL 
booloom catha 

kootook kani. 
kootook. 
boolong. 
booloom catha 

kootook. 
booloom catha 

booloom. 
lang. 
yakkan. 
bowang. 
landack. 
tandang. 
brammon. 
brawit. 
boordine. 

leeth. 

lome. 

wagut leeth. 

kowat. 

mree. 

wring. 



SNOWY RIVER. 



561 





No. 212.— Snowy Bsvxa-'amtinuec 


I. 


Month 


- kaath. 


Boomerang - 


- wongin. 


Teeth - 


- ngemdak. 


Hill - - 


- ngarkandit. 


Hair of the head • lirt poork. 


Wood- 


- kallack. 


Beard- 


- yaan. 


Stone - 


- wollung. 


Thunder - 


- quarran. 


•Camp - 


- ngoya. 


Grass - 


- ban. 


Yes - - 


- nga. 


Tongue 


- jellin. 


No - - 


- ngatban. 


Stomach 


- booloon. 


I 


- ngio. 


Breasts 


- beng. 


Yon - 


- ngindo. 


Thigh 


- jerran. 


Bark - 


- ngoya. 


Foot - 


- Jan. 


Good - 


- laan. 


Bone - 


- bring. 


Bad - 


- dindin. 


Blood - 


- krook. 


Sweet - 


- laan. 


Skin - 


- yone. 


Food - 


- kindoine. 


Fat - 


- wamewan. 


Hungry 




Bowels 


' karrickguanang. 


Thirsty 


- kuan. 


Excrement - 


- guanang. 


FAt - 


- bangathang. 


War-spear - 
Reed-spear - 
Throwing-stick 
Shield 

Tomahawk - 
Canoe - 
Sun - 


• waal. 

- dhrak. 

. kanning. 

- bamorook. 

- gwian. 

- gree. 

- woorin. 


Sleep - 
Drink- 
Walk- 
See - 
Sit . 
Yesterday - 


- bamding. 

- glucknan. 

- yanning. 

- tiarwark. 

- ning. 

- merrin. 


Moon - 


- wane. 


To-day 


- jilli. 


Star - 


- brael. 


To-morrow - 


- preppa merrin 


Light - 


- yart. 


Where are the 


wulki thatha 


Dark - 


- broin. 


Blacks? 


kani? 


Cold - 


- merbaak. 


I don't know 


- ngree. 


Heat - 


- qnaraquarak. 


Plenty 


- nanwagut. 


Day - 
Night - 
Fire -. 
Water 
Smoke 
Ground 
Wind 
Rain - 


- woorin. 

- Uilat. 

- mrit. 

- yarn. 

- thone. 

- wrack. 

- qrowero. 

- willang. 


Big - - 
Little - 
Dead - 
By-and-by - 
Come on 
Milk - 
Eaglehawk - 


- parrewatti. 

- tarlit. 

- yurrutkatho. 

- tagut. 

- narrawert. 

- baak. 

- quamamerong. 


God - - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- (none). 


Ghosts 


- yutgang. 


Wife - 


- woorcat. 


VOL. UI. 


2 


N 





5«2 



No. 21S.— UPPER MUBBAT. 



Bt — MncBxiL, Em). 



Kangaroo - 
OpoMom - 
Tame dog - 
Wild dog - 
Ema • - - 
Black dnck 
Wood dnck 
Polican 

Langhing jaokaai 
Native oompanlon 
White cockatoo - 
Crow - 
Swan • 
Egg - 
Track of a foot - 
Fish - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito 
Fly - 
Snake - 
The Blacks 
A Blockfellow - 
A Black woman - 
Noso • 



bnja 

bnrrar. 

boa. 

mnrra. 

tooma. 

mullawur. 

karwadde. 

unbabua. 

berranga. 

keaa. 

berrutha. 

miewa. 

booa. 

bunju. 

kurewa. 

carrda. 

moUula. 

pemba. 

ju-u. 

yiera. 

jere, 

jaire. 

nga. 



Hand- 
2Black8 - 
SBlacks - 
One - - - 
Two . - - 
Three- 
Pour - - - 
Father 
Mother 
SlBter-Elder 

„ Younger - 
Brother-Elder - 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman • 
A baby 

A White man • 
Children 
Head - 

Eye - - - 
Ear - - . 



murra. 



gnddee. 

polithup. 

poligudd 



baba. 
tiga. 

wugug. 

ewaru. 

mudd^a. 

gerriga. 

kubeega. 

waruntha. 

murraga. 

bua. 

me. 

murramba. 



UPPER MURRAY. 



563 



No. 213.— Ufpbb ^UBJLAY—corUmued, 



Month 


- diara. 


Boomerang • 




Teeth- 


- ungum. 


Hill - - 




Hair of the head • korrowa. 


Wood- 


- tawa. 


Beard- 


- yerra. 


Stone - 


- bnnga. 


Thmider * 


- mondara. 


Camp - 


- maee. 


Grass - 


- kambnrm. 


Yes - 


■ yeo. 


Tongae 


- tnrra. 


No . 




Stomaoh - 


- ianam* 


I 


- ninna. 


Breasts 


- berree. 


Yon - 


- neibee. 


Thigh- - 


- monda. 


Bark ■ 


- waaree. 


Foot - 


- gerra. 


Good - 


• kieyangee. 


Bone • 


- keela. 


Bad - - 


• mnddinga. 


Blood- - 


- knrra. 


Sweet • 


• kieyangee. 


Skin - - 


- wadda. 


Food - 


- tnnna. 


Fat - 


- pnttarra. 


Hungry 


- bnngowonabee. 


Bowels 


- boogn. 


Thirsty 




Excrement - 


- gnrra. 


Eat - 


- tngathee. 


War-spear - 


- wonda. 


Sleep - 


• murrongnrra. 


Reed-spear - 


- mutncinga. 


Drink - 


- kuneemanabee. 


Throwing-stick 
Shield- 


- benga. 

- belgamba. 


Walk - 


- yannabee. 


Tomahawk - 


• nondee. 


See 


- nagadee. 


Canoe - 


- montha. 


Sit ■ 


• cnrradabee. 


Sun - 


- kunda. 


Yesterday • 


. pamnngee. 


Moon - 


-^ hueira. 


To-day 


• yanduga. 


Star - 


- teimba. 


To-morrow - 


• uluthln. 


light - 


- parlee. 


Where are the 


wonda jere? 


Dark - - 


- kiewarra. 


Blacks? 




Cold - 


- bonwatha. 






Heat • 


- oneba. 


I don't know 


wondaya. 


Day - 
Night - 


- dandigonda. 
• tonna. 


Plenty 

Big . . - 


yunngurm. 
bndda. 


Fire - 


- knrra. 


Little . 


nmbnrgnnya. 


Water 


- warra. 


Dead - 


bnrmra. 


Smoke 


• then. 


By-and-by - 


ndarra. 


Ground 


- merie. 


Come on 


yackeeaneegee. 


Wind- 


- karrie. 


Milk - 




Bain - 


- nenma. 


Eaglehawk - 




Qod - 


- 


wad tnrkey 




Ghosts 


- 


Wife - 


t 



2N2 



BOOK THE TWENTY-THIRD. 



NCARRIMOWRO / 



PIKKOLATPAN 

TOCUMWAU 







Scale of Statute Miles 



• > • 

iititt.titi 



BOOK THE TWENTY-THIRD. 

PREFATORY REMARKS. 

Tms book treats of the Bangerang tribes, in whose 
country I was a pioneer settler in 1841. Properly there was 
only one tribe of that name, which consisted of two inde- 
pendent sections, the Wongatpan and Towroonban, whicl^ 
speaking of themselves collectively always used the term 
Bangerang. Besides these there were eight other tribes in 
the neighbourhood, which sometimes spoke of themselves, 
and were always spoken of by other tribes, as Bangerang. 
The names of these tribes and their numbers, when I first 
knew them in their original strength, were approximately as 
follows : — 

WongStpan 150 persons. 

Towroonban 50 „ 

Wointhiga 50 „ 

Kfiilthiban, aometimea caUed Waaringolam 50 ,, 

Moltheriban 300 „ 

Pikkol&tpan 100 

Angootheriban 100 

Ngarrimowro .----- 150 

ToolenySgan 100 

Boongatpan 150 



If 



1,200 



n 



These tribes all spoke dosely-related dialects. The 
territory occupied by each I have set out roughly in the map 
attached to this book. It will, however, be understood that 
the boundaries of their lands did not run in straight lines 
as there shown, but were very irregular and governed by 
natural features. 

The Bangerang septs, it is important to notice, were 
surrounded by a number of tribes which spoke what may be 
called for the moment a common language which difiered 
from theirs. With these tribes (with the exception of the 



' 



568 



THB AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



Pinpandoor, which had cast in its lot with them} the 
Baugerang lived in a state of chronic fend. 

Li the conntry of the Bangerang proper, that in of the 

Wongatpan and Towroonhan, the writer resided from 1841 
to 1851, and having described their manners in a former 
work,* it will be nnnecessary to go into the subject liere. 
The situation, however, of a congeries of linguistically- 
related tribes surrounded by others whose language, closelj 
related amongst themselves, differed from theirs, is both un- 
usual and worthy of notice, and could not fail to have been 
the result of something uncommon in the past history of the 
population of those parts. Another point worthy of obser- 
vation is that the Bangerang tribes proper called the River 
Goulbum Kav-e-Uij and one of the tribes of their association 
which dwelt on that river, Kailheban^ or people of the Kaiela^ 
On the other hand, the Ngooraialum, which dwelt higher up 
that stream, occupied a considerable portion of its bank, and 
formed one of the several tribes which surrounded the 
Bangerang septs, called the Qt)ulbum Waaring and the 
Kdilthiban, and not themselves^ Waannffulumy or people of 
the Wadrinff, as though they had found them located on 
that river when they themselves first reached it. 

It is worthy of a passing notice that the Bangerang lan- 
guage has something in common with that of Mungalella 
Creek, which, with its difference fi^m the Ngooraialum 
tongue, is shown in the following table : — 



Engrlish. 


Mungalella Creek. 


Bangemig. 


Ngooraialum. 


Kangaroo 
Mosquito 


Poora - 
Pootie - 


Purra (red 
kangaroo) 
Betha - 


MaranL 
Kogok. 


Hair - 


Popa - 


Pokkan 


Kowing. 


Fire - 


Boodee 


Biitya - 


Wiin. 


Smoko - 


Toga - 


Thonga 


Boort. 


No - - - 


Yoorda or urda - 


Yoorta 


Thago. 


I don't know 


Wodthana - 


Wunna 


Indonga. 



* JRecoUections qf SqwUling in Victoria : George Bobertson, Melbourne, 
Sydney, and Adelaide, 1883. 



PREFATORY REMARKS. 569 

From these circxunstanceB and a general knowledge of 
the ways of the race, I am led to co^jectore that, as in the 
case of the Darling tribes, the progenitors of the Bangerang 
were a party of yonng men, who, finding themselves without 
wives, absconded (possibly from Mungalella Creek) with some 
of the yonng women whom the old men had monopolized. 
That, in order to evade pursuit, the young people travelled 
on over many a mile of unknown country until they reached 
that expansion of the Murray called Moira, where they 
located themselves, and where we found their descendants 
living. That long (perhaps a century or two) after they had 
settled in that locality and spread to the Goulburn, and 
increased and broken up into several tribes, which spoke 
distinct dialects, they were overtaken by the general wave 
of population, which for ages had been evermore rolling 
south across the whole width of the continent; that the 
new comers, as they advanced, occupied the country on every 
side of the Bangerang, henmied them in, and peopled all the 
lands they found untenanted, and at last completed the 
occupation of the continent. Whilst this was in progress, 
the Ngooraialum, who formed a portion of this wave of 
population, I have no doubt, found, as I have said, already 
located on the Lower Gk)ulburn, which river they named 
Warring, a strange tribe, which they called Waarmgulwm^ 
OT people of the Waarinff. 

The Bangerang language has many diminutives, as 
naika = dicck^ naikidjiga = little duck; choonda = bird, 
ckoondoonffa = little bird; pokka = dog, pokkidjiga = little 
dog or pup; inyanook = small, ingamika = very small. The 
Pikkolatpan used to speak of the Bangerang as the Yoorta or 
No Blacks, but I never heard them use that term themselves. 
A considerable portion of the Bangerang were pitted with 
small-pox, some of ihem dreadftdly so; and in 1843, or 
thereabouts, I saw amongst them a child absolutely suffering 
from that disease. One or two other children also, of not 
more than ten years of age, bore its marks unmistakably. 
Of the Bangerang tribes fifty or sixty persons are now all 



570 



THB AC8I&AUAH RACK 



chooodiS&[ig>> 

naikidjiga. 

oBQiifltp* 



tojinja, dfikoU. 



bOfinyor. 
demilbSiinja. 



ngftring. 

l&wan. 

mongdbara. 

kortwa. 

pokkldjiga. 



that remaiiL The following Additional Bangerang 
occur tome: — 

Biid . . - 

UttlebM • 
T«al - 

The laiige dirar 
„ amall dhrcr • 
Parrot • 
Shag - 

Spnr-winged plover 

Ibifl . • • 

Black oockatoo 

Scmb turkey 

Pigeon • 

Enra feathers 

Pap 

Bing-tailed opoMiim 

Monee • 

Kangaroo-rat 

Bandicoot 

Red kangaroo 

Flying aquirrel 

Native cat - 

Water rat 

Rat • - • 

Frog . - - - - 

An imaginary make of vaat 
dimenaiona 

Very small - - . - 
Fishing-net • . . . 
Woman's bag 

Yam-stiok .... 
Sorts of clnbs ... 
Net worn round the forehead 
Emu spear .... 
Fishing-spear 
Shield used with dubs • 
„ „ „ spears- 
Reed necklace 
Wooden spade 



mfcitob?^ngfti 

barrinftda. 

thilwa. 

pOrra. 

pir&nga. 

punm&itpa. 

w5wa. 

tungOba. 
toon&tpan. 

ingftmika. 

bSltyire. 

mooka-mooka.. 

kt&nna. 

wongOba, p&ringa. 

maranSQlin cr marangoQlin. 

k5yir. 

m59la. 

m&lka. 

m5nda. 

jag5ga. 

pflnbora. 



PREFATORY REMARKS. 



Additional Wouds— conlmued. 


A hooked twig with whioh nndSma. 


grubs are extracted froni 


I 


treee 




Belt and stringB' worn bj 


' be-e-lin. 


girls, which hang before 


) 


and behind 




A twig used in opossnn 


I ji-€k-or-a. 


honting 




Wooden water-trongh - 


• k5-koma. 


Back shell of tortoise • 




Plate of bark 




Homy substance on emu's 


waichSra. 


breast 




Delf plate of the Whites J 




String - • . • 


- woothool-wo5thool. 


Opossum-cloak 


- bigtoga. 


Blanket .... 


- yallaneborong, yallanSbora 


Leg ... - 


- mOSnna. 


Trousers 


- moonnOSpna. 


Arm, wing, ana-branch of i 


% b5rinya. 


river 




Shirt .... 


• borinyo5pna. 


TaU . ■ 


- koogfija. 


Feather - - - - 


. tunno. 


Nest .... 


- manga. 


Beak, mouth • 


- woorro. 


Man in general 


- yeyir. 


Woman in general • 


- paiabia. 


AUttleboy - 


- maldiga. 


A lad whose tooth has beei 


1 kogomSolga. 


knocked out 




A lad of the same age whos 


e wonga. 


tooth is not to be knocker 


i 


out 




Young woman 


- thathewa. 


Son .... 


- kooiga. 


Girl ■ ■ - - 


- ySrka. 


Uncle .... 


- karSngoba. 


Aunt . - - - 


- baarpo. 


A man's back 


. mSokoona. 


Back-bone 


. pfimio. 



571 



572 



THE AUSTEALIAN RAGE: 



Additiokal Wordo omHnued, 


Wrist - 


• k55koora, wooninga. 


Ankle - 


- yaanga. 


Navel • 


. kakaga. 


Eyebrow 


- mimithtngin. 


Eyelash • 


- w55ogo. 


Finger • 


• kSrtchera. 


Face 


- maan. 


Moustache 


- mondooruL 


WhiBker 


- ySring. 


Neck - 


• wanora. 


Rib - - 


- kaahgoort. 


Heart • 


- tippa. 


Jaw - . - 


- kOnga. 


Shoalder 


- kfttin. 


Knee 


• eOringa. 


Liver - 


- potha. 


AnoB 


• mootcha. 


Longs • 


. mamille. 


Long hair 


. cherOngunan pOkkan. 


Short hair 


• th59lookan p5kkan. 


Curly hair 


- main-malt-pan pdkkan. 


Qrey hair 


- taa-o-go« p5kkan. 


Louse - 


- m59nna. 


Flea - - 


- moonna pokka ; t.e., dog*B louse. 



Verbs. 

Dive karoobok. 

Swim - - • - yarribok. 
Bathe marribok. 



Make - 
Give 
Swallow - 
Fall 



- nuuMnaa. 
• i, ngoochick. 

- yfiya. 

- taatin. 

Strike nginyuk. 

Evacuate the bowels - konyoobok. 

Scratch chlnbok. 

Carry looppa. 

Cut thai-ir-i-chuk. 

Spit ..... toopan. 

Throw ytLnga. 

Dream nurSite. 



PREFATORY REMARKS. 573 

Additionaii WoKD^-^otUmued, 

Bum pia-ir. 

Fight • nginySlerak. 

Stink tigimnoora. 

Laugh kSribok. 

Tie • ktUine. 

Feel baamCongooda. 

Pinoh .... pirra. 

Jump ' • - - yaarkobuk. 
Blow (a fire) .... poCnuna. 
Whistle ISrtchooma. 

MiSOELLANBOUS WOBDS. 

What? minne? 

Full wS5TOomaitch. 

Tall chiroongCQiia. 

Coward ■ • . • . chi-I-moon-ook. 

Mad komfiirmooch. 

Round ngarwidpa. 

Sick itchyoomuoh. 

Red bafithaiik, mdrmnch. 

Black thailannn. 

White baatchatpa. 

New wortha. 

Old morida, thama. 

Angry kdlyinnn. 

Wet ..... waaloQpka. 

Blind ynrflngnra. 

Deaf ngamothSrmarmooch. 

Lazy or tired • mnrralatyamooeh. 

Taste bSawa. 

Rainbow .... nairandrma. 

Clouds yoor&tha. 

Tassels worn by the men before ngSra. 
and behind, suspended from 
a belt 

Footpath .... t&na, t&bora. 
Moonlight .... ySSrunguk. 
Morning .... barperipna. 

Shadow moQlwa. 

Pipe-clay .... tarOnga. 
A rogue, bad ... mattimna. 



674 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE 



Abdriohal WcRDfl amtmmed. 



Alie 




NoDfleiiae! 


- yathfipkal 


Pain 


- ylttya. 


Haa - . . 


. ngtnogan. 


A grave • 


- m6lwan. 


LagooD • 


• bfiartba. 


A crab-hole • 


- kAka. 


Waterhole - 


- k5lpaga. 


A plain - 


- QBtya. 


A UtUe plain 


• nOtsiga. 


The Murray River - 


- tOngala. 


M Gonlbnm River 


- kSlela, 


Magpie - 


• ko-^m-gain. 


Codfiah . . . . 


- boorin&wa. 


Peroh . - . . 


• kongOGpka. 


Fish like a minnow 


* jaawa. 


Large tortoise 


- balfidthera. 


Small tortoise 


- wadjeiQOpna. 


Shrimp - . . . 


• kandow. 


Prawn - . • . 


- kQ5nooga. 


Mussel • 


- ratyo. 


Crayfish 


- bOrpa. 


Sand, sandhill 


• maldga. 


Land left uncovered after 


being thdniga. 


flooded 




Lightning 


- tohiringiwa. 


To drive away rain by i 


neans warchOka kdrkora. 


of a song 




Mud 


- m5ppan. 


Qoud - - . . 


- yoorStha. 


Yam . . . . 


- malela. 


Pine-tree 




Gum-tree 


- bSuL 


Grub of gum-tree - 


• bdulaga. 


Box-tree 




Manna . . • . 


- k&ango. 


Quondong 


• malinyodo. 


Flax . . . . 


. ySmen. 


Large fire at which a 


party wooloomb&ra. 


cook together 




Leal . . - . 


- wftla. 



PREFATORY RESMARKS. 576 



ADDmoNAL Words— cofitkttted. 

Branch • . - . - manS5ga. 

Native cherry-tree 

Reeds • - 

House-fly 

Sand-fly 

Blow-fly, maggots, matter 

Bull-dog ant - 

Little black ant 

Yellow iguana 

Black iguana 

Long .... 



Short 



bSrtja. 

mo9goo-ga. 

wowimya. 

naanyoom^Ldyooga. 

toortS5lla. 

ithitha. 

lelltha. 

beljimja. 

wawaith. 

chirung&na. 

thoolCQpka. 



Names of Men. 
YallSbla. 
LettLpna. 
Moolldgiga. 
Kanipka. 
BSrromop. 

Names of Womek. 

NarrungSming. 

UndySming. 

M&rdjiga. 

ThOre mellapHming. 

TOrtool. 

KillbSngaroo. 

Wadjibialgrook. 

MirSndola. 

Kongobla. 

Minniga. 

WindySming. 

Bdrogoa. 

Names of Bots. 
EonSbla, 
Mootugoa. 
TongOba (frog). 
Monorumbe. 
BarQpna, 
Waw-ra-na-ra-be. 
Momogoa. 
Monabbi. 



576 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



Additional 

Nambs of Plains. 
Kfiiooga. 

Tetooga, called Tiiziki Plain by the Wliites. 
Goolgftila. 
BOnderL 
W&kkida. 
ThathtUnnera. 

Wai-Q5-iia (oonmumly spelt Wynna). 
RotSOpna. 

Nambs of Gbxxks. 

Baala = Broken Creek. 

Dim = teeth. 

Kdkoma = calabash. 

Walola. 

Ti-i-a. 

Bathlnbina. 

Tongoldga. 

Phrases. 



Where (are the) Blacks ? 
(I have) not seen (them) 
(Affirmative) seen (them) 
(I) don't know 
One man I seen 
Give (me) opossnm 
Give (me) little water - 

Who (is that) person ? - 
(I) don't know 
(I) cannot see (him) 
(Do) you see woman that? 

* (She has a) pretty face 

* Ugly (that) old woman (is) 
Hungry you ? 

Hungry the stomach (and) in 

testines 
My opossum here; that is, 

here is an opossum for you 
Look! 



wOnnul Snbena ? 

yoorta-t-naan. 

baanga-t-naan. 

wimna. 

iawa yeyir ngata naan. 

i pnnna or punna i. 

i inyanook wolla or wolla i inya* 

nook, 
ngain neUea ? 
wunna. 
katir naan. 
ngaarin winyara? 
kalinya maan. 
matlimna kormooka. 
moolanmook nginna? 
mooanmook ta booli, koonna. 

ngi punna ondeyia. 

mirral 



* There is only one word to express good and pretty, and another to express ti^^ and hoA. 



PREFATORY REMARKS. 



577 



Additionaii Wobds — continued. 



Look here! • 

Mr. Richard - 

Look here, Mr. Richard 

Bellyfal 

Desire water (I am thirsty) 

Sick 1 1 . - . - 

How yoQ sick ? 

Sick the beUy 

Big yon eat • 

Let us sleep - 

Ck>me (and) bathe - 

Make haste! (let us) bathe 

(I can) not swim - 

Nonsense ! - - • 

Shut month (hold your tongne 

Make haste 

Let nsgo 

Beoffr go! 

Dear yon 

Ck>me here 

Where (is) Yallebla? 

Up there (I) think Moira, or nelangaia imbat Moira. 

I think he's gone to Moira 
What for go Moira, or Why minyanook yanna Moira? 

djd he go to Moira ? 

To fish munyooganyoonook. 

Horse that one belongs to him, karakatemook nellea nellanya. 

or that horse belongs to him 



mirramnal 
Mitta Itchen. 
miramna, Mitta Itohenna. 
powganOwmook. 
thanyannk wolla. 
ityoomnch nga ! 
minne ngan ityoomnch ? 
ityoomnch ta booli. 
tungooja ngia thnna. 
nanyoobok. 
yakorinja marribokt 
kakaiarro! marribok. 
yoorta yarrowin. 
yathSpkal 
nappa woorroo. 
pnrri or pir. 
yarrabong. 
proma! promganja! 
thoma ngeni. 
yakkorma, kabai. 
Yallebla wnnnnl? 



(Is) Colbinabbm far off? 
Near (is) Worparilla 
Let ns go to Worparilla 
Give (me a) little manna 
Quick ! take (some) 
Kangaroo (is) bad - 
Gk>od or the best (is) emu 



Kollbinabbin boor? 
kiranjamik Worparilla. 
annubok Worparilla. 
i inyanook kaango. 
pnrri ! mumma. 
mattimna kai-i-mer. 
kaUnya pikkeioomdja. 



Where is my woman, i.e. , wife ? wnnnul ngeni wiinya? 
(She is) asleep (in the) camp • nanyoobok maanoo. 
(She is) sitting (in the) camp kamo maanoo. 
Make haste I come on, let ns pnrri I kakaiarro, anyoobok. 
walk 
There (are) two kangaroos - nelangaia boltubol kuimer. 

VOL. in. 20 



578 THB AUSTRAUAH RAGS 



Wbidi one will job tike or womogfamgU 



Luge, that one, I» or I will tongooje toqgeie egatk 

heve thet leige one 

Whe ipeeied (tliem)7 * - ngVMg beatim? 
niat (man I) beHere ipeaied talkoobaia yimbat baatiiii. 

(them) 
To-day ipeaied (I) beHere • iimnilMig baatim imbat 
Teeterday (I) believe (he) irnkbirak imbat baaAim. 

■peered (them) 
Lend now me reed-ipear, I tomak kara ngata kama baatiina 

will apear two bdltaboL 

Be off I not I will lend - • proma ! yoortadbin ngata io m cwi n . 
Alwaya I lend (to) yon - - moonuagoorapg ngata tomooa ngoo- 

nook. 
(Do)yoa know (the) road Port ngia koon tabora Por^iD^odk? 

PhiUipto? 

Pretty face that woman (haa) kalinya mean (or meon) wiinyarin. 
Wiinya =s woman. 
Wiinyarm = that woman. 
Sore (ia) my hand - • ityoomnch ngeni beyin. 

He speared my back - • baatin ngeni mookoona. 
Tou hit (him with a) wongoba ngia natto wongGbaL 
I see one emn - ngata naan lawa pikkeroomd ja. 

• yoorta iawa, boltnbdl iooog. 
- oonya I nio ! 

• koqnill 

• yoorta l&jt-pa. 
> nappawooroo. 

I will spear (him) directly • ngata baathima tinyoowinya. 
I think he ia fat. Literally, kalinya imbat woUikthia. 

Good believe fat 
I believe he ia thin or bad. mattabe imbat nel*le-ya^ 

Literally, Bad believe that 

one 
I will eat (him) presently - ngata thaitchek tinyoowinya. 
You (hit) that one with (your) ngia nellSya wongGbaL 

wongoba 
How fat (he is) 1 - - bSndGla woUikthial 

Gome on, let as eat * kakkaiarro thaichimia. 

Haste, (I) want fire - pir ! (or onge !) thannk biitya. 



Not one, (but) three 
There ! see t - 
Hush! - 
Don't speak • 
Shnt your month - 



PBEFATOBT REMARKS. 



679 



Additional Wosda— eon^trmecf. 
Stand back, you will break prSma 1 pfQlo nOUe kftma. 

my reed-0pear. lit., Qol 

break this reed-Bpear 
Hallo I (here is a) tomahawk 



Whose (18 it)? 

' M'f-nft ... 

Grass - 

To searoh for grass 

A minnow 

To fish for minnows 

Food 



te ! ana. 

ithslr 

ngieni 

bSrpan. 

baxpSnyanook. 

j&wa. 

jawSnyanook. 

mftndiga. 



To searoh for food or hunt mondigSnyanook. 
or fish for food 

Firewood .... biitehSo. 
To look for or get firewood biltySnyoonook. 



Opossum 

To hunt opossums 

Grab 

To look for grabs • 

A Black 

To go on the war-path 



pttnna. 

punySnyimook. 

be&laga. 

bealftnyanook. 

9nben&. 

enbenSnyanook. 



SONO. 

Ngoe immlift^fig kai-i-mer, 
Yoorta yanna yooringa, 
Wanama wai panama^ 
Toorta pnrra wollikthia. 

Translation. 

Tes, to-day (we will have) kangaroo, 

Not go son (or before snndown), 
• ••••• 

Not red kangaroo fat. 

. Anobt Exclamations. 
Kotoopna molwa ! - - • The graves of Kotoopna I 
Moneroopna moocha I • • Thunder in (your) anna I 
Takkai I . - - . An exclamation of pain or sorrow. 
Kai-kai t .... An exclamation of surprise. 

So mnch for the language of the Bangerang tribes proper. 
Taming to the Pikkolatpan^ its vocabolary was obtained 
from one of the tribe. Whilst many of its words are pure 

2 02 



580 



THE AUST&ALIAN RAGB: 



Bangerang, it will be noticed that the equivalents of tAs 
Blacks, BlackfelloWy Black wamafij and no are not amongst 
them. It has been remarked before that when a section of 
a tribe broke off from the parent stem and became indepen- 
dent, an alteration of one or all of the above words generallj 
took place. 

The Toolinyagan vocabulary has many Bangerang words. 
The name by which the Murray River is known to this tribe 
is Kaiela, which the reader is aware is applied by sevenl 
Bangerang tribes to the Goulburn, their name for the Moiray 
being Tongala. It is noticeable that this vocabulary con- 
tains two instances of words being changed to meet the 
custom of not naming the dead. Thus kangaroo used to be 
kaiimer, as in Bangerang, until a woman of that name died, 
and oposmmrTug used to be pinga, but a man called JPtnga 
died, and the word was changed to kocnyo/^inya. 

The following are a few Additional Toolinyagan Words: — 



Kangaroo-rat 


- 


ngarringurra. 


IMfknflA H » a 




. bartha. 
wollithola. 


Water rat 


«. 


Woman's net-bag - 


- 


• mnrra. 


Net worn on forehead 


- 


- mummgilling. 


Fishing-net - 


- 


- woolwyra. 


Manna - 


- 


• kaango. 


Opoesum-oloak 


■ fl 


> koonya-wiinya. 


Husband 


- 


■ yeyir. 


Blow-fly 


■ • < 


• thongera. 


Big ant - 


- 


- kagija. 


Codfish - 


- 


- booringawa. 


Perch - 


- 


- markoon,'theika. 


Hole in the ground 


- 


- mithitha. 


A sore - 


m 


- koot-tha. 


Speaking of an elder brother 


- baanyoobin. 


„ to an elder brother 


- baanyooba. 


Come swim (in the) water 


- kabbai marribok woUa. 


Don*t talk - 




- yoorta loitpa. 


Vftll llA - 




. ngeniandaik. 

• wunul ngieni wiinya 7 


X uu uo — - - 

Where is my wife? 




(I have) not seen (her) 




- yoortat naan. 


(She has) run away 




- yammin. 


Arm 




• borinya. 


Mussel - 




- yanga. 



PBEFATOBT REMARKS. 



581 



In the Ngarrimowro language it is remarkable that the 
snbstantiye Bawo = Blackfellow has a daal, Bawooly and a 
plnral, Borwalj as a very intelligent Black woman from 
whom I got my vocabulary was at pains to inform me. 
About twenty-five years ago the equivalent of karigaroo was 
Poonminmiry which name a girl also bore. The girl died, 
and wardakow became the term for kangaroo^ as the name 
of the dead could not be uttered for many years, in accord- 
ance with a custom which seems to be universal in Australia. 
In like manner the tribe used to say Bakka wirra = tobacco 
give; but a boy called Bakka having died, the phrase was 
altered to thcmga wirra = STnoke give. The word marrai = 
woman becomes in the plural mddnyoamein. Some of the 
neighbouring tribes call the Ngarrimowro the Yabbala = No 
Blacks. This people called the Murray Kaiela^ and, though 
they knew of the existence of the Goulbum, had no name 
for it. On pressing my informant on the subject, I learnt 
that, if she had to speak of it, she should call it Kaiela^ 
pointing in its direction with her nose, so as to distinguish it 
from the Murray. Men generally point with the beard, 
women with the nose. The following Additional Words are 
Ngarrimowro 2 — 



A cloud - 

Lightning 

Many women 

Codfish - 

Perch 

Manna - 

To swim - 

Gum-tree 

Box- tree - 

Diver (a bird) 

A boy 

Arm 

Murray River 

To-morrow I wiU go 

Give me some fish (fish give) 

I am hungry - 

Hungry you? - 

Opossum is bad 



yoorathek. 

chiringawik. 

karoik maanyoomain. 

booroonoo. 

boongooma. 

kanog. 

marrechang. 

tullo. 

buUoit. 

dai-e-leL 

moolao. 

borein. 

Kaiyel or Eaiela. 

burriburri ngai-ir yanne. 

munni wirra. 

moolinmi ngai-ir. 

moolinmi nginy a T 

matthir toompooL 



582 



THB AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



Additional WonDB—^contmued. 



Emn ia good - 
Don't talk 
Hush I - 
Many Black (will) oome to 
moROw 

When (will) yoa go? 
To-morrow I (will) go 
Come and fiah 
Where are you going? 
Where Ib my wife? - 
Not I Bee (her) 



kalein godaiamL 

yabbala loitpa. 

ko-ka! 

karoik barwal yanne pnrri bmri. 

wamnk nginya yanne? 
purriburri ngailr yanne. 
yennera munnika. 
wmmul yanne? 
wnnnnl ngeni marrai? 
yabbale ngata nakaL 



No. 214a.— NEAR THE JUNCTION OP THE MURRAY AND 
(K)ULBURN.— THE BANGERANG TRIBES PROPER. 

Bt tes Wkftsb. 



Kangaroo - 
OpoBsnm 
Tame dog - 
Wild dog - 
Emu . . - 
Black dnck- 
Wood dnok- 
Pelican 

Laughing jaokasB 
Native companion 

White cockatoo - 

Crow - - - 

Swan - - - 

Egg - - - 

Track of a foot - 

Fiah - - - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito - 

Fly - - - 
Snake- 
TheBlacks- 

A Blackf ellow - 

A Black woman • 

Nose - - - 



kfi-i-mer. 
pOn-na. 
p6k-ka. 
wOk-id-da. 
pikk-er-Som-dja. 
nfil-ka. 
ung-S-wa. 
ka-tin. 
wig-il-Op-ka. 
koo-noo-go5- 
thoo-la. 
j5r-ing. 
wok-ka. 
mail-ya. 
poo-jang-a. 
moo-goo- jin-na. 
mOnd-ji. 

b5r-pa. 

bS-tha. 

wo-wEn-ya. 

go-na. 

Sn-ben-na. 

Sn-ben-na. 

wDn-ya. 

kowo. 



Hand - - - 

2 Blacks - 

3 Blacks - 

One - - - 
Two - 
Three- 
Four - - - 

Father 

Mother 

Sister-^Elder 

„ Yoimger - 
Brother^Elder - 

„ Younger 
A young man 
An old man 
An old woman - 
A baby 
A White man 
Children - 

Head - - - 

Eye. - 

Ear - - - 



bS-yin. 
bol-tfi-bol-ySyir. 

bol-tu-bol i-oOBg 
yeyir. 
iftwa, ioong. 
bol-tu-boL 
bol-tu-bol i-oong. 

bol-tu-bol bol-ta- 

bol. 
ku-a. 
kSn-a. 
gid-git-ka. 
thft-jip. 
bainyooba. 

th&-ju-ba. 

pan-n55p-ka. 

thow-mtSng-a. 

kor-moo-ka. 

ko-t55p-ka. 

moo-l&-wa. 

ySr-ka, yar-kid- 

po-ko. 
mS-uL 
mir-moo. 



JUNCTION OF THE MURRAY AND GOULBURN. 683 



No. 214a.— Nkab the Junction of tes Mukbat and Goulbubn— 



Month 


w53r-roo. 


Teeth - 


dir-ra. 


Hair of the head • 


• p5k-kan. 


Beard- 


yaar-ing. 


Thunder - 


- m5n-er-a. 


Grass - 


h&r-pan. 


Tongae 


thai-ling. 


Stomach 


b55l-L 


Breasts 


b&ir. 


Thigh- 


m55n-na. 


Foot - 


chin-na. 


Bone - 


lil-di-ma. 


Blood - 


m&w-wa. 


RWn - - - 


wo-wfild-ja. 


Fat - - • 


woU-ik-thi-a. 


Bowels 


■ kSon-na. 


EbEorement - 


- kCon-na. 


War-spear - 


• j6k-kor-a. 


Reed-spear - 


kfi-ma. 


Throwing-stiok • 


• ySol-wa. 


Shield - 


■ mal'ka. 




&-na. 


Ganoe- 


- mat-tha. 


Sun - 


• yoor-ing-a. 


Moon - 


■ yoor-e. 


Star - 


• to5r-ta. 


Light - 


• moo-l&-wa. 


Dark - 


' thsl-la, moo-Iok 




mo5-lok. 


Cold - - 


' ma-tlg-i-wik. 


Heat - 


- ti-check. 


Day 


- kan-ftn-goor-a. 


Night • 


• thalla, m55lok- 




m59lok. 


Fire - 


• biit-ya. 


Water 


• wol-la. 


Smoke 


• thong-a 


Ground 


- w5k-ka. 


Wind- - 


. baang-a. 


Rain - 


- koo-kor-a. 


God - 




Ghosts 


• pSk-ka. 



Boomerang - 


- wGn-ya. 


Hill • 




- y6ol-la. 


Wood- 




- biit-chS-o. 


Stone • 




- e-5r-ga. 


Camp • 




- maan-oo. 


Yes 




- ng5-e. 


No . 




- yS5r-ta. 


I 




• nge-ni, ngft-ta. 


You ■ 




- ngft, ngia. 


Bark • 




- yfil-ma. 


Good • 




- kaal-in-ya. 


Bad 




- mat-ISm-na. 


Sweet- 




- kaai-in-ya. 


Food 




- mOn-di-ga. 


Hungry 


- moo-Un-mook. 


Thirsty 




Eat 




- thai-chTm-i-a. 


Sleep 




- naan-yoo-bok. 


Drink 




- thft-goo-na. 


Walk 




- yfin-yoo-bok. 


See 




- nSt-chook, naan. 


Sit 




- kSr-choo-bok. 


Yesterday 


- imk-bimk. 


To-day 


. immil-ang. 


To-morrow 


- b&r-per-ik. 


Where are 


the wOnnul Snbena? 


Blacks? 




I don't knOT 


w - wlln-na. 


Plenty 


. Stan. 


Big - 


- tOn-goo-ja. 


little- 


- in-ya-nook. 


Dead - 


- ko-koo-in. 


By-and-by 


- 


Come on 


- ya-kor-ma, ka-kd. 


Milk . 


• ngoon-oo-in. 


Eaglehawk 


• wQn-mir. 


Wild turkey 


r - kor-mi-me-bU. 


Wife 


* 


- nge-ni wlin-ya. 



584 



THE AU8TBALIAN BAGS: 



No. 214b.— TOCUMWALL, ON THE MURRAY.— THE 

PIKKOLATPAN TBIBE. 



Bt thx Wbitkb. 



Kangaroo • 

OpoMom • 

Tame dog • 

Wild dog • 

Jqihixx " • 

Black dnck • 

Wooddnok 

Pelican 

Laughing jack 

Native companion 

White cockatoo - jarim. 



- wortogoa. 

- baltya. 
• pokka. 

- pikkeroomdja. 



Crow • 
Swan • 
Egg . 

Track of a foot 
Fish - 
Lobster 
Crayfish 
Mosquito 
Ply - 
Snake- 
The Blacks 
A Blackf ellow 



wokkir. 



mam. 



beowka. 
- beowkaL 



A Black woman - momidgiga. 
Nose - . kowo. 



Hand • 


• bium. 


2 Blacks - 


- 


SBlacks • 


- 


One • 


- iawa. 


Two - 


- balabooL 


Three- 


- balahool ul 


Four • 


-balaboolba 




booL 


Father 


- bapo. 


Mother 


- napo. 


Sister-Elder 


• thaigip. 


„ Younger 


- baanyooip. 


Brother-Elder 




„ Younger 


A young man 


- 


An old man 


• 


An old woman 


m 


Ababy - 


- 


A White man 


- 


Children - 


- 


Head - 


- 


Eye - 


- ma. 


Bar - 


- marmoo. 



TOCXJMWALL, ON THE MUBRAY. 



585 



No. 214b.— TOGinMWALL.^THE 

Month - - woorro. 
Teeth - . - dirran. 
Hair of the head 
Beard- 
Thunder - - mnmera. 
GraaB- - - barpan. 
Tongne 

Stomach • - botha. 
Breasts 
Thigh- 
Foot . - - mogochinna. 
Bone - - - 
Blood - 
Skin -. - 
Pat - - - 
Bowels 
Excrement - 
War-spear - - koyir, 
Eeed-spear - - kama. 
Throwing-stick - 
Shield - - marka. 
Tomahawk - - ngana. 
Ganoe 

Sun - - - yooringa.* 

Moour • - yoore. 

Star - - - toorta. 

Light - - - 

Dark - - 

Cold - - 
Heat - 

Day - - - kanenorga. 

Night- r thalla. 

Fire - - - biitya. 

Water - - thethowganna. 
Smoke 
Ground 
Wind - 

Rain - - - korkonu 

God - . - 
Ghosts 



PikkolItpan Tbibb — catUinued, 

Boomerang - 
Hill - 
Wood 

Stone - - - eorga. 
Camp - 

Tes - - ngoe. 

No - - • yalliba. 
I ... ngBkj my^ ngenL 
You - . . ngena. 
Bark - - - yalma. 
Good - 

Bad . - - 
Sweet - 
Food - 
Hungry 
Thirsty 

Eat ... maichimiak. 
Sleep ... nanyoobok. 
Drink - - - bogiak. 
Walk ... yanyoobok. 
See - - - 
Sit - - - 
Yesterday - - bigauga. 
To-day 
To-morrow - 

Where are the wunulbeowka? 
Blacks? 

I don't know 

Plenty 

Big - - - 

Little - 

Dead - 

By-and-by - 

Come on - • kakaiyarro. 

Milk - 

Eaglehiawk - 

Wild turkey 

Wife 



686 



THB ADBTRAUAN EACB: 



Ko. 21«a-DLUPNA.-THB TOOUNTiQAN TRIBB. 



Bt thb Wbitbb. 



Kangaroo 

OpoMam 

Tame dog 

WUd dog 

Emu . 

Blaok daok 

Wood daok 

Pelican 

Laughing jaokaas 

Native companion 

White cockatoo 

Crow - 

Swan - 



tanjntooopna. 
baitya. 
pokka. 
wokkida. 



Track of a foot 
Fiah . 
Lobster 
Crayfish 

Mosquito 
Fly - 

Snake- 
The Blacks 
A BUokf eUow 
A Blaok woman 
Nose - 



borpa. 



wowiin3ra. 

^<^^^JOft» gona. 

yenbena. 

yeyir. 

paiabia w wiinya. 

kowo. 






Hand • 
S Blacks . 
SBIaoks . 
One . 
Two - 
Three- 
Four '- 

Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

»• Younger 
Brother-Elder 

i» Younger 
A young man 
An old TMa% 

An old woman 
A baby 

A White man 
ChOdren 
Head - 
Eye - 
Ear - 



iawa. 

bdtuboL 

bdtubol iooQg. 

boltubol- 

boltuboL 
bapo. 

napo. 

thaigip. 

poo-gika. 

baanyooba. 
banyip. 

towmunga. 

kormooka. 

kotoopna. 



poko. 
meuL 







ULUPNA. 


587 


No. 


2140 


,— Ulupna.— This Toolintaoan Tribe— comEtnuecf. 


Mouth 


- 


- wQoroo. 


Boomerang - 


- kooronga. 


Teeth- 


- 


- dirran. 


Hill - 


« 


Hair of the head- 


Wood- . 


- biityao. 


Beard- 


. 


_ 




w 


Thnnder 


m» 


- monwa. 


Stone - 


' iorga. 


Graas - 


m 


- barpa. 


Camp - 


- ynana. 


Tongae 


- 


- 


Yes - 


- ngoe. 


3tomaoh 


- 


- boolL 


No - - 


- yoorta. 


BreaatB 


- 


- bai-ir. 


I 


- ngeni. 


Thigh- 


- 


- towo. 


You - . 


- nginna. 


Foot - 


. 


- mogoginna. 


Bark ■ 


• 


Bone - 


. 


• 


Good - 


- kaalinya. 


Blood - 


. 


- maw-wa. 


Bad - 




Skin - 


- 


> 


Sweet - 


- thunathaich. 


Fat - 


- 


- wolikthia. 


Food - 


m 


Bowelfl 


- 


- bartoogoona. 


Hungry 


- 


Excrement 


- 


- koonna. 


Thinrty 


m 


War-spear 


- 


- wuxmuga. 


Eat - • 


- 


Beed-Bpeai 


1 ^ 


- Irf^Tna.^ 


Sleep - 


' nanyoobok. 


Throwing-stiok 


- yoolwa. 


Drink- . 


• 


Shield- 


- 


- 


Walk- 


- yanyoobok. 


Tomahawk 


- 


- ngana. 


See • 


- 


Canoe - 


- 


- matta. 


Sit - - 


- kartyoobok. 


Sun - 


- 


- yooringa. 


Yesterday - 


- 


Moon- 


• 


- yooringeja. 


To-day 


- kanangor. 


Star - 


- 


- toorta. 


To-morrow - 


- parparik. 


Light - 


- 


- 


Where are 1 


the wunul yenbena ? 


Dark - 


- 


- 


Blaoks? 




Cold - 


- 


- 


I don*t know 


- ai yoort-at naan. 


Heat - 


- 


1 


Plenty 


- ngotan. 


Day - 


- 


- 


Big - - 


„ 


ITight- 


•» 


- 


C7 

' litfcle- 




Fire - 


- 


- biitya. 


Dead - 


- kokooin. 


Water 


_ 


- woUa. 






Smoke 


„ 




By-and-by - 


- 


Ground 


« 


- wokka. 


Come on - 


' kabai. 


Wmd- 


. 


. 


Milk - - 


• 


Bain - 


- 


- korkora. 


Eaglehawk - 


- 


God - 


- 


- 


Wild turkey 


- 


Ghosts 


m 


• 


Wife - 


- ngieni wiinya. 



' 



588 



THE AU8TBALEAN BAGS: 



No. 2Ud.— NEAR YIILIMA, ON BOTH SIDES OF THE BIVEB 
MUBfiAY.— THE NGABKIMOWBO TBIBE. 



Bt thb Wbitie. 



Kangaroo - 
Opoflsom - 
Tame dog • 
WUddog - 
Emu • 
Black duck 
Wood dnok 
Pelican 
Laughing jackaaa 
Native companion 
White cockatoo- 
Crow • - - 
Swan - 



- waidakow. 

- toompool, korak* 

- kamow, kamao. 

- godaianuL 

- wangirL 

- garikart. 



tarwirrL 

kaxang. 

woklut. 



Track of a foot 
Fish - - 
Lobster 
Crayfiah 
Moaquito 
Fly - 
Snake- 
The Blaoka - 
A Blackf allow 
ABlack woman 
Nose - 



mnwil^ 



burroita 

komoi littagow. 

bawaL 

warrangenbawo. 

marraL 

kowo. 



Hand • 

2Blacka 

SBlacka 

One • 
Two - 
Three- 
Four • 
Father 
Mother 
Sister-Elder 

„ Younger 
Brother-Elder 

„ Younger 
A young man 
Anoldman- 
An old woman 
A baby 
A White man 
Children - 
Head - 
Eye • 
Ear • 



lOrik. 

platir bawooL 
platir 
bawaL 



platir. 

platir wanangen. 

pUtir-pUtir. 

bingalam. 

nga*ga-lam. 

ngaigerem. 

thatham* 

wawom. 



kothopook. 

ngolwaiohik. 

mai mawo* 
maram. 



NEAR YnUMA, ON BOTH SIDES OF MUERAY. 



589 



No. 214i>.^Nbab Yzilima, on both sidxb of the Riyeb Mub&at. — 

Thx Ngasbihowbo Tbibb — continued. 



Month 


- worro. 


Boomerang - 


- 


Teeth 


- tarrawil, tarre- 


Hill - 


- woluntha. 




woli. 


Wood- 


- worogolik, kalo 


Hair of the head- | 




weik. 


Beard- 
Thnnder - 


- moolgoorooky 
binyaknm. 


Stone - 
Camp- 


. moppo. 


QrasB 


- belart. 


Yes - 


- ngoe. 


Tongne 


- thalla. 


No - - 


- yabbala. 

9 9 


Stomach 


- botha, pondtho. 


I 


- ngai-m. 


Breasts 


- 


Yon - 


- ngenya. 


Thigh 


- 


Bark - 


- yalam. 


Foot - 


- chinna, mogo- 


Good - 


- kalein. 




chinna. 


Bad - 


- matthir. 


Bone - 


- 


Sweet - 


« 


Blood- - 


- 


Food - 


^ 


Skin - 
Fat - 


•« 


Hungry 


- moolinmL 


Bowels 


• 


Thirsty 


- 


Excrement - 


- koonna. 


Eat - 


- thaikia. 


War-spear - 


- marreoo. 


Sleep - 


- pirtilong. 


Eeed-spear- 


- thorongal. 


Drink- - 


- kongaiang. 


Throwing-stick 


- 


Walk- - 


- nganyera. 


Shield- 


• palart. 


See 


^7 tr 

- nakal. 




- nagaiak. 


Sit - - 




Canoe - 


- boo^o. 




Sun - 


- worgo. 


Yesterday - 


- 


Moon - 


- yoori. 


To-day 


- 


Star - 


- toorto 


To-morrow - 


- purriburrL 


* * 1 j_ 




Where are the wunulbawal? 


light - 


• 






Dark - 


^ 


BUcks? 




Cold - - 
Heat - 


- polekL 

- dikarti, dekki. 


I don't know 


- yabbal ngata 
nakal. 


Day - 


- kamawak. 


Plenty 


- karoik. 


Night - 


- yenoit. 


Big - - 
Little - 


— 


Fire - - 


- kalao. 




Water 


- banna. 


Dead - 


- notharun. 


Smoke 


- thonga. 


By-and-by - 


- 


Qronnd 


^7 

- wokka. 


Come on 


- kak5. 


Wind- 


mm 


Milk - - 


- 


Bahi - 


- karokor. 


Eaglehawk - 


- ngarta. 


God - - 


- 


Wild turkey 


- cherakaL 


Qhosts 


. 


Wife - 


- marraL 



k 



APPENDICES. 



APPENDIX A. 

THE TASMANIANS. 

In the short reference which I am abont to make to the 
manners and customs of the Tasmanian race^ I have taken 
as my authority a little work by the late J. E. Calder, en- 
titled, Some AccouTit of the WarSy Extirpation^ Habits, ^c, of 
the Native Tribes of Tasmania, To Mr. Calder, whose kind- 
ness in supplying me with information on the subject was 
indefatigable, I am also indebted for a good deal of additional 
matter. Concerning the sources of his knowledge, in a letter 
to Colonel St. Hill, Private Secretary to His Excellency Sir 
Frederic A. Weld, Governor of Tasmania, through whose 
hands the beginning of our correspondence passed, Mr. 
Calder says : — " Some of this intelligence, I beg to say, I 
have collected orally, in the long series of years I have re- 
sided here ; partly from persons who of all others had the 
most to do with the capture and removal of our natives from 
the main land (G. A. Robinson and Alexander McKay) ; and 
the rest from a very diligent study of the only authentic 
records extant, in which the history of this people, as far as 
it can ever be known to us, is contained ; viz. : — ^The many 
voluminous manuscript reports that are preserved in the 
office of the Colonial Secretary, of which there are about 
nineteen. This great mass of evidence, I think I may ven- 
ture to affirm, no one has ever gone completely through 
except myself, who have toiled patiently through it thrice, 

to master the subject perfectly Having at 

aU times during the last fifty years taken great interest in 
the race of men whom we have displaced, I have been further 
induced to get together into one massive vocabulary all the 
words (about 1,500) I could trace out of the languages or 
dialects once spoken by the original tribes of this country. 
This vocabulary — the completion of which cost me more 
labor than I care to boast of — I deposited in the Museum 
of the Royal Society, where I suppose it still is." 

VOL, in. 2 p 



594 THE AUSTBALIAN RAGE: 

With respect to the languages of Tasmania, of which there 
seem to have been at least six or eight (the many points of 
agreement in which show them to be variations of one original 
tongne), the best aathority is, I think, the vocabnlary of the 
late Dr. Joseph Milligan, F.L.S., who was for some years 
Medical Superintendent of the Aboriginal Establishm^its^ 
first at Flinders Island, and afterwards at Oyster Cove. Thia 
gentleman I knew formerly intimately, and think it well to 
point oat that he was unacquainted with any language hot 
English, and so not well fitted for his task. Also the reader 
will notice that his mode of spelling is a very haphazard 
one. Besides, several incorrectnesses are noticeable in his 
pages. For instance, the translations of the numerals 1, 2, 
3, 4, 5, in his Vocabulary^ do not agree with those which 
appear in his ^^ Short sentences in the nattne languagesJ^ 
Nevertheless, Milligan was a very painstaking man and very 
happily situated for carrying out the work. 

On the other hand, Jorgen Jorgenson, ex-Eing of Iceland, 
whose vocabulary is also given (and who, by-the-by, I remem- 
ber as an assigned clerk to my father in Hobartown), was a 
man of intellect and a linguist of considerable attainments, 
but lacked the opportunities enjoyed by Milligan. In addi- 
tion to the above, six other vocabularies forwarded to me by 
the late Mr. Calder, two of which are new to the public, are 
inserted. 

Of the history of the Tasmanian people little is known, 
and it will be enough for my purpose to say that our first 
settlement in their island took place in 1803. Their number 
at that date cannot be given, even approximately. By some 
writers it has been set down at 7,000 and upwards, and by 
Milligan as not exceeding 2,000, which last estimate is 
probably nearer the truth. Whatever were their aggregate 
numbers, however, the natives we know were divided into 
about twenty tribes, which occupied amongst them the whole 
island, most parts of which were occasionally visited. At 
the outset of our colonization, the natives were found to be 
a very friendly people ; but owing to the outrages and murders 
of the early settlers, they betook themselves, after a time, 



THE TASMANIANS. 696 

to their forests, resolutely declined all farther intercourse 
with the Whites, and commenced a bush war of surprises 
and massacres, which was carried on by both sides with 
unmitigated ferocity. In this struggle, Mr. Calder is of 
opinion that a great many more Whites fell than Blacks. 
In the meantime, the latter, who in their native state, went, 
the men entirely and the women almost naked, had become 
accustomed to the use of blankets, in which they often slept 
when soaked with rain, and at other times discarded alto- 
gether, according to the whim of the moment. The result 
of this was an epidemic of lung diseases, which, within half 
a century, brought about the total extinction of the race. A 
cordon of 3,000 armed men having been drawn across a 
portion of the island, with a view to hemming in and 
capturing the tribes in those parts, and various other 
measures having been had recourse to for their capture or de- 
struction, with equal ill success, the late George Augustus 
Bobinson was authorized by the Governor to go with a small 
party, consisting chiefly of semi-civilized natives, amongst 
the remnants of the tribes, and induce them, if he could, to 
give themselves up. This at length he succeeded in accom- 
plishing, and brought into Hobartown, the capital of th^ 
island, by instalments, all except four, who remained at large; 
that is about 250 persons, who were taken to Flinders Island, 
where almost all of them died of lung complaints within a 
few years. The last survivor of the race was Trugannini, 
who had been, in Robinson's hands, the chief instrument in 
the capture of her country people. She died in 1876, having 
reached the age of about sixty-four years. The following 
names of some of the Tasmanian tribes have been handed 
down to us. The Ninnee^ who dwelt about Port Davey ; the 
TackinSy whose country was near Sandy Cape ; and on the 
south coast the Mo-le^oke-er-dee^ the Ifue-nonni^, the Tur- 
rer-he^tinorirmej the Pan-ger-mo-ig-hej and the Nee-l^woiv^ne. 
Though several writers have adverted in a passing way 
to the descent of the now extinct native race of Tasmania, 
I am not aware that any one has gone into the details of 
the subject. As the only question in connection with that 

2P 2 



596 



THE AXTBTBAUAK RACE: 



people which comes within the scope of this work is, 
whether they were descended from the Australians or via 
versd, I shall in great measure restrict what I have to say 
concerning them to that point. As usaal, the evidenoe set 
before the reader will be gathered from custom, language, 
and physical characteristics. 

Beginning then, with customs, we find the following 
common to Tasmanians and Australians, viz.: — The manu- 
facture of baskets; making drawings of living objects with 
charcoal on smooth surfaces; smearing the person with 
grease, ochre, and charcoal; placing corpses in hollow trees 
after binding their arms and legs firmly to the body; and 
scarring the skin on arrival at puberty for the purpose of 
ornament. With the Tasmanians, however, this last practice 
was restricted to the males. Further, both races climbed trees 
by means of notches cut in the bark ; abstained from speak- 
ing of the dead; and required the offender against certain 
customs to stand to have spears thrown at him, which 
(shields being unknown in Tasmania) he avoided as best he 
could by contortions of the body, without quitting the spot on 
which he had taken up his position. As in Australia, also, 
feuds were hereditary ; fireemasonry was unknown ; Albinos 
were not found; and no government of any sort existed. 

Turning to language (in connection with which Milligan's 
vocabulary is generally referred to when no other is specially 
named), we find the following points of agreement between 
Tasmanian and Australian speech, which I have supplemented 
with corresponding terms from the Negro languages of Africa, 
as a subject of remark, fiirther on: — 



English. 


Tasmanian. 


Aostnlian. 


African. 


You 


Neena 


. 


Keena - 


Nyn. 


Fire 


Winalea - 


- 


Wiin - - 


Wun. 


Ear 


Mungenna 


- 


Munga • 


— 


Smoke - 


Boorana - 


- 


Booyoo - 


Buruzoe. 


Two 


/ Boula (Jorgenson) 
\ Bura (Lhotsky) 


} 


Boola - 


BuoL 


Tongue - 


Tullana ( JorgeuBon) 


• 


Tailing. 


Talam. 


Noae 


Moonar (Norman) - 


• 


Moolya - 


Mola. 



THE TASMANIANS. 597 

Again, in the three -sets of languages there is an absence 
of any collective word for brother ^ but distinct words for elder 
brother and younger brother. Also in Tasmania and Aus- 
tralia we find night and darkness related ; likewise bowels 
and excrement; but in neither of these cases do the words in 
use in the two countries display any glossarial affinity. 

It has been shown in the first volume that the words 
ama and Ubi^ both a little varied, prevail in Australia and 
in Africa, signifying, in different languages, woman^ mother ^ 
breasts^ milk, water ^ and rain, and having at the present day 
in some of the languages of both continents two or three of 
the above significations. 

In Tasmania we meet with practically the same pecu- 
liarity, though the root which goes through the variations is 
not either of those found in the two continents, as follows: — 

Young woman - • loaUa puggana. 

Teat pruggana. 

Breasts .... pamgganna. 
Milk - < - . ■ prooganeannah. 
Rain - ... - pogana. 

Such are the points of agreement in customs and lan- 
guage between the Australian and Tasmanian races, so far 
as the evidence on hand goes. It has, however, been shown, 
in the chapter which treats of the origin of the Australian 
race, that most of these customs and the whole of these 
linguistic peculiarities prevail also in Negro Africa at the 
present day; and hence it follows that there is in reality 
nothing in evidence, so far, to affiliate the Tasmanian to the 
Australian rather than to the Negro. For if there be a few 
savage customs common to Australians and Tasmanians 
which do not exist in Africa — such, for instance, as climbing 
trees by means of notches — the circumstance will not carry 
much weight when it is recollected that the Negro has in 
all likelihood, probably as the result of contact with more 
civilized peoples, given up some customs which prevailed at 
the epoch at which the forefathers of the Australians may 
be supposed to have left the shores of the " dark continent." 

There exists, however, on the other hand, a good deal of 
evidence which leads to the conclusion that the Tasmanian 






598 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

must be traced direct to the Negro without the intervention 
of the Anstralian. For instance, a number of remarkable 
Australian characteristics not found in Africa were aU absent 
from Tasmania. Thus the corroboree, the boomerang, the 
wommera certainly, and the message-stick as fiur as known, 
did not exist there. Again, Galder notices that the Tasma- 
nians never eat scaled fish, which all Australians did ; and 
in Livingstone's Lciat Journals^ vol. 1, p. 308, we find the 
Banyamwesi, on the east side of Tanganyika, practising' the 
same abstinence. Though not bearing on this point, it may 
be noticed that many things common to the Australian and 
Negro were not met with in Tasmania, such as pieTcing- the 
septum of the nose, knocking out teeth, barbing spears, the 
use of shields, canoes, fishing nets and hooks, and of the 
tomahawk. Further, the Tasmanian neither skinned nor 
disembowled animals before cooking, but laid them whole on 
the fire. Ovens also were not used by him, neither did he 
carve or paint his weapons ; fire was not made by friction of 
wood, or cannibalism or circumcision practised. If polyg- 
amy existed at all, it was very unusual in the island. 
Finally, the Tasmanian decorated his head with flowers, a 
custom, I believe, unknown in Australia. 

The differences in the languages of the two peoples are 
at least as remarkable as those of custom. Before particu- 
larizing them, it may be repeated that the number of lan- 
guages which existed in Tasmania is not known, but that 
there were several is certain, and also that they were all off- 
shoots of one original tongue. Now, it is to be noticed that 
in Australia we have, as shown in Chapter I., many words 
which extend, with slight variations, to from fifty to ninety 
per cent, of our languages, and from one end of the continent 
to the other. The same feature also appears in Tasmania; 
but the remarkable point is that in no instance does the word 
common in the island agree with the one prevalent in the 
continent when absent from the Negro langiuiges. I will 
give a few instances. In Australia we have thinruij Jtnna, 
or chinna ^s^foot^ in nineteen-twentieths of the languages. In 
the Tasmanian languages we have also in the same sense 



THE TASMANIANS. 599 

words from a common but distinct root, as Itiggaruiy Vug^ 
langoon^ lagarra^ langoanar, langanaj as the reader will 
see in the several vocabularies which follow. Again, one of 
the most widely-spread words in Australia is koonrui^ koodna^ 
&c., = excrement. In Tasmania, in the same sense, we have 
tzamenay tiannahy tiena, tganer, and teetkaner. Again, in 
Australia, 7na, fnarra, murra = handy appear in four-fifths 
of the languages; but in Tasmania we have riem, reemutta, 
rabalgay riliaj ragurnery &c. (Roberts) reena =^JingerSy and 
reenatta = thumb. Milligan also mentions the sounds 
lock as used in Scotland and the French u as preva- 
lent in Tasmania, which certainly do not occur in this 
continent. We also know that the peculiar Australian 
system of counting did not prevail in Tasmania. Now, as 
we found the Tasmanians divided into about twenty tribes, 
between which, for the most part, communication was diffi- 
cult and ill kept up, it is to be assumed that those of their 
words which are general or agree in root belong to the Ian- 
guage which the first comers to the island br&ughJt with them^ 
rather than that tongues which for the purpose of conversa- 
tion had become distinct had varied from the parent speech 
vAth urdformity. 

In view of these facts, the only conclusion to be arrived 
at is, that the language which the Tasmanians brought with 
them to their island was not that which reached Australia. 
Mr. R. H. Davies, referred to by Mr. R. Brough Smyth in 
his Aborigines of Victoria^ vol. 1, p. Ixx, has given it as 
his opinion that the Tasmanians originally came from the 
continent, and part of them from Cape Leeuwin, grounding 
his assertions on their agreement in habits and weapons and 
on the equivalents of the word nMer. With habits I have 
already dealt, and, I think, shown that the evidence to be 
derived from them is of a contrary tendency. As regards 
weapons, it would be difficult to say how many kinds exist 
in Australia; but we may enumerate spears, plain and also 
barbed in various ways, some thrown by hand, and others 
with the wommera; clubs of many patterns, some used with 



600 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

one and others with both hands; boomerangs, shields of 
two distinct sorts and many patterns ; wooden swords, 
double and single handed; also fishing spears of varions 
sorts; and the tomahawk and the chisel; many of these 
implements being elaborately carved and painted. On the 
other hand, the Tasmanians had merely a spear and clab 
of the simplest description, and the bit of chipped quartz 
with which they mann&ctored them, ornamentation of 
any kind being unknown to them, so that the arms and 
implements of the two peoples were remarkably nnlike. 

Touching the equivalents of the word watevj it is only 
necessary to produce them for their want of likeness to be 
recognized. Thus, in Tasmania, we have, MUligan, Uena, 
Itawenee, lileah; Roberts, leena; Norman, mookener; Jor- 
genson, lent, mogOy moka; Lhotsky, lia, Itiffanay moga; and 
Scott, mookaria. At and within a hundred miles of Cape 
Leeuwin the terms for wcUer are gabaj gabbeej giapy Map, 
and others closely resembling them. 

Latham, however, in his Elements of Comparative Phi- 
lology, pp. 369 and 370, finds much in common between the 
Tasmanian and Australian languages. The Australian words 
on which he bases this conclusion were obtained from Scott 
Nind's vocabulary of the King George's Sound language, 
published in the Memoirs of the Geographical Society of 
London, vol. 1, and the Tasmanian terms from the Voya>ge 
de V Astrolabe, vol. 7, pp. 9, 10. Mr. Latham's first section 
on this subject I have examined carefully, with information 
before me which he did not possess, with the following 
results: — 

Wound. — The equivalents given by Latham for this word 
are barana at Port Dalrymple, Tasmania; and bareuk at 
Sang George's Sound, Australia; but as the word is not 
found in my vocabulary of King George's Sound, nor in 
any of the seven Tasmanian vocabularies which appear 
further on, it must be passed over without remark. 

Wood: moumbra, Tasmania, and pourn, Australia, as 
given by Latham. Li the Tasmanian vocabularies there are 



THE TASMANIANS. 601 

words from two roots in this sense, of which moomara, 
mumanaraj and weenar, Tveenararmej are instances. The 
fonner of these will be seen to agree fairly well with 
Latham's moumbra. 

Nind's word poum is incorrect, boon being the term in 
use, as the reader will see by reference to my vocabnlary of 
King George's Sonnd, vol. I., p. 389. The same word and 
boona and booana also appear in the neighbouring languages. 
In Australia and Africa (Negro) there is frequently but one 
word to express tree and wood, and in this instance the 
Australian word boon seems to be allied to the African 
bono =: tree. For firewood we have — Tasmania, weegeim; 
Australia, wiin; Africa, Timn. 

Hair: hide, Tasmania; ^a^, Australia. In the seven 
Tasmanian vocabularies found in this work, keelana (Jor- 
genson) is the only equivalent of hair which bears any 
resemblance to hide, unless it be Scott's word nukakala. 
KaMy the Australian word given by Nind, signifies heady 
and not hair, for which chow is the equivalent. Hair of the 
head is chow-kaat. In some of our languages head and hair 
are expressed by the same term, but not in this. 

Thigh: degagla, Tasmania ; tawaly Australia. In none 
of the Tasmanian vocabularies is the first of these words 
found. The Australian word is correct. 

Kangaroo: tarameiy Tasmania ; taamoury Australia. In 
Milligan's vocabulary we meet with tarranay and in Norman's 
terrary in this sense, which agree very well. With Nind's 
taamour I have not met, the common equivalent for kangaroo 
at King George's Sound and in its neighbourhood being 
younger or yongor. 

Lips: monay Tasmania; meley Australia. In the Tas- 
manian vocabularies I find for lips warlerminner and 
mogudelia twice ; mona does not occur. Probably tongue 
should take the place of lipSy as we find the former translated 
menuy mennSy mnay &c., in most of the Tasmanian vocabu- 
laries. In my vocabulary of King George's Sound lips does 
not occur. 



602 THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 

No: pauttey Tasmania ; pmtalt or poart^ AostraUa. In 
the Tasmanian vocabolanes pootsa and poobyer are the onl j 
words which resemble the above. Nind's terms are inoorrect, 
ooad being the word in nse at King (George's Somid. 

Egg: komekuy Tasmania ; kierkee, Australia. Milligan*s 
and Jorgenson's vocabnlaries are the only ones which gire 
the word egg. In them we find Uefia punnay pcUeena^ and 
palinnay which have something in conmion with each other, 
but bear no resemblance to koneka. In King Greorge's 
Sound noorok and boay are the equivalents of egg^ and noc 
kierkee. 

Bone: pnale, Tasmania; nouil (bone of a bird used for 
sucking up water), Australia. Nind's real translation of 
bofie, as given in the Voyage de FAstrolabej is kautt. In 
three of the Tasmanian vocabularies found in this work we 
have translations of this word, none of which bear the most 
distant resemblance to pnale, Nind's words notUl and kouit 
are equally wide of the mark, qtieecA and queeka being the 
terms in use. 

Skin: kidna, Tasmania; kiao, Australia. In my Tas- 
manian vocabularies the reader will find translations of this 
word given by Milligan, Roberts, and Norman, none of 
which in the least resemble kidna, Nind's word kiaOy which 
is followed by a sign of interrogation, is equally incorrect, 
mop and boak being the terms in use at Eling George's 
Sound, both of which are supported by words in use in the 
neighbouring languages. 

Two; katebouevey Tasmania ; kadjen^ Australia. Transla- 
tions of two are given by Milligan, Jorgenson, Norman, 
and Perron. Jorgenson's calabawa somewhat resembles 
Latham's katebotieve; the rest have no likeness. Nind's 
word kadjen is evidently incorrect, koochal being the term 
in use.* 



* In several works Scott Kind's vocabulary is highly spoken of, and oo 
this ground I recommended it to the reader in Chapter IX., though I had 
never seen it. Acquaintance with it has altered my estimate of its value. 



THE TASMANIANS. 603 

From this it will be seen that, whilst the relationship 
between the languages of Tasmania and Australia is not 
questioned (for my contention is that both are descended 
independently from Negro languages), it is certain that the 
data on which Latham based his comparison was much less 
reliable than those now available. Neither, it must be 
remembered, does that eminent philologist aver that the 
Tasmanians were descended from the Australians, but goes 
on to show that the languages of Tasmania have, equally, 
many Papuan affinities. 

A few points of agreement between the Tasmanian and 
African languages which do not, as far as I am aware, extend 
to Australian tongues, are noticeable as follows: — 

Boy — ^Tasmanian, ludawinna, luena ; African, lewi. 

MovAh — Tasmanian, canea, canlna, ftc.; African, kana, kanna dekanu. 

Tooth or ittlh — Tasmanian, pegui, pegi, beyge, leeaner; African, pinyi, 
bei, lieno, lino, lizo. 

WaJUr — Tasmanian, liena, lia, leena, &c.; African, le, Ina. 

But whilst I have thought it desirable to consider the 
descent of the Tasmanians in connection with customs and 
language, the strongest evidence that they were not an off- 
shoot of the Australian race is found in the physical charac- 
teristics of the two peoples, which differed remarkably in 
several particulars. Thus the hair of the Australian from 
Torres Straits to Wilson's Promontory is long, sometimes 
straight, and at others wavy, but never woolly, and hifl com- 
plexion is black with a tinge of red. In both of these 
particulars the Tasmanian was strikingly different, for his 
hair, though long, was woolly, and his color a sooty black. 
Besides this, aU writers on the subject agree that the two 
peoples differed in features in a marked manner. Now if two 
thousand miles of latitude failed to get rid of the roots of 
many words, or to modify the hair, color, and features of 
the continental tribes, what ground is there for assuming 
that a transfer across Bass' Straits brought such changes 
about ? 



604 



THE AUSTRALIAK RACK: 



Weighing the facts connected with language, customs, 
and phyedcal characteristics, it seems impossible to come 
to any other conclusion than that the Tasmanians were 
of mixed Negro, but not of Australian descent. By what 
route and at what epoch the fore&thers of the Tasmanians 
reached their island, and by what race their Negro ancestors 
were crossed, there is, as far as I am aware, no evidence 
to show. 

The following are the vocabularies of the Tasmanian 
languages which I have been able to obtain. The first was 
collected in 1803 by the French navigator^ Peron: — 



Afar off 




- renene. 


Ankle - 




- lure. 


AmiB - 




- guna-lia. 


Bark - 




• nnebnra.* 


Basket 




- terri. 


Beadfl- 




- perelede. 


Beard- 




- kongine. 


Beat, to 




- kindrega. 


Bird - 




- muta-muta. 


Blow - 




- bure. 


BotUe- 




- luga. 


Branch 




- ponhi. 


Breast - 




- lere. 


Bum one self, to lagoana. 


CaU, to 


* 


- toni 


Canoe - 


- 


- nenga. 


Casaarina, fruit of Inbada. 


Charcoal 


• 


- loira. 


Chin • 


• 


- onaba. 


Qoak of 


kanga- boira. 


roo skins 






Crab - 


• 


- renorari. 


Cut, to 


• 


- rogeri, fordi. 


Dance, to 


- 


- ledrae. 


Dine, to (eat ?) 


- bugure. 



PERON'S VOCABULARY. 

Die, to 

Drink, to 

Ear - - - 

Eat, go and 
„ I win - 

Eucalyptus - 

„ seed of 
,, trunk of 

Evacuate, to 

Eye - 

Eyebrow - 

Fall, to 

FamUy 

Fire - 

Fish (gadus) 

Fucus palmatus - 

Fly - - - 

Give me 

Qo away (let us) - 

Grass • 

Grease the hair - 

Hair - 

Haliotis 

Hand - 



mata. 
laina. 
cnengi 
matgera. 



monodadro. 

pirebe. 

tere. 

nubere. 

line nubera. 

midngiya. 

tagari-Ua? 

une. 

punerala. 

rugona. 

oille. 

noki. 

tangara. 

poene. 

tanepoere. 

cililogenL 

caene. 

rilia. 



* See jSre, also UgKtnui(f and thunder 



THE TASMANIANS. 



606 





Pbbok'b Yocasulary— continued 


. 


Head • 


- onegL 


See, I- 


- rendera. 


He«l - 


- laidoga. 


Sing, to 


- ledrani. 


I- 


- mana. 


Sit down, to 


- medi, medito. 


I don't know - nideje. 


Slap, to 


- noeni. 


I don*t under- nidejo. 


Sleep, to 


- makunya. 


stand 




Spear, to 


-kie. 


Insect, a coUecHve paroe. 


Starfish 


- oneri. 


noun which 


t pro- 


Stone - 


- loine. 


bdbly doet 


r not 


Strangle, to 


- lodamerede. 


exist. Poastbty 


Son - 


- panubere.* 


the name 0/ some 


Tattoo- 


- palere. 


partteulan 


msect 


Tear • 


- ure. 


Jump - 


' waragra. 


Teeth • 


- pegi. 


Kick, to 


- vare. 


That - 


- avere. 


Knees- 


- rangalia. 


That belongs 


to paturana. 


Kneel, to - 


- guanera. 


me 




Laugh 


- drohi. 


That kills - 


- mata e nigo. 


Leaf - 


- drin^. 


This way 


- lone. 


Lightning • 


- one bnra. 


Three- 


- aliri. 


Lips - 


• magndilia 


Throw, to - 


- pegara. 


Lobster 


- nnele. 


Thunder - 


- bura. 


Lonae - 


- nnre. 


Tie, to 


- nimere. 


Me - 


- pawahi. 


Tongue 


- mene. 


Moss - 


- mannra. 


Tree - 


- InparL 


NailH - 


- t^ilia. 


Two - 


- bura. 


Navel - 


. line. 


Untie, to 


- laini. 


Night - 


- bnrdunya. 


Upset, to - 


- moido-guna. 


No - 


> nendL 


Warm oneself, 


to gagvui. 


Nose - 


• mngid. 


Water, fresh 


- lia. 


One - 


- marai. 


Weep, to - 


- tara. 


Oyster 


- lonbodia. 


„ on - 


- le. 


„ shell 


-luba. 


What do you call wanarana? 


Parrakeet • 


- mola. 


that? 




Parrot 


- girgra. 


W haVsyonrnameT wanarana 7 


Play, to 


- pass. 


Wife - 


- cuani. 


Polish, to - 


- rina. 


Will you come 


? - canglanac. 


Pat wood 01 


I fire treni. 


Whistle, to 


- menne. 


Sand - 


- gone. 


Wood- 


- gui. 


Seaweed 


- roenan. 


Yellow ochre 


- malane. 


„ dri< 


9dfor rori. 


Yes, good - 


- erre. 


eating 




You - 


- nina. 



*8eefye. 



606 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



VOCABULARY OF THE OYSTER BAY TRIBE. 







SUBVKTOB-QKirSRAL OF TaSMAXIA. 


■ 


Arm • 


- 


• nanimpena. 


Knife or flint 


• teeroona, tra- 


Bird . 


- 


• darwaUa. 




wootta. 


Blood • 




- baloqyana. 


Man (white) 


• ragina, ra^ 


Bread - 




• taoorela. 




rytia. 


Chin - 




- ooomegaaa. 


Marrow of a bone moonwlena. 


Dog - 




- booloobenara, 


Moon - 


- wee-etta. 






knayatta 


Mouth- 


- moonapena. 


Ear 




- roogara. 


Neck - 


- loobeyera. 


Emn • 




- pandanwoonta. 


Nose . 


- meegrooera. 


Eyes - 




- nepoogamena. 


Scar (ornamental) troobenic. 


Feather 




- kaaoolegebra. 


SheU - 


- kaa-ana. 


Fire ■ 




- nooena. 


Spear - 


- preana. 


Forehead 


- dmanamalla. 


Stone - 


- peoora. 


Grass • 


- 


- rawinuina. 


Sun • 


- paganubrana. 


Hair ■ 


- 


• nukakala. 


Toombs Lake, 


moyenteleea. 


Hand • 


- 


- dregena, reege- 


Macquarie Raver 






bena. 


Thumb 


- manamera 


Head - 


- 


• neeanapena. 




tagina. 


Kangaroo(boomer) rena. 


Trees • 


- moogootena. 


If 


(brush) 


- lena. 


Water - 


- mookaria. 


II 


skin 


- bleagana. 


Wood (dead) 


- we^^ena. 



With regard to the vocabulary which follows, I was in- 
formed by the late Robert Calder that the late R. A. Roberts 
published it in the Hobartown Courier of 3rd May, 1828. 
Mr. Roberts' widow, who was alive, in July, 1879, the time 
of Calder's writing to me, informed that gentleman that it 
comprised, she believed, the whole of her late husband^a 
collection. Following the vocabulary, a table is inserted in 
which Milligan's rendering of the Brune Island language is 
contrasted with Roberts'. 



ROBERTS' VOCABULARY. 



Arm - 


- womena. 


BeUy 


- lomodina. 


Back - 


- tabrina. 


Bird 


- greigena. 


Bad - 


. poamorL 


Birth 


- aya. 


Basket 


- tareena. 


Bone • 


- toodna. 


Beard - 


- coquina. 


Boy ■ 


' leuna or luena. 



THE TASMANIAKS. 



607 



Roberts' Vooabulabt — continued. 



Catamaran - 


- nungana. 


Morning 


- nigrarua. 


Cherriea 


- poaranna. 


Mouth 


- canina. 


Child - 


- pugyta. 


Nails - 


- reerana. 


Chin 


• oongene. 


Night - 


- luena. 


Cloud - 


- hagota. 


Nose . 


- mudena. 


Cockatoo (white)- ngarana. 


Oyster 


- rauba. 


„ (hlack)- moingnana. 


Rain - 


• boora. 


Cold - 


- malanii. 


Salt-water - 


- lena. 


Come here - 


- todawadda. 


Sapling 


- prebena. 


Crayfish 


- nuhena. 


Seal ■ 


- marina. 


Crying 


- taarana. 


Sheoak 


- lube. 


Day - 


- tagama. 


Shell-fish ■ 


- barana. 


Dead - 


- moingaha. 


Singing 


- tiana. 


Diver - 


- morana. 


Ship . 


- tedeluna. 


*Eagle - 


- nairana. 


Skin • 


- tendana. 


Ears - 


- wegge. 


SknU - 


- poiedaranina. 


Emu - 


- ngananna. 


Sleep - 


- loagna. 


Eye - 


• nubrana. 


Smoke 


- boorana. 


Fingers 


- reena. 


Spittle 


- cackbennina. 


Fighting 


- monganenida. 


Spear - 


- preena. 


Fire - 


- ouane. 


Stars • 


- daledine. 


Fish - 


- breona. 


Stringybark 


- toilena. 


Flesh . 


- cragana. 


Sun - 


. pannubrae. 


Forehead 


- rougena. 


Swinuning - 


• pugara. 


Foot - 


- lagarra. 


Talk - 


- palquand. 


Friendship - 


- caradi. 


Teeth - 


- beyge. 


Frost - 


- ounadina. 


Thigh - 


- teigna. 


Gannet 


- crupena. 


To-morrow - 


- ligrame. 


Girl - 


- deeberana. 


Tongue 


- mene. 


Go away 


- tagara. 


Tree - 


- weena. 


Good - 


- paegrada. 


Thumb 


- rennitta. 


Gum-tree - 


- greeta. 


Valley 


- logowelae. 


Hand • 


- nuna. 


Waddy 


• lorina. 


House - 


- lineda. 


Wallaby 


- tarana. 


Kangaroo - 


- leina. 


Warm 


- lagarudde. 


Kiss - 


- modamogi. 


Water (fresh) 


' leena. 


Laughing - 


- binana. 


White man - 


- reigina begutta. 


Leg - 


- leurina. 


„ woman 


- reigina loanina. 


Light - 


- unamenina. 


Wind - 


- ragalanae. 


Little - 


- moboleneda. 


Wombat - 


- rogeta. 


Man - 


- nagada. 


Woman (Black 


1 - louana. 


Moon - 


- weethae. 


Wood 


- mouna. 



608 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



COMPARISON OF THE VOCABULARIES OF ROBERTS AKD 

MILUOAN. 





Bobtrta 


Mm^M. 


Brfly ... - 


Lomodina 




Lomate. 


Back .... 


Tabrina 


- 


Talina. 


Thomb- 


Rennitta 


. 


Rftanafwtita. 


Fingen 


Reena - 


- 


Rye-na. 


Naila ... 


Reerana 


m * m • 


Ryeetony^ 


Wallaby 


Tarana 


- 




Wombat 


Rogeta 


- 


Rowitta. 


Spear - . - - 


Preena- 


- 


Pena. 


Basket- 


Tareena 


M * * 


Trenah. 


Swim .... 


Pugara 


. 


Pughrah. 


Catamaran (canoe) 


Nungana 


- 


Nunganah. 


Flesh .... 


Oagana 


- 


Palammena. 


Skin .... 


Tendana 


- - - 


Lurarunna. 


Noae ... - 


Mudena 


- . . 


Muye, muggeDA. 


Mouth - 




. 


Kaneina, 


Chin . - . - 


Congene 




Comniena (Oyster Bay). 


Tongne 


Mene - 


. 


Menn^ 


Ears .... 


VVegge 


. 


Wayee. 


SkuU .... 


Poiedaranina 


Pmggamoogena (Oyster 








Bay). 


Beard .... 


Cognina 


a « a 


Cowinn^ 


Hand .... 


Nuna - 


- 


Reemutta. 


Arm - - . - 


Womena 


* * w 


Wiihnna. 


Ship .... 


Tedeluna 


. 


Lune poina makkaba. 


Foot ... - 


Lagaira 


- 


Lugganah. 


Man (Black) 


Nagada 


. 


Pallawah 


Woman 


Louana 


- 




ChUd (babe) • 


Pugyta 


^ « « 


Pugyta riela. 


Valley. 


Logowelae 


- 


Mara-way-lee. 


Kangaroo - 


Leina - 


• • * 


Lena. 


Bird - - - - 


Greigena 


m m m 


Punna. 


Crayfifih 


Nubena 


- 


Nubd. 


Eye - - - - 


Nubena 


- 


Nubrenah. 


Sun . . . - 


Pannubrae 


. 


Pallanubranah« 


Moon .... 


Weethae 


- 


Weetah. 


Star ... - 


Daledine 


- 


Romtenah. 


Rain . 


Boora - 


- 


Porrah. 


Wind .... 


Ragalanae 


- 


Rallinganunn^ 



COMFABISOir 


OF THX 


THE TASMANIANS. OU« 

YOGABULASIBS OF ROBERTS AND MlLUGAN — 






continued. 






Aoberts. 


MtlHgMi- 


Cold - 


^ 


^ ^ 


Malanii 


Mallan^. 


Frost • 


- 


- 


Onnadina 


OorattaL ^ 


Fire - 


- 


- 


Ooane . - - - 


Ngnne. 


Water- 


• 


- 


Leena - ■ > - 


Liawenee (Liena, 
Oyster Bay). 


HOQBO - 


- 


• * 


Lineda- - - 


line. 


Night . 


- 




Lnena - - . • 


Nmi6. 


Forehead 


» 




Bongena 


Penghana. 


Fiinn - 


tf 




Ngananna 


Ngonannah. 


Black cockatoo 




Moingnana - 


Menuggana. 


White „ 






Ngarana 


Nghara. 


Gome here 


- 




Todawadda - 


Tattawatta. 


Go away 


- 




Tagara 


Tawkwabee. 


Laugh • 


- 




Binana 


Penlnna (Oyster Bay). 


Cry - 








Tarratoone. 


Dead - 






Moingaba 


Moy^. 


Sing - 






Tiana .... 


Lyenn^. 


Fight - 






Moingaba 


Moymengana. 


Kiss - 






Modamogi - 


Moeemir^. 


Talk - 






Palqnajid 


Poieta kannabeh. 


Bad 


- 




Poamori 


Nolle. 


Sheoak- 


- 


- 


Lube ... - 


1 TiUhbe. 


Gum-tree 


- 


- 


Greeta- - .- 


Moonah. 



Vocabulary of the language of a Tasmanian tribe, 
obtained in Hobart Town, in 1835, by Dr. John Lhotsky, 
from a Mr. McGeary, who was exceptionally well acquainted 
with the language. Geographical Journal of Van Diem&fCs 
Landy vol. 1, p. 47. 

(W.) and (£.) signify respectively the west and east side of Van 

Diemen*s Land. 



All round - - metaira. 


Bandicoot - 


- padana. 


Arms - - abri (W.). 


Belly - 


- kavinmSra (W.). 


Ashamed, to be - vadabnrena. 


Boy - 


- plireni. 


Bad - - katca. 


Breast 


- voyena. 


Badger - napanrena. 


Brother 


- pleaganana. 



VOL. m. 



2Q 



610 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



VOCABULABT 


1 

OF THE liANGUAas OF A Tasmaniak Tbibe — oomJtkmoL 1 


Canoe - 


- lukrapanL 


Grass - 


- rodedana, paUL 1 


Cape Grimm 


- pilni. 


Grass-tree - 




Cat (native) 


- lila(E.). 


Ground 


- gonta. 1 


Chief • 


- bungana. 


Gull - 




Chin - 


- kamnina. 


Hair • 


• zitina. 


Circular Head 


- malut&. 


Hand • 




Clouds 


. limeri 


Handsome - 


- marakupa. 


Come, to 


- tipera. 


Hawk • 


. ingftfiATia. 


Country 




,, (bUck) 


- putuna. 


Crow - 


- kella, katena. 


High - . 


• vatina. 


Day . 


- megra. 


I- 


- mena. 


Deva - 


- comtana (E.), 


I will go and hunt mena malaga | 




nama (W.)i 




latia. 




rediarapa (S.)* 


I tell you - 


- mena lageta. 


Dog (native) 


- leputalla (E.). 


Island- 


. lirevigana. 


Drake- 


- mabena. 


Kangaroo - 


- lelagia (W.). 


Drink, to - 


- lugana. 




Dry - 


- katribintana. 


Kangaroo-rat 


- riprinana. 


Ear - 


- pitserata. 


Knee - 


- minebana. 


Earth - 


- natta. 


Know, to 


- tunepi. 


Elbow (?) . 


- roweUa (W.). 


Leg - 


- latanama. > 


Emu - 


- rakana. 


Less - 


. tavengana. 


Evacuate, to 


- legard. 


Little - 


- lavara. 


Eye - 


- lepina. 


Low - 


- linteoe. 


Eyebrow - 


- tipla (W.). 


Magpie 


- kenara. 


Face - 


- niperina. 


Man (White) 


. lusivina. 




manarabel (W.). 


„ (Bkck) 


- vaiba. 


Father 


- mumlamSna. 


Mersey River 


- pirinapel. 


Fight - 


- menana. 


Moon • 


- vena. 


Fine day 


- lutragala. 


Mother 


- tattana (W.). 


Fire - 


- lope. 


Mountain • 


- trawala. 


Flying 


. pinega. 


Mutton-bird 


- yavla. 


Foot - 


- langana. 


Neck - 


- denia (W.), 


Fog . 


. mina. 




lepina. 


Forest 


- lovregana. 


Night - 


- levira. 


Frog - 


- pulbena. 


Nose - 


- minarara. 


Frost - 


- oltana. 


Oak (native) 


- lemena. 


Get, to 


- mengana. 


. Old man 


- lalubegana. 


Girl - 


• sudinana. 


One side 


- mabea. 


Go, to 


- kableti. 


Opossum 


- milabaina. 


Goose - 


- robengana. 


Pelican 


- trudena. 



TEE TASMANIAKS. 



611 



VOOABULABT 


OF THE Lanouaoe OF A Tashanian Tuibe — Continued. 


Porcnpine • 




Stop, to 


- mekropani. 


Port Sorell - 


- panatani. 


Stout - 


- canola. 


Posteriors - 


- wobrata. 


Sultry - 


• ratavenlna. 


Biver - 


- waltomana. 


Sun - 


- piterina. 


BiYnlet 


- montemana. 


Swan - 


- rowendana. 


Bock - 


- megog. 


Teeth - 


- yana. 


Bun, to 
Seal - 


- moltena, mella. 

- kateila. 


Thigh - 


- tula. 


Shout, to - 


- kamL 


Tongue 


- mena. 


Sit down, to 


- mevana. 


Walk, to • 


- tabelti. 


Snake - 


- kataL 


Water (fresh) 


- lugana. 


Snow - 


- oldina. 




moga. 


Star - 


• potena, luarama. 


„ (salt) 


- moahakall. 


Stone - 


- nami. 


Wood- 


- munumara (E.)* 




NORMAN'S Vi 


DCABULAB 


Y. 



The following vocabulaay, which has never been in print, 
was forwarded to me by the late J. E. Calder. It was col- 
lected by the late Revd. James Norman, at Port Sorell, Tas- 
mania, at which place he resided for many years as minister. 
In what tribes the words recorded were in nse is not known. 
Though they differ very considerably from MiUigan's, it will 
be seen, nevertheless, from the table which follows the 
vocabulary, that there are a certain number which agree. 
It will have been noticed that in some of the Australian 
languages we have wee or ween in the senses of sun^Jlre, Q,ud 
wood. In the Tasmanian languages we have sometimes the 
equivalents of moon, rainbow, word, ashes, ojid^re from the 



same root :— 


■ 






Ant (large) 


- tySnerminn^r, 


Bark (a.) - 


- m5om^$. 




w&yteenn6r. 


Baskets (native) • 


- tringh^rSr, 


Ascend (v.) 


- tSccSmfo, 




pdftkSlSr, 




tSng2(ru&r. 




mS9i&, 


Back («.) • 


- kSrmttr&r, 




pamellar. 




kSmdOrrenSr. 


Be quiet 


- cSrran6r. 


Bark, to 


- tSlamtSr. 


Burthplace 


- moleddemer. 




2( 


J2 





612 



THE AUSTRAUAK RACE: 



Nobmak's YooAxuiABY^contmued, 



Beef - 
Big . . 

Bite, to - 
Black beetle 



Blood 



Blow, to 
Bone 



Bread 

Break (see EUl). 



pSrkftlUr. 

jackdrOm^n&r. 

Id^&imdr. 

tSrr&rgSr, 
noonghenar, 
wollibb£mdr. 

iiLySgttrmSSiidr, 
w.yftt&rmSQndr, 
p€ntdrw§rt£nSr. 

l^c5oxigh&i&r, 
loang&re. 

trannSn&r, 
trifinn&r, 
pdn&rthdnfir. 

tooreSlifir. 



Breasts 


- nfirr&rgoSnfir, 




trSrwdrlam^, 




tdbOrcSrloSner. 


Bring, to - 


- worrar. 


„ water 


- mokdntir. 




woortlnSr. 


Bush 


- meSthenfir, 






Calf (of leg) 


- warkellar. 


Caress, to - 


• kayerp&ngomer. 




kftmerminn&:. 


Cat (domestic) 


- wyammgherwfL- 




nghemer. 


Catamaran (raft) Io5croppdm6r. 


Chief - 


- ndSndrftmdr. 


Child (Black) 


- poometh^n&r. 


Olimh, to - 


- tSrrSmarrSr, 




croanghYnn^. 


Clothing 


- ttlem^. 




ttlSmSm&r. 


Cockatoo • 


- toonanftmee. 


Cold - 


- krfiarwSrlar. 


Come • 


• teSanfir. 


Conveyance 


- le9&rmoor&r. 


Convalescent 


- tSggtlrpSSlfir, 




nfim^ndpeetSr, 



Copulate 

Cramp 

Crow 



Cry, to 

Cuts in skin (orna- 
mental) 
Cut, to 

Dead - 

Deception • 

Descend, to 

Dig, to 

Dirty 

Dive (v.) - 

Dog - 
Drink, to - 
Dull— stupid 
Bar 

Eiarth • - - 

Eat - - - 
Exclamations of 

surprise 
Exclamation to 

draw attention 
Evil spirit - 
Excrement - 
Expression of 

salutation 
Eye - 



trok&iur. 



wo: 

lOnyfir, mdkdr&i^ 
tSSand^roodd- 
nSr, triiinyttr. 

tSrrSr. 

pStthenSr. 

tStrSanghln^y 
oongtkrtfirpool&: 

bl&gttrdedlflr, 

wdrjliOck. 
p&rm6reuo5, 

gSrb6r^b5ber& 
mabberkennar, 

oongnrlnnhtner. 

martl^coot&iXr, 

nOndrmeSnSr. 
plgggOrlermin- 

n6r, triSgtirbo- 

ghdmS. 
tognrlongurber- 

ner. 

moograr. 
t6m5kSnfLr. 
to&nnSr. 
teSmtirladdS- 

nan3. 
triSgurbugume, 

plegurlamer. 
tSguruSr. 
SUSr! nomebeiX! 

nee! nee! 

lagueroppeme. 

t.yan6r,te6than6r 

peQlingh^n&r, 

plegagenar. 
plggQrlethltr, 

nebbelteSthfi- 

nSr, neurikee- 

nar. 



THE TASMANIANS. 



613 



Nobman's yooAStJLABY— continued. 



Fall down - 


- nebbertaltick, 




nayendree. 


Fiddle 


- Ifigapack, lagrer- 




mlxiner, langa- 




mark. 


Fire - 


- partr5ller. 


Fire-tail (a bird) - pootherenner. 


Fireagun, Boonrge lingh&idg. 


Flatulent • 


- tick&mar, tee- 




agurnaunerne. 


Flea - 


- nSHnar. 


Fold up 


- languennee. 


Food - 


- gibbly. 


Foot - 


- langoonar. 


Forehead - 


- m5nur, n5on- 




ghiner. 


Frightened • 


- terrewSrtenar. 


Frog - 


- roUaner. 


Fly 


- nfibo5lytinXr, 




m&rnar, mar- 




pooemlLrtenar. 


Give away, to 


- p&rrSg0ne8, 




tSfighener, 




rappSS. 


Go, to 


- tagOrner, trar- 




wernar. 


„ back, to 


- canghdnd. 


» 


- t5p«ltd6. 


„ away - 


- p&rrSrwSr. 


Goat • 


- m&rtillarghellar. 


Good - - 


- narrarcooper. 


Good-bye - 


- wollighererper- 




narner. 


Grape 


- tllrrurcfLrtar, 




tOrrocOrthenar. 


Grass - 


- rorertherwSr- 




tener. 


,f (long) 


- troonar, nOngur- 




minner. 


Grab, found under nfirnar, narnSr- 


roota of trees 


nannd. 



Gum - 


- marnar, moonar. 


„ -tree - 


- wftrterooenar. 




plandUddenar. 


Hair - 


- lagurnerbarner. 


Hang (execute) 


- troguiUgilrdick, 




wartherpS5- 




thertick. 


Hand - 


- rajfirner, nar- 




neruienner. 




p&rtererminner. 


He, she 


- nftrrar. 


Head - 


- neftcoOgular, 




neugolar. 




peScSrkerlein- 




armer. 


Here - 


- lumbe. 


Horse- 


- parcoHtenar. 


House - 


- ISSbrSrnS, 




ldp^n&rn& 


Hungry (stomach plonerpOrtick. 


empty) 




Hut - 


. pedngurnee. 




nartick. 


Iguana 


- mSrtheriddenar, ' 




leenar, peelSn- 




nar, meethSn- 




nar. 


It 


- niggnr. 


Jaw (under) 


- camOner. 


„ (upper) 


- naarwmner. 


Kaugaroo - 


- terrar, w5olar, 




ill&r, pleathe- 




nar. 


,, -rat 


- keupSrrar. 


„ sinew 


- laerp€nner. 


Kill or break 


- crackerpucker. 




tamur. 


Kiss, to 


- mellkener. 




pigurner. 


Knead, to - 


- trallerpereSner, 




bfinghernar, 




narrynar. 



614 


THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 






Norman's Vooabuiabt-— oonXmiiaJ. 




Knee • 


- nSmerpSnner, 


Nice or palatable 


leekener. 




plS&nerp$nner. 




troanghener. 


Laugh 


- piUeurmolar, 


No . - • 


nummerwar. 




pickemar, mac- 


„ good - 


• nouddiock. 




kererpillame. 


Nose 


mSnfiwuiT&r, 


Lazy - 


• warterpS5lyar, 




mo5n2r. 




nemeSner. 


One - 


. marrSrvran, 


Leg - 


• plegOmer, 




borar, pirmere. 




lurerener. 


Open - 


- lee&rway, 


Lips - 


• wurlermlnner. 




lee&DgwtillAr* 


Look!- 


- tr5necartee! 




Sif. 


Look, to 


- l&bberar. 


Opossum - 


. wolimmemer. 


„ at me 


- labberar mSSner. 




tarrimderrar. 


Magpie 


• c&llecotoghener, 


Peach 


■ warterooramar. 




trubramar. 




beemguoganar. 


Man (White) 


- loderwinner. 


Peppermint-tree 


- mSetherbir- 


„ (Black) 


- wibar. 




benar, mdlghe- 


Me - 


• meSner. 


• 


n&r. 


Mimoea (prickly) pavemlnner, 


Pig - - • 


• oomecartanganer. 




rapprinner. 




probrithener. 


Moon (see Sun). 




Pigeon 


- lamar, larrenar. 


More 


. weSminer. 


Picture 


- nSSmerteekener, 


Mouth 


- mokerl§ebrer. 




loteSbemefiner- 


Move - 


- linguminne. 




ner, loteSghe- 


Music 


- n&yamerooc&r- 




nar. 




nee, nebSrle 


Plenty 


- p&rmerprar. 




camee. 


Posteriors 


- catdrar, war- 


Mushroom (not 


plSnnar, neSrar, 




berertSener. 


eaten by the nSeraik, mSSro- 


Pregnancy 


- tragardick, 


BlackB) 


rar. 




nomercurtick, 


Musket 


- partrollarne (see 




planewoorack. 




Fire), leunar. 


Presently - 


- parcdniack, 




loeenar. 




peSmar. 


Mussel 


- poftckerler, par- 


Prick, to - 


- troonghenne. 




nellar, war- 


Pull to (a boat) 


• pargonee. 


% 


keUer. 




wayabbemer, 


Mosquito - 


- mokerer. 




lucroppemer. 


Mutton 


- martillar. 


Put or place (v.) 


• plangener. 


Nails 


- teuminer, mi&r- 


„ bn(t;.)- 


- toanohinnee, 




thereroomenar. 




mokenurmin- 


Neck 


- pleallergobber- 




ner. 




ner, loorener. 


1 Bain - - 


- toorar. 



THE TASMAIOANS. 



615 







Nobman's VorjiBiJUiSY— continued. 




Raw (relating to 


pleSnduddlSck, 


Spit, to 


- mamerminner, 


meat) 




m&ncar. 




petherwartenar. 


Boast, to 


- 


meerorar, 


Stare or track 


- lamgemer. 






mamgumer. 


Starfish 


- maenkoo, 


Bnb, to 


- 


newmertew- 




maarkanner. 






ghenar. 


Stay - 


- ulvugheme. 


Ban, to - 


- 


nSSnghenar. 


Stone - 


- teewartear, lar- 


Salt-water 


or sea 


mokenur, 
trarwerlar. 




nar, peurar, 
noeenar. 


Scorbntio 


oom- 


peunermumer, 


Stomach 


- pldner, 


plaint, name of 


leallerminner. 




plaangner. 


Seaweed 


- 


penneagumer. 


Stomachfal 


- plonerboniack. 






neoonendenar. 


Strike 


- lugumarmoonar. 


See • 


m « 


netLnkenar. 




riagumer. 


Sick - 


- 


loneroner, 


Strong 


- noomeanner. 






memonr&ck. 


Suck - 


- marrarwar. 


Sing, to 


- 


camerwelegor- 


Sun and moon tooweenyer. 






ner. 


(left undifitin- larthethelar. 


Sit down 


• • 


cr§ckemee. 


guished) 


warkellenner, 


Shake hands - - 


iiamenneiiner, 




larthertegumer 






parlerlermin- 


Swim, to - 


- tringhener. 






ner. 


Take off, to 


- licanghener. 


Shake, to 


• • 


peeng wartenar. 




licoorar. 


Shut • 


- 


pomeway, 
pewterway. 


Thighs 


- trtlngermar- 
teener, kaar- 


Skin - 


- 


neeamurrar. 




werrar. 






loantagamar. 


Tiger (native) 


- crimererrar. 






moomtenar. 


Toadstool • 


- mayerkeperlar- 


Sky - 


- 


tooreSner. 




lee. 


Sleep, to 


- 


logumer. 


Tobacco 


" pySgumer. 


Smoke 


- 


noonwartenar. 


Toe - 


- lagumer. 






eulSrmlnndr. 


To-day 


- larthertegumer. 


Soldier (a 


corrup- 


tooyar. 


Tooth - 


- le^aner. 


tion) 






Tongue - - 


- trarwemer. 


Song, snn^ 


l by wo- mazgnricker- 




kdnewurrar. 


men in a 


stand- 


earner. 


Touch, to • 


- namerminner. 


ing posture 




Trinket 


• derenner, 


Sprat - 


- 


pellogSnnor, 




neandramer. 






ploo-crimmniir. 


Three 


- wyandirwar. 


Speak, to 


- 


carmee. 


There 


• mamder. 


Spear 


- 


arlenar, peear- 
ner, pleSplar. 


Throw, to - 


- p^rrerpenner, 
lugurpemeller. 



1 



616 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 



NOBMAS'S VOCABULABT— COMtiltMeil. 



Two - 


• pySnerbarwir. 


Wing of bird 


. podrOnnjyr, 


Unfiniihed - 


• pennayniertick. 




paranerrar. 


Urine • 


. mCdnghenar. 


We - 


- warrander. 


Vomit, to - 


- neQgonar, 


Woman, anything tSSbrarmokennr. 




wyfingnmer, 
penSffherer- 


appertaining to 




meBner. 


Wombat • 


- probnddener. 


Waddy (club) 


. Hilar. 


Wood 


• weenar. 


Walk, to • 


- p55pl&nghenack, 




weSnamSme. 




wirkcrGSner. 


Woodaahea 


• weSnti^nnar, 


Wash, to - 


- legumer. 




portroltiennar. 


Water 


• mSokenner. 


Whistle, to 


. pencannor. 


Wa^letree 


- mS5nar. 




ploogamlnner. 


Wind 


• llnghenar, 
tSSverluttenar, 




peunoonghener. 




UngOmerrar. 


Whiskers - 


- cSrtneener. 


Wipe, to - 


- nagtLnner, 


Yes . 


• pSmxir, 




nabmckert&r- 




p&rwarlar. 




ner. 


You - 


• nSSner. 



Words in thb Vogabulabibs of Norman and Milugan which 

agrkb mors or less. 



FngHth. 


Nonnao. 


iffffligMi 


Nose - 


• • « 


Noonar 


Mununa. 


To dine 


. 


Togurlongurbemer 


Tonelunto. 


„ eat - 


- 


Tegumer - 


Tuggana. 


Rain • 


m m m 


Toorar 


Porrar. 


To laugh 


. 


Pickemar - 


Poenghana. 


„ sleep 


... 


Logumer - 


Lony. 


Stone - 


. 


Lamar 


Loinah. 


Spear - 


. 


Peeamer 


Pena. 


Dung or excrement 


Tyaner 


Tiena. 


Bad : 


. 


Nouddiook - . . 


Noweiack. 


You - 


- 


Neener 


Neena. 


Me - 


- 


Meener 


Meena. 


Sick - 


. 


Memunrack 


Micrackanyach. 


To strike 


- 


Lugumarmoonar 


Luggana golumpt6. 


Flea - 


. 


Neunar 


Non^. 


Gum-tree 


- 


Moonar 


Moonah. 


One - 


. 


Marrarwan * 


Marrawah. 



THE TASMANIANS. 



617 



WOBI>S m THE VOOABULASIBS OF NOBMAN ANP MiLUOAN WHIOH 

AOBEE MORE OR LESS — contmued. 



Engliah. 


Norman. 


Mniigiin. 


Spit 


V 


. 


Mamerminner - 


Kamenameena. 


Mushrooiii 


- 


- 


Neerar 


Nearana. 


To climb 


- 


- 


Groanghinnee 


Erony^. 


Opoflsum 


- 




Tarramderrar 


Tarripnyenna. 


Kangaroo 


- 




Terrar - - - 


Tarra-na. 


My blood 


- 




Wyattermeener - 


Warrgata meena. 


To blow 


- 




Loangare - 


Loinganah. 


Wind - 


- 




Linghenar - - - 


Lewan. 


To kiss 


- 


- 


Melikener - 


MiewalU. 


Frog - 


m m 


- 


Rollaner 


Balla. 


Basket 


- 


- 


Tringherar - - - 


Tnghbranah. 


Two - 


- 


- 


Payanerbarwar - 


Piawah. 


Three - 


- 


- 


Wyandirwar 


Lea winnawah. 


Urine - 


• ^ 


- 


Moonghenar 


Mongana. 


Fly 


- 


- 


Mamar 


Monga. 


Hand - 


m m 


- 


Ragumer - 


Biena. 


Foot - 


- 


- 


Langoonar - - 


Luggana. 


Wood - 


- 


- 


Weenar 


Winna, wiena. 



NAMES OP NATIVES GIVEN IN THE REVD. ME. NORMAN'S 

VOCABULARY. 

Ben Lomond Mob. 
Leemogannar, the Chief. 



TSSm€S. 

MallangSrparwarle5n&r. 

PSbb^rpooter. 



Women's Names. 

Mftyt3fenn6r. 
Po5r6rtenn£r. 



Men's Names. 



PrignSpann&r. 

PeHndroon&roon&r. 

Trall&rpeSnSr. 

ParthSmerpSnndnSr. 

Gamdrleetdn&r. 

PlA&nndroon&r. 



TSSthSrwUbbeiSr. 

NSSmgfirSnn&r. 

MeemoolibbdmSr. 

TeetOrterSr. 

Plan^SrrftrtoothdnSr. 

May'ennSr. 



618 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



Bin LoMoyD Mob.- 
l^thdrpSSndr. 
TS6w6rldrpoon6r. 
Troon'dthdrpoondr. 
TSrr&*peSndr]angttni&:. 
P55r65iiS9oXr. 
LeSnfirfile&ngh&idr. 
Larwarl&rparwirlSSniCr. 
PenhdrdrpOrwilrlSimar. 
LftrklgOoXr. 
Tewt&rpQim&r. 
NfiggtirplUinfir. 
PuHndrweSghtiiiSr. 
TrSSSrpSnn&r. 
P§imdr65n£r. 
Loonfirminn^. 
Tingh&^rpSrrSr. 
W&rtherl55kfirt6xmSr. 
PCSthdrdrterrXr. 
TSewdrldrpoonte. 
Pl€ngtLrr&:terrSr. 
Pring'firtoSldrSr. 
T&rth6rialdr6r. 
M6wdrtSxm&r. 
TS9ih6nn5op6lrSr. 
R&ngtbiD&nnfir. 
Tr55gttrpaim6r. 



-Men's Names — conUmteeL 
Eb*b6lrazmer. 
N6Siid6r£rp55ndr. 
Ksetdrpoondr. 
TSSlatterSr. 
TeOgftrfirpanndr. 
MdrgnnSr. 
CflppSrlangflnXr. 
Peiirapp6rleeiiar. 

NeSndrclSendr. 

Warterlookdrtexm&r. 

Tiiig*tirSip€rrSr. 

PSrlfirtSrwdpitt&ifir. 

OSrw^rtfirwinndr. 

Lfir'gQim&. 

TeethermobberUCr. 

PennerGonSr. 

LdXrtennXr. 

Peb'bfiranSr. 

Pling'thootfinXr. 

Par'lSrpSupSrterten&r. 

War'tSmSmmdrtinnfir. 

Trar'n^reSnte. 

Nam^kfiranndr. 

WartdrmSSltittdrweSndr. 



Note. — Sexes of the Big River tribe not distinguiahed. 

Bio Riyeb Mob. 
Mont'erpeSlySrtSr, the Chief. 
P&Tdrp&rco5t6nSr. | TfireSt^e. 



VOCABULARY BY JORGEN JORGENSON. 

The following vocabQlary is extracted from the Tasmanian 
Journal of Natural Science ^ vol. 1, p. 309 et seq., where the 
following statement occurs: — " The major part of the follow- 
ing list of native words was extracted from documents in the 
Colonial Secretary's Office, by the late Jorgen Jorgenson." 
Those marked with an asterisk were frirnished by the Revd. 
Thomas Dove, lately resident in Flinders Island. Those in 
italics are from L'Entrecasteaux, taken in 1792: — 



THE TA8MAKIANS. 



619 



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THE TASMANIANS. 



621 



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THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



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THE TASMAmAKS. 



623 



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624 



THB AUBTBALIAN BACB: 



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THE TASMANIANS. 



625 



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VOL. III. 






I 



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2B 



626 



THB AUSntALIAN RACE: 



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627 






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628 



THE AUSTRALIAK BACE: 



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THE TASMANIAKS. 



629 



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1 1 •. 1 


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1 


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I 


Taddiwa - 


1 1 


1 1 1 1 i 1 


1 \ 

\ 


1 


1 


III 


Keekawa* 


1 

1 1 1 1 


Nabowla 


Mella - 
£mita - 


\ 1 


1 






1 1 


Cartela 
Bulemena - 




1 • 


1 1 1 












1 


1 1 1 


Waddamana 
Montnmana - 

Mabea - 
Moltema 


1 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Nenuwaddinam 








a • 


1 


1 

! 

1 


Sea - - - - 

Seaweed - 

See - - - - 


Seal- - - 
Sharpen - 
Sheep 


Porpoise • 
Port Sorell 
Put away - 
Bain 


Biver 

„ (large) - 


Bivulet - 

Bocks 

Bope 

Bound (turn) - 

Bun (v.) - 

Sand 


Say • 
Scold 


1 
.13 

1 



630 



THB AUSTRALIAN BACK: 




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THE TASMANIAKS. 



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632 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACK 






^ 



II ilrl 11 






I I 






^^ ^^ ^^ 

s s* s 

a; Se: iz; 




I I I 



• I 



•§1 






CB CQ CO 10 69 

^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



I 






THE TASMANIANS. 



633 



WOBDA IN WHICH JOBGSKSON AND MlLLIQAN AQBEB MOBE OB LESS. 





J. Joigenion. 


Mmig&D. 


Aim - 


_ , 


^ 


Houana 


Wfihnna. 


Basket 


- 


- 


Tern - - 


Tille. 


Beard 


- 


- 


Canguin^ - 


Cowinn6. 


Black man 


- 


- 


Palewaredia 


Pahleah. 


Gome - 


- 


• 


Tarrabilyie 


Tallya-lea. 


Crow - 


- 


- 


Tiina - - • - 


Lietenna. 


Cry - 


- 


- 


Targa 


Tagara toomiack. 


Ear - 


- 


- 


Ouagui 


Wayee, 


To eat 


- 


- 


Tuwie 


Tughlee. 


Egg - 


- 


- 


Palinna 


Pateenah. 


Eye - 


- 


- 


Nuber^ . . - 


Nubr6. 


Fight - 


- 


- 


Memana 


Miamengana. 


Fire - 


- 


■• 


Unee - - - - 


Ngune. 


Fist - 


- 


- 


Reannemana 


Ree-trierrena. 


Flyblow 


- 


- 


Mounga 


Mongana (fly). 


Foot - 


- 


- 


Langana ... 


Luggana. 


Frost - 


- 


- 


Ulta - - - - 


Ookah. 


Grass • 


- 


- 


Boonina 


Rouninna. 


Moon - 


- 


- 


Weena 


Weenah leah. 


Mouth 


- 


- 


Canea 


Kaneinah. 


Mutton-bird 


- 


Youla 


Yolla. 


To run 


- 


- 


Reugnie ... 


Ren^. 


Snake 


- 


- 


Pouranna - 


Rawannah. 


Spear - 


- 


- 


Prenna 


Perenna. 


Star - 


- 


- 


Moordnnna 


Rhomdunna. 


Stone - 


. 


- 


Lonna 


Lonna* 


Strong 


. 


- 


Ralipianna 


Rulla rullanah. 


Tongue 


- 


- 


Mene - - - - 


Menn^. 


Two - 


- 


- 


Boula - - - - 


Pooalih. 


Wallaby 


- 


- 


Tara - . - - 


Taranna. 


Wmd 


- 


- 


Leewan 


Lewan. 


Vou - 


- 


- 


Nena 


Neena. 



634 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



VOCABULARY OF DIALECTS OF ABORIGINAL TRIBBS OF 

TASMANIA. 

Bt J08EFH MiLUOAK, F.L.S., ira 



Ki^HA 


Tribes from Ojtter 
B^ to Plttwmter. 


Tribes about Mount 
Royal, Brane Udaiid, 
Beoherdie Bay* and 


North-vest and 
WestccB. 


Absoeas 


Lieemena - 


Limet^- 




Absent 


Malumbo - 


Taggara 




Abstain - 


Miengpa - 


Parraw^ 


Wannabea 
toogh. 


Abstract (to 






— 


deduct) 








Accompany 


Taw4- - 


• m • ■ 


Tawfflea 
mepoilea. 


Acid (taste) - 


No-wieack 


Noilee - . . 


<Odulla. 


Acrid (taste) - 


Peooniack - 


Men^ wnttA or 
men^ruggara 


^-" 


Add to or put - 


Prolong - 


Poggoanee 
wughta 


Poilabea. 


Across (to put or 


Prolon-unyere - 


Wuggara tnngal^ 


Tienenable 


place) 






poingh. 


Adult wiy* 


Puggana min- 
yenna 


Pallawah - 


Pahlea. 


„ woman • 


Lowall min- 


Nienat^ and 


Noallea. 




yenna 


lowanna 




Afraid 


Tianna coith- 
yack 


Tiennawill^ - 


Camballet^ 


Afternoon - 


Eaawutto - 


Nunto-n^ 


Kaoonyleah. 


Aged (Uterally, 


Tinna-triours- 


Naggataboy^ 


'Gnee-muckl^ 


rotten-boned) 


tick 






Agile . - 


Menakarowa 


Narra warraggara 


— 


Ah! . - - 


Ah! . - - 


Mile-n^ 


— 


Air - 


Oimunnia - 




— 


Altogether 


Nnntyemtick - 


Mabbyl^ 


— 


Aloft - - 


Muyanato - 


Orougana 


— 






wughata 


• 



THE TASMANIANS. 



635 



VOGABULABY OF DiALEOTS OF AbOBIGIHAL TbIBES OF TAS1£ANIA— 

eofUintied. 



English. 


Tribes from Oyster 
Bay to Pittwater. 


Tribes about Mount 

Boyai, Bnme Island, 

Recherche Bay, and 

the South of Tasmania* 


North-west and 
Western. 


Amatoiy (rakiBh) 


Binnyowalinya - 


Tiingana looa 
renowa 


— 


Anger 


Miengoonnene- 
chana 


Poin^ moonalan^ - 


^~" 


Angle (crooked 


Wien-powenya - 


Wiena an<2 


— 


like the elbow) 




wienenna 




Ankle 


Munnaghana 


Mnnnawana- 


— 


Anoint 


Yennemee - 


Ruggara 


— 


Another - 


Tabboucaok 


Neggana 




Answer (to) 


Ouneeprap^ 


Oghnemip^ and 


— 


Ant (blue) 


Pugganeiptietta- 


oghnerap^ 


— 


Ant (small black, 


Ouiteitana- 


Moyberry 


— 


strong smelling) 








Ant (largest 


Tietta 


Tit4 - - - 


— 


black, Yenemons) 








Ant (red body. 


Nowateita - 


Lalla and loattera 


— 


with black head 








and tail) 








Ant-eater - 


Mnngyenna 


Munny^ 


— 


(Echidnasetoaa) 








Apparition 


Wurrawena 
krottomiento- 
neack 


Ria-wurrawa 




Aquiline - 


Munnna pugga- 


Maitingul^ - 


— 


(Boman-noeed) 


winya 






Arm - - . 


Wu'hnna - 


Wu*hnna - 


— 


Ashamed • 


Leiemtonnyack - 


Lienut^ 


— 


Aha ! yon are 


Annyah! 


Keetrelbea- 


— 


sulky all of a 


Teborah! 


noomena, penig- 




sudden 




gomaree! 




Ashes 


Tontaiyenna 


Toiberry . - 


Ronghtnly n^. 


Ask • . - 


Ongheewammeno 


Oghnamile^ - 


Onabeamabbel^. 



636 



THE AUSTRALIAN BACE: 



VOGABULA&T OF DiALICTS OF AbOBIOIKAL TEIBSB OF TaSICAKU— 

continued. 



Sa^iah. 


TribM from Oyvter 
BiOr to Pittwmter. 


Ttibem abonfc Mount 

Roya], Bmne Uftod, 

Rocherdie Baj, md 

the Sooth of TMDMiiiA. 


North'wwtuid 
WMtecn. 


Aflleep 


Tugganick - 


1 ^ngliJMia. 


Nenaiongabea. 


Awake (to open 


Grannymongthe^ 


— 


— 


theeyee) 








i> " " 


Wennymongthe^ 


Kunneoine- 
roidukat^ 




Awake him, 


lientiap^ - 


— 


nietiap^ 


ronaehim 








Ay (yea) - 


Narramuna 


Narrawa 


NaiTobaro. 


Azure (sky) 


Noorbiack - 


Warra-n6 


Loaranneleah. 


Awake (rouae ye. 


Lientable, tagga 


Nawat^, pegrate, 


T^kawugh nk 


get up) 


munal 


wergho ! 




Babe - . 


Cottrulutty^ - 


Puggata riela 


Rikent^ 


Bachelor - 


Pugganara mitty^ 


Lowatimy - 


Paponnewatt^ 


Back (the) 




Talinah 


Teerannelee* 
leah. 


Backward - 


Lenere 


Talire - 


Kelabateoorsh. 


Bad (no good) - 


Noweiack - 


None . - - 


Ee-ayngh-la- 
leah. 


Bandy-legged - 


paoick 


Rentrouet^ - 


— 


Bandicoot - 


Tiennah 


Tenghanah or 


Lugoileah mun- 






tenna-ne 


goinah leah. 


Bark (of a tree) 


Poora, poora-nah 


Warra- 


Pooraleah. 


Barren (woman) 


Kaeeto kekra- 
bonah 


Lowa puggatimy - 


Lopiteneeba. 


)> )> 


Kangemoona 


Loakennamal^ 


— 


Baskets 




Trenah 


Till^ 


Bat - - - 


Peounyenna 


L^rynah 




Battle 


Miemyenganah - 


Mialungana- 


Mungymeni leah. 


Beard 


Gomena puren- 


Gowinn^ 


Gomen^waggel^ 


Beardless - 


Gomena-ranyah • 


0>-win-timy 


Gominerah leah. 



THE TASMANIAKS. 



637 



VOOABULABY OF DiALBGTS OF ASOBIOINAL TbIBES OF TASMANIA— 

continued. 



EDgliah. 


Tribes from Oyster 
Bay to Pittwater. 


Tribes about Mount 
Royal, Bnrne Island, 
Recherche Bay, and 


North-west and 
Western. 


Beat (to strike) - 


Legganegulump- 


Lugguna 


Menghboibee 




t4 


, 


rat^. 


Bean (coxcomb) - 


Pugganatereety^ 


Pallowah-tutt^ - 


Papponn^ tughte 
leah. 


Beaaty(fine-look- 


Lowanna-elap- 


Nire-lowa - 


Noa noughanoatt^ 


ing woman) 


that-y^ 






»f f> " 


Lowanna-eleeba- 
naleah 


Loa-minery - 




Bark of tree flap- 


Poorakunnah - 


Lowarinnakunnah 




ping 








Bed (sleeping- 


Oortrackeomee, 


Orragorra warina, 




place in the 


noonameena 


orragnrra nemony 




bush) 








Before 


Mealtetriangule- 
beah 


Pningee 




Behind 


Mealtitta lerren- 
titta 


Talina 


— 


Belch (to) - 


Lnonna-konna - 


Loona kanna 




Belly - 


Tree-^rina - 


Lomate 


— 


Big (large) ■ 


Teeunna - 


Papla - 


— 


Bill (bird's) 


Meunna - 


Peegra - 


— 


Bird - 


Pnggunyenna - 


Pnnna - 




Bite - 


Ralkwomma 


Rebkarranah 




Bitter 


Laieeriack- 


Poina noily - 


— 


Bland/ordia no- 


None in the dis' 


Bernini 


— 


hUis 


trict 






Black 


Maback or ma- 
banna 


Loaparte 




Blood (my) 


Warrgata meena 


CUoccah 




Blossom 


Maleety^ - 


Nannee purillabe- 
nannee 


— ^ 


Blow-fly - 


Mongana - 


Monganah - 


^— 



638 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



VOOASOLABT Off DiALICTS OF AbOXIOIHAX. 



Tmibm ov 



EngUdL 


Tribes from Oyitor 
B^toPittwAtor. 


Tribes about Moimt 

Royal, BrmM Iriuid, 

Bwbarche B^j, and 

th« South of TlMDMBia. 


Worten. 


Blow (with the 


Loynn^ 


Loinganah - 


_^_ 


month forcibly) 








Boil {Fwruneulu») 


lieemena - 


Lieematah - 


—. 


Bosom (woman's) 




Pamgganah- 


— 


„ (man's) - 


Pnggamenyera - 


Pammgyenah or 
liatimy 


— 


Boy (smaU child) 


Melaagyenna - 


Puggatah paw-aw^ 


— 


„ (large „ ) 


Cotty-mellity^ - 


Poilahmaneenah - 




Bread 


Pannaboo - 


Pannaboona 


— - 


„ (give me 


Tienna miap^ 


liengana mk pan- 


Tnnghmbib^ tun- 


some) 


pannaboona 


naboo 


garingalea 


Breast (chest) - 


Meryanna - 


Toorinah 


— 


Brook 


Manenge-keetan- 


Wayatinah - 




Broom (a besom) 


lACt 

Perrutty^ - 


Beroieah 


m ^ 


Brother (Uttle) . 


Nietta mena of 
nietarrana 


Piembucki - 


— 


» (big) - 


Puggana tuantit- 


Peegennah - 


.» 




tyah 


m- 




Brow (forehead)' 


Rogoona - 


Roie-runnah 


— 


Bmshwood 


Weena-keetyen- 


liooranah 


— 


Bnm (hurt by fire) 


ua 
Punna meena - 


Wuggatah - 


^MiM 


Bury (to) - 


Parraw^ pean- 
gluntapoo 


Pomanneneluko - 




Buttock 


liengana - 


Nunnah 




By-and-by 


Piyer6 - 


Gunnyem waub- 
beraboo 


— 


Buzz (like a fly; 


Mongana • 


Monganah - 


_ 


also name of fly) 








0>me along, I 


Talpyawadyno 


Tattawattah onga> 


— 


want you 


tuyenacnnna- 
mee 


neena 





THE TASMAKIAKS. 



639 



VOCABULABY OP DlALECTB OF AbOBIOIKAL 

eonUnued, 



Tbibbs or Taskania— 



Engliflh. 


TribM from Oyster 
Buy to Pittwmtor. 


Tribee about Mount 
Royal, Bnine Island, 
Beoherohe Bay, and 


North-wert and 
Western. 


Call - 


Ronnie 


Ronnypalpee 


-^ 


Canoe (catama- 


Mallanna - 




Nunghnna. 


ran) 








Carcase 


Miackbourack - 


Miepoiyenah 




Cat (large native) 


Luyenna - 


Luyenna 


Lunnaorlaboib^. 


„ (small „ ) 


Pringreenyeh 


Lapuggana • 


Labaggyna or 
naboineen^U. 


Catarrh 


Teachrymena, 


Manah, 


Teachreena, 


• 


teaknonyak 


tekalieny 


teeakunny. 


,, with2)2(0p- 


Takkaruttye - 


Mmnm.ti larree 


Poorannacalle. 


- ncea 








Caterpillar 


Bianna 


Peenga - 


— 


(small) 








Cavern 


lielle wolingana 


Poatina 


— 


Caul - - 


Roongreena 


Meena or loarinah- 


Mena lowallina 
or kuttamoileh. 


C;ea8e(to) - 


Myeemarah 


Parraw^ 


— 


Charcoal - 


Maweena - 


Loarra 


— 


Chase (to) - 


Rhinyetto- 


Lerypoontabee 


— 


Chirrup (to) 


Tetyenna - 


TeUta - - 


— 


Chin - 


Comnienna 


Wahba 


— 


Chine (backbone) 


Myingana-tenena 


Turarunna - 




Cider from Euca- 


Way-a-linah 


Way-a-linah 


— 


lyptus 








Circle 


Lowamachana - 


Riawunna - 




Claw (talon) 


Kurluggana 


KuUuggana - 




Oay - 


Pannogana ma- 
Utty6 


Pappalye mallee - 




Crazy (cranky) - 


Tagantyenna or 


Tannatea 


Wayenoeele, or 




muggana pug- 




poietanat^, or 




goonyack 




kongatnn^, or 


Clean - 


Pannyealeebna - 


Mallea- 


kongatueele. 



640 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



VOOABULABY OF DiALBCTS OF AsOKIGnf AL TBIBBS OF TASMANIA- 

continued. 



EDftllflh. 


Tribes from Oyflter 
Bigr to Plttwster. 


Tribes ftboat Mount 

Royal, Bnine Islud, 

Recherche Bay, and 

the South of Tunnania. 


North-wesfcand 
Weetem. 


Climb (to) - 


Erony^ 


Eroanna 


— 


autch (to) 


Tiackboorack 


Tigyola 


— 


Cold . - - 


Tunack 


MaUan^ 


— 


Come (to) - 


Talpeyawadeno, 
taUya-lea 


Tnttawatta- 


— 


Conflnz (crowd) - 


Tirranganna 
menya 


Palabamabbyl^ - 


^~~ 


Conflagration - 


Kawaloochta 


Loiny or una par- 
oina 




Conversation (a 


Rhineowa mun- 


Poyara kunna nne- 


— 


great talking) 


gtHiagonea pog- 


mena 




>> 


Kamyalimenya - 


Kamamoonalan^ - 


— 


ff 


Kamalirya 


Kamaiar^ - 


— 


Cord (asmaUrope) 


Metakeetana 


Mit^ - 


— 


Corpse (a dead 


Myack boorrack 


Moy^ or mongy^ - 


— 


caroaee) 








Collect 


Onnyneealeeby^- 


Nirabe- - 


— 


Cough 


Tachareetya 




— 


Coxcomb (a fine- 


Pngganatareetya, 


Pallawah tntty, 


— 


looking fellow) 


puggatimy pena 


pallawahpamary 




Cockatoo (white) 


Weeanoobryna - 


*Nghara 


— 


„ (black) 


Mennggana 


'Nghay nunna 


— 


Crevice or fiasnre 


Liellownllingana 


Riengeena - 


— 


in rocks 








Oeek 


Manenya kee- 
tanna 


Liapota 




Cross- 


Oeilupoonia nra- 
poonie 


Poir^ tnngaba 


— 


Crow - - - 


Lietenna - 


Taw wereiny 


— 


Cry (weep) 


Naoutagh boa- 


Moi-luggata, 




• 


rack, tagara 


tarra toone 






toomiack 







THE TASMANIANS. 



641 



VOGABULABT OF BlAI^BOTS OF ABOBIOINAL TrIBES OF TASMANIA — 

continued. 



EngUsh. 


Tribes from Oyster 
Bay to Pittwater. 


Tribes about Mount 
Royal, Brune Island, 
Recherche Bay, and 


North-west and 
Western. 


Cut (to) - 


Lowgoone - 


Toagarah 


_ 


Cape Portland 


Tebryounna 


— 


— 


(language) 






• 


Creak (from fric- 


Tematakunna 


Betakunna - 


— 


tion of limbe of 








trees) 








Dance 


Kianna riacunha 




— 


Dark. - - 


Taggremapack ■ 


Nunc meene larra- 
boo 




Daughter • 


Neantym^na 


Loggatal^ meena - 


— 


Daylight - 


Taggre maranny ^ 




— 


Dead- 


Mientung bour- 
rackaTuJmerack 
bourrack 


Moy^ - 




Deaf - 


Guallengatick 
guanghata 


Wayeebed^ - 


— 


Deep (water) 


Loa maggalangta 


Kellatie 


— 


Demon 


Mienginya- 


Kia warrawah noil^ 


Pawtenlng-eelyU. 


Demur (grumble) 


Kokoleeny kon- 
qua 


^■^ 


■""* 


Den (of wild ani- 


lienwollingena - 


Blengena poatina - 


— 


mals) 








Depict (draw a de- 


Maoooloona 


Pallapoirena- 




sign in charcoal) 








Deplore (to lament 


Tagrunahkamul- 


Moaluggata kanna- 


— 


as at an Trinh 


uggana 


proie 




wake) 








Desire (to) - 


Oonacragniack - 


Poykokarra - 


— 


Desist (to) • 


Parrawureigu- 
nepa 


Parawuree - 




Dine (to) - 


Pooloogoorack • 


Tuggara nowe - - 




Dirt (mud of a 


Panogana ma- 


Mannana mally^ - 


— 


whitish color) 


leetya 







VOL. in. 



28 



642 



THE AUSTRALIAN RAGE: 



VOGABULAST OF DlALECTS OF AbOBIGINAL TBIBBS OF TASOUCnk — 

continued. 



EnglUh. 


Tribes from Oyster 
B^y to Pittwater. 


Trib«s ftboot Moont 
Royal, BruDe Iflland, 

RecherdM Bay, and 
the Sooth of 'Kunnanla. 


Korth-veit and 

WesteiB. 


Dirt (mud dried) 


Penganaratta - 
Pengana - 








— 


Dirty- 


Mawpack - 


Mawpa 


— 


Displeaae (to 


lieneghi mia- 


Poinawall^ . 


— 


make angry) 


wero or kukun- 
napoipuggeapa 






Dispute (to) 


Rinnea guanettya 


Kanna moonalan^ 


— 


Distant • 


Manlumb^ra 


Kantogganna w^b- 
bery 


— ~ 


Dive (to) - 


Ton^ lunto 


Togana lea-lutah 


— 


Diversion (sport, 


Leenyall^ - 


Luggara riaw^ 




play) 








Dizzy 


Mongtantiack - 


Nnbretanyt^ 


— 


Dog - 


Kaeeta 


Panoin^ 


— 


Dove (wild 


Mongalonerya - 


Moatah 


— 


pigeon) 








Draw (to pull) - 


Ko-ulopu - 


Menghana • 


— 


Dream 


Neacha puggaroa- 
mee 


Neaggara 


— " 


Drink 


Lougholee - 


Nugara 


— 


Drop (water) 


Liemkaneack 


Mikany 


— 


Drown 


Tong bourrak - 


Tong poyerd 


— 


Drowsy 


Tuggan^m^nui- 
ack 


Nueen^y - 


— 


Dry - - ■ 


Rongoiulong 
bonrrack, 
roungeack 


Eamaroide - 




Duck (gender not 


Wiekennya 


Woaroir^ - 


aa^ • 


distinguished) 








Dug - 


Paroogualla 


Paruggana - 




Dull (stupid dolt) 


Eoullangtaratta 


Poyetannyt^ 




Dumb 


Manemmen^na - 


Menaw^ly 





Dung (excrement) 


Tiamena - 


Tiena - 






THE TASMANIANS. 



643 



VOOABULABY OF DiALECIS OF ABORIGINAL TbIBES OF TASMANIA — 

continued. 



English. 


Tribes from Oyster 
Bay to Pittwater. 


Tribes about Mount 

Royal, Brune Island, 

Recherche Bay, and 


North-west and 
Western. 


Dnak- 


E^aoota 


Panubratony 


— 


Dust - - - 


Pughrenna 


— 


— 


Dwarf 


Wughwerra pae- 
etya 


Nuggatapaw^ 


" ^ 


Dyaentery or 


Tiaqu^nny^ 


Tiamabbyl^ 




Diarrhoea 








East Bay Neck - 


Lueenalang'ta - 


Lueenalanghta - 




Eaglehawk Neck 


Teeralinnick 


Teralinna - 




Eagle- 


Gooalanghta 


Weelaty 




Eagle's nest 


Lieemunetta 


Lieewughta - 




Ear - 


Mungenna - 


Wayee 


— 


Early (in the 


Tuggamarannye 


Nunawenapoyla - 




morning, at twi- 








Ught) 








Earth (mould) - 


Pengana - 


Mannena 


— 


Earthquake 


W ugbyranniack 


Munna potrunne • 


— 


Earthworm 


Lollah 


Lollara- 




Eat heartily 


Telbeteleebea - 


— 




Eat (to) - 


Tughlee, tuggana 


Tughrah, tuggranah 




Echo - 


Eukanna wurra- 
wina 


Eannamy^t^ 


^~" 


Eel 1 - . 


L^gomenya 


T ingowenah • 




Effluvia - 


Membreac - 


Poin4 noil4 - 


— 


Egg - - . 


Liena punna 


Pateenah 


— 


Elbow 


Wieninnah- 


Wayeninnah 


— 


Elf or fairy (fond 


Nang-inya - 


Nungheenah or 




of children and 




noilowanah 


. 


dances in the 




• 




hills, after the 








fashion of Scotch 








fairies) 




« 




Eloquent (talka- 


Mimkannilra 


Kannamoonalan^ - 


— 


tive) 


walah 







2 8 2 



644 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



VOCABITLABY OF DlALECTS OF AsOBIOnTAX. TeIBBS OF TaSMARIA- 

continued. 



EngUilL 


Tribes from Oyiter 
Bay to PittwatBT. 


Tribes aboat Moant 
Rojrml, Brune Uand, 

Becherdie Bay, and 
the South of Tumania. 


XI onh-wert and 
Western. 


Ember (red hot) 


Toneetea - 


Weealuttah - 




Embowel (to diB-) 


Parraw^ tiak- 
rangana 


Parratibe - 


~~ 


Emhraoe (Plato- 


Talwattawa or 


Tallawatta - 


Moilatend. 


nic) 


mgana wurra- 






• 


naree, 

Ramuna reluga* 
nee 






Emmet (small 


Ouyeteita - 


Lallah - 


— 


ant) 








£Imii - - - 


Punnamoonta - 


'Ngnnannah - 


— 


Encampment 


Liena wughta ro- 
taleebana 


Tiine rotali - 


^■" 


Enfeeble (to) - 


Miengotick, 
mienkomyack 


Mungawel4 • 


"^ 


Enough (suffi- 


Miemer^mel^ 


Narramoiewa 


— 


cient) 








Entrails 


Regana tianna 
or tiakrangana 


Poin^ > 


^■~ 


Evening 


Kaoota - 


Kawootah - 


— 


Exchange - 


Tientewatera 


Tayeneb^ or tayene 


— 




nent4 or tiang- 


nyelutera 






tetewemyna 






Excrement 


Tiamena - 


Tiannah 


— 


Expectorate 


Teagarea kragan- 
eack 


Manna m^red4 


-^ 


Extinguish 


Parlier^ - 


Patmgunab^ 


— 


Exudation - 


Wialina, or wal- 
lenah, or walla- 
menula 


Wialin4 - • 




Exuvia (skin of a 


Lierkanapoona 


liergrapoinena - 




snake) 


or lierkapoona 






Eye - 


Mongt^na 


Nubr^ or nubrenah 





THE TASMANIANS. 



645 



VOGABULABT OF DiALBOTS OF ASORIGINAL TbIBBS OF TaSMAKIA— 

corUinued. 



English. 


Tribes from Oyster 
Bay to Pittwater. 


Tribes about Mount 
Royal, Brune Island, 

Keofaemhe Bay, and 
the South of Tasmania. 


North-west and 
Western. 


Eyebrow - 


Lyeninna poor- 
hma 


Leeininn^ - 


— 


Eyelash 


Mongtalinna 


Nnbr^ tongany - 


— 


Eyelid 


Moygta genna - 


Nubre wnrrme - 


— 


Eyry - 


Malanna meena 


Tiinenah 




Falinoath and 


Eonawra Konna 






Gkorge's Blver 








Face - 


JN'iengheta - 


Noienenah - 


— 


„ • (fine) - 


Niengheta elap- 
thatea 


Noienanir^ - 


"^ 


Faoetioiis - 


Poigneagana 


Pen^ or penamab- 
beU 


~^ 


FfBoes 


Tianana 


Tianah 




Faint- 


Mongtaniack 


Nubretannet6* - 




Fairy- 


Mnrrombuckan- 
nya or nanginy a 


Murrumbnkannya 


~~ 


Falsehood - 


Maneentayana - 


Laninga noil^ 


• 


Fang (canine 


Wngherinna ru-r 


Payee roty W or 


— 


tooth) 


gotoleebana 


coorina 




Far - - - 


Tongoomela, 


Lomawpa, tomalah 


— 




lewatenoo, or 




— 








• 


Fat - - 


T^iAnTiA.mAAnA 


Pangana wayede^ 
PaUawah proina - 


_^ 


„ man - 


Poonamena 


— 




moonta 






„ woman 


Nienna langhta ■ 


Lowa proina 


— 


Father 


Noonalmeena - 


Nanghabee or nan- 
ghamee 


^i^m 


Feart- 


Tnf(pfely petta- 
leebea 


Tuggety proibee - 


^^^ 


Feather 


Paggerinna 


Lowinn^ 





Feeble 


Tnggemboonah • 


'Ngattai 


-— . 



* See the translation of tUizy, also of eye,—E. M. C. 



646 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



VOCABULABT OF DlALBCTS OF ABORIGINAL TbIBSS OF TASMANIA- 

continued. 



English. 


TxfbeB from Oyntet 
Bay to Plttwater. 


Tribes about Moont 

Royal, Brune Island, 

Recherche Bay, and 

the South of TMmania. 


North-wecfc and 

Westenu 


Feel (to pinch) - 


Waghanee • 


Winghaaee - 


^^ 


Fern - 


Lawitta-bmtea - 




— 


Fern-tree - 


Nowarraoomnu> 
nea 


Lapoinya 


— 


Fetch (to bring) - 


Eonnywattera • 


Kanna watta 


— 


„ (a spirit) - 


Preolenna - 


— 


— 


Fever 


Miempeooniack - 


Mie Inggrata 


— 


Few . 


Liiowa 


Potalttghy^ - 




Fiend- 


Winnya wainet- 
tea or miengin- 
nya 


Winnelnaghabam 


~~" 


Fight. 


Miamengana 


Moymengana 


• 


Filth - 


Lenymebry^ 


Ijin^ poine noil^ - 




Fin (of a finh) • 


Wunha - 


Puigha lamarina - 


— 


Finger 


Ri-ena 


Rye-na 


Reeleah. 


Fire - 


Tonna 


•Ngune' 


Winnaleah. 


Fire-taU (bird) - 


Lyenapontendiah 


Lyekah 


— 


Fire in the buHh 


Kawnrrinna 


Lienah 


— 


grass 








Firm (not rotten) 


Weerutta - 


VVeerull^ • 


— 


Firmament (sky) 


Warratinna 


Warrangal4 lomn- 


— 


Fish (a) - 


Mungunna - 


na 
Peeggana 




„ (cray) - 


Nunnya - 


Nub^ - - 


Nubyna. 


Fist - - - 


Ree-trierrena - 


Ree-mutha • 


— 


Five - 


Pugganna - 


Marah - 


— 


Flambeau - 


Poorena maneg- 
gana 


Leewnrr^ 


-^ 


Flank 


Poolominna 


Poolnmta and tia- 


—• 


Flea - 


Lowangerimena - 


None - 


— 


Flay - 


Relbooee traw- 


Lergara leawarina 


— 




mea 







J 



THE TASMANIANS. 



647 



VOGABUIABT OF DiALBCfIS OF ASOBIOINAL TbIBES OF TASMANIA — 

conHnued, 



Englkh. 


Tribes from Oyster 
B^y to Pittwater. 


Tribes about Mount 
Royal, Bruno Island, 

Recherche Bay, and 
the South of Tasmania. 


North-west and 
Western. 


Fleet (Bwift) - 


Wurrangata 




— 




poonalareety^ 


• 




Flesh (meat) - 


Wiangata - 


Palammena - 




Fling - 


Peaw^ 


Pikara 




Flint- 


Trowutta - 


Mungara 


• 


„ (black) - 


- 


Moratrona - 


— 


Float (to) - 


Ida ruolattea 


Puggata or ranny- 


— 


Flog - 


Luggana pooga- 
ran6 


BJia 
Lnnghana 


— 


Floimder(flatfiBh) 


Leninna - 


'Ngupota-metee - 


— 


Flow (as water) - 


Lia tarightea 


Lia teruttena 


— 


Fleece (or fur of 


Pooeerinna 


Longwinny - 


— 


animals) 








Fly (like a bird) - 


Koomela - 


Coaggara 


— 


„ (insect) 


Mongana - 


Monga 




Foam (froth) 


Kukamena-mena 


liia Uratame 


— 


Fog - ... 


Mainentayana - 


Warratie 


Pulangal6. 


Foolish (or fool)- 


Mungana paon- 
yack 


Noilee - 


Louneeat^. 


Foot - 


Luggana - 


Lugganah 


Lugh. 


„ (right) 


Luggana elee- 
bana 


Lugga worlna 


Malleear^. 


„ (left)- - 


Luggana aoota - 


Lugga oangta 


Oolatyneeal^. 


Footmark of 


Puggalugganna - 


Pallowa lugganah 


Pah lug. 


Black man 








Footmark of 


Bia luggana 


Beea lugganah 


Matyena lugh. 


White man 








Ford of a river - 


Teeatta kannawa 


Penghana 


— 


Forehead - 


Raoonah or rogo- 
unim lienya 


Roee Toeerunna - 


Rioona. 


Forest gromid - 


Teeatta kanna- 


Wayraparattee - 


Pallanyneen^. 




marranah 







648 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



VOOABULABT OF DiALSCTTS OF ABORIGINAL TrIBBS OW TaSMANIA- 

caiUinued. 



Engllah. 


Tribes from Oyster 
Bay to Plttwater. 


Tribes about Moont 
Roy«l, Brune laland. 

Recherche Bay, and 
tk* Antith nf TiLnfnBnIa 


North'iv^eet and 
Weateni. 




* 




Forget 


Poeenabah - 


Wannabayooerack 


Lyinneragoo. 


Four • 


Pagunta 


Wullyawa - 


— 


Fragrant (smell)- 


Noya leebana - 


Poin^ nire - 


Polimganoaiiat& 


Freestone • 


Boatta or potha 
malleety^ 


Potta mallya 


Poningalee. 


Fresh-water 


Liena eleebana* 


Lienir^- 


IA6 nonghat^ 


Friend 


Kaeetagooana- 


Lapoile In nagree- 


Matet^ logaat- 




menah 


nahmoolanah 


tame. 


Frigid (cold) • 


Tunnack - 


MaUan^ 


^Ptunarra. 


Fright 


Tian-cottiack 


Tianawilly - 


Micumoolaka. 


Frog - 


Rallah 


Tattounepuyna 


Lora. 


Frost - 


Parattah - 


Oorattai 


Oolrah. 


„ (hoar) 


Parattiana- 


Oorattai 


— 


Fuel - 


Wielurena- 


Ooeena or winna - 


Ooee. 


Full (after a 


Riawaeeack 


Mateelaty - 


MapilriagunanL 


meal) 








Full (a Teasel 


Rueeleetipla 




Yeackanara. 


filled) 






^ 


Fun (sport)- 


Riawena - * 


Luggara 


Riaw^. 


Fundament 


Leieena 


Loi^ loining^ 




Fur of animals - 


Pooarenna - 


Longwinny - 


Waggel^. 


Fury - 


Leenangunnye or 
koananietya 


Liapooneranh 


Neenubrulatai. 


Gale . 


Ralanghta - 


Rallana proiena - 


Loweeny rnlloi 


• 






leah or loweeny 
loileah. 


Gape • 


Grannacunna - 


Granna caniadbee - 


'Ngana kankapea 
oolralabeah ca- 
pueeleah. 


Ghost- 


Wurrawana 


Riawarawapah • 


Teeajianga 
winn^. 


Girl - - 


Lowana keet- 
anna or kotto- 


LongatyU - 


Noamoloibee. 




malletye 







* Literally, iMttor pood.— E. M. C. 



THE TASMAOTANS. 



649 



VOQABULA&T OF DlALEdS OF AbOBIOINAL TbIBES OF TASMANIA — 

continued. 



Eoglieh. 


Tribes from Oyntet 
Bay to Pittwater. 


Tribes about Mount 
Royal, Brune lalaiid, 

Recherche Bay, and 
ihe South of Tomiiuii^ 


Norih-wert And 
Weetem. 




vmMV ^#^^iAwaA ^/a ^woauflvaaAW* 




Glutton - 


Lemyouterittya 


Pamoonalantutte - 


Tuggattapeeatto. 


Good person 


goonya 


Nirree - 


Kanna noangat^. 


Go - - 


Taw^- 


Tawkw&bee - 


Taw4. 


€k)od (things) - 


Noona meena - 


Goraimabil^ - 


Noonamoy. 


Goose (wUd) - 


Weienterootya - 


None - 


None. 


Gosling 


ILaeeta boena 






Grandmother - 


Lowan karei- 


Ooaimena or wye- 


Neenambee. 




mena 


mena 




Grass - 


Bouninna - 


Nemon^ . 


Probluah. 


Great-beUied 


Lowallaomnena • 


Paggata lowatta 


Lomalle^. 


(with child) 




lutta 


• 


Green 


Norabeetya 


Nobeetya mallya • 


Mallabeabu. 


Greeting (a) 


Yah ! tahwatty- 


Yah ! nun*oyn6 - 


Yah I 


Grin (to make 


W a 1 

Monapaooniack 


Moyetungali 


Boabenneetea. 


faoes) 


paareetye 






Grinder (back 


Wuggarinna 


Payelughana 


Yennaloigh. 


tooth) 


ryana 






Gristle 


Comyenna - 


VV^yaW 


P^ngaL 


Groin- 


Mungalarrma - 


Tramina 


Tarrant. 


Gronnd 


Pyengana - 


Mannina 


Nattie. 


Grow (as a tree, 


MyaUanga bou- 


Mangapoier^ 


Mallacka. 


child) 


rack 






Growl 


Nann^aquanhe - 


Nunnaquanna- 


Dyekkanamee- 






peiere 


nera. 


Grab • 


Menia or mung- 
wenya 


Larraminnia 


Langw^. 


Gnll - 


Lueeteianna 


lieppetah 


Payngh. 


Gulp (to) - 




Tongan^ 


Tonnabea. 


Gum( wattle- tree) 


Munganna- 


Beeatta 


Reeattawee. 


Gam>tree (Euca- 


Lottah 


Moonah 


Loyk^. 


lyptus) 









650 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



VOOABULA&T Of DlALSCTS OF AbOBIOINAL 

cotUinued, 



Tbibeb or Tasmabtia— 



igpg l^ i ih. 



GamB (of the 
mouth) 
Gun (muBket) - 

Gunpowder 
Glow-worm, or 

phosphorescence 
Hen (native) 
Hold your tongue, 

be patient, by- 

and-by 
HaU . 

,, (matted 

with ochre) 
Halo (round the 

moon) 

Halt (limp on leg) 
Ham or hough - 
Hamstring (the)- 
Hand • 
Harlot 



Hastily (quickly) 

Hawk 
Head- 
Headache - 

Heal • 

Heap (to make) • 



Tribes from Oygter 
Bi^ to PittwAter. 



'Ngenna 



or le 



Leryna 

langta 
Lerytiana - 
Puggangalewa or 

monghtamena 
Mienteroonye - 
My-elbeerkam- 

ma or mealkam- 

mah 

Pratteratta 
Poinglyenna 
Poinghj 



Weetaboona 

Ungunniack 
Pryenna - 
Metta 
Rlena 
Pugganatingana 

or meneterut- 

tye 
Lemya or tug- 

gana 

Nierrina • 
Oolumpta - 
Oongena liack 

Raick bourrack • 
Prolmy nunty 
mente 



Tribes aboat Mooot 

Royal, Brane laland, 

EtcN^erche B«y, and 

the South of Tumania. 



North' 



QLrana- 

Pawleena 

Pawleenatiana - 
Payaleena - 

Riaooon^ 

Eanna moonalan^ 

mentakuntiby or 

konnyab 
Tur^lai 

Poiet^ longwinne 
Poina - 

Panoggata - 

'Nganee 
Tabba - 
Tapmita 
Reemutta • 
Patingana 



Coth^ . 

Pengana 
Poiet6 - 

Poiete merede and 
poingata 
Nir^ - 
Teeat^ - 



Kattamoy. 



RulU. 



Lu^^toy. 



Reeakallingalle. 
Wannabee or 
kannebo. 



THE TASMANIANS. 



651 



VOGABITLAIIT OP DiALECTS OF ABORIGINAL TbIBBS OF TASMANIA — 

continued. 



Eogliflh. 


Tribes from Ojsfeer 
Bay to Pittwater. 


Tribes about Mount 
Royal, Bruno Island, 

Recherche Bay, and 
the South of Tasmania. 


Nori^h-west and 
Western. 


Hear (to) - 


Toienook boo- 
rack 


W&yee - 




Heart- 


Teeackana war- 
rana 


Teggana 


-^ 


Heat - 


Peooniac - 


Lughrah 




Heave (to pant) - 


Tengoonyack 


Teggalughrata 


— 


Heavy 


Miemooatick 


Moorah 


— 


Heel - 


Tokana or tog- 
gana 


Tokana 


^— 


Help - 


Nelumie - 


Lagrah 


— 


Hide (to conceal 


Lyeemena kamei 


Muggrah 


— 


kangaroo) 








Hide one's self - 


Mur kamiah 


Muggrah 


— 


Hill (little one) - 


Poimena - 


Layet^ paaw4 




„ (mountain) - 


Poimena tyen- 
kanganarrah 
tienare warrah 


Layet^ proigh 




Hit - - - 


Menny 


Merrh^ 


— 


Hither and 


Pughawee nya- 


Tackra, tungal^, 




thither 


wee 


tungal^ 




Hoar-frost - 


Tyeebertia crac- 
kana 


Warattai 


^^ 


Hoarse 


Lonypeack 


Lonnabeead^ 


— 


Hole (like wom- 


Lowa lengana - 


'Ngeanah 


— 


bat barrow) 








Hot - 


Peooniack - 


Lughrata 


— 


House 


Lenna 


Tiine - 


— 


Howl (in distress, 


Tuggermacama 


Gockata 


— 


like a dog) 


or myluggana 






Humid (wet, 


Malleeack • 


Layekah 


— 


damp) 








Hunger 


Meeoongyneack - 


Teecotte 




Husband - 


Puggan neena - 


Pah-neena - 





652 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



VooABULA&T or DiALioxB OF Abobioinal Tiubbs ow Taskakia — 

comtmued. 



English. 


Tribes from Oyster 
Bi^ to Pittvster. 


Tribes »bont Mount 
Boysl, Bnine Island, 

Recherche Bi^, and 
the South of nMnsoia. 


North-west sad 
Western. 


Hart ( with Bpear) 


Mayannee raye- 


Roaddah 


— 


„ (witfi waddle) 


Payalee 


Loipun^ 


— . 


Ice - 


Paratta 


RuUai ungaratin^- 


Ralloileah. 


ni(8ick) . 


Crackanaeeack - 


M^rM^ OMd mery- 
dyneh 


^^TTfygfln^nrrah. 


Imp - 


W inya waumetjra 


Ria warapp^ noil^ 


— 


Impatient - 
Inaotive (indo- 


Telwangatea leah 
Meallee tonenra- 










lent) 


getta 






Indolent (lacy) • 


Mimooneka nen- 
taca nepoony 




~"~ 


Infant 


Malangenna 


Puggetta 


— 


„ (female) - 


- 


Lowa luggeta 


— 


„ (newly 


Gotruolttttye 


Puggata riale 


Lapoitab or l»- 


born) 






poittendayl^. 


Inform (to tell) - 


Oana • 


Oanganab - 




,» (tell me)- 


Oanamia - 


Ongana meena 


— 


Instant (quick) - 


Krottee 


Roatt^ 


— 


Instep 


Luggapoola 
mena 


Lugga umen^ 




Intimidate - 


Tiencooty^ 


Tienweal^ - 


— 


Intersect - 


Unginnapuee 


Poany puer^ 


— 


Intestines - 




Lomatina - 


— 


Invigorate • 


Neingtera tero- 
ontee 


— 


^~ 


Jawbone - - Yangena - - | 


Wahba and wab- 


Ninennaleah. 






ranna 




Jealous 


Pachabrea - 


Mahrewealai and 


— 




longhe 


poin^wealai 




Jerk - 


Oo-ul^ 


Cokura 


— 


Juice of a plant 


Miangatenty^ - 


Miengaleena 


— 


(red) 







THE TASMANIANS. 



653 



VOGABULABT OF DiALEOTS' OT AbOBIOINAL TSIBES OF TASMANIA — 

continued. 



BngHsh. 


Tribes from Oyater 
Bay to Pfttwater. 


Tribes about Mount 

Royal, Bruno Island, 

Recherche Bay, and 

the South of Tumania 


North-west and 
Western. 




VU^F PN^^^ SA WSA ^^m Jm ■MHwA'HbAmW 




Jaioe of a plant 


Tnggara malee- 


Taramena - 


___ 


(white) 


ty6 






Jnmp- 


Wughallee- 


Warrakara - 


— 


JuYenile - 


Croatta meleety^ 


— 


— 


Keep - 


Tialapn^ - 


Tiagarra 


— 


Kill (deprive of 


Mien^miento 


Longana 


— 


life) 








Kiss (to) - 


Miewall^ - 


Moee mir^ • 


— 


Knee • 


Mienna 


Ranga - 


Rawinnaleah. 


Kneel 


Meall^ mianaber- 


Leetarangah 


Wannabaya ra- 




r^ 




minnaerybee. 


Knuckle - 


Reekateninna - 


Ria pnggana 


Releenula leah. 


Kangaroo (brash) 


Lyenna 


Lena - 


Kn leah. 


„ (joie) - 


Tnninanna - 


Rarryna 


PiaclnniTn^. 


n 


Nawitty^ - 


Tarrana 


Tarr leah. 


TAd . - . 


Puggannaeree- 
bana 


Pa-ga-talina- 




Lake (lagoon) - 


Miena, mena 


liia mena 


— 


Lame- 


Playwarmngana 


Lnggamutte or 
raggamuttah 


— — 


Lance (wooden 


Perenna - 


Pena - 




spear) 








Large (big) 


Pawpela - 


Proina naghabah - 




Last (to walk last 


Loente wannela- 


Mitnggara mura- 




in file) 




wamena 




Laagh 


Poeenyeggana - 


P<Rnghana • 


Peninna. 


Lax (diarrhoea) • 
Lazy (see Indo- 


Tiacloinnamena - 


Tia noileh 


^_^^ 


Mienoyack 


Rn^t^ - 


Rudanah. 


lent) 








Leaf - 


Porutty^ - 


Proi^ - 


Parocheboina. 


Leafless 


Poruttye-mayeck 
and paruye- 
noye-maeck 


Paroytimena 


Parochyateemna. 



654 



THE AI7STRALIAK RACE: 



VOCABULABT OF DlALICIS OF AbOBIOIKAL TbIBES OF TaSHAIHA— 

coHiinued. 



Eogliflh. 



Lean 

Leap (see Jump) 

Leech 

Left hand - 

Leg (left) . 
„ (right)- 

Lick (with the 
tongue) 

Light of a fire 

Lightning - 

Limp (aee Lame) 
right foot 

Limp (left foot) - 

Load - 

Lobster (fresh- 
water) 

Log (wood) 

Long - 

Look (to gaze) - 

Loud (to speak) - 

Low - 

Lie (falsehood) 



Locust (V.D.L.) 
Long way - 

Maria Island 

Magpie 

Maim 

Man (Black) 



Tribes from Oyster 
B«y to Pittwater. 



Tughenapoonyac 

Waighalleh 

Pyenna 

Riena-aoota 

Leoonyana • 

Leoonyaeleebana 

Neungulee - 

Tonna kayinna - 
Poimetty^ - 
Wughnna elee- 
bana 

Playwughrena - 
Mangeluhwa 
Tayatea 

Wyee langhta - 
Bogoteleebana • 
Reliquamma 
Euggana langhta 

Lunta 
Manengtyangha 

tyangamoneeny 

rappar^ 
Ganammeny^ 
Murramanattya 

onamarumpto 
Tiarra marra mo- 

nah 

Poierrynienna - 
Mennanwee 
Pugganna - 



TribM about Mount 
Royal, Bmne Island, I 

Recherche Bay, and 
the South of Tasmania 



'Ngattai 
Wurragara - 
Pangah 
^Ngotta 
Luggunagoota 
Warrxna nir^ 
Nugramainre 



Poimataleena 



Raggamuttah 
Mnnghe mabbely - 
Tay-a-teh - 

Weea proingha • 
Botuli • 
Lutubrenem^ 
Kann^ proine wag- 
gaba 
Pranako 
Linugh^ noU^ 



Ganenmianga 
Noina muttaina • 

Tiarerrymeealonah 

Eeninna 

Pallawah 



North-west and 
Westenu 



Ngatta. 

Liawena. 
Oottamutta. 
Luggrangootta. 
lAggra-nir^ 



Unamayna. 
Rayeepoinee. 



Row^ leah. 



GurraillyU. 
Pah-leah. 



THE TASMANIAKS. 



655 



VOCABULA&T or DiALBCTS OT ABORIGINAL TbIBSS OF TaSUANIA — 

continued. 



EoffUah. 


Tribes from Oyster 
Bay to Pittwater. 


Tribes about Mount 
Royal, Brune Island, 

Recherche Bay, and 
the South of Tasmania. 


iToith-west and 
Western. 


Marrow - 


Moomelinah 


Lebrana 


^^ 


Me - - - 


Mina - 


Meenah 




Menstraate 


Teebra wangha- 
tamena 


— 


— 


Midday (or noon) 


Tooggy malangta 


Toina wunnah 


— 


Milk (of aborigi- 


Proogwallah 


Prooga neannah - 


— 


nal woman) 








Milt of fiflh 


Lowalinnamelah 


Perina - 


— 


Mirth 


Leeneal^ 


Penamoonalane - 


— 


Mischief - 


Puoynoback 


Tannate 


— 


Moon- 


Wiggetena- 


Weetah 


Weenah leah. 


Moonlight - 


Wiggetapoona - 


Weetapoona- 


Weenapooleah. 


Mobs - - - 


Laffowunnah 







Mother 


Neingmenna 


Neeminah 


Neena moygh. 


Moth- 


Commeneana 


^. . 


— 


Mouse 


Terangat^ mu- 
nuggana 


Pngganarottah 


Ptoarahleah. 


Mouth 


Kakannina 


Kaneinah 


Kapoughy leah. 


Mud, sediment - 


Eokerea kokelee- 
ty^ 


Manannywayleh - 


— 


Murmur 


Mannyaquanee - 


KanaroUuggata - 




Mushroom - 


Neatyranna 


Ne^b:una 


— 


Mole-cricket 


Nawywemena - 


— 


— 


Mutton-bird 


Yolla- 


Yolla - 


— 


(sooty petrel) 








Mutton-fish 


Magrannyah 




— 


(smooth) 








Mutton-fish 


Yowarrenah 


— 




(rough) 








Mount Royal 


- 


Tulun^ 




(country inter- 








vening between 








there and Port 








Cygnet) 









656 



THE AUSTBAUAK RACE: 



VOOABULAKT OF DlALKCIS Or AbOBIOINAL TbIBSS OF TaSXAXIA- 

eotUinuexL 



EogUflh. 


Tribes from Oyster 
Bi^ to Pittwater. 


THbesaboatXoaiit 

Bojil, Bnine Ubnd, 

Recherche B«y, And 

the Soath of TiMmania. 


Nortb-wntaiid 
Westo. 


Nail (finger) - 


Tonye 


Ryeetony^ - 


Wanteleah. 


M (toe) - - 


Peyerrena • 


Lugga-tonny^ 


Perranmne. 


Navel 


Mienanuggana • 


Tunoh 


— 


Near- - - 


MalumnyeUa 


R6n^ - 




Nautilua sheU 


Wietatenana 


Weettah 


Weoia numah. 


{Argonaut) 








Nettle 


Miatownnna- 
meena 


Miny - 


— 


Nest (bird's) - 


Malonna - 


Lin^ 




„ (Uttle 


- 


Pun^ lin^ 


— 


bird's) 






■ 


Never 


Noye myack or 
noeeack 


Tlmeh or timy 


— - 


New (not old) - 


Croatte - 


Boil^ • 




Night 


Tagnimmena 


Nun^ - 


Daynaleah. 


Nip (to pinch) - 


Beloy^ tonyer^ - 


R^eekatah • 


— 


Nipple 


Pnigga poyeenta 


Pruggapogenna - 


— 


No - - ■ 


Parragarah 


Timeh, or timy, or 
pothyack 


MaUya leah. 


Noise - 


Eukanna walla- 
monyack 


Ki^ima. ... 




Nose - 


Munnna - 


Maye or muggenah 


Muanoigh. 


Now (at this 


Groattee - 


-r- 


— 


time) 








Ochre (red) 


Ballawin^ 


Ballawin^ - 




One* - 


Marrawah - 


Marrawah - 




Orphan 


Kollyenna - 


Wah-witteh - 




Outside 


Tulenteena 


Pratty-toh - 




Owl (large) 


Tryeenna - 


Kokatah 


Tayaleah, 
kokannaleah. 


„ (little one) - 


Laoona 


Wawtronyte 





* It is to be remarked that the tranalationB of 1 and 2 agree very well in these vocabu- 
laries, but that those of 8, 4, and 5 dissgree.--E. M. C. 



THE TASMANIANS. 



657 



VOOABITLABT OF DiALEOTS OF ABORIGINAL TrIBSB OF TASMANIA- 

continued. 



EngUah. 



Oyster Bay 
High land behind 
Oyster Bay 
Opossum (black) 

(ringtail) 



tt 



(moose) 

Ore of iron, iron 
glance (used by 
the aborigines 
as a black paint) 

Pain - 

Palm of the hand 

Parrot 

Parrakeet - 

Paw - 

Peak (St. Valen- 
tine's) 

Peak (a hill) . 

Pelican 

Penguin - 

Perspire - 

Pet (pettish) 

Pigeon 

Place (a) - 
„ (this) 

Plant 

Play - - . 

Point of spear • 

Pool or lagoon - 

Porcupine - 



TrflMs from OjBier 
Bay to Pittwater. 



Pottry munatta - 

Nualangtamab- 
bena 
Tarripnyenna - 

Lowowyenna 
Latta 



Orackanyeack 
Bielowolmgana - 
Ouggana - 
Welleetya 
Luggantereena • 



Poymalangta 
Treoontalangta 
Tomenyenna 
Begleetya - 

Lowabereelonga 

* 

Mooaloonya 
Lenna 



Mellangbourack 
Lyanel^ 
Poyeenta - 
Mienameena 
Mungyenna 



TiibM aboat Mount 
Royal, Bmne Iiland, 
Becberche Bay, and 


Forth-west and 
Western. 


— 




Tonytah 


Temytahtemyia 




malughlee. 


Pawtella 


Pawtellunna 




nuckelah. 


Leena - 


Papnoolearah. 


Lattawinn<^ • 


' 


Mayrude 




Beea-rarra - 


— 


Ouddah 


— 


Wellya 


— 


Togga-n^ 


— 


- 


Natone. 


Letteen^ 


_ 


Toyn^ 


— 


Tong- Wynne - 




Laywurroy - 


— 


Poyneh 


— 


Mootah 


— 


Lin^h 


— 


Tin^ poynena 


— 


Luggarrah - 


— 


Poyeenna 


— 


Kannah 


— 


Mungy^ 


Mungynnaka- 




nagale* 



VOL. III. 



2 T 



658 



THE AUSTRAUAK BACK: 



VOOABULABT OF DlALBOIB OF ABQRIGIKAL TBXBIS 01 


^ TASKAinA— 


continued. 


BngUdL 


Tribes from Oyiter 
Bay to Pittwstor. 


Tribei about Mount 

Royal, Brans ISIaiid, 

RMfa«rch« Bay, and 

the Sooth of Tksmania. 


North-weataod 
WsstenL 


Porpoiie 


Minga-oinyah - 


Poyrennah - 




Pregnant • 


Lowalloomanye- 
nea 


LomatUatta - 


~^ 


Prickly 


Mona-meenee - 


Moyn6ia 


— 


Pnnk 


Wullugbetye - 


Barra - 


— 


Pebble rolled 

• 


Kughaweenya • 


Tramutta 


— 


quartz 








Rper'8 River dis- 


Oramakunna 




— 


trict 








Port Davey 


. 


Poinduc 


— 


Penia 


Lubra, mattah- 
prenna 


Leena - 


""~ 


Pabea (tnons ve- 


Maga 


Magana 


— 


neris) 








Quaff (drink) - 


Lowelly - 


Nugarah 


— 


Quail 


Terranguatta - 


T^na terrangutta 


Tenateewairah. 


Quiet 


— 


— 


— 


Bun together 


B^n^ nunempt^ - 


Loongana 


— 


(race) 








Bage - 


Neoongyack 


Leecot^ 


— 


Bain - 


Pokana or pog- 
ana 


Porrah- 


— ~ 


„ (heavy) - 


Pro^^-langtha • 


Porra - - - 


— 


Bainbow - 


Weeytena • 


Wayatih 




Rascal 


Nowettye-elee- 
bana 


Pawee - - - 




Bat - - - 


Lyinganena 


Tooarrana - 


— 


Bay (stingaree) - 


Leranna - 


Pirem^ 


— 


Bed . - - 


Tendyagh or 
tentya 


Koka - • - 




Bepair 


Trulee 


Peruggareh - 




Bespire 


Tyackanoyack - 


Taykalyngana 


— 


Betch (to vomit) 


Nutyack - 


Nukatah 


— - 



THE TABMANIANB. 



659 



VOGABULABT OF DiALECTS Or AbOBIOINAL TBIBES OF TASMANIA — 

coniinued. 



TgHglliyh- 


Trib«s from Oyster 
Bay to Pittwator. 


Tribes about Mount 
Boyal, Bnme Island, 
Becherche Bm', and 


Korth-west and 
Weeteni. 


Bib - - - 


Tolameena 


Ten^ - 




Bise - 


Takumuna - 


Peggaruggarua • 




Eipe - 


Crang-boorack - 


Pegarah 


— 


Root (tree) 


Remeeny^ - 


Monalghana or 
pughweady 


"-~ 


Biver (Uttle) - 


Menace keetan- 
nah 


Lia-pootah - 


^— 


Bock (large) 


Lonah or loel- 
anghta 


Loynee broyee 


— 


Bod (Rmall) 


Weenah keetan- 
nah 


Weeapawee- 


— — 


Boll (to) . - 


« M « « 


Wangana weepoo- 
tah 




Roe of (iBh • 


Leena bunna 


— 


— 


Rotten wood 


Tr^ratick - 


Tawnah 




Bough 


Payralyack 


RulW - - 


— 


Round like a ball 


Mieawiack 


Mattah 


— 


Row (a long one) 


Raondeleeboa - 


Beekara 


— 


Rub (nib in fat) - 


Mtmgannemoee - 


Buggarra - 




Raddy cheeks - 


Miypooetanyack, 


Koka - 


— 


- 


mientendyack 






Run - 


Ren^- 


L^gara- 


— 


Rnsh - 


■ • * • 


Boba - 


— 


Ringlets (cork- 


Pow-ing-aroote- 


Poeena -• 


Poenghana. 


screws^ with red 


leebana 






ochre) 








Sexual inter- 


Loanga metea or 




— 


course 


poangametea 






Sea-horse (Hip- 


Lay-an-unea 


Poolta - 




pocampus) 








Salt on the rocks 


lienowittye, 






by the sea side 


liopackanapoona 






Sand . . - Mungara mena • 


'Nguna- 





2T 2 



660 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



VOGABULABT OF DiALlOTS OF AbOBIOIKAL 

continued. 



Tbibbs of Taskaiiia — 



BogUah. 


Tribes fromOyitar 
Bay (0 PlttWfttor. 


Tribes alxmtMoant 
Bo7»l, Brune laUnd, 

Reoheiche Bay, and 
theSoQtb of TiMmanla 


Noctii-vwiaiid 
WMton. 


Sap - - - 


Miangatentya, 
mimgmaUeetya 


— 


— 


„ (milk white) 




— 




Scab • ■ - 


Loryomcna or 
loiamena 


Lowid^ 


-^ 


Scales (of fish) - 


Poerinna - 


Lowinna 


Nangennamm. 


Scar . 


Trogatepoona - 


Mnngerapoona - 


Toolengennaleah. 


Scarify 


Lowoon^ - 


Towatt^ 


— 


Scent 


Mebryack - 


Poanoil^ 


— 


Scratch 


Larr^- 


Lart^ - 


— 


Sea (ocean) 


Ljenna wnttya 
and lyaleetea 


Panamnna • 


LeahU. 


Seal (PAoca), 


Naweetya 




— 


black, on Sandy 




beUy) 




beach) 








Seal (black, on 


Pienrenya - 


— 


— 


rooks, white- 








belUed) 








Seal (sandy beach) 


Prematagomo- 
neetya 


""■• 


— 


See (to behold) • 


Mongtone - 


Nttbraton^ - 


— 


Serious (sad gaze) 


Lelgany-gnonga • 


Manattamlla 


— 


Serpent 


Loiena or lonnabe 


Loina - 




ShaUow - 


Waylearack 


Rohet^ 


— 


Shadow 


Wurrawina tietta 


Maydena 


Belanyleah. 


Sharp (like a 


Lyetta 


Nenah - 


— 


knife) 








Sheoak-tree 


Lnggana-brenna 


Luh-be 


— 


Skin - 


Lurentanena 


Lnramnna - 


— 


Ship - 


Lotomalangta loo- 


Lun^ poina mak- 


LoaUyb^ 




mena 


kaba 




Shore - 


Malompto 


lioccota 


— 


„ (sandy beach) Roynaratingana- 


— 


— 



*-J 



IT 



THE TASMANIANS. 



661 



YOGABULABT OF DiALECIS OT ASOBIOINAL TRIBES OF TASMANIA — 

continued. 



"RngHiih- 


Tribes from Oyster 
Bay to PittwKter. 


Tribes about Moant 
Royal, BruDO Island, 

Recherche Bay, and 
the South of Tasmania. 


North-west and 
Western. 


Go aahore 


• a - • 


Taw^ looooto 


_ 


Shoulder - 


Pnggarenna 


Parangana - 




Shout (yell) 


Kukanna wurra- 
renna 


Palla-kanna - 


~~ 


Shower (of rain 


Pokanna knanna 


Tungatinah - 


— 


Shrub 


Tarracoonee 


Tarrara mann^ - 


— 


Sick 


Micrackanyach, 
miycracknata- 
reetya 


Mim^red^ - 




Side (the) - 


lietelinna 


Taynna 


— 


Sinew (kangaroo) 


Metah (met-ah) • 


Mitah - 


— 


Sing - 


Lyenny 


Lyenn^ 


— 


Shag (oormorant) 


Moora 


Moora - 


— 


Sing a song 


Lyenny riacunna 


— 


— 


Sink - 


Tomla, tome, 
boorcka 


^^ 


"•" 


Sit down - 


Mealpugha- 




— 


Sister 


Nowantareena - 




— 


Skin . 


Tarra meenya - 




— 


Skull - 


Pruggamoogena - 


— 


— 


Sleep ■ 


Lony - 


— 


— 


„ (verysound) 


— 


— 


— 


Smile - . . 


Pughoneoree 


— 


— 


Smoke 


Progoonaor proo- 
ana 


^^^ 


""^ 


Sneeze 


Lonughutta 




— 


Smooth 


Panninya - 


— 


— 


Snail - 


— 


— 


— 


Snore - 


Teakanarraloneah 


Boggara 


— 


Snake 


Loiena 


Loinah 


Boxmna rawan- 
nah, pallawa 
royanah, roal- 
labeah. 



662 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACB: 



VOGABULABT OF DlAUECTS OF ABORIGINAL TRIBBS OV TaSMAHIA— 




eofUtnuAf. 


SBgliah. 


IkibM f rom Oyitor 
Bij to PittvTBter. 


Tribes About Momit 

Royil, BnuM Iibuid, 

Bacherehe Bv» mmI 

tlw South of TMnukDiA. 


1 

Nortli-vHtaiiA 
WMlem. 


Snow - 




Tnrrana 


^^ 


Sole (of foot) • 


Lng-yenna 




— 


Song • 


Riaconnah' 


Lnnariabe - 


Riacannah. 


Soon - 


Leemya 


Koth4 - 


— 


Snow - 


Paratta - 


— 


— 


Son - 




Pnggatah - 


. — 


Sour - 


No-wiyack 


NoUe - - - 


— 


Spark 


Tonypeprinna - 


Powitt^ 


Pughweenyna 
weimyale. 


Spawn 




Mannngana- 


— 


Spear (wood) 


Perenna 


Pe-na - - - 


Pana, pilhali. 


Spew - 


Nnka 


Nnkara 


Nngiyna. 


Speak 


Pueellakanny 


Poeerakonnabeh - 




Spider 


Tangana - 


Waytanga - 


— 


Spine • 


Myingeena ter- 
rena 


Toherarunnah 


— 


Spit - 


Tyaokaree-meena 






Sport (play) 


Riawena - 


Riaw^ - - - 


Riaw^ wayboree. 


Spring (wattle 


Pewenya poeena 


Luggarato paw^ - 


Laghra-pawee. 


bloesom aeaaon) 








Squall 


Ralangta - 


Ballanaproee 


Raali poyngnah. 


Stamp (with the 


Taoonteckap^ • 


Taoonteckap^ 


— 


foot) 








Stand (stand up) 


Tackamuna 


Cracka-wughata - 


Pegretty weigha 


Starlight • 


Teahbertyfuarack- 

via 


Oarattih - 


— 


Shooting star 


ua 
Puggareetya 


Pachareah - 


~— 


Star - 


Teahbrana- 


Romtenah - 


Rhomdnnna or 


Steal. 


Maneena langa- 
tick 


Maneena layaw^ . 


miabeemeiiah 


Step - 


Lnggana marah - 


Lnggacanna- 


— 


Stomach 


Teenah 


Teena 


Teenah. 



THE TASMANIANS. 



663 



YOOABULABT OF DlALEOIS OV ABORIGINAL TbIBBS OF TASMAmA— 

continued. 



fBiwHah- 


Tribee from jster 
Biqr to Pittwater. 


Tribes about lioont 
Royal, Bnme Island, 

Bedierohe Bay, and 
the South of TMmania. 


North-west aDd 
Western. 




WmM^M ■k^%#%KWAA ^^* ^^^BBaMHHBAfla^W 




Stone 


Loantennina 


Loinah, lonna 


Loin4 


Stoop 


Puggana narrat- 
yack 




~^ 


Stop - 


Poyeer6 


Kuneeam^ - 


— 


Straight 


Ungoyeleebana - 


Tnnghab^ - 


— 


Strike 


Luggana golumpt^ 


Lunghana 


— 


Strong 


Oyngteratta 


RuUa rullanah 


Ramanarral^. 


Stomp of a tree- 


Pomyakunnah - 


Ortawenah - 


Weealynghana. 


Stnpid 


Koallangatiok - 


Oyelarraboo- 


Wayeelarraboo or 
puggytemoorah. 


Sun - • - 


Pugganoobra nah 


Pallanubra nah - 


Panubrynah, 




pukkanebrenah 




tonahleah. 


Sack - 


Mol^ - - 


Mokr& prugh 


— 


Sullen 


Lowattobeolo ka- 
kannete monna 
perinna Iowa 
peree longha 


Poininna 




i Snminer 


Wingytellangta - 


Lughoratoh - 




SunriBe 


Puggalena par- 


Panuboine roeela- 


M^^ 




raokbooraok 


poerack 




Sunset 


Wietytongmena- 


Panubra tongoiee- 
raU 


^"~ 


Snspiration (sigh) 


TeaJigonyack •> 


Takon^ 





Survivor - 


Lugga poerannea 


— 





Swallow (a bird) 


Waylelimna 


Papalawe - 


— 


„ (act of 


Tony quanmia - 


Tonganah - 





deglutition) 








Swan 


Kelangunya 


Pugherittah- 





Sweat 


Malleeack reg- 
leetya reglee 
poona 


Leghromina- 




Swell- 


Lienyaok • 


Tiineh - 





Swim- 


Puggely - 


Pughrah - — 



664 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



VOGABUULBT OF DlAUCTS OV AbOKIGIKAL TbIBSS OV TASMAVIA — 

eofUimued, 



EnglUi. 


Tribes from Qyster 
Bay to Pittwiler. 


Tribes aboat Mount 

Royal, Bnme Uaod, 

Recherche Bay, and 

the South of TlMDiaiiia. 


Noffth-veskaiHl 
Western. 


Switch 


Tarra koona 


Tarraweenah 


.— 


Taa - . . 


Manna goonee - 


Pngghnah - 




Take- - . 


Nnnn^ 


Nunnabeh - 


— 


Talk - . - 


Pueelcanny 


Poieta kannabeh - 


— 


TaU - . . 


Takkaro deleea- 
bano righ elee- 
bana 






Talon- 


Kuluggana 


Kuhlnggana 


— 


Tame- 


Riaputheggana - 


Tiagropoineena - 




Tarantula (large 


Ne-ungalangta - 


Temmatah - 


— 


■pider) 








Taste - 


Wnghn^ - 


Ween^ 


— 


Teal - • 


Ryennatiabroo- 
tea 


Weahwanghrutah 


■MHM 


Tear - 


Tagarrena • 


Tarragatt^ - 





Teat - 


• ■ • « 


Praggana 





Teeth - 


Wngherrinna - 


— 





Thirsty 






^IMW 


yack 






Throw 


Myengy 


Mftnghnkim. 


— 


Thumb 


Rianaoonta 


Ryanaootta - 


— 


Thumb-naU 


Tony^ 


Toiena 


— 


Thunder - 


Poimettya - 


Papatongun^ 


— 


Tick - - - 


Loangaritea 




— 


Tie (a knot) 


Kukannaboee 


Pilangootah- 


— 


Tide - 


Luggatick - 


Lughruttah - 


— 


Tiger (V.D.L.) 


Lagnnta 




— 


{Thylacinua cy- 








nocephahu) 








Timber (large) - 


Wyelangta 


Wee a proinah - 


— 


„ (small) - 


Wyena 


We*rapaw6 - 


— 


Tired- - - 


Pryennemkoot- 
tiack 


Kakara wayalee - 





THE TASMANIANS. 



665 



VOGABULABT 07 DiALECTS 07 AbOBIOINAL TbIBES 07 TASMANIA— 

ctmtmued. 



English. 


Tribes from Oyster 
Bay to Pittwater. 


Tribes about Mount 

Recherche Bay, and 
the South of TasmaniA. 


North-west and 
Western. 




WBA^^ Iv^^ViBHWM ^^A ^mW^^mUmmltl&mmmHt^m 




Three 


Led winnawah • 


Talleh 


... 


Toothless • 


Wugherinna nor- 
myak 


Payeatimy - 


^— 


Tooth 


Wughrinna 


Pay-ee-a 


— 


Talk (much 
speaking) 


Mealpeal kft^""*!*- 






or kukannah 


lane, or kunrare. 






U^reah 


or kunmoonera 




Tongne 


Kayena 


Menn^, or mayna, 
or maynerinah 


— • 


Top 


Tulendeeno 


Waghata 


— 


Topaz (crystal) 


Tendeagh - 


Mughra mallee - 


— 


Tor (apeaked hill) 


Poymalyetta 


Layattinnah 


— 


Torch 


Poorena mon^- 
gana 


Lee wurr^ - 


^^ 


Touch 


Neungpa - 


Winganah - 


— 


Touch- wood (rot- 


Weitree ouriatta 


Weeawanghratta • 


— 


ten wood) 








Tough 


Lughteeac - 


RuUi - 


— 


Track (footmark) 


Puggataghana 
and tughana- 
loumeno 


Luggaboin^ - 




Trample (to) 


Tyentiah • 


Teeantibe • 


— 


Transfix (to) 


Myenny-pinga- 
ter-reluteo 


Menaoitete - 


•^^ 


Travel 


Tackamoona 


Tackramoonina - 


— 


Tree - 


Loatta 




— 


„ (faUofa) - 


Poengboorack - 


Moona pungance - 


— 


Tremble - 


Mienintyao 


Tien^w^leh - 


— 


Trickle - 


Kukkamena 
meena 


Truggara 


■ 


True - 


Gbnyneealeebya 
Wughne^ - 


^TJtrha.TiAlrATtTiA.nir^ 





Try (to) - 


Ween^ - 


— 


Tug (to, at a rope 


Koy-ule • 


Kottub^ 


— 


or string) 









666 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



VOOABUULBT OV BlALEOTB OT AbOBIGIKAL TbIBIS OF TASBKAHXA- 

contmued. 



BngHfh. 


Tribes from <>ytt«r 
Bay to Pittwater. 


Tribes About Mount 

Boyal, Brone lalAnd, 

Becherohe Ba^, and 

the South of Tumania. 


North-wertaad 
Weatetn. 


Tumble - 


Mientongka 


ICiepairagana 


~- 


Turn (to) • 




Miewangana 


— 


ToBk (oaaine 


Wuggerinnarota- 


Payee, il rotyl^ - 


— 


tooth) 


leebana 






Twig- - - 


Loatta keetana • 


Weea wunna 


— 


Twins 


Maiynabyeck 


Meinna-na - 


— 


Twilight • 


Teggrymony 
keetana narra 


Nunto neenah 


^^ 




longboorack 


• 




Twirl (twiat) - 


Wughannemoe 


Oaghra 


— 


Twitch (pluck) - 


Kol^ - 


Ko-kra 


— 


Two - 


Pia wah 


Pooalih 


— 


Ugly - 


Mowatty nielee- 


Noailee nuggabah 


— 




bana 






Urine 


• 


Munghatemungha- 
beh 


— 


Uxorious • 


Lowa puggelan- 


— 


« 


nye 






Vale or valley - 


Ma-ra oominya 


Mara-way-lee 


— 


Vanish 


Poyena potatty- 
ack 


Tiembngh • 


^^ 


Vassal (serf) - 


Pueetof^gana 
mena 


Potaigroee narana 


•^^ 


Venomous - 


Ree punner^ 


Nunghbooraok 


— 




nunghapa 


nungabah 




Venom 




Kamona moina - 


— 


Vent - 


Loa lingana 


'Ngeenah 


— 


Vertex 


Toganee • 


Togari - 


— 


Warratah (plant 


Kinntah - 


— 


— 


Telopea trun- 








cata) 








Wallaby - 


Lukangana 


Taranna 


Koguoyleah. 


Warm even to 


Reggooleetya - 


Lewurra moina - 


— 


perspiration 









THE TASMANIAN8. 



667 



VOGABTTLABT OF 0IALBCTS OF AbOBIGIKAL TbIBBS OF TASMANIA — 



Sngliafa. 


Tribes from Oyster 
Bay to Pittwater. 


Tribes about Meant 
Royal, Brone Islaiid, 
Recherche Bay, and 


North-west and 
Western. 


Water (fresh) • 


Liena- 


Liawenee 


Ilia winne wnd 
lileah. 


„ (cold) - 


Lietinna 


Liawenee - 


— 


„ (warm) - 


liena peoonya w 
liena peeonyack 


Lialnghrana • 


— 


Wood, firewood - 


Wiena anc2 winna 


Mnggra web^ wnd 
mattaweb^ 




Woman 


Lowanna - 


Ne-eanta and low- 
anna 


Nowaleah. 


„ (handsome) 


Loanna eleebana 


Loa-nir^ lyady- 


— 


• 


ancZloaniry 


waiack 




„ (yoimg) . 


Krotto meleety^ 


Loalla pnggana - 


— 


» (adult) - 


Puggya malleet- 
ya 


LongataUinah 


""*■ 


„ (aged, old) 


Payanna - 


Nena ta poiena - 


— 


Wombat - 


Baoompta ro- 
woomata 


Rowitta - 


^■" 


Wake 


lientiack - 


Weeny 


— 


Wade 


Woimenniac 


Mowerrenah 




Wail (to lament) 


Tegryma kan- 
nmiya 


Moelnggrana 


—^ 


Waist 


Pooalminna 


Pooarynmena 


— 


Wait 


Myelpoyer^ 


Krattab^ - 




Walk - - 


Tahlyooner^ 


Lawtaboorana 


— 


War - 


Kennamoimenya 


Moimenganmabeli 


— 


„ (skirmish, 


Mftn*-»A- 


Moeemntt^ - 


— 


one or two 








killed) 






«> 


War (battle, all 


Moeelaghawa - 


Moeemabbyl^ 


— 


killed but one 


■ 






or two) 








Warm 


Peoonyack 


Lnghreto 


— 


Wart 


Grtean poona - 


Ta winn^ 


— 



668 



THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 



VOGABULABT OF DlAUECTS OF AbOBIGINAL 

amtmued. 



TBIBES of TASlCAinA — 



BngliA 


Tribes from Qyiter 
B4iy to Plttwater. 


Tribes about Mount 
Royal, Bmne lelaiid. 

Recherche B^, end 
the South of Tminania 


North-west and 
Westan. 


Waah (to) - 


Nonelmol 


Mannogra - 


.1.^ 


Wattle-tree 


<Kghearetta 




— 


Wave 


Legleetya men- 
gyna 


Leatori 




Weak 


Koomyenna 


Biia wayleh - 


— 


Weed 


Pannabon bmt- 


Tallaratai • 


— 




ty^ 






Weep 


Tagarramena 


Tana wayleh 


— 


WeU (spring) - 


Loy-ulena 


^gyena 




Wet (rainy) 


May-niaok 


Lay-ka 


— 


What? - 


Telingha? tebya? 


Pallawaleh?- 


Tarraginna? 


What*Bthat? - 


Telingha? - 


— 


— 


W lien and where? 


Namelah naye- 
leh? 


Wabbaia? - 


-~- 


W heref ore,Bpeak 


— 


— 




low, let nobody 








hear 








Widaper - 


Knkana pnnye- 


Poeta kanna pa- 


— 




para 


waybah 




WhiBtle - - 


Purraknnna 


Munnakaona 


Plnbeah. 


White - . 


Malleety^ 


Mallee - - 


Mungyanghgar- 
rah. 


Whiz (like a ball, 


'Kgona knnna - 


Payngnnnana or 


Nangoinoleah. 


&c.) 




poyngonna konna 




Whore, fomi- 


• a B • 


Panubr^ mabbyl^ 


— 


catrix 








Widow - 


Wurrawa no- 
atty^, wnrrawa 
lowanna 


Nenatura tena 




Wife (newlymar- 


Kroatta langu- 


Poyalannn^- 


Waggapoony- 


ried) 


nya 




nurrah. 


Wind . - 


Rawlinna 


Rallinganxmn^ 


Lewan. 


» (bigh) . 




Rallinga proiena - 


Lewanhock. 



THE TASMANIANS. 



669 



VOGABULABT OF DlALEOTS OY ABORIGINAL TbIBES OF TASMANIA — 

continued. 



FngHah. 


Tribes from OjTBter 
Bay to Pittw»ter. 


Tribes about Mount 

Royal, Bmne Island, 

Recherche Bay, and 


« 

North-west and 
Western. 


Windpipe - 


Lonna 


Lonna and loar- 
inna 


— 


Wing 


Poilinna - 


Maykanapounghra 


— 


Wink - - 


Mentroiack 


Nubra rott^ - 


— 


Winter - 


Tnnna 


Turra 


— 


Wrinkle - 


Niangt^ nepoony 


Pelanypooneh 


— 


Wrong 


Miengana - 


Nuyeko 




Wrist 


Bapoolmena 


Eiapoolumpta 


— 


Woe^Bine, ah me 


Paygra waylea- 
beh ktun leah 


Taqneat^ 


- - 


Yawn 


Granna kunna - 


Leakanny 


— 


Yes - - - 


Murramoona, 


Narra warrah, nar- 


Narrobarro. 




narrawallee 


raway narra lua- 
wah 




Yesterday 


N^ntegga men- 
yena 


Neea nunnawa 

■ 


— 


You - - - 


Neena 


Neena or nee 


— 


Young (little) 


Kaeetenna mal- 


Puggata paweena 


— 


boy 


lang yenna 






Young (little) 


Lowanna kaee- 


— 


— 


girl 

■ 


tenna 







SHORT SENTENCES IN THE NATIVE LANGUAGE. 



Give me a stone 

Give him a stone 

I gi^e you some water 

I will not give you any water 

You give me food 

You do not give me food - 



- Lona or loina tyennabeah mito. 

- Lonna tyennamibeah. 

- Lina tyennamibeah. 

- Noia meahteang meena neeto Imah. 
• Tyennabeah tuggen^. 

- Noia meah teang meena neeto 

tuggen^. 



670 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

Shobt Sbntinosb in ths Natiyx Lanouage — etmikmed. 

Give me some bread- ■ l^emia miap^ pumabooiia, cr teen- 

gaiuuma ma pannaboo, or tqnghm- 
bib^ tangaringaleali. 

We will give yon a stick - • Tyennamibeah weena. 

We will not give yon a stick - - Noia tyennamibeah weena. 

Give me some bread to eat, I am Teeanymiape tnggan^, meeongy- 
himgry neeom^, or teeanymeiape teeaoot- 

tym'na, or teeamj^p^ matngliala 
mapilreoottai. 

This is my hand .... Reena nan^wa I 

Sing a song Lyenn^ riakuma or rislinghana. 

Where is your father ? - - - Ungamleanang^ena? 

My father is here .... Nangamea nnmb^ 

He is my father - ■ . . Nangamea nomb^ 

He is not my father .... Miangonana. 

Tell your father of this - - - Onnabea nangato. 

We go to see the river '- - Nialomiah manaiah. 

I like to drink the water • - - Monna langarrap4. 

I make the boat go fast Parapetaleebea malanna talea war- 

rangat^. 

The ship goes upon the sea • - Tiretya teeakalummala. 

The waves make the sea rough - - Leea leetyah poinnmmeah. 

You see the sea over the hill • - Roogoomal^ linoiyack. 

Go down from the hill - - Rongtan^ tyungerawa. 

Run over the ground .... RingApyanganaweber^ 

Do not run along the road - Parraw^ ringap^. 

The man feeds the dog - - Ty^nnabeah kaeetabeah. 

The woman makes a basket - - Lowanna oll^ tubbrana. 

The woman is very fair - - Lowa maleetya. 

The child eats his food ... Teeana malangeebeah. 

The child is small .... Malangeebeah. 

The horse runs on the ground - - Pangooneah r^e pateleebea. 

The horse kicks the child - - - Pangooneah paraingumenah. 

One - Marrawah. 

Two Piawah. 

Three --.-.. Luwah. 

Four ..-....- Paguntawulliawah. 

Five ..-.--. Pugganna niarah. 

I shall go to my house ... Tugganna lunameatah. 

I strike the horse .... Pella pangooneah. 

Touch his hand ..... Bientonnabeah. 

Do not touch his hand ... Tall^ tall^ parraw^. 



THE TASMAKIANS. 



671 



Short Sbhtbnoes in the Native LANonAOB — contimted. 



Out down the tree - 
Tell him to go to the house 
Speak to the man ... 
He is in the house ... 
They jump over the river - 
They walk through the river - 
Run along the side of the river - 
They swim in the river 
They sink in the river 
We drink water - - - 
He cuts his hair with flint 
My brother has a long arm 

My sister is very tall 

He has two children ... 

Take a stick and beat the dog • 

The dog is beaten with a stick - 

The sun is rising ... 

The sun is set already 

The moon is risen 

The moon is not seen 

The moon is behind the cloud - 

You stand behind the tree 

They climb up the tree 

The swan swims in the water - 

The water is very warm - 

The water is not warm 

Salt-water- - - - - 

Fresh-water - . - - 

He is a good man 

He is a bad man 

Gome and drink the water 

This water is salt 

That water is fresh - 

Milk comes from the cow - 

Send him to get milk 

I saw the tree yesterday - 

I have cut my finger - 

He limps with one leg 

He sees with one eye 

My face is very black 

Make the horse run fast - 



- Ungana puy^ lot^. 

• Tall^ lenutoo. 

- Oonah beah. 

• Lunaretah. 

' Wuggala menay^. 

- Yang^ menay^. 

• Taw^ rant^ weber^. 

- Puaw^ menay^. 

- Tong^ menay^. 

- Loaliy^. 

- Tuggana pugheranymee trautta. 

- Nietta mena oon root* elebena. 

- Nienta mena tuggara root* eleebana. 

- Malang-piawah. 

- Tial wee peUa kaeeta. 

- Pella kaeetah naootamena. 

- Puggule^na par^bara. 

• Pnggule^na toomla pawa. 

- Ooeeta poona. 

• Ooeeta mayangti byeack. 

- Ooeeta toggana warratena lunta. 

• Mangana lutena. 

- Orong^ lotta. 

- Ealungnnya tagumena liyetitta. 

- Lia pyoonyack 1^. 

• Lia tunnack. 

- Lia noattye. 

• Lian eleebana or liana eleebana. 

- Puggana tareety^. 

- Tagantyaryack. 

- raU4 le loolaka Ua. 

- Lianoatty^ 

- Liana eleebana. 

- FrughwuUah packalla. 

- Bang^ prughwullah. 

- Lotta mont6 meena cott^. 

- Bi^ poy^ pueningyack. 

- Raggamuttah. 

- Taggunnah. 

- Baoonah mawpack. 

- Pangoonya ren^ wurrangat^. 



672 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

Shobt Skmtsnois in the Nativx Lakouaob-— oontiiiiced. 

When the wann weather is oome - Nente pyoonta. 
It IB now cold weather ... Tnnna. 
They are White men (the men are Riana. Rianowitty^ 
white) 
This woman is very white - - Lowana eleehana.* 
Bring him and put him down here - Nonnalea pooranamby, or kanna 

wattah ponnaw^, or kannawntfcah 

ponnapoo. 
Come alongi I want to speak to yon - Talpy arwadeno tayena knnnamee, or 

tatta wnttah onganeenah, or ton- 

neka mak^nnft talmatieraleh. 
Aha ! yon are rolky all of a andden - Anyah I teborah ! keetrelbya noo- 

mena peniggomaree. 
Hold yonr tongue, or be patient, by- Mealkamma, or metakantibe, or kan- 
and-by nyah mielbeerkammah, or kanna 

moonalan^ wannabee kannybo. 
Come here -.-.-- Tia neber^ or ttalleh. 

Walk naked Tia reea Ingongana. 

Go ashore Tawe loocato. 

Make a light, I want to see you - Men^ le monghtiapee monghtoneel^ 

matangonabee nubratonee. 
Ron together (a race) ... Rene nonempty or leongana. 
Stay or keep a long way off - - Onamarromnebere, or crackn4 b 

maba, or kelaba rowd. 
Awake, rouse ye, get up I • - Tientable taggamunna, or nawatty ! 

pegraty ! wergho ! or takka 

wnghra 1 
Don't wake him, let him sleep - - Tialenghpalontnn-narra, or knnnyam 

tilanga bah, or kunnyam narra- 

loyea. 
Whisper, speak low, let nobody hear Kukanna lenagangpa nunty pate- 

inuyero or onabeah dayaleah. 

SoMB Abobioival Names of Plages m Taskaitia. 

Cape Portland District - - - Tebrakunna. 
Country extending back from Ringa- Warrentinna. 

rooma township 
Douglas River Leeaberryack or Leeaberra. 

* Sleebana does not mean white ; see vocabuluy. It frequently oooozb in ttds rocftbo- 
lary, and evidently meauB good. This word and no other will fit in every instanoe^-Eif .G. 



. THE TASMANIANS. 673 

Some Abobioinal Names of Places in TAaMAmA-- continued, 

Nicholas's Cap ----- Mita winnya, Kurunna poima- 

langta. 
Doctor's Greek (East Coast) - - Wnggatena menennya. 

Long Point Wuggatena poeenta. 

Salt-water Lagoon near the Coal Mungarattya. 
Mines 

€k)yemor's Island .... Tittanariack. 
George's River District - Kunarra-kunnah. 

Maria Island - . . . . Tiarra-marra-monah. 
Monnt Royal and Port Cygnet, oonn- Talun^ 

try lying between 
Oyster Bay ----- Poyanannupyack. 
High lands behind ditto - - - Pothy munatta. 
"St. Valentine's Peak, on Sorrey Naton^. 

Hills, Peak like a Volcano," of 

Flinders 

Piper's River District ... Orramaktuuia> 

PortDavey ----- Poynduc. 

East Bay Neck ----- Lueena langhta muraoomyiack. 

Eaglehawk Neck .... Teeralinnack or Tera-linna. 

Hampshire Hills District, in the Pateena. 

North-west 
Barren Joey Island - - - - Roobala mangana. 
Glamorgan District - - - - Tebrannykonna. 

Port Arthur Prtoaydena. 

Macqnarie Harbour - - - - Parralaongatek. 
Recherche Bay - - - - . Leillateah. 

Port Esperanoe Raminea, 

Southport- Lamabb^le. 

Bmne Island ----- Lunawanna-elonnah. 

South Arm Reemer^ 

Huon Island - ... - Prahree. 
Betsy, Island ..... Temeteletta. 
Three-hut Point .... Taoonawenna. 

Tinder-box Bay Renna kannapughoola. 

Brown's River - - - - - Promenalinah. 
Arch Island ..... Poora tingal^. 
Tamar River - - - - . Ponrabbel. 
Piper's River ----- Wattra karoola. 
Swan Island ..... Terelbess^. 
Arthur River ----- Tunganrick. 
Schonten Island .... Tiggana marraboona. 
VOL. ni. 2 V 



674 THE AUSTRALIAN RACE: 

Sons ABOBioniAL Naub or Piaois nr TAgnAHiA— <w i liimfty , 
CapeQrim ..... Kenoaook. 
Monnt Cameron (West Gout) - - Plymlnghaiia, 
Mount Hemakirk .... Boeinrim w Tnoota mnnafebL 
Mount Zeehan ..... Weiawenena. 

Circolar Head Monattek or Bomaaraik. 

Frenchman*! Cap .... Mebbelek. 

Albatrofls Island .... Tangatema. 

Hunter's Island .... Beeneka. 

Pieman's Biver ... - - Corinna. 

District north of Maoqnarie Harbour Timgarick. 

Lake St. Clair . - - - - Leeawnlena. 

Huon Biver ..... Tahnn^linah. 

Satellite Island - .... Wayaree. 

Derwent Biver . . . - . TeemtoomeU menennye. 

Mount Wellington .... Unghaniahletta or Pooranetter^ 

Clarence Plains ..... Nannyeleebata. 

Crooked Billet and on to the Drome- Unghanyenna. 

dary 
Bange of Hills between Bagdad and Ballolinghana. 

Dromedary 

Jordan River ..... Knta linah. 
Lovely Banks ..... Taghera wnghata. 
Ben Lomond ..... Toorbnnna. 
South Esk Biver .... Mangana lienta. 
Lagoon or summit of Ben Lomond • Meenamata. 
St. Patrick's Head .... Lumera genena wnggelena. 

SoMs Names ov Abobioinbs of Tasmania* 

Jsisfi* 
MftTinalatfg'Hift' . . . . • 

Tonack A native of Macquarie Harbour. 

Wureddy or Ooareddy 

Paoblattena (literally, wombat) • A native of North-west District. 
Kakannawayreetya (literally, joey of A native of Oyster Bay. 
the forester kangaroo) 

Bonep A native of Maoqnarie Harbour. 

Kellawurumnea - - - A native of Pittwater. 
Lanney - - - - A native of the North-west. 
Kunnarawialeety^ - - - - A native of Oyster Bay. 
Meenapeckameena - - - - A native of Lovely Banks. 
Maywedick qr Maywerick - • A native of Port Davey. 
Redaryioick A native of Circular Head District 






THE TASMANIANS. 675 

Wotnen, 

Taenghaaootera (literally, weeping A natiye of George's Biver. 

bitterly) 
Woixomonoloo (literally, bonghB) - A native of Piper's Biver Eoad DIb- 

trict. 
Bammanaloo (literally, little gnU) - A native of CJape Portland. 
Wnttawantyenna (literally, nausea) • A native of East Bank of Tamar 

Biver. 
Plooranaloona (literally, sunshine) - A native of George's Biver. 
Tenghanoop - - - - - A native of Port Davey. 
Trooganeenie - - - - - A native of Mount Boyal. 
Metakartea - - - - - A native of North-east Quarter. 
Tiabeah - - - - - -A native of Bmne Island. 

Koonya - A native of SoreU. 

Paeelongmeena A native of Oyster Bay. 

Unghlottymeena - - - - A native of North-east. 

Bayna - - - - A native of Pieman's Biver District. 

Penghanawaddlck - - - - n >, i, 



APPENDIX B. 

THE OVENS, CAVES, PAINTINGS, AND SCULPTUBES OF OtJB 
BLACKS, AND ALSO THE QUESTION OP WHETHEB THE 
PBESENT BA(}E WEBE THE FIBJST INHABITANTS OF AUS- 
TBALIA. 

In the territories of most of the tribes in the sonthem 
half of the continent we meet with what bnshmen call 
Blacks' ovens, of which none are found in the North. They 
consist of accnmulations of ashes, stones, or lamps of burnt 
clay and the debris of food. I have seen them in use at 
many places long distances apart, and constantly at Col- 
binabbin for nearly ten years. At that place they were used 
for baking kangaroo, emu, opossums, crabs or yabbe, yams 
and other roots. The larger animals were sometimes cut up, 
and at others cooked whole in them, the entrails always, 
and the skin sometimes, being first removed. The food, 
when cooked, was not eaten at the oven, but was taken to 

2 u 2 



6